telecom headlines

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Wed, 26 Apr 2000 08:44:02 -0700 (PDT)

ARTS

A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS AN INTERNET MARKETER
Issue: Arts
" 'If you build it, they will come,' just isn't true," advised Eve Smith,
project manager for Open Studio: The Arts Online, a four-year-old project
financed by the Benton Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts
that helps artists and arts groups learn how to use the Web to promote their
work (www.openstudio.org). To start on the road to recognition, Ms. Smith
advises artists to list their Web sites with as many search engines as
possible and join e-mail lists. "Merely having a Web presence will not be
enough to attract people to what you do," added Ms. Smith, noting that the
Open Studio, which is based in
Washington, was founded because artists and arts groups were perceived to be
among those most likely to fall into the digital divide without proper
training. To date, the project has helped more than 1,100 artists and arts
groups with the nuances of getting recognition on the Web. Story includes
artist-friendly sites and strategies for artists and authors to promote
their own work.
[SOURCE: New York Times (D8), AUTHOR: Bonnie Rothman Morris]
(http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/04/circuits/articles/20artt.html)

NEW DIGITAL TELEVISION PROCEEDING
Issue: Digital TV
>From Press Release: The FCC began a proceeding to resolve outstanding issues
regarding the compatibility between cable television systems and digital
television receivers, set top boxes and other consumer electronics
equipment. In a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, the Commission asked for
comments on two unresolved cable compatibility issues: (1) how to label DTV
receivers with different features, including the proper designation for
receivers providing two-way interactive capability; and (2) licensing terms
for copy protection technology.
Action by the Commission by Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, FCC No. 00-137,
Office of Plans and Policy Docket No. 00-67 For more info: Office of Plans
and Policy Contact: Jonathan Levy (202) 418-2030
(http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/OPP/Notices/fcc00137.doc)
[SOURCE: FCC]
(http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Miscellaneous/News_Releases/2000/nrmc0022.html)

COMPARATIVE STANDARDS FOR NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCAST STATIONS
Issue: Public Broadcasting
The FCC has adopted new procedures and standards it will use to select among
mutually exclusive applicants to construct new noncommercial educational
(NCE) stations. The agency claims that the new process will be faster and
less expensive than the former traditional hearing process, while continuing
to foster the growth of public broadcasting as an expression of diversity
and excellence. Under the new procedures, the commission will select the
best applicants using a point system when it receives mutually exclusive
applications during a filing window.
[SOURCE:
FCC](http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Mass_Media/News_Releases/2000/nrmm0019.html)

ACCESSIBILITY OF VIDEO PROGRAMMING TO VIEWERS WITH HEARING DISABILITIES
Issue: Disabilities
>From Press Release: The FCC adopted rules to require broadcasters, cable
operators, and other multichannel video programming distributors to make
local emergency information that they provide to viewers accessible to
persons with hearing disabilities. The FCC concluded that critical aural
information that affects the safety of viewers must be made available to
persons with hearing disabilities. This action further implements Section
713 of the Communications Act, added by the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
Pursuant to Section 713, the Commission previously adopted rules and
implementation schedules to ensure that video programming is accessible via
closed captioning to persons with hearing disabilities. Because the closed
captioning requirement will be phased in over a number of years, today's
action ensures that people with hearing disabilities will receive critical
emergency information in an accessible format, even before the phase-in of
closed captioning is complete.
In a Second Report and Order, the Commission said that emergency information
not provided through closed captioning must be provided through some other
method of visual presentation, such as open captioning, crawls or scrolls.
These rules will apply regardless of whether the provision of information
regarding an emergency occurs during a regularly scheduled newscast, an
unscheduled break during regular programming, as part of continuing coverage
of a situation, or in any other fashion.
Cable Services Bureau contact: Marcia Glauberman 202-418-7046, TTY 202-
418-7172 Consumer Information Bureau, Disability Rights Office contact:
Meryl S. Icove 202-418-2372, TTY 202-418-1169
[SOURCE: FCC]
(http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Cable/News_Releases/2000/nrcb0009.html)

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley 94720-6000
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"Everything wants to become television" (James Ulmer -- Teletheory)