Re: Cataloguing foreign films/videos

Stephanie Andrew (stephanie.andrew@yale.edu)
Thu, 21 Sep 2000 11:07:15 -0700 (PDT)

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This question points up the lack of standardization in video records on
OCLC, especially for foreign and multiple version titles. But it's really
no wonder that they're so wildly inconsistent. After a recent move from a
public library (where our first video cataloging rule was to maximize
general patron access) to a specialized academic collection (where
completeness and accuracy are paramount), I've been looking for
information. The handful of individual library video cataloging guidelines
I've found on the web contradict each other on important points, and LC's
1984 Archival Moving Images Cataloging Manual predates even VHS (never mind
that its main audience isn't public libraries). Posted on their site now
(http://lcweb.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/amimcovr.html) is their proposal from
3/99 and on AMIA's site
(http://www.amianet.org/05_Committees/committees.html) are their 4/99
recommendations in response. Some of the proposals (such as uniform titles
for films, entries for country of origin, firm definitions of chief source
and what constitutes a "version") would make things easier for all kinds of
libraries and their users. I'm sure someone on this list must know more
about the status of this. What's happening?

Stevie Andrew
Yale Film Study Center

At 08:58 AM 9/20/00 -0700, you wrote:
>I'm in a bit of a disagreement with our regional library about the main
>title entry for foreign films/videos. My contention is that a film or
>video such as "Like Water for Chocolate" should be entered with the
>main title entry under the English version of the name, not the Spanish
>version. I won't go into all the ramifications of overdue notices, etc.
>except to say that it is extremely confusing to patrons to receive one
>with a foreign title that they probably couldn't even find on a video
>that has been processed for American audiences - subtitled or not!
> This seems to have become an issue due to the fact a number of our
>records are being superimposed by OCLC records which appear to be
>just as inconsistent as any others I've seen.
> I don't see the similarity between a book written and published in
>a foreign language to a video which has obviously been produced and
>distributed for an English speaking audience.
> I'd appreciate any thoughts on this and if you have something I can
>use for ammunition in my argument, that would be even better.
> If I'm way off base here, I'd like to know that too.
> Thanks,
> Mary Gontarek
> Owatonna Public Library
> Owatonna, MN
>

Stephanie Andrew

Film Study Center
53 Wall Street
New Haven CT 06511
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This question points up the lack of standardization in video records on OCLC, especially for foreign and multiple version titles.  But it=92s really no wonder that they=92re so wildly inconsistent.  After a recent move from a public library (where our first video cataloging rule was to maximize general patron access) to a specialized academic collection (where completeness and accuracy are paramount), I=92ve been looking for information.  The handful of individual library video cataloging guidelines I=92ve found on the web contradict each other on important points, and LC=92s 1984 Archival Moving Images Cataloging Manual predates even VHS (never mind that its main audience isn't public libraries).  Posted on their site now (http://lcweb.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/amimcovr.html) is their proposal from 3/99 and on AMIA=92s site (http://www.amianet.org/05_Committees/committees.html) are their 4/99 recommendations in response.  Some of the proposals (such as uniform titles for films, entries for country of origin, firm definitions of chief source and what constitutes a =93version=94) would make things easier for all kinds of libraries and their users.  I=92m sure someone on this list must know more about the status of this.  What=92s happening?

Stevie Andrew
Yale Film Study Center


At 08:58 AM 9/20/00 -0700, you wrote:

I'm in a bit of a disagreement with our regional library about the main
title entry for foreign films/videos. My contention is that a film or
video such as "Like Water for Chocolate" should be entered with the
main title entry under the English version of the name, not the Spanish
version. I won't go into all the ramifications of overdue notices, etc.
except to say that it is extremely confusing to patrons to receive one
with a foreign title that they probably couldn't even find on a video
that has been processed for American audiences - subtitled or not!
 This seems to have become an issue due to the fact a number of our
records are being superimposed by OCLC records which appear to be
just as inconsistent as any others I've seen.
 I don't see the similarity between a book written and published in
a foreign language to a video which has obviously been produced and
distributed for an English speaking audience.
 I'd appreciate any thoughts on this and if you have something I can
use for ammunition in my argument, that would be even better.
 If I'm way off base here, I'd like to know that too.
 Thanks,
  Mary Gontarek
  Owatonna Public Library
  Owatonna, MN
 

Stephanie Andrew

Film Study Center
53 Wall Street
New Haven CT  06511

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