Television Comedy:
A Bibliography of Books and Articles in the UC Berkeley Libraries












Books
Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual films

Books

Adams, John.
"Yes, Prime Minister: 'The Ministerial Broadcast' (Jonathan Lynn and Anthony Jay): Social Reality and Cosmic Realism in Popular Television Drama." In: British television drama in the 1980s / edited and introduced by George W. Brandt. pp: 62-85 Cambridge [England]; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
Main Stack PN1992.65.B682 1993

Because I tell a joke or two : comedy, politics, and social difference
Edited by Stephen Wagg. London; New York : Routledge, 1998.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.B43 1998

Brook, Vincent
Something ain't kosher here : the rise of the "Jewish" sitcom / Vincent Brook. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2003.
Main Stack PN1992.8.J48.B76 2003

Butsch, Richard
"Five decades and three hundred sitcoms about class and gender." In: Thinking outside the box : a contemporary television genre reader / edited by Gary R. Edgerton and Brian G. Rose. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
Main Stack PN1992.55.T47 2005

Chunovic, Louis.
One foot on the floor : the curious evolution of sex on television from I love Lucy to South Park / Louis Chunovic.New York TV Books, c2000.
Main Stack PN1992.3.U5.C44 2000

Critiquing the sitcom : a reader
Edited by Joanne Morreale. 1st ed. Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 2003. Television series.
Moffitt PN1992.8.C66.C75 2003
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.C75 2003

Eisner, Joel
Television comedy series: an episode guide to 153 TV sitcoms in syndication / by Joel Eisner & David Krinsky. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1984.
UCB Main PN1992.8.C66 E37 1984

Feuer, Jane.
"Genre Study and Television." In: Channels of discourse: television and contemporary criticism / edited by Robert C. Allen. pp: 113-133 Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, c1987.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C7.C481 1987
Moffitt PN1992.8.C7.C48 1987

Feuer, Jane.
"The 'Gay' and 'Queer' Sitcom." In: The television genre book / edited by Glen Creeber; associate editors, Toby Miller and John Tulloch. pp: 70-71. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1992.55.T45 2001

Feuer, Jane.
"Situation Comedy, Part 2." In: The television genre book / edited by Glen Creeber; associate editors, Toby Miller and John Tulloch. pp: 67, 69-70. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1992.55.T45 2001

Gray, Frances (Frances B.)
Women and laughter / Frances Gray. Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 1994. Feminist issues (Charlottesville, Va.)
Main Stack PN1590.W64.G73 1994

Grote, David.
The end of comedy: the sit-com and the comedic tradition / David Grote. Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1983.
UCB Moffitt PN1922 .G76 1983

Hamamoto, Darrell Y.
Nervous laughter: television situation comedy and liberal democratic ideology / Darrell Y. Hamamoto. New York: Praeger, 1989. Series title: Media and society series.
UCB Main PN1992.8.C66 H31 1989

Hartley, John. .
"Situation Comedy, Part 1." In: The television genre book / edited by Glen Creeber; associate editors, Toby Miller and John Tulloch. pp: 65-67.London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1992.55.T45 2001

Haskell, Molly
"Bearded ladies: women in comedy." In: Holding my own in no man's land : women and men, film and feminists / Molly Haskell. New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.H32 1997
Moffitt PN1995.9.W6.H32 1997 p. 197-207.

Heilbronn, Lisa Miriam.
Domesticating social change: the situation comedy as social history / by Lisa Miriam Heilbronn. 1986.
NRLF C 2 928 780

Ibelema, Minabere.
"Identity Crisis: The African Connection in African American Sitcom Characters." In: Sexual politics and popular culture / edited by Diane Raymond. pp: 121-30 Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, c1990.
Educ/Psych HQ1233.S49 1990
Main Stack HQ1233.S49 1990

Jones, Gerard.
Honey, I'm home!: sitcoms, selling the American dream / Gerard Jones. 1st ed. New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1992.
UCB Main PN1992.8.C66 J65 1992
UCB Moffitt PN1992.8.C66 J65 1992

Karlyn, Kathleen Rowe
The unruly woman : gender and the genres of laughter / by Kathleen Rowe. 1st ed. Austin, Tex. : University of Texas Press, 1995. Texas film studies series.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.R65 1995
Moffitt PN1995.9.W6.R65 1995

Koseluk, Gregory
Great Brit-coms : British television situation comedy / Gregory Koseluk. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2000.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.K67 2000

Marc, David.
Comic visions: television comedy and American culture / David Marc. Boston: Unwin Hyman, 1989. Series title: Media and popular culture;.
UCB Moffitt PN1992.8.C66 M35 1989
Table of contents via Google Books

Marc, David.
Demographic vistas: television in American culture / David Marc. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, c1984.
UCB Main PN1992.3.U5 M261 1984
UCB Moffitt PN1992.3.U5 M26 1984 *c2 copies

Marc, David.
"The making of the sitcom, 1961" In: Popular culture in American history / edited by Jim Cullen. Malden, Mass. : Blackwell Publishers, 2001.
Main Stack E161.P66 2001

Marc, David.
Prime time, prime movers: from I love Lucy to L.A. law--America's greatest TV shows and the people who created them / David Marc and Robert J. Thompson. 1st ed. Boston: Little, Brown, c1992 .
UCB Moffitt PN1992.3.U5 M264 1992

Means Coleman, Robin R.
African American viewers and the Black situation comedy: situating racial humor / Robin R. Means Coleman. New York: Garland Pub., 1998. Series title: Studies in African American history and culture.
UCB Main PN1992.8.A34 M43 2000
UCB Main PN1992.8.A34 M43 1998 [an earlier edition]

Mills, Brett.
Television sitcom London : BFI, 2005.
MAIN: PN1992.8.C66 M45 2005

Mitz, Rick.
The great TV sitcom book / by Rick Mitz. New York, N.Y.: R. Marek Publishers, c1980.
UCB Main PN1992.8.C66 M5 1980

Muller, Elsa Christina.
"No Sacred Clowns: Fighting 'Sacred Allergies' in American Self-Images in Soaps and Sitcoms; Selected Papers, 1999 Conference, Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery, March 11-13, 1999." In: Wright, Will, ed. pp: 361-66 The Image of America in Literature, Media, and Society. Pueblo, CO: Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery, University of Southern Colorado, 1999.
Main Stack PN843.S63 1999

Neale, Stephen.
Popular film and television comedy / Steve Neale and Frank Krutnik. London; New York: Routledge, 1990. Series title: Popular fiction series.
UCB Main PN1995.9.C55 N44 1990
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.C55 N44 1990

Nelson, Angela M. S.
"The Objectification of Julia: Texts, Textures, and Contexts of Black Women in American Television Situation Comedies." In: Generations: academic feminists in dialogue / Devoney Looser and E. Ann Kaplan, editors. pp: 237-49 Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, c1997.
Educ/Psych LC197.G446 1997

Palmer, Jerry
The logic of the absurd on film and television comedy / Jerry Palmer. London: BFI Pub., 1987.
UCB Main PN6147 .P341 1987

