Re: First Amendment Titles

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Mon, 12 Feb 2001 08:53:51 -0800 (PST)

Here you go, Sal...At 08:29 AM 02/12/2001 -0800, you wrote:

>>>>

<excerpt><fontfamily><param>arial</param><smaller>Videolibbers:

I would appreciate any recommendations from the group on documentaries on

First Amendment issues.

Thanks in advance,

Sally Mason-Robinson</smaller>

</fontfamily></excerpt><<<<<<<<

Damned in the U.S.A. and Obscenity, Hate Speech and the First

Amendment.

Damned in the U.S.A features Jesse Helms, Christie
Hefner, Donald

Wildmon, Luther Campbell, Al D'Amato, Andres Serrano.
Debate panel: John

Frohnmayer, David Llewellyn, Bruce Herschensohn, Carol
Sobel. covers the

most significant battles over freedom of expression
and censorship in the arts

over the last five years. From the Mapplethorpe
controversy to the debate

over the lyrics of 2 Live Crew, from government
sponsorship of artists to

morally motivated boycotts, this film addresses both
sides of the censorship

debate in all its complexity. Film is followed by a
debate which broadens the

discussion of the First Amendment as it provides a
sober, balanced look at the

limits placed on freedom of speech. 126 min. total
running time. (carried by FACETS and others)

Voices in Exile: Immigrants and the First Amendment

Examines the question of to what extent aliens are
protected by First

Amendments rights. Follows the case of eight
Palestinian immigrants in Los

Angeles who were arrested for distributing PLO
literature. The case involved

the FBI, the INS, and the ACLU. 1998. 30 min. (New Day
Films)

Patently Offensive: Porn Under Siege.

This documentary explores the tension between freedom
of speech and the

preservation of values which define a civilized
society. Whose interests should

prevail in the debate which rages about pornography's
contribution to criminal

behavior, its First Amendment status, and its abuse of
women and even

children? 58 min. [filmakers library]

Media Rights and Responsibilities

The media have established new outposts in the
frontiers of taste that were

thought impossible 25 years ago: sexually explicit and
violent movies,

"Gangsta" rap music, tabloid journalism, and all in
the name of First

Amendment rights and giving the public what it wants.
But with these rights

come responsibilities that are seldom respected. What
leverage can society

use to put curbs on the more outrageous forms of media
expression while

retaining a respect for creativity and freedom of
expression? This program

looks at all of the issues surrounding the media's
pursuit of the advertising

dollar vs. its responsibility to exercise concern for
the public good. 1998. 28

min. [films for the humanities]

Gary

>>>>

<excerpt><fontfamily><param>arial</param>

</fontfamily></excerpt><fontfamily><param>arial</param><<<<<<<<

</fontfamily>