Re: special effects question

Sergio Angelini (sergio@bufvc.ac.uk)
Tue, 18 Jun 2002 02:35:41 -0700 (PDT)

Hello there,

The effect you're referring to is basically achieved by altering the
camera's shutter speed (to between 45 or 90)allowing in this case for a
shorter exposure time for each frame, which reduces motion blur giving a
kind of "staccato" effect - it was first really used in a popular movie in
the Omaha Beach sequence in SAVING PRIVATE RYAN where it was partly done to
recreate the look of the look of the photographs and newsreels of the time,
trying to replicate the lower shutter speed of the newsreel cameras of the
day.

You can read an article about it at this address:

http://www.cinematographer.com/article/mainv/0,7220,30430,00.html

Regards,

Sergio Angelini

Library and Database Manager
British Universities Film and Video Council
77 Wells Street
London
W1T 3QJ
Tel: 020 7393 1506
Fax: 020 7393 1555
sergio@bufvc.ac.uk
----- Original Message -----
From: James Scholtz <jimscholtz@sdln.net>
To: Multiple recipients of list <videolib@library.berkeley.edu>
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2002 6:03 PM
Subject: special effects question

> Okay videolibbers - this isn't actually a video title distribution
> question; it's more of a "how they did it" film 101 class question. I'm
> wondering how the filmakers accomplished a particular special effect. The
> effect first turned up in Gladiator, then I just recently saw it in The
> Bourne Identity. They both occur in all the fight scenes - the frames
> appear to be moving at slightly slower speed but the image clarity seems
to
> be more accute. While the film speed seems slower, it isn't slow motion,
> but the visual sequence appears slightly segmented or broken, not a smooth
> flow. Any idea of film speed - is this a digital effect? What is this
> technique called? Thanks for the help.
> Jim Scholtz.
>
> James C. Scholtz, Director
> Yankton Community Library
> 515 Walnut St.
> Yankton, SD 57078
> 605-668-5276
> jimscholtz@sdln.net
>
>