Re: [Videolib] DVDs and Aspect Ratios

MileFilms@aol.com
Thu, 10 Jul 2003 12:58:34 EDT

--part1_1cf.d8f8a3b.2c3ef53a_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

In a message dated 7/10/03 12:28:45 PM, maurine.canarsky@taos.fnsb.lib.ak.us=
=20
writes:

> We are attempting to build our DVD collection, and I am a bit confused=20
> about aspect ratios.
> For example, when I look at IMDB and the technical specs and see an aspec=
t=20
> ratio of 1:37:1, and the only DVD available is 1:33:1, am I losing part of=
=20
> the picture?=A0 I've read the widescreen advocacy materials, but am not ce=
rtain=20
> about the difference in this particular case.
>=20

Dear Maureen,

This has been a very lively discussion lately. The simple answer is no, it's=
=20
just a scientific disagreement of what to call the exact, correct aspect rat=
io=20
for Academy aperture sound films that was established when they started=20
putting the soundtrack on the film itself. Traditionally, it's called 1.33 a=
nd=20
that's what almost everybody calls it. Some people insist on calling it 1.37=
.=20

But in essence, we're talking about the exact same theatrical negative or=20
fine grain or print being video mastered to television standards. Do you los=
e a=20
tiny little bit on all sides because of the safety margin needed for video t=
o=20
avoid black borders around the image? (All monitors and televisions do not s=
how=20
the exact same image size) Yes, but it has nothing to do with the aspect=20
ratio or what the imdb or distributors call it.=20

Now if it's a 1:1.66, 1:1.85 or 1:2.15 film and it's listed as 1:1.33 on a=20
video box cover, that means it's a pan and scan version, of course.

Hope that helps...

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
www.milestonefilms.com

--part1_1cf.d8f8a3b.2c3ef53a_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="ISO-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

In a message dated 7/10/03 12:28:45 PM, mauri= ne.canarsky@taos.fnsb.lib.ak.us writes:

We are attempting to=20= build our DVD collection, and I am a bit confused about aspect ratios.
For example, when I look at IMDB and the technical specs and see an aspect=20= ratio of 1:37:1, and the only DVD available is 1:33:1, am I losing part of t= he picture?=A0 I've read the widescreen advocacy materials, but am not certa= in about the difference in this particular case.


Dear Maureen,

This has been a very lively discussion lately. The simple answer is no, it's= just a scientific disagreement of what to call the exact, correct aspect ra= tio for Academy aperture sound films that was established when they started=20= putting the soundtrack on the film itself. Traditionally, it's called 1.33 a= nd that's what almost everybody calls it. Some people insist on calling it 1= .37.

But in essence, we're talking about the exact same theatrical negative or fi= ne grain or print being video mastered to television standards. Do you lose=20= a tiny little bit on all sides because of the safety margin needed for video= to avoid black borders around the image? (All monitors and televisions do n= ot show the exact same image size) Yes, but it has nothing to do with the as= pect ratio or what the imdb or distributors call it.

Now if it's a 1:1.66, 1:1.85 or 1:2.15 film and it's listed as 1:1.33 on a v= ideo box cover, that means it's a pan and scan version, of course.

Hope that helps...

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: (800) 603-1104 or (201) 767-3117
Fax: (201) 767-3035
Email: milefilms@aol.com
www.milestonefilms.com
--part1_1cf.d8f8a3b.2c3ef53a_boundary--