Re: re oldest videotape still OK

Jessica Rosner (jrosner@kino.com)
Thu, 29 Nov 2001 16:09:00 -0800 (PST)

I have a copy of what I believe is one of the oldest "living" retail VHS
tapes. It is a PHILADELPHIA HERE I COME on obscure film from a major play
which was released on video around 1975-76 on 1/2 MAGNETIC tape(this was at
the time most studios would not release anything so many early titles were
independent films). It comes in one of those old padded boxes. It plays fine
but the color is starting to go and it it is impossible to dub.
-- 
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com

> From: CATARCHIVE@aol.com > Reply-To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu > Date: Thu, 29 Nov 2001 15:44:50 -0800 (PST) > To: Multiple recipients of list <videolib@library.berkeley.edu> > Subject: re oldest videotape still OK > > Oldest living videotape? The video originals in our archive go back to 1968, > and some U-matics from that date are still good. Also some 2-inch stuff from > that period. (Yet I've seen late 70's material that's unplayable now.) Of > course, age alone is not the question; tape stock, storage conditions, etc. > impinge on longevity. And when it comes to 2-inch there is an age-induced > process of "banding" that will eventually make nearly all color tapes of that > old format look as if they were printed on African flags. There is no > reason, however, to rely on antique tapes remaining healthy....transfer them > anyway. Any format you choose will be technically obsolete in a year or > two....art is long and video is short...so bite the bullet and just do it. We > use D2 and have been very satisfied with it. > Stephan Chodorov > Creative Arts Television