Rabinovitz, Lauren.
"Ms.-Representation: The Politics of Feminist Sitcoms." In: Television, history, and American culture: feminist critical essays / edited by Mary Beth Haralovich and Lauren Rabinovitz. pp: 144-67 Durham [N.C.]: Duke University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1992.6.T414 1999

Rafkin, Alan
Cue the bunny on the rainbow : tales from TV's most prolific sitcom director Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 1998.
MOFF: PN1992.4.R34 A3 1998

Rowe, John Carlos.
"Metavideo: Fictionality and Mass Culture in a Postmodern Economy." In: Intertextuality and contemporary American fiction / edited by Patrick O'Donnell and Robert Con Davis. pp: 214-235 Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, c1989.
Main Stack PS374.I56.I581 1989

The sitcom reader : America viewed and skewed
Edited by Mary M. Dalton and Laura R. Linder. Albany : State University of New York Press, c2005.
MAIN: PN1991.8.C65 S57 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip054/2004028407.html

Smith, Evan S. (Evan Scott)
Writing television sitcoms / Evan S. Smith. 1st ed. New York : Perigee Books, 1999.
Main Stack PN1992.7.S64 1999

Spangler, Lynn C.
Television women from Lucy to Friends : fifty years of sitcoms and feminism Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
MAIN: PN1995.9.W6 S69 2003

Spigel, Lynn
"From domestic space to outer space: the 1960s fantastic family sit-com." In: Close encounters : film, feminism, and science fiction / Constance Penley ... [et al.], editors. p. 205-35. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1991. Series title: A Camera obscura book.
UCB Main PN1995.9.S26 C57 1991

Staiger, Janet.
Blockbuster TV : must-see sitcoms in the network era / Janet Staiger. New York : New York University Press, c2000.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.S718 2000

Terrace, Vincent
Sitcom factfinder, 1948-1984 / by Vincent Terrace. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2002.
Media Center PN1992.8.C66.T46 2002

Tueth, Michael.
Laughter in the living room : television comedy and the American home audience New York : Peter Lang, c2005.
MAIN: PN1992.8.C66 T84 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0421/2004018131.html

Wolff, Jurgen
Successful sitcom writing : [how to write and sell scripts for TV's hottest format] / Jurgen Wolff with L.P. Ferrante. Rev. ed. New York : St. Martin's Press, 1996.
Moffitt PN1992.8.C66.W64 1996

Journal Articles

Ace, Goodman.
"Of glamour, grammar and good times gone." (gag writing during early days of TV) Television Quarterly v30, n2 (Fall, 1999):11 (4 pages).
"A comedy writer tells what it was like writing jokes for star performers on US network television during the 1950 and 1960s. Personal encounters with Perry Como, Talluah Bankhead and others are discussed."

"African Americans Remain Overrepresented on Television and concentrated in Situation Comedies, UCLA Study Finds." Ascribe Higher Education News Service June 4, 2002 pNA

Auter, Philip J.
Analysis of the ratings for television comedy programs 1950-1959: the end of "Berlesque." (format change from live comedy/variety to situation comedy) Mass Comm Review v17, n3 (Summer, 1990):23 (10 pages).
"This study was designed to look at the audience composition for comedy/variety programs and situation comedies by examining population percentage statistics. Population percentage—one of the earliest demographic breakdown statistics—is the percentage of a program's viewing audience that is either men, women, or children. Children today are audience members younger than the age of 12, but in the 1950s, teens (those between 12 and 17) were included in the children demographic. Anyone 18 or older falls into the categories of men or women today. Eighteen was the cutoff for the men and women categories in the 1950s as well. Data gathered from Arbitron ratings books for the 10 television seasons from 1950 to 1959 were subjected to secondary analysis to determine the average percentage of men, women, and children/teenagers watching comedy/variety and situation comedy programming each season. The data were then examined to determine patterns or trends that may have existed in population percentage growth for a show type. The author found that very little change appears to have occurred for population percentages of comedy/varieties or situation comedies during the 1950s. Both consistently delivered more women viewers than men or children and teenager—except during the 1959 season. Comedy/variety delivered a far greater number of men than children and teenagers during the entire decade." [Communication Abstracts]

Berman, Ronald.
"Sitcoms." The Journal of Aesthetic Education v 21 Spring 1987. p. 5-19.

"Black can be funny." Time v. 93 (March 7 1969) p. 71

Bowman, James.
"Groupthink TV." The New Criterion v 14 Jan 1996. p. 52-6.
"The writer discusses current American television sitcoms and dramas."Groupthink" is of the very essence of television programming; television entertainment is a branch of marketing rather than of art orliterature or drama. Not only are the shows all similar, but they areall alike in particular ways. The programs' makers find out whoadvertisers think is the most desirable audience and then write somethingthat will make that audience feel good and that will give them avicarious pleasure in recognizing someone dealing with the world as theylike to imagine it." [Art Abstracts]

Brownfield, Paul.
"The long goodbye." (the final run of situation comedies)Los Angeles Times (Tue, May 25, 1999):F1, col 2, 35 col in.

Bryant, John.
"Situation Comedy Of The Sixties: The Evolution Of A Popular Genre." Studies in American Humor 1989 7: 118-139.
"Discusses the way television's rural, military, and fantasy situation comedies of the 1960's diverged from the formulaic domestic comedies of the 1950's and examines some of the reasons for the success of the later shows." [America History & Life]

Butsch, Richard
"Class and gender in four decades of television situation comedy: plus ca change...." (Critical Demography) Critical Studies in Mass Communication Dec 1992 v9 n4 p387(13)
Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 1992 Speech Communication Association. "For four decades, the few working-class families portrayed in domestic situation comedies have inverted the gender roles of fathers and mothers, with the men failing as men and the wives filling the vacuum.Series with middle-class families, by contrast, depict fathers as easilymeeting the standard of masculinity." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bunce, Alan.
"Sitcoms: barometer of racial progress." (television situation comedies) (Column) Christian Science Monitor v84, n133 (Thu, June 4, 1992):13, col 4, 11 col in.

Butsch, Richard.
"Class and Gender in Four Decades of Television Situation Comedy: Plus ça Change." Critical Studies in Mass Communication 1992 Dec, 9:4, 387- 99.
Author Abstract: For four decades, the few working-class families portrayed in domestic situation comedies have inverted the gender roles of fathers and mothers, with the men failing as men and the wives filling the vacuum. Series with middle-class families, by contrast, depict fathers as easily meeting the standard of masculinity. COPYRIGHT Speech Communication Association 1992.

