Re: [Videolib] films dealing with human rights

www.richardcohenfilms.com (rbc24@earthlink.net)
Fri, 21 Mar 2003 15:03:50 -0800

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GOING TO SCHOOL - IR A LA ESCUELA (2001, English w/cc or Spanish
language versions, 64 minutes) A film by Richard Cohen. A compelling
story about inclusion and special education services, revealing the
determination of parents to make sure their children receive a quality
education. The film gives insight into the purpose of the I.D.E.A.
(Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and challenges our
understanding of what diversity means. Scenes filmed in schools and
homes examine the daily experiences of students with different
disabilities in middle and elementary schools in Los Angeles. The film
was commissioned by the Class Member Review Committee of the Chanda
Smith Consent Decree pursuant to Chanda Smith et al v. LAUSD in US
District Court. This past winter the film was translated into Russian
and featured at the first disability rights film festival in Moscow,
Russia -- Breaking Down Barriers.

TAYLOR'S CAMPAIGN (74 minutes, 1997) Narrated by Martin Sheen
Directed & Edited by Richard Cohen, Produced by Amy Ziering Kofman &
Richard Cohen
An intensely gripping, humorous and insightful look at hardworking
people living in cardboard lean-tos, dumpster diving for survival, in
Santa Monica, California. When local lawmakers threaten to suspend
their civil rights in a drive to sweep the streets of "the homeless",
this spirited encampment of of military vets, drifters and disabled
people rally behind the leadership of a destitute ex-truck driver named
Ron Taylor. Taylor runs for city council and turn. Scenes show the day
to day living conditions of people on the streets, volunteers providing
free meals in public parks and city council members debating an
ordinance preventing the charitable giving away of food.

HURRY TOMORROW (78 minutes,1975) A film by Richard Cohen and Kevin
Rafferty. A documentary about the loss of human rights suffered by
psychiatric patients in a state mental institution. Filmed over a six
week period in a locked ward at Metropolitan State Hospital in Los
Angeles, HURRY TOMORROW shows patients being tied down with straps and
cuffs, forcibly medicated with powerful tranuqilizers, reducing the to
helpless, zombie like states. This cinema verite classic illustrates
how individuals struggle to maintain their dignity in a dehumanized
environment. Unsuccessful efforts to ban the film by hospital staff
helped to trigger an investigation into more than 1,300 patient deaths
in the state hospitals in California. An offer by a major
pharmaceutical company to buy the film was turned down by the
filmmakers, and over the years the documentary was used widely to
organize patients' rights and self-help groups.

DEADLY FORCE (1980, 60 minutes) A film by Richard Cohen. The use of
deadly force is a recurring and divisive issue in communities across the
nation. This powerful and provocative documentary examines police
accountability for civilian fatalities by focusing on a killing that
rocked Los Angeles; the shooting of Ron Burkholder, a National Science
Fellow, by a veteran officer of the LAPD's Ramparts Division.

http://www.richardcohenfilms.com

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GOING TO SCHOOL - IR A LA ESCUELA (2001, English w/cc or Spanish language versions, 64 minutes) A film by Richard Cohen.   A compelling story about inclusion and special education services, revealing the determination of parents to make sure their children receive a quality education. The film gives insight into the purpose of the I.D.E.A. (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and challenges our understanding of what diversity means.   Scenes filmed in schools and homes examine the daily experiences of students with different disabilities in middle and elementary schools in Los Angeles.   The film was commissioned by the Class Member Review Committee of the Chanda Smith Consent Decree pursuant to Chanda Smith et al v. LAUSD in US District Court.  This past winter the film was translated into Russian and featured at the first disability rights film festival in Moscow, Russia -- Breaking Down Barriers.

TAYLOR'S CAMPAIGN (74 minutes, 1997)  Narrated by Martin Sheen
Directed & Edited by Richard Cohen,  Produced by Amy Ziering Kofman & Richard Cohen
An intensely gripping, humorous and insightful look at hardworking people living in cardboard lean-tos, dumpster diving for survival, in Santa Monica, California.  When local lawmakers threaten to suspend their civil rights in a drive to sweep the streets of "the homeless", this spirited encampment of of military vets, drifters and disabled people rally behind the leadership of a destitute ex-truck driver named Ron Taylor.  Taylor runs for city council and turn.  Scenes show the day to day living conditions of people on the streets, volunteers providing free meals in public parks and city council members debating an ordinance preventing the charitable giving away of food.

HURRY TOMORROW (78 minutes,1975) A film by Richard Cohen and Kevin Rafferty. A documentary about the loss of human rights suffered by psychiatric patients in a state mental institution.
 Filmed over a six week period in a locked ward at Metropolitan State Hospital in Los Angeles, HURRY TOMORROW shows patients being tied down with straps and cuffs, forcibly medicated with powerful tranuqilizers, reducing the to helpless, zombie like states.  This cinema verite classic illustrates how individuals struggle to maintain their dignity in a dehumanized environment.  Unsuccessful efforts to ban the film by hospital staff helped to trigger an investigation into more than 1,300 patient deaths in the state hospitals in California.  An offer by a major pharmaceutical company to buy the film was turned down by the filmmakers, and over the years the documentary was used widely to organize patients' rights and self-help groups.

DEADLY FORCE (1980, 60 minutes) A film by Richard Cohen.  The use of deadly force is a recurring and divisive issue in communities across the nation.  This powerful and provocative documentary examines police accountability for civilian fatalities by focusing on a killing that rocked Los Angeles; the shooting of Ron Burkholder, a National Science Fellow,  by a veteran officer of the LAPD's Ramparts Division.

http://www.richardcohenfilms.com

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