Re: Eire-land on Film and Video

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Fri, 11 Jan 2002 12:34:44 -0800 (PST)

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I really like:

Irish in America: The Long Journey Home (PBS)
1997. 80 min. each installment

--The Great Hunger. The first of a four part series
packed with personal
remembrances and rare archival footage of the Irish
immigration to America.
In the 19th century the Irish peasants were among the
poorest people in the
Christian world. From America ships carried a fungus to
their shores which
began the "potato famine" triggering one of the
greatest migrations in human
history.

--All Across America. The second of a four part series
packed with
personal remembrances and rare archival footage of the
Irish immigration to
America. At the start the Irish who survived the famine
found poverty,
disease, religious bigotry and political oppression in
America. But they stuck
together, built their own churches and communities and
by the later 19th
century Irish-American heroes had begun to emerge.
Prospector John
Mackay discovered silver and gold, Marcus Daly opened
his Anaconda
Copper Mine and John L. Sullivan made himself a legend
by facing
challenger Jake Kilrain in an amazing 75-round boxing
match.

-- Up From City Streets. The third of a four part series
packed with personal
remembrances and rare archival footage of the Irish
immigration to America.
Eventually the Irish immigrants rose to run America's
great cities from the
sewers to the skyline. They left their mark everywhere:
in theater, sports,
music, crime, labor, Wall Street, Hollywood and one
Irish boy, Al Smith,
made a bid for the American presidency.

--Success. The last of a four part series packed with
personal remembrances
and rare archival footage of the Irish immigration to
America. This final
segment chronicles the history of two very different
Irish-American families
who both reached international celebrity in the 1930s.
The Kennedys were
considered America's royalty, especially when patriarch
Joseph P. Kennedy
Sr., was appointed ambassador to England and his son,
John F. Kennedy
became the first Irish-Catholic president of the United
States. In contrast to
the Kennedy's basking in their assimilation as
Americans, the playwright,
Eugene O'Neill, was fiercely Irish and kept his family
roots exposed in most
of his classic plays preferring to relive his family's
bitter struggle to remain
Irish in America.

-Reviews: Goodman, Walter. "The Irish in America:
Long Journey Home."
(television program reviews) New York Times v147
(Mon, Jan 26,
1998):B1(N), E1(L), col 4, 13 col in.
Leonard, John. "The Irish in America: Long Journey
Home."
(television program reviews) New York v31, n3 (Jan
26, 1998):50 (2
pages).
Phillips, Barbara D. "The Irish in America: Long
Journey Home."
(television program reviews) Wall Street Journal
(Mon, Jan 26,
1998):A16(W), A16(E), col 1, 21 col in.
Scott, Tony. "The Irish in America: Long Journey
Home." (television
program reviews) Variety v369, n11 (Jan 26, 1998):37.

FACETS (and other mass marketers) also sell--pretty good also:

Out of Ireland: The Story of Irish Emigration to America.
Examines the history of the seven million Irish who
emigrated to America in
the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries including the causes
of the exodus and the
immigrant experience in the United States. Uses
photographs, archival
footage, manuscript material and interviews with Irish
immigrants to describe
their experiences and the profound influence they have
had on American
culture. 1995. 111 min.

I also like:

Gael Force: Ireland's Greatest Entertainers (available from FACETS et al)
Recorded live in concert at Dublin's Point Theatre and
introduced by
Emmylou Harris, combines stunning live performances,
beautiful melodies
and virtuoso playing from Ireland's greatest musicians
and performers.

A History of Irish Music and Dance. (available from FACETS et al)
Performers: Thomas Makem, the Irish Brigade, Boiled in
Lead, the Trinity
Dance Company, Peter Yeates, the Makem Brothers, Brian
Sullivan.

At 12:13 PM 1/11/2002 -0800, you wrote:
>I'm highlighting Ireland and Irish heritage for SFPL's weekly film series
>in March. I'd appreciate suggestions, especially of documentaries relevant
>to our theme. Thanks!
>
>Blaine
>
>
>Blaine Waterman
>Audiovisual Center Librarian
>San Francisco Public Library
>100 Larkin Street SF, CA 94102
>415-557-4461; fax 415-557-4424
>blainew@sfpl.org

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu

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I really like:

Irish in America: The Long Journey Home (PBS)
                   1997. 80 min. each installment

                  --The Great Hunger. The first of a four part series packed with personal
                   remembrances and rare archival footage of the Irish immigration to America.
                   In the 19th century the Irish peasants were among the poorest people in the
                   Christian world. From America ships carried a fungus to their shores which
                   began the "potato famine" triggering one of the greatest migrations in human
                   history.