Cantor, Muriel G.
"The American family on television: from Molly Goldberg to Bill Cosby." Journal of Comparative Family Studies v22, n2 (Summer, 1991):205 (12 pages).
Author Abstract: This article is about the family (domestic) comedy, one of the most popular and enduring genre on television. The first section concentrates on the background and rationale for studying family life as portrayed in television's domestic comedies; the second follows the evolution of the TV family from Molly Goldberg in the 1940s when television came into American homes to the Nelsons (The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet) and the Stones (The Donna Reed Show) in the 1950s to the Huxtables (The Cosby Show) and Keatons of Family Ties in the 1980s. The focus is on how gender, race, and class have been portrayed over time, and whether the messages, issues, and themes about love and sex have changed and in what ways. After analyzing approximately 40 years of television, the article concludes by noting that the family is not always presented as conflict-free. Family members often make fun of each other; sometimes they deceive each other to get their way; and often interact by putting each other down. However, the family is basically the place where one goes for support, to solve problems that are generated from the outside, and to find solace when needed. COPYRIGHT George Kurian (Canada) 1991.

Carson, Tom.
"Network novelties."Film Comment v 24 Mar/Apr 1988. p. 70-2.
"The "dramady," a new type of television program, is not as innovative as it pretends to be. Shows like The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd, Hooperman, Frank's Place, Beverly Hills Buntz, and The "Slap" Maxwell Story use film and do not have a laugh track, but there is little else that is genuinely new about them. The mixture of laughs and sentiment is merely an inversion of the techniques used by Hill Street Blues and St. Elsewhere, which in turn took their cues from sitcoms like MASH and Mary Tyler Moore. The coercive and the mechanical are so ingrained in network television that any deliberate attempt to avoid them looks spurious. Setting out to do something consciously artistic has never worked well in any other kind of mass-culture art, so it is probably not the best approach to making a network sitcom." [Art Abstracts]

Chaker, Anne Marie.
"A comedy tonight." (television watching survey in California reveals preference for situation comedies) Wall Street Journal (sun, Dec 15, 1998):CA4(E), col 3, 6 col in.

Charney, Leo.
"Television sitcoms." In: Comedy : a geographic and historical guide / edited by Maurice Charney. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2005.
Doe Refe PN6147.C565 2005

Clark, Leroy D.
"The second coming of Amos 'n' Andy." The New Crisis, Jan-Feb 2000 v107 i1 p34(2)
Almost all television comedy portrayals of African Americans perpetuate racial stereotypes. Lampooning stereotypes requires the deft touches of Richard Pryor or Robert Townsend, qualities absent from these shows.

Compton, N.
"TV comedy." Commentary v. 48 (July 1969) p. 18-21

Crotty, Mark.
"Murphy Would Probably Also Win the Election: The Effect of Television as Related to the Portrayal of the Family in Situation Comedies." Journal of Popular Culture,1995 Winter, 29:3, 1-15.
"In response to criticisms of television programming, the author analyzes the media's influence on their viewers' perceptions of the world, discussing the extent and nature of television's impact and focusing on the portrayal of the family in television comedies. From their beginnings in radio, situation comedies have always stressed the value of the family. Far from undermining the importance of families and traditional values, television comedies have tended to confirm their value." [America History & Life]

De Vries, Hilary
"In comedies, signs of a new women's movement; as female TV executives gain more power, a new wave of post-feminist sitcoms created by women gets on the air." The New York Times Feb 25, 2001 pAR19(N) pAR19(L) col 1 (35 col in)

Dugdale, John
"British sitcoms: not much to laugh about." Listener 118:3038 (1987:Nov. 19) 41

Fiddy, Dick
"Laughing in the Isles." (British television comedy) . Television Quarterly Spring 2002 v33 i1 p8(8)

Fouts, Gregory; Inch, Rebecca.
"Homosexuality in TV Situation Comedies: Characters and Verbal Comments." Journal of Homosexuality, 2005, Vol. 49 Issue 1, p35-45, 11p;

Fouts, Gregory; Kimberley Burggraf.
"Television Situation Comedies: Female Weight, Male Negative Comments, and Audience Reactions." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research May 2000 p925 (3286 words)
UC users only

Fouts, Gregory; Kimberley Burggraf.
"Television situation comedies: female body images and verbal reinforcements." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research March 1999 v40 i5-6 p473(9)
UC users only

Free, Marcus.
"From the 'Other' Island to the One with 'No West Side': The Irish in British Soap and Sitcom." Irish Studies Review. 9(2):215-27. 2001 Aug

Freeman, Lewis.
"Social Mobility in Television Comedies." Critical Studies in Mass Communication 1992 Dec, 9:4, 400-406.
UC users only
"A survey of 32 situation comedy programs that aired during 1990-92 shows that social mobility is depicted as the result of self-reliance and sacrifice. Oftentimes, however, the sitcoms portray success as bittersweet and failure as a silver lining, thereby defeating social mobility and reestablishing the status quo." [America History & Life]

Friend, Tad; Michael Fleming, Milton Armitage.
"The stupid guy, the fat guy, the bratty white kid, the cute black kid, the saucy wench, the bitch, the fop, the big furry dog, and the quite dead Chuckles the Clown: sitcoms, seriously." (popularity of situation TV comedies; includes related articles) (Cover Story) Tad Friend, Esquire March 1993 v119 n3 p112(14)
"Viewers love sitcoms for their predictable plots and familiar characters, as these elements provide comfort and companionship. The top comedy series are profiled, and a history of the genre is given. A quiz is included." [Expanded Academic Index]

Friend, Tad.
"The trouble with sitcoms." (situation comedies) New Yorker v76, n25 (Sept 4, 2000):28 (2 pages).
"Situation comedies broadcast on US network television are discussed, with focus on how the name of the program is chosen, and how an inappropriate name will shorten the length of time that a show survives."

Frutkin, Alan
"Television's 23 gay characters." (list of gay characters in popular soap operas and situation comedies) The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) Feb 18, 1997 n727 p30(2)
UC users only
"Twenty-two popular and highly-rated soap operas and situation comedies have their recurring gay characters who add wit and humor to sitcoms as well as tackle sensitive issues in soaps. Even the popular cartoon 'The Simpsons' has a gay character in Waylon Smithers, Montgomery Burn's loyal assistant.' [Expanded Academic Index]

Gardner, Joann.
"Self-Referentiality in Art: A Look at Three Television Situation-Comedies of the 1950s."Studies in Popular Culture, 1988, 11:1, 35-50. Journal of Popular Culture 1976 10(1): 167-180.
"Domestic situation comedies are not products of the age of radio and television, but of the mass audiences provided in the 19th century with the coming of weekly and daily newspapers. Although earlier prototypes can be identified, humorous columns containing all of the essential characteristics of contemporary domestic situation comedies were well established by the late 19th century in such newspapers as the Detroit Free Press and the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Americans laughed at the sketches of the familiar trials of a Mr. Bowser or a Mr. Spoopendyke." [America History & Life]

Gladden, Jack.
"Archie Bunker meets Mr. Spoopendyke: nineteenth-century prototypes for domestic situation comedy." Journal of Popular Culture (10) 1976, 167-80. (1976)

Good, Glenn E., Michael J. Porter, Mark G. Dillon.
"When men divulge: Portrayals of men's self-disclosure in prime time situation comedies." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research June 2002 p419(9)
UC users only
"Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 2002 Plenum Publishing Corporation The media have been widely criticized for promoting unhealthy images of masculinity. To better understand how men are portrayed on television, we analyzed male characters' self-disclosures on television. From the 11 most highly rated situation comedies, 1,320 min of programming were examined, in which 328 incidents of self-disclosure were identified. Results indicated that male characters disclosed an average of once every 4.08 min (5.96 times per 24-min episode), disclosed more often to male than to female characters, and expressed negative emotions more frequently to male than to female characters. Male characters self-disclosed freely and comfortably, and they were moderately emotionally expressive and personally revealing. They typically received somewhat favorable responses from others to their disclosures. However, the demographic characteristics of the characters failed to represent the diversity of U.S. society. Potential implications for television and society are discussed, and directions for future research are suggested." [Expanded Academic Index]

Gray, H.
"Television and the New Black Man - Black-Male Images In Prime-Time Situation Comedy." Media Culture & Society 8 (2): 223-242 Apr 1986
UC users only

Greenberg, James.
"Sitcom writing: riches plus respectability." (situation comedies) New York Times v139, sec2 (Sun, August 5, 1990):H27(N), H27(L), col 1, 43 col in.

