Re: videos, distance education, & fair use

Jessica Rosner (jrosner@kino.com)
Thu, 15 Mar 2001 11:57:40 -0800 (PST)

-- 
Jessica Rosner
Kino International
333 W 39th St. 503
NY NY 10018
jrosner@kino.com

I'll try to avoid a long silly thread but you are always free to put the tape on reserve like a book. IF your distance Ed students are in one place than you can send the tape there for showing but it really isn't fair ( or legal) to broadcast the tape to multiple locations. Tapes generally fall into two types, retail & "educational". Retail tapes are usually under $50 so buying an additional copy should not be that big a burden. I understand that many educational films can be very costly but most distributors would be willing to negotiate an arrangement for distance ed screenings if you asked them.

I just get frustrated by the idea that it is somehow OK to copy or broadcast a video/dvd when it is clearly NOT ok to do the same thing with a book. It is NOT the format but THE RIGHTS that matter.

Jessica

> From: "Jennifer Robichaud" <jrobich@uottawa.ca> > Reply-To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu > Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 11:36:34 -0800 (PST) > To: Multiple recipients of list <videolib@library.berkeley.edu> > Subject: Re: videos, distance education, & fair use > > What is so terrible is to order and PAY FOR a second (third, fourth) > copy because it is punishingly expensive to do so. Distance Ed. > students are still a part of the same institution and you don't > have to buy items according to the number of students you have > do you? It's not as if you can say that if a library serves more > than 1200 students you must buy two copies of this or that item. > If a distance course uses a text they can borrow the one held by the > library when it is not in use by someone else who uses that library. > When you're talking about broadcasting a video for class purposes it > is usually just used once for that class and never again (unless it > is needed the next semester) - it just means the students are spread > around and not all in the same place. > >> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 11:04:58 -0800 (PST) >> Reply-to: videolib@library.berkeley.edu >> From: Jessica Rosner <jrosner@kino.com> >> To: Multiple recipients of list <videolib@library.berkeley.edu> >> Subject: Re: videos, distance education, & fair use > >> >> -- >> Jessica Rosner >> Kino International >> 333 W 39th St. 503 >> NY NY 10018 >> jrosner@kino.com >> >> I really was gonna stay out of this one but I feel compelled to ask, why is >> it so terrible to order a second or third copy if you need it at another >> location? I am assuming distance courses also use books. Do you just >> broadcast them as well ? As a distributor I might be a bit put off if >> say someone did an intro film course and broadcast one of our titles to >> 50 distance education sites using only one copy. Apart from the legal >> ramifications it hardly seems fair. >> It kind of reminds me of an interview that Godard once gave in which he >> said that basically Hollywood would make one blockbuster film a year which >> would just be shown in every theater at once. >> >> jessica >> >>> From: Barb Bergman <barbara.bergman@angelo.edu> >>> Reply-To: videolib@library.berkeley.edu >>> Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 10:40:28 -0800 (PST) >>> To: Multiple recipients of list <videolib@library.berkeley.edu> >>> Subject: Re: videos, distance education, & fair use >>> >>> Personally, I thought it sounded like fair use to me too, but the Distance >>> Education section of "Fair Use Harbor" >>> http://www.stfrancis.edu/cid/coprbay/fairuse.htm said otherwise. I mean, >>> what are you supposed to do? Buy a second copy of a video and mail it to >>> the remote site? >>> >>> Barb >>> >>> At 09:58 AM 3/14/2001 -0800, you wrote: >>>> I dunno. If access to the broadcast is limited strictly to enrolled >>>> students, I'd vote for this being fair use. >>>> >>>> gary >>>> >>>> >>>> >>>> At 08:45 AM 03/14/2001 -0800, you wrote: >>>>> I'm working on a presentation on fair use. I've gathered all sorts of good >>>>> resources (most of which I've learned about from you guys!) but have one >>>>> question: >>>>> >>>>> The sources I have say: >>>>> When teaching a class via Distance Education, it's NOT okay to broadcast a >>>>> video without permission. (Even if no one outside the class could access >>> it.) >>>>> >>>>> Is this still correct? Or have there been changes in this doctrine? Any >>>>> changes in the works? >>>>> >>>>> thanks in advance, >>>>> Barb >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-**-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* >>>>> Barbara J. Bergman Porter Henderson Library >>>>> Media Librarian Angelo State University >>>>> ph: (915) 942-2313 Box 11013, ASU Station >>>>> fax: (915) 942-2198 San Angelo, TX 76909 >>>>> *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-**-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* >>>>> Buffy: You need to have some fun. >>>>> Giles: I'll have you know that I have very many relaxing hobbies. >>>>> Buffy: Such as? >>>>> Giles: I enjoy cross-referencing. >>>> >>>> Gary Handman >>>> Director >>>> Media Resources Center >>>> Moffitt Library >>>> UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000 >>>> 510-643-8566 >>>> ghandman@library.berkeley.edu >>>> >>>> "You are looking into the mind of home video. It is innocent, it is >>>> aimless, >>>> it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld >>>> >>>> >> >>