                   --All Across America. The second of a four part series packed with
                   personal remembrances and rare archival footage of the Irish immigration to
                   America. At the start the Irish who survived the famine found poverty,
                   disease, religious bigotry and political oppression in America. But they stuck
                   together, built their own churches and communities and by the later 19th
                   century Irish-American heroes had begun to emerge. Prospector John
                   Mackay discovered silver and gold, Marcus Daly opened his Anaconda
                   Copper Mine and John L. Sullivan made himself a legend by facing
                   challenger Jake Kilrain in an amazing 75-round boxing match. 

                  -- Up From City Streets. The third of a four part series packed with personal
                   remembrances and rare archival footage of the Irish immigration to America.
                   Eventually the Irish immigrants rose to run America's great cities from the
                   sewers to the skyline. They left their mark everywhere: in theater, sports,
                   music, crime, labor, Wall Street, Hollywood and one Irish boy, Al Smith,
                   made a bid for the American presidency. 

                   --Success. The last of a four part series packed with personal remembrances
                   and rare archival footage of the Irish immigration to America. This final
                   segment chronicles the history of two very different Irish-American families
                   who both reached international celebrity in the 1930s. The Kennedys were
                   considered America's royalty, especially when patriarch Joseph P. Kennedy
                   Sr., was appointed ambassador to England and his son, John F. Kennedy
                   became the first Irish-Catholic president of the United States. In contrast to
                   the Kennedy's basking in their assimilation as Americans, the playwright,
                   Eugene O'Neill, was fiercely Irish and kept his family roots exposed in most
                   of his classic plays preferring to relive his family's bitter struggle to remain
                   Irish in America.

                        -Reviews:  Goodman, Walter. "The Irish in America: Long Journey Home."
                        (television program reviews) New York Times v147 (Mon, Jan 26,
                        1998):B1(N), E1(L), col 4, 13 col in.
                        Leonard, John. "The Irish in America: Long Journey Home."
                        (television program reviews) New York v31, n3 (Jan 26, 1998):50 (2
                        pages).
                        Phillips, Barbara D. "The Irish in America: Long Journey Home."
                        (television program reviews) Wall Street Journal (Mon, Jan 26,
                        1998):A16(W), A16(E), col 1, 21 col in.
                        Scott, Tony. "The Irish in America: Long Journey Home." (television
                        program reviews) Variety v369, n11 (Jan 26, 1998):37.


FACETS (and other mass marketers) also sell--pretty good also:

Out of Ireland: The Story of Irish Emigration to America.
                   Examines the history of the seven million Irish who emigrated to America in
                   the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries including the causes of the exodus and the
                   immigrant experience in the United States. Uses photographs, archival
                   footage, manuscript material and interviews with Irish immigrants to describe
                   their experiences and the profound influence they have had on American
                   culture. 1995. 111 min.

I also like:

Gael Force: Ireland's Greatest Entertainers (available from FACETS et al)
                   Recorded live in concert at Dublin's Point Theatre and introduced by
                   Emmylou Harris, combines stunning live performances, beautiful melodies
                   and virtuoso playing from Ireland's greatest musicians and performers.

A History of Irish Music and Dance. (available from FACETS et al)
                   Performers: Thomas Makem, the Irish Brigade, Boiled in Lead, the Trinity
                   Dance Company, Peter Yeates, the Makem Brothers, Brian Sullivan.
 



At 12:13 PM 1/11/2002 -0800, you wrote:

I'm highlighting Ireland and Irish heritage for SFPL's weekly film series
in March. I'd appreciate suggestions, especially of documentaries relevant
to our theme. Thanks!

Blaine

 
Blaine Waterman
Audiovisual Center Librarian
San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin Street SF, CA 94102
415-557-4461; fax 415-557-4424
blainew@sfpl.org

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu

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