Grenier, Cynthia.
"Bring on the Clones: Twenty-something Shows Run Amok." World and I v14, n4 (April, 1999):124.
"Television programming has reached a low point in creativity by using the same formula, and sometimes the same actors, for new shows. The majority of programs are aimed at the youth market, and sacrifice complex life experiences for trendy issues and topics. This thematic repetition is also perceptible in other media such as magazines.

Haggins, Bambi L.
"There's No Place Like Home: The American Dream, African-American Identity, and the Situation Comedy." Velvet Light Trap, 1999 Spring, 43, 23-36.
"Television situation comedies of the 1980's and 1990's, such as The Cosby Show, Family Ties, Living Single, and Friends, show that the genre remains bound to the mythos of the American Dream - now extended to include African Americans - and the notion that the failure to achieve it is a matter of individual responsibility." [America History & Life]

Hammer, Joshua
"Must blacks be buffoons? Bill Cosby and others blast how sitcoms depict African-American life." Newsweek Oct 26, 1992 v120 n17 p70(2)
"Although there are more television situation comedies featuring black actors than ever before, the images they project are stereotypic and negative. Several programs and the stereotypes they use are described." [Expanded Academic Index]

Hanke, Robert.
"The "mock-macho" situation comedy: hegemonic masculinity and its reiteration." Western Journal of Communication v62, n1 (Wntr, 1998):74 (20 pages).
UC users only"Examines how the TV sitcoms, Home Improvement and Coach play off the stereotypes of conventional masculinity in order to describe how these texts work to reiterate hegemonic masculinity. The analysis focuses on how the "mock-macho" sitcom takes masculinity as an object of its own discourse and induces pleasure in the realization of masculinity as a gender performance. This study suggests some of the features and complexities of this discursive strategy and draws on J. Butler's (1990) concept of "gender parody" to theorize mock-macho gender performances and their comic effectivity. The essay concludes with an assessment of the ambivalent gender politics of mock-macho." [PsychInfo]

Haralovich, Mary Beth.
"Sitcoms and Suburbs: Positioning the 1950s Homemaker." Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 1989, 11:1, 61-83.

Harris, Joanne
"Why not just laugh? Making fun of ourselves on television." (portrayals of African Americans in situation comedies) American Visions April-May 1993 v8 n2 p38(4)
"African American scriptwriters for TV comedies feel they have to combat both Hollywood's perpetuation of Black caricatures and a shortage of opportunities for Black writers in the television industry. Profiles of the more successful writers are provided." [Expanded Academic Index]

Healy, Murray
"Were we being served? Homosexual representation in popular British comedy." Screen v 36 Autumn 1995. p. 243-56
"Part of a special section on gender identity in motion pictures. The writer refutes the largely undisputed assumption that all homosexual characters in popular British comedy of the 1960s and 1970s functioned only as figures of heterosexist containment, marginalizing homosexual identity through derision. Although the representations of gay men featured in the Carry On film series and the situation comedy Are You Being Served? were not confrontational or challenging, they were not oppressive, outright demonizations either. These men were speaking from within--and under the cover of--the dominant." [Art Abstracts]

Hicks, Jeffrey Alan
"Television theme songs: a content analysis." (twenty songs from situation comedies) Popular Music and Society Spring 1992 v16 n1 p13(8)
"Television theme songs represent what ideas viewers are consuming while watching TV, because music instructs and re-enforces the shared values of society. Four recurring themes were detected in the songs analysed: moving to a better life, fairy tales or fantasies, a view that all things can be achieved, and the idea that people need others to get along. The themes from 'The Jeffersons' and 'In Living Color' illustrate the 'moving on up' theme of a better life. 'The Golden Girls' and 'Cheers' themes are examples of the people-need-people theme." [Expanded Academic Index]

Holbert, Lance R.; Dhavan V. Shah; Noijin Kwak.
"Political implications of prime-time drama and sitcom use: Genres of representation and opinions concerning women's rights." Journal of Communication, March 2003 v53 i1 pNA
UC users only
The authors, using hierarchical regression, found three forms of television programming (traditional drama, progressive drama and situation comedy) that retain statistically significant, unique relationships with opinions concerning women's rights.

Homans, Peter.
"Psychology and Popular Culture: Psychological Reflections On M*A*S*H." Journal of Popular Culture 1983 17(3): 3-21.
"Employs the concepts of "psychological modernism" and "psychological traditionalism" in an analysis of "politically-toned situation comedy." M*A*S*H, along with the earlier All in the Family and the Mary Tyler Moore Show, provided their audiences with situations in which the ambivalent role of tradition in contemporary life was worked out." [America History & Life]

Hontz, Jenny.
"Genre-Ation Gap Hits Sitcoms." (Younger Audiences Are Not Watching situation comedies)(Brief Article) Variety v374, n10 (April 26, 1999):25 (1 page).

Housham, David; Feldman, Marty.
"Prime Time."Sight and Sound, 1994 Mar, 4:3, 10-13.

Hudes, Karen.
"It's the sitcom cartoons that have character." (cartoon characters in 'The Simpsons' and characters in 'Third Rock From the Sun' are more complex than the characters in 'Ally McBeal' and 'Dharma and Greg') New York Times v147, sec2 (Sun, March 8, 1998):AR36(N), AR36(L), col 1, 24 col in

Imberg, Bernard M. .
"What's so funny?" (television comedies). Television Quarterly 35.1 (Fall 2004): p20-25.
The powerful effect of television comedy on politics is presented. Arguments are discussed regarding the credibility of newscasters, which is being dimmed by that of comedy commentators.

James, Caryn.
"Playing prime time close to the shtick." (comedians on television situation comedies; includes related article) New York Times v140, sec2 (Sun, Feb 24, 1991):H27(N), col 1, 17 col in.

