RE: [Videolib] Salaries in higher ed

Roberta Astroff (rja7@psulias.psu.edu)
Mon, 14 Jul 2003 09:30:22 -0400

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I left a career as a professor to become an academic librarian. When I
started as a librarian 5 years ago, my starting salary was higher than the
salary a tenured former colleague was making as a professor at a research
university.

Roberta Astroff
Penn State

At 12:35 PM 7/11/2003 -0500, you wrote:

>I read Marsha Sinetar's "Do What You Love, The Money Will Follow" in 1987,
>around the time I got my MLS. I'm still waiting.
>
>
>
>PC
>
>
>
>Peter Cartford
>AV Librarian
>Johnson County Library
>Overland Park, KS
>913-495-2496
>cartfordp@jocolibrary.org
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Steve Brantley [mailto:jbrant1@uic.edu]
>Sent: Friday, July 11, 2003 11:05 AM
>To: Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
>Subject: Re: [Videolib] Salaries in higher ed
>
>
>
>more on salaries
>
>Having read some other posts on the subject, I don't want to sound
>unrealistic, but ...
>
>
>
>It is really dismal. As a young librarian, with 3 years in higher
>education and with a second masters, I make less than 10% more than the
>original quoted stating salary. I am on a 12 month tenure track contract
>and am expected to serve, present and publish nationally if I am to
>progress. Given the state budget this year, we may not receive raises for
>a 2nd year in a row. Chicago Public is in a worse position than we are
>and, having looked around the job market, I feel like I'm in a decent
>position. I wonder how this supposedly graying profession expects to
>maintain motivated and high quality librarians when it is (and has been) a
>financial sacrifice to practice this profession. I like what I do and want
>to continue doing it, but I see what my brains and skills can do outside
>of academic librarianship and I question the longevity of my commitment in
>higher ed. I am encouraged by the current ALA administration making pay
>equity a priority, but I think the real pay equity must come from
>individuals fighting for salaries they deserve and salaries that are
>comparable to the level of their qualifications. Otherwise there will
>eventually be a talent vacuum in the profession, if in fact this type of
>cycle has not already played out in libraries in the past.
>
>
>At 08:50 AM 7/11/2003 -0500, you wrote:
>
>A lot of PUBLIC libraries that I know of offer even less than that to an
>entry-level librarian with an MLS. The way I figure it, a Master's in
>library science will get you the equivalent of what a Bachelor's should
>get you in the private sector. And, quite often, a bachelor's degree will
>get you, in the library world, about what the rest of the world can expect
>with a high school diploma or GED.
>
>-Scott
>
>At 09:16 AM 7/11/2003 -0400, you wrote:
>
>I wasn't going say anything, but I thought to myself when I read the
>posting, that I wouldn't have wanted to invest in a Masters Degree only to
>be offered $39,000...hmmm!!!
>
>*******************************************
>
>At 06:03 PM 7/10/03 -0700, you wrote:
>
>Took a look at that recent job announcment posted on that list.
>
>"Qualifications: The University of Delaware Library seeks a motivated,
>service-oriented, entry-level librarian with: an ALA accredited master's
>degree; strong oral and written communication skills; strong public service
>orientation; strong interest in video and film as an instructional resource;
>interest in and experience with audiovisual media and computers, preferably
>in an academic setting; ability to create and manage web sites; ability to
>provide effective user education; ability to establish and maintain
>effective working relationships with diverse individuals in a busy and
>rapidly evolving instructional media environment; and, an interest in
>working with new developments in instructional media technology.
>
>Salary: Expect to hire at the entry-level Assistant Librarian level,
>$39,000."
>
>$39,000 on a Masters in an academic institution? Wow, that's pretty rugged
>isn't it?
>
>Good heavens I had no idea. Think I'll stay in K-12 if possible.
>
>Rick Faaberg
>
>_______________________________________________
>Videolib mailing list
>Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib
>
>
>****************************************************************************
>Mark W. Kopp
>Circulation Coordinator
>Appalachia Intermediate Unit 8
>Instructional Materials Services Department
>580 Foot of Ten Road
>Duncansville, Pa 16635
>(814) 695-1972 Phone
>(814) 695-3018 Fax
>E-Address:
>mailto:iu8film@iu08.org
>See us on the Web at:
><http://www.iu08.org>http://www.iu08.org
>Click on; "Instructional Materials Services"

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I left a career as a professor to become an academic librarian.  When I started as a librarian 5 years ago, my starting salary was higher than the salary a tenured former colleague was making as a professor at a research university. 

