The Remains of Sara Baartman Returned to S. Africa

Ryan Krivoshey (ryan@frif.com)
Mon, 6 May 2002 13:11:39 -0700 (PDT)

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Dear Videolibbers,

I thought this would be of interest...

On Friday, May 3, 2002, the remains of Sara Baartman, a young Khoisan woman
who was taken from South Africa in the early 1800s and exhibited across
Europe as a scientific curiosity, were finally returned to South Africa.

Brought to France in 1814, Baartman became the object of scientific and
medical research that formed the bedrock of European ideas about black
female sexuality. After her death the following year, Baartman's remains
were preserved by French scientists and exhibited at the Museum of Mankind
in Paris until 1974.

After many years of lobbying by South African and indigenous rights groups,
the French government has finally agreed to send her remains home.

If you would like to learn more about this historic event, The New York
Times published an excellent article about this in Saturday's edition. It
can be found on-line at:
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/04/international/africa/04AFRI.html

Please keep in mind that The New York Times only allows its articles to be
viewed on-line for 7 days after publication.

For more in-depth information, you can visit our web site for the
documentary, THE LIFE AND TIMES OF SARA BAARTMAN - "THE HOTTENTOT VENUS" at
: http://www.frif.com/new99/hottento.html

If you have any questions or would like further information, please don't
hesitate to contact me.

Thank you.
Ryan Krivoshey

Ryan Krivoshey
First Run / Icarus Films
32 Court Street, 21st Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Tel. 718-488-8900
Fax. 718-488-8642
Web: http://www.frif.com
Email: ryan@frif.com
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Dear Videolibbers,

I thought this would be of interest...

On Friday, May 3, 2002, the remains of Sara Baartman, a young Khoisan woman who was taken from South Africa in the early 1800s and exhibited across Europe as a scientific curiosity, were finally returned to South Africa.

Brought to France in 1814,  Baartman became the object of scientific and medical research that formed the bedrock of European ideas about black female sexuality. After her death the following year, Baartman's remains were preserved by French scientists and exhibited at the Museum of Mankind in Paris until 1974.

After many years of lobbying by South African and indigenous rights groups, the French government has finally agreed to send her remains home.

If you would like to learn more about this historic event, The New York Times published an excellent article about this in Saturday's edition. It can be found on-line at: http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/04/international/africa/04AFRI.html

Please keep in mind that The New York Times only allows its articles to be viewed on-line for 7 days after publication.

For more in-depth information, you can visit our web site for the documentary, THE LIFE AND TIMES OF SARA BAARTMAN - "THE HOTTENTOT VENUS" at : http://www.frif.com/new99/hottento.html

If you have any questions or would like further information, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Thank you.
Ryan Krivoshey


Ryan Krivoshey
First Run / Icarus Films
32 Court Street, 21st Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Tel. 718-488-8900
Fax. 718-488-8642
Web: http://www.frif.com
Email: ryan@frif.com --=====================_22097676==_.ALT--