Jordan, Amy.
"The Portrayal of Children on Prime-Time Situation Comedies." Journal of Popular Culture, 1995 Winter, 29:3, 139-47.
UC users only
"An analysis of prime-time situation comedies shows that there has been a change in portrayed behavior between adults and children. Programs with children as main characters, such as 'Growing Pains' and 'The Cosby Show,' were used as samples. The 59 child characters examined indicate that interactions between adults and children are more positive than those between children themselves. Children turn to adults for direction and advice, but adults are more likely to confide in children than vice-versa." [Expanded Academic Index]

Klumas, Amy L.; Marchant, Thomas.
"Images of Men in Popular Sitcoms." Journal of Men's Studies 1994 Feb, 2:3, 269-85.

Konstan, David.
"The Premises of Comedy: Functions of Dramatic Space in an Ancient and Modern Form." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 1988 Winter, 15:4, 180-190.

Krassner, Paul.
"Life sure is dumb on the planet of the sitcoms." (analysis of situation comedies on TV) Los Angeles Times v102, secC (Sun, Oct 9, 1983):5, col 1, 57 col in.

Kutulas, Judy
"Do I look like a chick?": men, women, and babies on sitcom maternity stories." (TV and American Culture) American Studies Summer 1998 v39 n2 p13(20)
"Portrayals of maternity stories in television situation comedies in the US have evolved as attitudes towards pregnancy and childbirth have changed within society as a whole. Men are now portrayed as being actively involved when their partner gives birth, but are often seen as uncomfortable in this role, a reflection of tensions within modern society between women who have changed as a result of the women's movement and men who have not. Maternity stories often serve a comic purpose in situation comedies, and also show how society contextualizes women's events and how culture regards the responsibilities of men and women with regard to babies." [Expanded Academic Index]

LaFia, Christine.
"'Superwoman' in Television Situation Comedies of the 1980s." Studies in Popular Culture, 1988, 11:2, 78-90.

Larson, Mary Strom.
"Sibling Interactions In 1950s Versus 1980s Sitcoms: A Comparison." Journalism Quarterly 1991 68(3): 381-387.
"A comparison of how children interact with their brothers and sisters on such 1950's situation comedy television programs as Leave It To Beaver and Father Knows Best with those on such 1980's programs as The Cosby Show and Family Ties finds that children interacted more positively in the early period but were important and central - if more conflictual - to the main story action in the 1980's. Drawing on Bandura's social learning theory the study speculates on what is learned by children watching and whether these program changes reflect changes in television production or changes in society." [America History & Life]

Lentz, Kirsten Marthe.
"Quality versus Relevance: Feminism, Race, and the Politics of the Sign in 1970s Television." Camera Obscura 2000 Jan, 43, 45-93.
UC users only

Long, Rob.
"Three cheers." (TV situation comedy 'Cheers' never tried to raise viewer consciousness) National Review v45, n11 (June 7, 1993):62 (2 pages).
The final episode of 'Cheers' that took place May 20, 1993 deserves all of the attention and public tribute it is receiving. This was a TV series that remained faithful to its sole objective for 11 years: to entertain viewers rather than to preach values to its audience.

Lusane, Clarence
"Assessing the disconnect between Black and white television audiences: the race, class, and gender politics of Married. . . with children." Journal of Popular Film and Television v 27 no1 Spring 1999. p. 12-20
"The writer considers what accounts for Married...With Children's popularity among African-Americans, revealing that this show was the one "white" show that consistently appeared in the top ten shows watched by black audiences. With a predominantly white cast and humor that is only occasionally social or political, this show posits a comedy situation where the nuclear family is not privileged, cynicism is celebrated, class oppression is omnipresent, and opportunities are elusive. Such a conception of entertainment appeals to the black community that has already recognized that everything is not right in contemporary America. Furthermore, the show's executive producer until 1996 was Michael Moye, an African-American writer and producer who started out working on the black sitcoms of the 1970s and 1980s and whose instincts are in tune to the insult-driven humor that is popular in the black community." [Art Abstracts]

Mainil, Jean.
"Hijacking National Identities in French Sitcoms: Stereotypes and Gay Performance in Les filles d'a cote (or, Why the Academie francaise Should Watch Sitcoms on TF1)." Paragraph. 18(1):25-38. 1995 Mar

Marc, David.
"Comic Visions Of The City: New York And The Television Sitcom." Radical History Review 1988 (42): 49-63.
"Reviews the rise and decline of racial, ethnic, and gender depictions in television situation comedies set in New York City or its surroundings from the 1940's to the 1980's. Ethnic humor was a prominent feature in vaudeville and radio broadcasts during the 1920's-30's. In the 1950's, McCarthyite pressure on the television networks resulted in programs geared to a more stereotypical white Anglo-Saxon Protestant "American" look, such as Father Knows Best and Leave It to Beaver. This "whitebread period" in television history, from 1955 to 1971, resulted in the featuring of few ethnic and racial minorities in programs. The "American" look depicted the great American dream: a house in the suburbs and an automobile. This scenario was more plausible to mainstream society than programs showing the wealthy in their Park Avenue duplexes with live-in servants." [America History & Life]

Marc, David.
"The sitcom sensibility; TV suburbomythology: why we loved Lucy, what Father really knew best." (situation comedy, "I Love Lucy,""Father Knows Best") (column) Washington Post v112 (Sun, June 25, 1989):B1, col 1, 47 col in.

Mayerle, Judine.
"The Most Inconspicuous Hit On Television: A Case Study Of Newhart." Journal of Popular Film and Television 1989 17(3): 100-112.
"A behind-the-scenes look at the 1980's television program Newhart reveals the production components of a successful television situation comedy."

McBride, Allan.
"Television, individualism, and social capital." PS: Political Science & Politics, Sept 1998 v31 n3 p542(11)
UC users only
"Television has been accused of eroding social and political capital with its focus on characters and stories that serve to undermine group attachments as well as social and political commitment. Analyses of top 20 entertainment programs and of crime-drama programming were conducted to find evidence of significant political culture values. Cultural bias as represented by individualism was found to be most prevalent in situation comedies, given their emphasis on conflicts that predominantly involve individuals and the solution of these through individual effort." [Expanded Academic Index]

McEachern, Charmaine.
"Comic interventions: passion and the men's movement in the situation comedy, 'Home Improvement'". Journal of Gender Studies v8, n1 (March, 1999):5 (14 pages).
The author argues the television program 'Home Improvement' may be seen as a discourse between authenticity and male passion. How leaders of the men's movement link cultural constructions of masculinity is explored.

McPherson, Tara.
"Disregarding romance and refashioning femininity: getting down and dirty with the Designing Women." Camera Obscura no32 Sept 1993/Jan 1994. p. 102-23.

