From the Library Administator's Digest

Rrroby@aol.com
Fri, 14 Feb 2003 09:18:40 -0800 (PST)

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> >
> >Beating a Dead Horse
> >
> >Reprinted From Library Administrator's Digest 38, no. 1, January 2003
> >
> >Are there issues in your library (substitute other
department/organization)
> >that you've been dealing with for years with no resolve? Are you "beating
a
> >dead horse"? Perhaps it is time to create a new file, the "Dead Horse
File."
> >It might include your persistent requests for a bookmobile (new facility,
> >staff, equipment or raise) for you or your service area. Year after year
you
> >bring cost analysis to your board (CEO, Budget Administrator, Director,
> >Department Head, Supervisor*), only to have the idea shot down.
> >
> >File it under "Dead Horse." You can revisit it, but it will probably still
> >remain dead, unless another board (CEO, Budget Administrator, Director,
> >Department Head, Supervisor*) is able to see your vision. And, speaking of
> >vision, having a vision won't get you anywhere if you cannot communicate
and
> >articulate that vision to others.
> >
> >Dakota tribal wisdom says that when you discover you are riding a dead
> >horse, the best strategy is to dismount. However, we often try other
strategies with dead horses, including the following:
> >1. Using a stronger whip.
> >2. Changing riders.
> >3. Saying things like, "This is the way we have always ridden this horse."
> >4. Appointing a committee to study the horse.
> >5. Arranging to visit other sites to see how they ride dead horses.
> >6. Increasing the standards to ride dead horses.
> >7. Appointing a group to revive the dead horse.
> >8. Creating a training session to increase our riding ability.
> >9. Comparing the state of dead horses in today's environment.
> >10. Changing the requirements so the horse no longer meets the standard
for
> >death.
> >11. Hiring a consultant to show us how to ride the dead horse.
> >12. Harnessing several dead horses together for increased speed.
> >13. Declaring "No horse is too dead to beat."
> >14. Providing additional funding to increase the horse's performance.
> >15. Studying to see if outsourcing will reduce the cost of riding a dead
horse.
> >16. Buying the latest computer program to enhance dead horse performance.
> >17. Declaring that a dead horse is less costly than a live one.
> >18. Forming a committee to find uses for dead horses.
> >19. Revisiting the performance requirements for horses.
> >20. Promoting the dead horse to a supervisory position.
> >
> >As it is with an addiction, so it is with the dead horse. First you must
> >admit the horse is dead and bury the issue. That is of course until you
can
> >convince the next board or staff (CEO, Budget Administrator, Director,
> >Department Head, Supervisor*) that there never really was a horse*
> >
> >Rural Library Services Newsletter, Paulding County (OH) Carnegie Library,
> >November 2002
>
>

Ron Roby, School Media Consultant
Great River Area Education Agency 16
Burlington, Iowa

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> >
> >Beating a Dead Horse
> >
> >Reprinted From Library Administrator's Digest 38, no. 1, January 20= 03
> >
> >Are there issues in your library (substitute other department/organ= ization)
> >that you've been dealing with for years with no resolve? Are you "b= eating a
> >dead horse"? Perhaps it is time to create a new file, the "Dead Hor= se File."
> >It might include your persistent requests for a bookmobile (new fac= ility,
> >staff, equipment or raise) for you or your service area. Year after= year you
> >bring cost analysis to your board (CEO, Budget Administrator, Direc= tor,
> >Department Head, Supervisor*), only to have the idea shot down.
> >
> >File it under "Dead Horse." You can revisit it, but it will probabl= y still
> >remain dead, unless another board (CEO, Budget Administrator, Direc= tor,
> >Department Head, Supervisor*) is able to see your vision. And, spea= king of
> >vision, having a vision won't get you anywhere if you cannot commun= icate and
> >articulate that vision to others.
> >
> >Dakota tribal wisdom says that when you discover you are riding a d= ead
> >horse, the best strategy is to dismount. However, we often try othe= r strategies  with dead horses, including the following:
> >1. Using a stronger whip.
> >2. Changing riders.
> >3. Saying things like, "This is the way we have always ridden this=20= horse."
> >4. Appointing a committee to study the horse.
> >5. Arranging to visit other sites to see how they ride dead horses.=
> >6. Increasing the standards to ride dead horses.
> >7. Appointing a group to revive the dead horse.
> >8. Creating a training session to increase our riding ability.
> >9. Comparing the state of dead horses in today's environment.
> >10. Changing the requirements so the horse no longer meets the stan= dard for
> >death.
> >11. Hiring a consultant to show us how to ride the dead horse.
> >12. Harnessing several dead horses together for increased speed. > >13. Declaring "No horse is too dead to beat."
> >14. Providing additional funding to increase the horse's performanc= e.
> >15. Studying to see if outsourcing will reduce the cost of riding a= dead horse.
> >16. Buying the latest computer program to enhance dead horse perfor= mance.
> >17. Declaring that a dead horse is less costly than a live one.
> >18. Forming a committee to find uses for dead horses.
> >19. Revisiting the performance requirements for horses.
> >20. Promoting the dead horse to a supervisory position.
> >
> >As it is with an addiction, so it is with the dead horse. First you= must
> >admit the horse is dead and bury the issue. That is of course until= you can
> >convince the next board or staff (CEO, Budget Administrator, Direct= or,
> >Department Head, Supervisor*) that there never really was a horse*<= BR> > >
> >Rural Library Services Newsletter, Paulding County (OH) Carnegie Li= brary,
> >November 2002
>
>

Ron Roby, School Media Consultant
Great River Area Education Agency 16
Burlington, Iowa
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