Re: Communism in FIlm

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Tue, 28 Mar 2000 11:07:54 -0800 (PST)

These ain't around, but there are others (equally, horrifyingly funky) that
are:

Red Menace. (1949)
Directed by R. G. Springsteen. Anti-Communist propaganda in the form of a
story about a disgruntled ex-soldier. When he gets no help from the
Veterans Bureau, he is ripe for the influences of Communists who lead him
down the party line. But he soon meets up with disillusioned party members
who attempt to break out. When released this film caused a sensation with
ts anti-Communist theme. It was a clear sign of the times--McCarthyism in
America.

Red Nightmare
What would happen if the Communists infiltrated a typically small town in the
U.S.? An average American finds out when his wife, children, and friends
reject him for the Soviet system. An example of McCarthy era atmosphere
and ideas. Starring Jack Webb. 30 min.

At 10:22 AM 03/28/2000 -0800, you wrote:
>I am looking to borrow two films from some one. I do not think these have
>ever been available on video. If you know of a source to borrow them (film
>or video) I would appreciate it.

And who could forget:

Angry Red Planet(1959)
Saturday Matinee sci-fi fave follows an expedition to Mars, home of
three-eyed aliens, giant bat/spider monsters, and strange, surrealistic
landscapes. Imaginative use of limited special effects highlight this I.B.
Melchior film; Les Tremayne, Gerald Mohr star. 83 min.


>
>My Son John (1952)
>Directed by
>Leo McCarey
>
>
>I was a Communist for the FBI (1951)
>Directed by
>Gordon Douglas
>________________________________________
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>Director for Media||Robertson Media Center
>Clemons Library||P.O. Box 400710
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>
>
Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley 94720-6000
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"Everything wants to become television" (James Ulmer -- Teletheory)