Medhurst, Andy.
"Funny games." Sight and Sound ns10 no11 Nov 2000. p. 28-31.
" In the 1980s, radical humorists became a television necessity in Britain, encouraged by the then new Channel 4. The station allowed innovation to flourish and gave time, space, and money to relatively untried new talent. The station's most important comedy series of the decade was Saturday Night Live, which represented the culmination of alternative comedy in several ways. The show was flawed and fractured, but it had a profound influence. It brought overtly political stand-up comedy into broadcast prominence, led to the subsequent explosion of comedy clubs across Britain, and nurtured an entire seedbed of nascent talent. Ben Elton was the central iconic figure in the public memory of the program and imbued the series with a leftist aura of establishment-baiting radicalism. It cleared a space for comedy to be young and sexy and asserted the right of comedians to challenge as well as conform. Its benefits are still being enjoyed." [Art Abstracts]

Mills, Brett.
"Comedy Verite: Contemporary Sitcom Form." Screen. 45 (1): 63-78. 2004 Spring.
" During the past decade or so, the sitcom has started to develop and mutate in a manner that necessitates a reappraisal of the accepted understandings of the sitcom form. In recent years, the conventional sitcom has been repeatedly challenged as the makers of programs have started to abandon some of the genre's most obvious conventions, replacing them with the formal traits of other, distinct genres. In this manner, the distinction between the ways in which the comedic and the serious are conventionally indicated have started to be deconstructed, and this has happened in a way that explicitly questions television's role in establishing such a distinction. Britain's most critically acclaimed new sitcom, The Office, represents the apotheosis of this new type, with the intentional use of other television forms not only providing new ground for the genre, but also resulting in a program that complicates conventional genre divisions and, by extension, derives its comic material from debates about the nature of performance and representation within the media." [Art Index]

Mintz, Lawrence E.
"Ideology in the Television Situation Comedy." Studies in Popular Culture, 1985, 8:2, 42-51.

"More Than Yuks Redux: Facing a slump in the sitcom genre, some producers are taking new series off the beaten laugh track." (The Arts/Television)(Industry Overview) Time v157, n10 (March 12, 2001):87+.

Montemurro, Beth
"Not a laughing matter: sexual harassment as "material" on workplace-based situation comedies." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research (May 2003): p433(13). (9485 words)

Morowitz, Laura.
"From Gauguin To Gilligan's Island." Journal of Popular Film and Television 1998 26(1): 2-10.
"Although pitched to the popular level, the television situation comedy Gilligan's Island (1964-66) dealt with significant "themes of progress and primitivism, imperialism and escape," reflecting a large-scale desire to escape from Western civilization. The program also epitomizes the role of television in society as a means of escape." [America History & Life]

Moss, Robert F.
"The shrinking life span of the black sitcom; since 'The Cosby Show,' black comedies haven't crossed over, and the major networks have turned away from them." The New York Times Feb 25, 2001 pAR19(N) pAR19(L) col 1 (35 col in)

"No time for comedy: censoring situation comedies for family time consumption."Time v. 106 (August 25 1975) p. 42+

O'Connor, John J.
"Situation comedies in need of new situations." New York Times v132, sec2 (Sun, Feb 13, 1983):H33(N), H33(L), col 1, 21 col in.

Olson, Beth; William Douglas.
"The family on television: evaluation of gender roles in situation comedy." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research March 1997 v36 n5-6 p409(19)
UC users only
"This study investigated whether television domestic comedies' depictions of gender roles within the family have changed in the past 40 years. Ten domestic comedies were selected based on their popularity and the inclusion of siblings. These series were divided into two groups - pre and post 1984, given the time span covered by the series and the series' setting. College students screened three representative episodes and made subsequent judgments on the portrayals of similarity, equality, and dominance, family satisfaction and family stability in the spousal, sibling, and familial relationships. Results indicated the depictions of gender roles fluctuated throughout the period, with peaks in satisfaction and stability ratings in the 1950s and mid-1980s. More recent domestic comedies contained less positive depictions, specifically displaying more dominance and less satisfaction and stability. Subjects reported families that were more distressed were less desirable and less like their own." [Expanded Academic Index]

O'Connor, John J.
"This Jewish mom dominates TV, too." (stereotypes and caricatures continue on modern situation comedies) (Living Arts Pages) The New York Times Oct 14, 1993 v143 pB2(N) pC20(L) col 1 (15 col in)

Oliver, Charles
"Family affairs: fashions in family sitcoms swing between nasty and nice." Reason July 1994 v26 n3 p58(2)
" The themes in family situation comedies have not significantly changed. Although shows have evolved from dealing with pure family matters to those thatconcern social and political issues, these shows still portray the family as important and loving with the parents as the ultimate authorities." [Expanded Academic Index]

Olson, Beth; Douglas, William
"The family on television: Evaluation of gender roles in situation comedy." Sex Roles. Vol 36(5-6), Mar 1997, pp. 409-427

Parks, Lisa.
"Watching the 'Working Gals': Fifties Sitcoms and the Repositioning of Women in Postwar American Culture." Critical Matrix 1999, 11:2, 42-66.

Plasketes, George M.
"The Invisible Artist: Lorne Michaels, the Television Comedy Writer in Contrasting Production Environments." Journal of Popular Film and Television 16:1 (1988:Spring) 22

Pope, Kyle.
"Single fathers are TV fodder as sitcoms imitate life." (several new situation comedies deal with single fathers) Wall Street Journal, n198 (Fri, Oct 3, 1997):B1(W), B1(E), col 3, 24 col in.

Potter, W. James; Ron Warren.
"Humor as camouflage of televised violence." Journal of Communication Spring 1998 v48 n2 p40(18)
" The observation that violence presented in comedy television programs are considered to be of minor impact by viewers was investigated. The schema theory which argues that people develop their interpretations of the social environment was used. Results indicated that the rate of violence, particularly the verbalized ones, is very high on comedy television programs. However, this rate is mainly due to large numbers of acts which are relatively trivial forms of violence." [Expanded Academic Index]

Press, Andrea; Strathman, Terry.
"Work, Family, and Social Class in Television Images of Women: Prime-Time Television and the Construction of Postfeminism." Women and Language, 1993 Fall, 16:2, 7-15.

Rabinovitz, Lauren, 1950-
"Sitcoms and single moms: representations of feminism on American TV." Cinema Journal v 29 Fall 1989. p. 3-19.

Rabinowitz, Dorothy.
"Watching the Sitcoms." Commentary 1975 60(4): 69-71.
"The recent television shows Americans like most are CBS's Saturday night situation comedies. These include "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "All in the Family," "The Jeffersons," and "The Bob Newhart Show." In the new breed of situation comedy, writers and performers are required not as much to sustain a plot line as to render social types; "to satirize, rather than to tell a story." The audience must know enough to recognize the types. "There is comfort as well as fun" in these shows, which tell us "that it is for our faults we are loved, really, not in spite of them." [Art Abstracts]

Reep, Diana; Dambrot, Faye
"TV Parents: Fathers (and now Mothers) Know Best." Journal of Popular Culture; Fall94, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p13-23, 11p
UC users only

Rohter, Larry.
"Sitcoms with not much in common." (British, U.S. television writers, directors compare cultural differences in situation comedies) (Living Arts Pages)New York Times v140 (Wed, Oct 31, 1990):B4(N), C22(L), col 1, 21 col in.

Roome, Dorothy.
"Humor as "cultural reconciliation" in South African situation comedy: 'Suburban Bliss' and multicultural female viewers." Journal of Film and Video v51, n3-4 (Fall, 1999):61 (27 pages).
The South African situation comedy 'Suburban Bliss' attracted black viewers by portraying middle class white and black families. Avoiding poverty meant avoiding failure and the mistakes of apartheid.

