Re: CDL-CORE LIST OF FILMS AVAILABLE? (fwd)

Oksana Dykyj (oksana@vax2.concordia.ca)
Thu, 2 Aug 2001 10:51:14 -0700 (PDT)

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A couple of additional comments to Kris' important point:

Most instructors in film studies (which also encompasses many areas of
cultural studies, fine arts, media arts etc.) are members of the Society
for Cinema Studies. Have a look at what the areas of research currently
are, based on the papers presented at the last conference in May 2001:
http://www.cinemastudies.org/01conf/final2001.htm this will give you a
sense of the courses that are now being offered or will be in the very near
future.

The University Film and Video Association has another source for sample
syllabi in the "Course Files" which used to be regularly published in the
Journal of Film and Video, which present examples of a wide variety of film
studies courses with reading lists, filmographies, modules, and sample
assignments: Erens, Patricia, ed. 1986. College Course Files. Monograph
#5, University Film and Video Association.

The third in a series of biannual issues on teaching film and video courses
appeared in the Summer 1999 issue of Cinema Journal: it contains several
articles dealing with teaching national cinemas courses and includes
screening lists which could be useful as a way of enhancing existing
collections: Welsch, Tricia. 1999. "Techniques and Approaches for
Teaching Film and Video Courses". Cinema Journal 38 (4) 86-108.

The most widely used textbook for introductory and intermediate
college-level film studies courses is: Bordwell, David and Kristin
Thompson. 2001. Film Art: An Introduction, 6th ed. NewYork: McGraw Hill.
The filmography there is worth using as a core list since most instructors
would like to show titles that are discussed and analyzed in the text.

This is just the starting point, in terms of meeting current teaching and
undergraduate research demands. But, there also needs to be some
retrospective collection development to fill out holes (wish lists of
titles to be on the look out for as soon as they are released on video or
dvd) and anticipate future research requirements. In many cases courses are
given only because materials are available. If the film is lost as in the
case of many silent and early sound films (negatives and prints), it's lost
and that's that. In other cases, a studio or artist may have the material
but are unwilling for legal or personal reasons to have it screened. That
eliminates those titles as well for now. Not everything that has been
produced is available. I personally think that the current trend towards
research and courses in silent films is because of the laserdisc and now
dvd silent films on the commercial market. They are usually great quality
with a good musical track. So, some of the current scholarship/teaching
actually reflects access to material.

I'll stop here.

Oksana

At 09:26 AM 8/2/01 -0700, you wrote:
>While there are many lists of recommended films and best films, there is
>no list of core titles for academic libraries. About 8 years ago, Jim
>Self (University of Virginia) and I compiled a list that was designed to
>be a core list of films available on video to support film studies. We
>worked with published syllabi from film studies courses in colleges and
>universities; there are actually two books that include dozens of such
>syllabi, covering both international and U.S. cinema. The idea was to
>create a list that reflected what faculty actually teach, not the titles
>that critics and film buffs believe to be important/interesting/good. The
>final list included all of the titles you would think would be there, plus
>many surprises. We never published this list, but I've sent copies to
>people from time to time.
>
>I'm sending this reply to the list because I still academic media
>librarians need such a list. Maybe an untenured, energetic media/film
>studies librarian would be interested in taking on the assignment. BTW,
>one of the big problems is the regularity with which titles go out of
>print on video -- then back in print on a new format, like DVD. Jim and I
>solved the problem, by putting a film on the list if it was ever released
>on video, thinking that it might come back in print in the future.
>However, that still excluded lots of great films that have never been
>released. -- Kris
>
>On Wed, 1 Aug 2001, Kim Hale wrote:
>
> > This message came across another listserv, but I thought it would be
> > appropriate here as well.
> >
> > Kim
> >
> > Kimberly Hale, Acquisitions Librarian/Coordinator of Collection
> Development
> > Library, Columbia College Chicago
> > 624 South Michigan Avenue Chicago, IL 60605
> > (312)344-7355(voice) / (312)344-8062(fax)
> >
> > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> > Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2001 16:29:13 -0700
> > From: Lynn F. Sipe <lsipe@usc.edu>
> > Reply-To: colldv-l@usc.edu
> > To: COLLDV-L@usc.edu
> > Subject: CDL-CORE LIST OF FILMS AVAILABLE?
> >
> > From: "Nafziger, Christopher L." <CNafzige@fgcu.edu>
> >
> > I am a Reference technical assistant working with the Librarian responsible
> > for developing our University's Library video collection. We are trying to
> > find out if any academic library, in particular, has developed a core list
> > of films an academic library should have. We are looking for a list of
> > classic American and foreign films on video. Library literature and several
> > Internet searches have produced no results. This is why I am posting this
> > message. Any suggestions or lists would be greatly appreciated.
> >
> > Thank you, in advance
> > Chris Nafziger
> > cnafzige@fgcu.edu
> > Library Services
> > Florida Gulf Coast University
> > 10501 FGCU Blvd. S.
> > Ft. Myers, FL 33965-6501
> >
> >
>
>Kristine R. Brancolini, Director, Digital Library Program
>Main Library E170, 1320 E. Tenth Street
>Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405
>Phone: 812.855.3710 | Fax: 812.856.2062 | Web: www.dlib.indiana.edu

__________________________________________________________________________
Oksana Dykyj voice: 514-848-3443
Head, Visual Media Resources fax: 514-848-7622
Instructional & Information Technology Services
Concordia University
LB-805-1, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W,
Montreal, Quebec
Canada H3G 1M8
__________________________________________________________________________
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

A couple of additional comments to Kris' important point:

Most instructors in film studies (which also encompasses many areas of cultural studies, fine arts, media arts etc.) are members of the Society for Cinema Studies. Have a look at what the areas of research currently are, based on the papers presented at the last conference in May 2001: http://www.cinemastudies.org/01conf/final2001.htm  this will give you a sense of the courses that are now being offered or will be in the very near future.

