SENATE BILL WOULD EXTEND 'FAIR USE' ...

Philip Fryer (pdf@loyola.edu)
Thu, 22 Mar 2001 06:46:02 -0800 (PST)

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]from today's Edupage]

SENATE BILL WOULD EXTEND 'FAIR USE' CLAUSE TO ONLINE EDUCATION

A recently introduced Senate bill called the Technology Education
and Copyright Harmonization Act (TEACH) would let educators using
distance-learning materials in digital formats use various
copyrighted material without getting permission from the content
owner. The bill modernizes the Copyright Act of 1976 for the
digital age, updating the fair-use distance-education provisions
contained in the original legislation. TEACH would scrap the
current requirement that learning must take place in a physical
classroom and would ensure that the distance-learning exemption
covers the temporary copies that must be created in networked
file servers to transmit content over the Web. The bill would also
change the current regulations to enable educators to display to
students "limited" portions of "dramatic" literature, music,
audiovisual, and sound recordings, as well as the total versions
of non-dramatic literature and musical works.
(eSchool News Online, 19 March 2001)

Philip Fryer
Media Services Librarian
Loyola/Notre Dame Library
200 Winston Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21212
pdf@loyola.edu or pfryer@ndm.edu
voice: 410-532-8787 x118 fax: 410-532-6130

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]from today's Edupage]
 
SENATE BILL WOULD EXTEND 'FAIR USE' CLAUSE TO ONLINE EDUCATION
A recently introduced Senate bill called the Technology Education
a= nd=20 Copyright Harmonization Act (TEACH) would let educators=20 using
distance-learning materials in digital formats use=20 various
copyrighted material without getting permission from the=20 content
owner. The bill modernizes the Copyright Act of 1976 for=20 the
digital age, updating the fair-use distance-education=20 provisions
contained in the original legislation. TEACH would scrap=20 the
current requirement that learning must take place in a=20 physical
classroom and would ensure that the distance-learning=20 exemption
covers the temporary copies that must be created in=20 networked
file servers to transmit content over the Web. The bill = would=20 also
change the current regulations to enable educators to display=20 to
students "limited" portions of "dramatic" literature,=20 music,
audiovisual, and sound recordings, as well as the total = versions
of=20 non-dramatic literature and musical works.
(eSchool News Online, 19 = March=20 2001)
 
Philip Fryer
Media Services Librarian
Loyola/Notre Dame=20 Library
200 Winston Avenue
Baltimore, MD  21212
pdf@loyola.edu or pfryer@ndm.edu
voice: 410-532-8787=20= x118  fax: 410-532-6130
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