Rosenkoetter, Lawrence I.
"The television situation comedy and children's prosocial behavior." Journal of Applied Social Psychology v29, n5 (May, 1999):979 (1 page).
Author Abstract: "The moral lessons of television situation comedies were explored as possible contributors to children's prosocial development. In order to determine if children comprehend the moral lessons of adult sitcoms, children in small groups watched sitcoms and then were individually interviewed to determine if they comprehended the moral lesson. An overwhelming majority of 1st, 3rd, and 5th graders understood moral lessons contained in an episode of The Cosby Show. Similarly, one third of the 1st graders and half of the 3rd graders were able to identify an overarching moral lesson in an episode of Full House. Finally, a correlational analysis was undertaken between the frequency with which the children viewed prosocial sitcoms and the frequency of their prosocial behavior. As anticipated, viewing emerged as a predictor variable, particularly for those subjects who evidenced understanding of the moral lessons of sitcoms." COPYRIGHT 1999 V.H. Winston & Son Inc. [Expanded Academic Index]

Rust, Michael
"Laughs, culture, yadda, yadda." (Nation: Comedy)(Cover Story) Insight on the News, June 8, 1998 v14 n21 p18(3)
UC users only

Saltzman, Joe
"The Agony and the Ecstasy: Live Television Comedy." USA Today 116:2510 (1987:Nov.) 90

Sanneh, Kelefa,
"Black in the Box: In defense of African American television." Transition - Volume 10, Issue 4 2001
UC users only

Scharrer, Erica.
"From Wise to Foolish: The Portrayal of the Sitcom Father, 1950s-1990s." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 45.1 (Wntr 2001): p23. (8819 words)
Author Abstract: "An exploratory content analysis of family-oriented sitcoms shows modern television fathers and working class television fathers are more likely to be portrayed foolishly than fathers of the past or fathers of higher socioeconomic classes. A sample of long-running and top rated domestic sitcoms from the 1950s through the 1990s is examined. A theoretical argument is made that the portrayal of sitcom fathers can be linked to changing social climates in which certain jokes become "fair game."" COPYRIGHT 2001 Broadcast Education Association.

Schmitz, Neil.
"Humor's Body: Jackie Gleason, Roseanne, and Some Others." Arizona Quarterly 2000 Summer, 56:2, 97-109.

Scodari C
"Possession, Attraction, And The Thrill Of The Chase - Gendered Myth-Making In Film And Television Comedy Of The Sexes."Critical Studies in Mass Communication 12 (1): 23-39 Mar 1995
"Examines articulations of "egalitarian" courtship in romantic comedy films of the 1930s and 1940s and recent television series resurrecting their conventions. Gauges the extent to which such texts are open to a negotiated reading that recontextualizes heterosexual monogamy in anarchic rather than patriarchal terms. Suggests that the television versions constrain this negotiated reading." [ERIC]

Shayon, R.L.
"Julia: breakthrough or letdown? first family-type situation comedy about Negroes." Saturday Review v. 51 (April 20 1968) p. 49

Sobel, Robert
"Changing tastes, more individual viewing blamed for decline of situation comedies on network TV." Television-Radio Age June 25, 1984 v31 p38(5)

Stark, Steven D.
"Is canned laughter a joke?" (television situation comedies eliminating audience laughter) New York Times v137, sec2 (Sun, Jan 3, 1988):H23(N), H23(L), col 1, 25 col in.

Stein, Benjamin J.
"TV land: from Mao to Dow." (situation comedy writers have changed since the 1970's from anti-establishment to establishment and no longer write politically-charged shows)(Column) Wall Street Journal (Wed, Feb 5, 1997):A18(W), A18(E), col 3, 18 col in.

Tidhar C. E.; Peri, S.
"Deceitful Behaviour In Situation Comedy - Effects On Childrens Perception Of Social Reality."Journal Of Educational Television, 1990, V16 N2:61-76.

Tomashoff, Craig.
"When sitcoms had magic: the high-concept era; today, the networks want to know how 'real' a series will be; in the 60's, no situation was too unreal to be turned into comedy." New York Times, sec0 (Sun, Sept 17, 2000):AR25(N), AR25(L), col 1, 35 col in.

Tueth, Michael V.
"Fun City: TV's Urban Situation Comedies of the 1990s." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 2000 Fall, 28:3, 98-107.
UCB users only
"Changes in the structure and settings of television sitcoms in the 1990s raises questions about changes in the values of U.S. viewers. Television situation comedies of the 1990s have moved almost all of their most popular characters into identifiable urban settings. The flexibility of the family structures and relationships portrayed by 1990s sitcoms encourages diversity and tolerance in contrast to the older model of a monolithic nuclear family. Furthermore, they no longer rely on wacky housewives or mischievous kids for comic adventures, showing that adults are capable of getting into trouble on their own in what is a confusing and risky urban culture. Ultimately, the conflicts of 1990s sitcoms do not need to be resolved with parental wisdom or spousal forgiveness; instead, the comic situations are allowed to remain exasperating and confused in accordance with the overall indeterminacy and unpredictability of modern city life." [Art Abstracts]

Wexman Vw
"Returning From The Moon Gleason,Jackie, The Carnivalesque, And Television Comedy."Journal Of Film and Video 42 (4): 20-32 Win 1990

Whissell, Cynthia
"Using an emotional compass to describe the emotional tone of situation comedies." (Objective Analysis of Text, part 2) Psychological Reports April 1998 v82 n2 p643(4)
Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 1998 Psychological Reports "Transcripts for episodes from 9 situation comedies (roughly 27,000 words in total) were scored by the program TEXT.NLZ in terms of emotional tone. To promote ease of interpretation scores for the dimensions of pleasantness and activation were depicted as vectors in a normative emotional space. Both numerical and figural representations of the data indicated that the words used in situation comedies were pleasant and mildly active, with small differences occurring between comedies. The emotional characteristics of situation comedies stood out in comparison to those of several other texts depicted in the same emotional space." [Expanded Academic Index]

White, Rob
"Decent proposals." (dealing with homosexuality on television) Sight and Sound, Jan 2002 v12 i1 p5(1)
Issues concerning the portrayal of homosexuality on UK television are discussed. Situation comedys often include openly gay men and women who have strong relationships with straight people

Wolff, Rick.
"The Flying Nun And Post-Vatican Ii Catholicism." Journal of Popular Film and Television 1991 19(2): 72-80.
A television situation comedy that ran on the ABC network from 1967 to 1970, The Flying Nun reflected developments in the American Catholic Church brought about by the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), especially the conflict between reformers and traditionalists." America History & Life]

Zoglin, Richard
"Friends and layabouts." (television situation comedies) Time March 20, 1995 v145 n11 p74(1)
UC users only
"A new wave of sitcoms seems to be built around people who spend much of their time sitting around, talking, and apparently doing little else. 'Ellen' and 'Pig Sty' are two examples, with perhaps the most blatant example being 'Friends.'" [Expanded Academic Index]

Zoglin, Richard
"Home is where the venom is; domestic life takes a drubbing in TV's anti-familysitcoms." ("Married ... With Children", "Roseanne", "The Simpsons") Time April 16, 1990 v135 n16 p85(2)

Individual Programs

All In the Family

All in the family: a critical appraisal
Edited by Richard P. Adler. New York, N.Y.: Praeger, 1979.
UCB Main PN1992.77 .A4

Buckley, William F., Jr.
"On the Right - The Laughter of Archie Bunker." (appreciation of legendary character and actor who portrayed him)(Brief Article) National Review v53, n14 (July 23, 2001):NA.

