RE: [Videolib] Digital materials and library collections

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Wed, 28 May 2003 09:24:43 -0700

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Ok. Stop.

Let me inject a bit of reality (at least MY perception of reality) into
this discussion, and that reality has to do with

1. The present and likely future of library budgets, both staff and materials
2. The present and likely future of commercially acquired digital moving
image content
3. The utility and availability of digital access mechanisms in various
library user communities

Let's start with number 3 first: discussions of the type below almost
always center on Hollywood...why? Easy: Hollywood is the only
content-providing sector with anything like the economic wherewithal to
push anything like substantial content over the wire. Yeah, a viable
economic model for video-on-demand may (and probably will) happen sooner or
later. When it does, why would anyone come into a library to access this
stuff? Certainly not to have someone download a movie or burn it onto a
disc for them. In any case, I'd bet that the licensing structure for
public institutions is likely to preclude effective "collection building"
... (I can just see the Disney minions chirping--Ohhhh! A public
library! Let's see: we license a title and they distribute it thousands
of times...how charming!)

OK...so Hollywood jumps...and let's say, for argument sake, that libraries
jump into digital on-demand too. The question you've got to ask yourself
is who else--which other content providers--are going to follow
suit. While I think it's altogether possible that special interest video
vendors, indie documentary and educational video vendors may get into the
business of selling digital rights, it's almost certainly going to fall on
the end-provider to do the digitization, to store the bites, etc. How many
libraries (even a big bad place like UC Berkeley) have the right stuff to
pull this off? (see my point 3 above...) On the other hand, it's my guess
that we won't be seeing abovementioned non-feature folks getting into the
on-demand business any time soon

Which brings me to point 4 (utility/access)...Given the barren content
landscape, we're considering digital...why?
Music and sound files are one thing...the digital world is here, now, and
rip-roaring. Video is another thing completely. We are still years away
from the bandwidth and infrastructure required to receive video that
doesn't look like it has Tourette's syndrome... In academic settings,
such as the one I live in, while classroom infrastructure upgrade has
finally made it possible for most locations on campus to receive
digital, there's still the little matter of end-user meltdown: it's hard
enough getting faculty to slide in a videocassette, let alone deal with the
mysteries of streamed media.

...think I'll quit now and wipe the foam off my lips...