The University Film and Video Association has another source for sample syllabi in the =93Course Files=94 which used to be regularly published in the Journal of Film and Video, which present examples of a wide variety of film studies courses with reading lists, filmographies, modules, and sample assignments: Erens, Patricia, ed. 1986.   College Course Files. Monograph #5, University Film and Video Association. 

The third in a series of biannual issues on teaching film and video courses appeared in the Summer 1999 issue of Cinema Journal:  it contains several articles dealing with teaching national cinemas courses and includes screening lists which could be useful as a way of enhancing existing collections: Welsch, Tricia.  1999.  =93Techniques and Approaches for Teaching Film and Video Courses=94.  Cinema Journal 38 (4) 86-108.

The most widely used textbook for introductory and intermediate college-level film studies courses is: Bordwell, David and Kristin Thompson.  2001.  Film Art: An Introduction, 6th ed.  NewYork: McGraw Hill. The filmography there is worth using as a core list since most instructors would like to show titles that are discussed and analyzed in the text.

This is just the starting point, in terms of meeting current teaching and undergraduate research demands. But, there also needs to be some retrospective collection development to fill out holes (wish lists of titles to be on the look out for as soon as they are released on video or dvd) and anticipate future research requirements. In many cases courses are given only because materials are available. If the film is lost as in the case of many silent and early sound films (negatives and prints), it's lost and that's that. In other cases, a studio or artist may have the material but are unwilling for legal or personal reasons to  have it screened. That eliminates those titles as well for now. Not everything that has been produced is available. I personally think that the current trend towards research and courses in silent films is because of the laserdisc and now dvd silent films on the commercial market. They are usually great quality with a good musical track. So, some of the current scholarship/teaching actually reflects access to material.

I'll stop here.

Oksana




At 09:26 AM 8/2/01 -0700, you wrote:

While there are many lists of recommended films and best films, there is
no list of core titles for academic libraries.  About 8 years ago, Jim
Self (University of Virginia) and I compiled a list that was designed to
be a core list of films available on video to support film studies.  We
worked with published syllabi from film studies courses in colleges and
universities; there are actually two books that include dozens of such
syllabi, covering both international and U.S. cinema. The idea was to
create a list that reflected what faculty actually teach, not the titles
that critics and film buffs believe to be important/interesting/good. The
final list included all of the titles you would think would be there, plus
many surprises.  We never published this list, but I've sent copies to
people from time to time.

I'm sending this reply to the list because I still academic media
librarians need such a list.  Maybe an untenured, energetic media/film
studies librarian would be interested in taking on the assignment.  BTW,
one of the big problems is the regularity with which titles go out of
print on video -- then back in print on a new format, like DVD.  Jim and I
solved the problem, by putting a film on the list if it was ever released
on video, thinking that it might come back in print in the future.
However, that still excluded lots of great films that have never been
released.  -- Kris

On Wed, 1 Aug 2001, Kim Hale wrote:

> This message came across another listserv, but I thought it would be
> appropriate here as well.
>
> Kim
>
> Kimberly Hale, Acquisitions Librarian/Coordinator of Collection Development
> Library, Columbia College Chicago
> 624 South Michigan Avenue Chicago, IL 60605
> (312)344-7355(voice) /  (312)344-8062(fax)
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2001 16:29:13 -0700
> From: Lynn F. Sipe <lsipe@usc.edu>
> Reply-To: colldv-l@usc.edu
> To: COLLDV-L@usc.edu
> Subject: CDL-CORE LIST OF FILMS AVAILABLE?
>
> From: "Nafziger, Christopher L." <CNafzige@fgcu.edu>
>
> I am a Reference technical assistant working with the Librarian responsible
> for developing our University's Library video collection. We are trying to
> find out if any academic library, in particular, has developed a core list
> of films an academic library should have. We are looking for a list of
> classic American and foreign films on video. Library literature and several
> Internet searches have produced no results. This is why I am posting this
> message. Any suggestions or lists would be greatly=20 appreciated.
>
> Thank you, in advance
> Chris Nafziger
> cnafzige@fgcu.edu
> Library Services
> Florida Gulf Coast University
> 10501 FGCU Blvd. S.
> Ft. Myers, FL 33965-6501
>
>

Kristine R. Brancolini, Director, Digital Library Program
Main Library E170, 1320 E. Tenth Street
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN  47405
Phone: 812.855.3710 | Fax: 812.856.2062 | Web: www.dlib.indiana.edu

_______________________________________________________________________= ___
Oksana Dykyj        &= nbsp;         &n= bsp;                  &n= bsp; voice: 514-848-3443
Head, Visual Media Resources       &nb= sp;         &nbs= p;     fax:   514-848-7622
Instructional & Information Technology Services       &nbs= p;         
Concordia University
LB-805-1, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W,
Montreal, Quebec
Canada  H3G 1M8
__________________________________________________________________________

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