Re: cost of DVD's

Mark Richie (Media2@bellatlantic.net)
Thu, 6 Mar 2003 11:38:58 -0800 (PST)

Have some intermittent problems with "R" versions of discs
being scratched more easily than commercial units, creating
skips or stalls in the drive.

I'm still confused why small quanity, non-chapter,
non-interactive video conversions need to be put on DVD-R
vs. a standard mpg-1 conversion for educational materials.
Perhaps for specialized video where higher res and detail is
necessary, but converting from VHS or S-VHS to DVD isn't
going to give any better resolution than the original.
Especially if typical playback will be on a TV set. I can't
see going for the extra initial cost, plus limiting playback
to DVD appliances or DVD equiped computers as being cost
effective.

Mark Richie

Jonathan Miller wrote:
>
> Dear Videolib experts:
>
> I would find it helpful if any one could comment on usability of DVD-Rs vs.
> DVD-videos (commercially replicated DVDs) in colleges and libraries - do
> you encounter any compatibility or other problems using DVD-Rs, or is that
> a thing of the past now?
>
> Thanks
>
> Jonathan Miller
>
> PS Generally the cost to make a small to medium quantity of DVD-Rs is
> greater than the cost of making VHS tapes, whereas the cost of replicating
> a large # of DVD-videos is lower than the cost of making VHS tapes (per
> unit made).
>
> At 03:00 PM 3/5/2003 -0800, you wrote:
> >I spoke with a sales rep at Films for Humanities about this right when
> >they started offering DVD's. I was told that Films is converting VHS's
> >to the DVD-R format on a title by title basis. The increased price
> >reflects staff time for conversion and is more expensive for the first
> >copy converted. I was also told that the price should come down once
> >multiple copies of a title are converted. But, you should know that
> >Films is only offering basic conversions without chapter encoding.
> >
> >Tom
> >
> >Thomas E. Herndon
> >Multimedia and Interdisciplinary Programs Librarian
> >Johnson Center Library
> >George Mason University
> >703-993-9047
> >703-993-9063 (fax)
> >
> >----- Original Message -----
> >From: "VENTURA, GERIE" <GVENTURA@highline.edu>
> >Date: Wednesday, March 5, 2003 3:25 pm
> >Subject: cost of DVD's
> >
> > > I'm probably violating email etiquette by doing this, and I'm
> > > sorry if it's someone on this list, but I think the issue is
> > > interesting.
> > > A librarian at our library forwarded this email (below) to me from
> > > another listserv. It brings up yet another interesting aspect in
> > > relation to DVD's, which I notice is a frequent topic of
> > > discussion lately.
> > >
> > > We are attempting to "up" our purchases in the DVD format.
> > >
> > > Have a great day.
> > >
> > > Gerie Ventura
> > > Highline Community College Library, Media Services
> > > Des Moines, WA
> > > e-mail: gventura@highline.edu
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > "I had a very strained conversation at ALA Midwinter with two reps
> > > from Films
> > > for the Humanities. As one of the most popular vendors of educational
> > > videos, they are at the top of our list when it comes to selecting
> > > titles.However, they have recently decided to charge an additional
> > > fee for the DVD
> > > format of any of their VHS titles. I asked for an explanation and
> > > got a very
> > > defensive vice president of sales practically in my face. She told
> > > me that
> > > there are digital licensing issues, hence the added fee.
> > >
> > > I noticed in Baker and Taylor today that there is no difference in the
> > > charge for the VHS format vs. the DVD format for many popular
> > > videos--some
> > > of them feature films, others produced by Kultur, for example,
> > > that are
> > > older films being re-released. They don't seem to have an issue
> > > wherein they
> > > add an extra cost."
> > >
> > >
>
> Jonathan Miller, President
> First Run / Icarus Films, Inc.
> 32 Court Street, 21st Floor
> Brooklyn, NY. 11201 USA
>
> Tel: 1.718.488.8900
> Fax: 1.718.488.8642
> Web: http://www.frif.com
> e mail: jmiller@frif.com