Roberta Astroff
Penn State


At 12:35 PM 7/11/2003 -0500, you wrote:

I read Marsha Sinetar's "Do What You Love, The Money Will Follow" in 1987, around the time I got my MLS.  I'm still waiting.

 

PC

 

Peter Cartford
AV Librarian
Johnson County Library
Overland Park, KS
913-495-2496
cartfordp@jocolibrary.org

-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Brantley [mailto:jbrant1@uic.edu]
Sent: Friday, July 11, 2003 11:05 AM
To: Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Salaries in higher ed

 


more on salaries

Having read some other posts on the subject, I don't want to sound unrealistic, but ...



It is really dismal. As a young librarian, with 3 years in higher education and with a second masters, I make less than 10% more than the original quoted stating salary. I am on a 12 month tenure track contract and am expected to serve, present and publish nationally if I am to progress. Given the state budget this year, we may not receive raises for a 2nd year in a row.  Chicago Public is in a worse position than we are and, having looked around the job market, I feel like I'm in a decent position. I wonder how this supposedly graying profession expects to maintain motivated and high quality librarians when it is (and has been) a financial sacrifice to practice this profession. I like what I do and want to continue doing it, but I see what my brains and skills can do outside of academic librarianship and I question the longevity of my commitment in higher ed.   I am encouraged by the current
ALA administration making pay equity a priority, but I think the real pay equity must come from individuals fighting for salaries they deserve and salaries that are comparable to the level of their qualifications. Otherwise there will eventually be a talent vacuum in the profession, if in fact this type of cycle has not already played out in libraries in the past.


At 08:50 AM 7/11/2003 -0500, you wrote:

A lot of PUBLIC libraries that I know of offer even less than that to an entry-level librarian with an MLS. The way I figure it, a Master's in library science will get you the equivalent of what a Bachelor's should get you in the private sector. And, quite often, a bachelor's degree will get you, in the library world, about what the rest of the world can expect with a high school diploma or GED.

-Scott

At
09:16 AM 7/11/2003 -0400, you wrote:

I wasn't going say anything, but I thought to myself when I read the posting, that I wouldn't have wanted to invest in a Masters Degree only to be offered $39,000...hmmm!!!

*******************************************

At
06:03 PM 7/10/03 -0700, you wrote:

Took a look at that recent job announcment posted on that list.

"Qualifications: The
University of Delaware Library seeks a motivated,
service-oriented, entry-level librarian with: an ALA accredited master's
degree; strong oral and written communication skills; strong public service
orientation; strong interest in video and film as an instructional resource;
interest in and experience with audiovisual media and computers, preferably
in an academic setting; ability to create and manage web sites; ability to
provide effective user education; ability to establish and maintain
effective working relationships with diverse individuals in a busy and
rapidly evolving instructional media environment; and, an interest in
working with new developments in instructional media technology.

Salary: Expect to hire at the entry-level Assistant Librarian level,
$39,000."

$39,000 on a Masters in an academic institution? Wow, that's pretty rugged
isn't it?

Good heavens I had no idea. Think I'll stay in K-12 if possible.

Rick Faaberg

_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib


****************************************************************************
Mark W. Kopp
Circulation Coordinator
Appalachia Intermediate Unit 8
Instructional Materials Services Department
580 Foot of Ten Road
Duncansville, Pa  16635
(814) 695-1972 Phone
(814) 695-3018 Fax
E-Address:
mailto:iu8film@iu08.org
See us on the Web at:
http://www.iu08.org
Click on;   "Instructional Materials Services"
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