Re: renting films

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Thu, 4 Jan 2001 08:32:34 -0800 (PST)

No. Sorry, I didn't include broadcast in the "off-limits" portion of the
note below. Broadcast rights are the exclusive right of the copyright holder

gary

At 10:00 PM 01/03/2001 -0800, you wrote:
>According to this interpretation of the Doctrine, the owner of a video
cassette
>could also REBROADCAST the material (for profit), via standard or broadband
>transmission, which is, as we all know, unlawful, and quite possibly,
illegal.
>Unless you left this out for some reason...
>
>(Deep breath taken, boy did it feel good. Thanks :) )
>
>Gary Handman wrote:
>
>> Ok: Let's take a deep breath here...
>>
>> 1. In my experience, few if any libraries proper "rent" films or videos
>> for a fee. Used to be a handful of rather misguided institutions used to
>> charge a small deposit fee for borrowing videos...don't believe that's too
>> common any longer (if it is, woe!)
>>
>> 2. Some universities still support Film/Video Centers--agencies that may
>> be profit or non--that are in the express business of film/video rental and
>> sale (eg UC Center for Media and Independent Learning).
>>
>> 3. The First Sale Doctrine of the copyright law allows the owner of a
>> legally-acquired video to do any damn thing he/she wants with it (except
>> copy or make derivative works): loan, rent, sell, give away. Public
>> performance rights has nothing to do with it (PPR have to do with
>> showing--"performing"--a work outside of the home or face-to-face teaching.
>> Period.)
>>
>> OK?
>>
>> At 04:18 PM 01/03/2001 -0800, you wrote:
>> >Let me get this straight...universities are in the practice of loaning
titles
>> >for a fee? Doesn't this violate the whole notion of public performance
>> rights
>> >being non-transferrable?
>> >
>> >I sure would like someone to clarify this point, as I am a filmmaker
myself
>> >with one title in educational distribution. The very thought of my hard
>> work (
>> >or anyone else's, for that matter) being loaned for a FEE without getting
>> a cut
>> >or royalties seems unacceptable, and at least, beyond the reasonable
>> bounds of
>> >the public performance clause.
>> >
>> >I never knew this was a common practice, and unless I've misunderstood,
it's
>> >shocking--
>> >
>> >J Rosette
>> >CAMERADO
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >"Pamela S. Reeves" wrote:
>> >
>> >> Individual departments pay for their own rentals here. There are
>> >> Universities that loan titles for a fee that is usually cheaper than you
>> >> would pay to rent from the distributor (if the distributor allows
that). I
>> >> usually supply them with the information on how to obtain the
material from
>> >> another university, if it is available.
>> >>
>> >> Pamela Sue Reeves
>> >> preeves@uwyo.edu
>> >> University of Wyoming
>> >> Audio Visual Services
>> >> P.O. Box 3273
>> >> Laramie, WY 82071
>> >> (307)766-3184
>> >>
>> >> > -----Original Message-----
>> >> > From: Tami-Jo M. Eckley [SMTP:eckleyt@mville.edu]
>> >> > Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 1:44 PM
>> >> > To: Multiple recipients of list
>> >> > Subject: renting films
>> >> >
>> >> > I was wondering if there are libraries paying for the renting of
videos
>> >> > for campus departments, for example from the filmakers library? Or is
>> the
>> >> > general practice that the department would pay for the rental? Thanks
>> for
>> >> > input and HAPPY NEW YEAR!
>> >> >
>> >> > --
>> >> > Tami-Jo Eckley
>> >> > Electronic Services & Media Librarian
>> >> > Manhattanville College Library
>> >> > Purchase, New York 10577
>> >> > http://www.mville.edu/library
>> >> > Tel:(914) 323-5274
>> >> > Fax:(914) 694-8139
>> >> > ______________________________________
>> >> >
>> >> > --
>> >
>> >
>> >
>
>
>