Re: Off-Campus Rentals

Barb Bergman (barbara.bergman@mnsu.edu)
Mon, 28 Jan 2002 11:48:07 -0800 (PST)

--=====================_19772291==_.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Since I don't recall anybody else mentioning it, don't forget that the
Guidelines for Media Resources in Academic Libraries, section 5.1,
advocates the interlibrary loan of videos. It's a nice statement to use on
the naysayers :)
http://www.ala.org/acrl/guides/medresg.html

My two cents worth:
I've implemented interlibrary loan of videos twice now at academic
libraries. The first experience was positive, so I didn't hesitate this
time around, although there are a few doomsayers in the library who are
against the video lending. (Because of them, I am, for now, keeping more
control over the process than I really feel is necessary.)

The biggest argument against video lending is what if it's not available to
a professor. My response is that's why we have a booking system. If it's
reserved, it doesn't go anywhere. (We do coddle the faculty a little-- If
we suspect the video will be needed before it returns from ILL, we do
contact the professor.)

One concern I noticed in someone else's comments (and an issue I heard
here), was about purchasing replacements for non-returns. Talk to your ILL
librarian--typical procedure is that in the case of a non-return or damage,
the borrowing library pays for the replacement.

At Library One, we loaned an average of 4 videos per week. The only
problems I encountered were a couple times that I had to clean the video
because it was returned in a jiffy bag.

I have no problem lending feature films because if something happens to
them, they're the cheapest to replace. I don't make judgment calls
regarding availability from Blockbuster. (We don't have current releases,
and there are many little towns that don't have a Blockbuster- type store.)

Our policy is to only charge libraries that charge us for loans.
We also decided to only lend to other libraries that lend videos. (It's an
attempt to blackmail a couple other universities in the state into
participating :)

Loan periods--We decided that 3 weeks was necessary because of shipping.
But we include a note to the borrowing library that we recommend a 3-day
checkout to the patron and that the video is expected to be back here
within the 3 weeks. (btw, the 3-days was suggested by the local public
library system which was grateful we were willing to lend to them on a
trial basis this spring).

I think I've gone beyond my 2 cents, so I'll stop rambling, but feel free
to contact me if you'd like specifics.
Barb

Barb Bergman Minnesota State University-Mankato
Media Services Librarian Memorial Library
(507) 389-5945 P.O. Box 8419
Mankato MN 56002-8419

--=====================_19772291==_.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"


Since I don't recall anybody else mentioning it, don't forget that the Guidelines for Media Resources in Academic Libraries, section 5.1, advocates the interlibrary loan of videos. It's a nice statement to use on the naysayers :)
http://www.ala.org/acrl/guides/medresg.html

My two cents worth:
I've implemented interlibrary loan of videos twice now at academic libraries. The first experience was positive, so I didn't hesitate this time around, although there are a few doomsayers in the library who are against the video lending. (Because of them, I am, for now, keeping more control over the process than I really feel is necessary.)

The biggest argument against video lending is what if it's not available to a professor. My response is that's why we have a booking system. If it's reserved, it doesn't go anywhere. (We do coddle the faculty a little-- If we suspect the video will be needed before it returns from ILL, we do contact the professor.)

One concern I noticed in someone else's comments (and an issue I heard here), was about purchasing replacements for non-returns. Talk to your ILL librarian--typical procedure is that in the case of a non-return or damage, the borrowing library pays for the replacement.

At Library One, we loaned an average of 4 videos per week. The only problems I encountered were a couple times that I had to clean the video because it was returned in a jiffy bag.

I have no problem lending feature films because if something happens to them, they're the cheapest to replace. I don't make judgment calls regarding availability from Blockbuster. (We don't have current releases, and there are many little towns that don't have a Blockbuster- type store.)

Our policy is to only charge libraries that charge us for loans.
We also decided to only lend to other libraries that lend videos. (It's an attempt to blackmail a couple other universities in the state into participating :)

Loan periods--We decided that 3 weeks was necessary because of shipping. But we include a note to the borrowing library that we recommend a 3-day checkout to the patron and that the video is expected to be back here within the 3 weeks. (btw, the 3-days was suggested by the local public library system which was grateful we were willing to lend to them on a trial basis this spring).

I think I've gone beyond my 2 cents, so I'll stop rambling, but feel free to contact me if you'd like specifics.
Barb

Barb Bergman                    Minnesota State University-Mankato
Media Services Librarian                Memorial Library
(507) 389-5945                  P.O. Box 8419
                                Mankato MN 56002-8419

--=====================_19772291==_.ALT--