gary

At 09:39 AM 5/28/2003 -0400, you wrote:
>Hi Claire,
>
>I like your ideal world! Help me take this a step further by imagining
>how these digital copies will be loaned. Libraries begin to build digital
>collections of video, audiobooks and music under the ideal conditions you
>have described. How would the materials be delivered? It seems that
>digital materials could either be burned to disc or transferred to a
>portable viewing/listening device at the library or "checked out" from the
>library catalog and streamed to an outside location. How would multiple
>uses be handled? If burned to disc, wouldn't it need to be a
>self-destructing, disposable disc (ala Disney) with a built-in "loan"
>period? Or in the case of portable devices, some encryption program that
>would make the material digitally "unreadable" after a certain period of
>time? In the physical world, libraries buy as many copies as they want to
>simultaneously circulate. Would this be true in the digital world? Or
>does it make more sense to buy the digital item AND some kind of use
>license that permits "x" number of simultaneous usages?
>
>When trying to think these things through, most of the models we've worked
>with in the past deal with physical items. I don't know how effective it
>is to try to apply these same principles to the digital world. But it's
>hard to come up with new models that are fair to all parties. Anyone have
>any other ideas about this? All of the comments posted so far have been
>extremely helpful; I thank you all for your shared wisdom on this subject.
>
>Sincerely,
>
>Lisa Irwin (af1587@wayne.edu)
>(on behalf of the Multimedia Focus Group, Internet Resources course at
>Wayne State University)
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: M. Claire Stewart [mailto:claire-stewart@northwestern.edu]
>Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2003 8:58 AM
>To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
>Subject: RE: [Videolib] Digital materials and library collections
>
>
>Lisa
>
>Here's what I think would be an ideal situation for the transition to
>all digital in multimedia library collections (film/video and
>music/audio):
>
>1. Buy digital = buy digital, as in: buy, own, have the ability to
>hold locally, not pay to access
>2. No licensing. No shrinkwrap licenses, no license to access, no
>special terms for use, and NO "digital use licenses" in addition to a
>title purchase.
>3. No digital rights management (DRM) enforcement of any kind
>
>This leaves aside the PPR issue, which I consider to be separate, and
>which really needn't change in an all digital scenario.
>Apologies for the delay in responding; I'm reading in digest mode.
>
>Claire
>
> >
> >Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 15:57:32 -0400
> >From: "Lisa Irwin" <LisaI@kpl.gov>
> >To: <videolib@library.berkeley.edu>
> >Subject: [Videolib] Digital materials and library collections
> >Message-ID: <492E0154ADE6194BAA5CF50869CE0A7B09EDE5@KPL-NT2.kpl.gov>
> >Content-Type: text/plain;
> > charset="iso-8859-1"
> >MIME-Version: 1.0
> >Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
> >Precedence: bulk
> >Message: 3
> >
> >Dear VideoLibbers,
> >
> >As members of a LIS course multimedia focus group, we are interested in =
> >comments from professionals working with multimedia materials regarding =
> >how a shift from analog-based to digital-based materials affects library =
> >collections. Specifically, how do you anticipate that your collections =
> >will be able to incorporate digital video and digital audio? What are =
> >the implications of a trend toward access to bits rather than ownership =
> >for library collections and patron services? How do you envision =
> >multimedia collections and services changing in the coming decade =
> >relative to advances in technology?
> >
> >Any thoughts and comments will be gratefully received! (Feel free to =
> >respond off-list if you feel it would be more appropriate.)
> >=20
> >Sincerely,
> >
> >Lisa Irwin (af1587@wayne.edu)
> >(on behalf of the Multimedia Focus Group, Internet Resources course at =
> >Wayne State University)
>
>--
>___________________________________________
>M. Claire Stewart
>Head, Digital Media Services
>Marjorie I. Mitchell Multimedia Center
>Northwestern University Library
>(847) 467-1437
>claire-stewart@northwestern.edu
>http://staffweb.library.northwestern.edu/staff/cstewart/
>http://copyrightreadings.blogspot.com
>_______________________________________________
>Videolib mailing list
>Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib
>
>
>
>_______________________________________________
>Videolib mailing list
>Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
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Ok.  Stop.

Let me inject a bit of reality (at least MY perception of reality) into this discussion, and that reality has to do with


1.  The present and likely future of library budgets, both staff and materials
2. The present and likely future of commercially acquired digital moving image content
3.  The utility and availability of digital access mechanisms in various library user communities

Let's start with number 3 first:  discussions of the type below almost always center on Hollywood...why?  Easy:  Hollywood is the only content-providing sector with anything like the economic wherewithal to push anything like substantial content over the wire.  Yeah, a viable economic model for video-on-demand may (and probably will) happen sooner or later.  When it does,  why would anyone come into a library to access this stuff?  Certainly not to have someone download a movie or burn it onto a disc for them.   In any case, I'd bet that the licensing structure for public institutions is likely to preclude effective "collection building" ...  (I can just see the Disney minions chirping--Ohhhh!  A public library!  Let's see:  we license a title and they distribute it thousands of times...how charming!)
 

OK...so Hollywood jumps...and let's say, for argument sake, that libraries jump into digital on-demand too.  The question you've got to ask yourself is who else--which other content providers--are going to follow suit.    While I think it's altogether possible that special interest video vendors, indie documentary and educational video vendors may get into the business of selling digital rights, it's almost certainly going to fall on the end-provider to do the digitization, to store the bites, etc. How many libraries (even a big bad place like UC Berkeley) have the right stuff to pull this off?  (see my point 3 above...)  On the other hand, it's my guess that we won't be seeing abovementioned non-feature folks getting into the on-demand business any time soon

Which brings me to point 4 (utility/access)...Given the barren content landscape, we're considering digital...why?
Music and sound files are one thing...the digital world is here, now, and rip-roaring.  Video is another thing completely.  We are still years away from the bandwidth and infrastructure required to receive video that doesn't look like it has Tourette's syndrome...    In academic settings, such as the one I live in, while classroom infrastructure upgrade has finally made it possible for most locations on campus to receive digital,  there's still the little matter of end-user meltdown:  it's hard enough getting faculty to slide in a videocassette, let alone deal with the mysteries of streamed media.

