Re: response to: [Videolib] Digital materials and library collections

Rrroby@aol.com
Tue, 27 May 2003 10:26:02 EDT

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One of the items that Chip didn't touch on was the pricing of educational
materials.

The reason many of the educational programs are edited television or acquired
is the unrealistic low pricing educational vendors can charge for their
programs because of the competition from features. Does a librarian want 1
documentary or 10 features to circulate? Also, does a parent check out a 20 minute
documentary or a 2 hour feature to keep her kid busy?

Educational producers can't afford to produce. I am going to give a quick
example: A producer makes an educational titles for $30,000 and he makes a deal
with a very generous distributor to give him a 20% royalty. The distributor
has to gross $150,000 to return just the cost of the production with no profit
considerations. Let's say this is a barn burner of a title and the
distributor is able to move 500 of them and it is a very rare title that will do that
volume. Do the math, the price should be $300 each. How many $300
documentaries are sold?

Oh, if you think my number are skewed, write a check and send it to one of
you favorite companies and have them produce a 20 minute documentary on your
favorite topic and wait for the money to roll in.

A former educational video distributor once said, "If there was money in
producing, we would all be producers and not distributors."

Thanks for listening.

Ronald Roby, School Media Consultant
Great River AEA 16
3601 West Avenue Road
Burlington, Iowa 52601
319-753-6561 X 143

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One of the items that Chip didn't touch on was the pri= cing of educational materials. 

The reason many of the educational programs are edited television or acquire= d is the unrealistic low pricing educational vendors can charge for their pr= ograms because of the competition from features.  Does a librarian want= 1 documentary or 10 features to circulate?  Also, does a parent check=20= out a 20 minute documentary or a 2 hour feature to keep her kid busy?

Educational producers can't afford to produce.  I am going to give a qu= ick example: A producer makes an educational titles for $30,000 and he makes= a deal with a very generous distributor to give him a 20% royalty.  Th= e distributor has to gross $150,000 to return just the cost of the productio= n with no profit considerations.  Let's say this is a barn burner of a=20= title and the distributor is able to move 500 of them and it is a very rare=20= title that will do that volume.  Do the math, the price should be $300=20= each.  How many $300 documentaries are sold? 

Oh, if you think my number are skewed, write a check and send it to one of y= ou favorite companies and have them produce a 20 minute documentary on your=20= favorite topic and wait for the money to roll in.

A former educational video distributor once said, "If there was money in pro= ducing, we would all be producers and not distributors."

Thanks for listening.

Ronald Roby, School Media Consultant
Great River AEA 16
3601 West Avenue Road
Burlington, Iowa 52601
319-753-6561 X 143
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