Re: Digital Challenge Survey

Rick Faaberg (rfaaberg@attbi.com)
Wed, 5 Mar 2003 00:00:04 -0800 (PST)

On 3/3/03 1:53 PM "Threatt, Monique L" <mthreatt@indiana.edu> sent this out:

> 1. What do you believe is the media delivery system of the future?
>
> VHS, and for how long? OR
> DVD, and for how long? OR
> Digital Streaming?

The delivery method will be whatever delivers the best possible quality,
ease of use, random access, and durability of media to the general public as
consumers of popular feature movies. Cost factors and economics of scale
will play a major role as when VHS became the standard consumer format.
Academic needs/concerns will have no real effect on formats/delivery methods
as the market is SO small and most of the time unrelated to what and where
the big consumer $ are in movies.

It will be DVD until we get a non-moving, solid-state replacement which is
coming REAL soon. DVD is a transitory thing. Don't invest in it as if it
were the format for the next ten years or whatever. It's too fragile and
frankly the data density isn't as good as it needs to be for HD. If we still
have physcial carriers for media, solid state modules will take over
surprisingly quickly as a physical replacement for spinning "whirligigs"
like tapes and disks.

And as broadband comes up (more slowly developing these days of course),
on-demand streaming will trump all physical formats. That a down-the-road
thing unfortunately since the economy and .com tanked.

So don't buy any more VHS, be conservative on DVD, and watch solid-state
delivery and streaming delivery VERY closely. Experiment and R&D when you
can.

>
> 2. Do you believe academic libraries can sway market trends in the
> delivery of media?

Never in your wildest dreams. Get a grip. Consumers drive the economy.

>
> 3. As a academic collection manager, which formats do you collect?
> What formats are supported in the classroom? Or, in the media center.

VHS, DVD, and experimental streaming.

Rick Faaberg

Ps. My answers pertain to my experience in K-12.