RE: Maltin, etc.

Dew, Margaret (mdew@post.cis.smu.edu)
Wed, 13 Sep 2000 07:29:05 -0700 (PDT)

I don't even bother with Maltin anymore, although most people consider him
authoritative because
he's such a tv talking head.
I much prefer VideoHound's publications, and have used their genre indexes
to pull
together films of a theme for faculty. Of course, the faculty think I'm
brilliant when I send them the list (don't tell on me), so I keep my
VidHound up to date.
I supplement the Videohound with the Halliwell, because, like Andrea, I
enjoy critical writing with a drole overlay.
-Margaret
SMU-CMIT
Dallas

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Notaro [mailto:notaro@bayflash.stpt.usf.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2000 9:09 AM
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: Maltin, etc.

Andrea Slonosky wrote:

> I recently requested that Leonard Maltin's Movie & Video Guide,
> Videohound's Golden Movie Retriever, and Halliwell's Film Guide all be
> placed on standing order, with the old copies being weeded as soon as
> the new copies were in. I've been asked if they are all necessary. My
> feeling is that they are all useful for faculty who want to think
> about including films in their courses, they provide a quick guide to
> feature films available on video, and they all have a slightly
> different emphasis and coverage, not to mention criteria. Currently
> there are no provisions in the library to maintain these titles,
> beyond my own memory. I want to respond that they are useful and
> necessary in the same way that multiple English dictionaries are, and
> far less expensive, but thought I'd check with the collective before
> shooting my mouth off! So the questions are: in your respected
> opinions, are these titles different from each other? Are they all
> necessary? If not, which one(s) would you prefer to have handy all the
> time? Personally, I like Halliwell for the pithy reviews, Maltin for
> the volume and Videohound for ease of use.

While it may not be the most inclusive, I find Halliwell's to be the
more authoritative.

Jerry Notaro, Media Librarian
University of South Florida, St. Petersburg