...think I'll quit now and wipe the foam off my lips...

gary

 
 


At 09:39 AM 5/28/2003 -0400, you wrote:

Hi Claire,

I like your ideal world!  Help me take this a step further by imagining how these digital copies will be loaned.  Libraries begin to build digital collections of video, audiobooks and music under the ideal conditions you have described.  How would the materials be delivered?  It seems that digital materials could either be burned to disc or transferred to a portable viewing/listening device at the library or "checked out" from the library catalog and streamed  to an outside location.  How would multiple uses be handled?  If burned to disc, wouldn't it need to be a self-destructing, disposable disc (ala Disney) with a built-in "loan" period?  Or in the case of portable devices, some encryption program that would make the material digitally "unreadable" after a certain period of time?  In the physical world, libraries buy as many copies as they want to simultaneously circulate.  Would this be true in the digital world?  Or does it make more sense to buy the digital item AND some kind of use license that permits "x" number of simultaneous usages?

When trying to think these things through, most of the models we've worked with in the past deal with physical items.  I don't know how effective it is to try to apply these same principles to the digital world.  But it's hard to come up with new models that are fair to all parties.  Anyone have any other ideas about this?  All of the comments posted so far have been extremely helpful; I thank you all for your shared wisdom on this subject.

Sincerely,

Lisa Irwin (af1587@wayne.edu)
(on behalf of the Multimedia Focus Group, Internet Resources course at Wayne State University)

-----Original Message-----
From: M. Claire Stewart [mailto:claire-stewart@northwestern.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2003 8:58 AM
To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: RE: [Videolib] Digital materials and library collections


Lisa

Here's what I think would be an ideal situation for the transition to
all digital in multimedia library collections (film/video and
music/audio):

1. Buy digital =3D buy digital, as in: buy, own, have the ability to
hold locally, not pay to access
2. No licensing.  No shrinkwrap licenses, no license to access, no
special terms for use, and NO "digital use licenses" in addition to a
title purchase.
3. No digital rights management (DRM) enforcement of any kind

This leaves aside the PPR issue, which I consider to be separate, and
which really needn't change in an all digital scenario.
Apologies for the delay in responding; I'm reading in digest mode.

Claire

>
>Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 15:57:32 -0400
>From: "Lisa Irwin" <LisaI@kpl.gov>
>To: <videolib@library.berkeley.edu>
>Subject: [Videolib] Digital materials and library collections
>Message-ID: <492E0154ADE6194BAA5CF50869CE0A7B09EDE5@KPL-NT2.kpl.gov>
>Content-Type: text/plain;
>       charset=3D"= ;iso-8859-1"
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>Precedence: bulk
>Message: 3
>
>Dear VideoLibbers,
>
>As members of a LIS course multimedia focus group, we are interested in =3D
>comments from professionals working with multimedia materials regarding =3D
>how a shift from analog-based to digital-based materials affects library =3D
>collections.  Specifically, how do you anticipate that your collections =3D
>will be able to incorporate digital video and digital audio?  What are =3D
>the implications of a trend toward access to bits rather than ownership =3D
>for library collections and patron services?  How do you envision =3D
>multimedia collections and services changing in the coming decade =3D
>relative to advances in technology?
>
>Any thoughts and comments will be gratefully received!  (Feel free to =3D
>respond off-list if you feel it would be more appropriate.)
>=3D20
>Sincerely,
>
>Lisa Irwin (af1587@wayne.edu)
>(on behalf of the Multimedia Focus Group, Internet Resources course at =3D
>Wayne State University)

--
___________________________________________
M. Claire Stewart
Head, Digital Media Services
Marjorie I. Mitchell Multimedia Center
Northwestern University Library
(847) 467-1437
claire-stewart@northwestern.edu
http://staffweb.library.northwestern.edu/staff/cstewart/=
http://copyrightreadings.blogspot.com
_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib



_______________________________________________
Videolib mailing list
Videolib@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/videolib

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

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