The more things change - [from Edupage]

Philip Fryer (PDF@loyola.edu)
Thu, 16 Nov 2000 06:53:51 -0800 (PST)

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HOW TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED THE WAY WE WATCH TV
Television's technology-driven evolution was sparked by the
introduction of the remote control, which inspired greater
impatience among viewers, and thus, more channels and more
action-packed shows. Now, digital technologies are entering the
mix, creating time-shifting services such as TiVo. TiVo uses a
computer hard drive to store shows, allowing users to pause live
shows and program their set-top box to record shows about a
particular topic. An up-and-coming development is interactive
television, combining the Internet with television. Companies
such as RespondTV and Wink Communications believe that the future
of television lies in a viewer's ability to react to onscreen
events using the Internet. Much of the potential of interactive
TV is tied into commerce. For example, a viewer might click
to buy a product as it is advertised on television.
(Wall Street Journal, 13 November 2000)

Philip Fryer
Media Services Librarian
Loyola/Notre Dame Library
200 Winston Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21212
pdf@loyola.edu or pfryer@ndm.edu
voice: 410-532-8787 x118 fax: 410-532-6130

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HOW TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED THE WAY WE WATCH TV
Telev= ision's=20 technology-driven evolution was sparked by the
introduction of the = remote=20 control, which inspired greater
impatience among viewers, and thus, = more=20 channels and more
action-packed shows. Now, digital technologies are = entering=20 the
mix, creating time-shifting services such as TiVo. TiVo uses=20 a
computer hard drive to store shows, allowing users to pause live
sh= ows=20 and program their set-top box to record shows about a
particular topic. = An=20 up-and-coming development is interactive
television, combining the = Internet=20 with television. Companies
such as RespondTV and Wink Communications = believe=20 that the future
of television lies in a viewer's ability to react to=20 onscreen
events using the Internet.  Much of the potential of=20 interactive
TV is tied into commerce. For example, a viewer might = click
to=20 buy a product as it is advertised on television.
(Wall Street Journal, = 13=20 November 2000)
 
 
 
Philip Fryer
Media Services Librarian
Loyola/Notr= e Dame=20 Library
200 Winston Avenue
Baltimore, MD  21212
pdf@loyola.edu or pfryer@ndm.edu
voice: 410-532-8787=20= x118  fax: 410-532-6130
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