Campbell, Sean
The sitcoms of Norman Lear Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2007.
MAIN: PN1992.8.C66 C36 2007
MOFF: PN1992.8.C66 C36 2007; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip071/2006030950.html

Eschholz, Paul A. and Rosa, Alfred F.
"Bunkerisms: Archie's Suppository Remarks In All In The Family." Journal of Popular Culture 1972 6(2): 271-278

Gladden, Jack.
"Archie Bunker Meets Mr. Spoopendyke: 19th Century Prototypes For Domestic Situation Comedy."
The manipulation of language in the television comedy All in the Family (1971-72) serves to undermine the bigotry expressed by the character Archie Bunker. Journal of Popular Culture 10 (1): 167-180 1976

Lentz, Kirsten Marthe.
"Quality versus Relevance: Feminism, Race, and the Politics of the Sign in 1970s Television." Camera Obscura 2000 Jan, 43, 45-93.UC users only

Peyser, Marc.
"America's Beloved Bigot: Carroll O'Connor Aug. 2, 1924-June 21, 2001." (Obituary) Newsweek (July 2, 2001):53.

Robinson, Eric.
"Archie Bunker: American Folk Hero?" Wittenberg Review 1990 Spring, 1:1, 77-94.

Shapiro, Marianne.
"The Semiotics of Archie Bunker." Ars Semeiotica PA 1980, 3, 159-80.

Showalter, Dennis E.
"Archie Bunker, Lenny Bruce, And Ben Cartwright: Taboo-Breaking And Character Identification In All In The Family." Journal of Popular Culture 1975 9(3): 618-621.
"All in the Family" reflects two major trends in popular entertainment: shock value - taboos exist to be broken - and the mellowing of characters and relationships in a television series over several years.

Staiger, Janet.
"All in the Family." In: Blockbuster TV : must-see sitcoms in the network era New York : New York University Press, c2000.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.S718 2000
Contents: Introduction -- The Beverly Hillbillies -- All in the Family -- Laverne & Shirley -- The Cosby Show.

Tate, Eugene D. and Surlin, Stuart H.
"Agreement With Opinionated Tv Characters Across Cultures." Journalism Quarterly 1976 53(2): 199-203.
"Uses survey research techniques to show that Canadian adults find less humor and realism in the television show All in the Family than US adults. Both American and Canadian adults exhibiting high levels of dogmatism agree significantly more with the views of Archie Bunker. Concludes that people in a foreign culture identify more with an opinionated TV character when they possess the same social and psychological characteristics. The results are based on surveys of 276 adults each in Athens, Georgia, and in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan." [America History and Life]

Vidmar, Neil and Rokeach, Milton.
"Archie Bunker's Bigotry: A Study In Selective Perception And Exposure." Journal of Communication 1974 24(1): 36-47.
Questions whether television's "All in the Family" reinforces or reduces racial and ethnic prejudice.

Wander, Philip.
"Counters In The Social Drama: Some Notes On "All In The Family."" Journal of Popular Culture 1974: 602-607.8(3)
Examines the characters and plot of "All in the Family" and inspects the character of the program as it both reflects and belies American society during the 1970's.

Ally McBeal

Ally McBeal Tackles TV's Biggest Taboo: Interracial Love.(television program)(Brief Article)
Jet v95, n13 (March 1, 1999):62.

Braxton, Greg.
"Colorblind or just plain blind?" (portrayal of biracial romance on the show 'Ally McBeal') Los Angeles Times (Tue, Feb 9, 1999):F1, col 6, 33 col in.

Chambers, Veronica.
"How would Ally do it?" (the 'Ally McBeal' television program) Newsweek v131, n9 (March 2, 1998):58 (3 pages).
"The 'Ally McBeal' television show, starring Calista Flockhart, is one of the hits of the 1997-1998 season, winning Golden Globe Awards for best comedy series and best actresses. After only 13 episodes, the program is being hailed by some as the successor to the 'Mary Tyler Moore Show.'." [Magazine Index]

Collins, James.
"Ally McBeal." (television program reviews) Time v150, n20 (Nov 10, 1997):117 (1 page).

Crouse-Dick, Christine E.
"She designed: deciphering messages targeting women in commercials aired during Ally McBeal." Women and Language Spring 2002 v25 i1 p18(11)

Brenda Cooper, Edward C. Pease.
""Don't want no Short People 'round here": confronting heterosexism's intolerance through comic and disruptive narratives in Ally McBeal." (Critical Essay) Western Journal of Communication Summer 2002 v66 i3 p300(19)

Dowd, Maureen.
"Pass the Midol." (the television show 'Ally McBeal' and changes in male and female work roles)(Column)New York Times v147 (Wed, April 15, 1998):A27(L), A25(N), col 5, 16 col in.

Dubrofsky, R.
"Ally McBeal as Postfeminist Icon: The Aestheticizing and Fetishizing of the Independent Working Woman." The Communication Review, 1 January 2002, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 264-284(21)

Durbin, Karen.
"Razor thin, but larger than life." (television show Ally McBeal and feminism) New York Times (sun, Dec 20, 1998):AR39(L), col 1, 21 col in.

Epstein, Michael M.
"Breaking the celluloid ceiling: Ally McBeal and the women attorneys who paved her way." (Ally McBeal television show starring Calista Flockhart) Television Quarterly v30, n1 (Wntr, 1999):28 (12 pages).
"The comedy-drama Ally McBeal is successful because it breaks the stereotype of a female attorney confronting the law. Instead it portrays females attorneys as empowered and co-equal, but also blurs the public and private emotional life of its characters. In the end, it is her relationships with others that mean more than the applications of law. Ally McBeal is compared with the gender-equal series The Young Lawyers and Storefront Lawyers." [Magazine Index]

Goldsmith, Olivia.
"Word-perfect women: out of the mouths of babes; sure, Dharma and Ally are scrumptious blondes; but have male viewers fallen for them or for the writers who created them?" (popularity among male viewers of situation comedies 'Dharma and Greg' and 'Ally McBeal' and their female stars). New York Times v147, sec2 (Sun, Dec 7, 1997):AR39(N), AR39(L), col

Heywood, Leslie.
"Hitting a cultural nerve: another season of 'Ally McBeal.'" Chronicle of Higher Education v45, n2 (Sept 4, 1998):B9 (1 page).
"The television program 'Ally McBeal' has stimulated a cultural nerve with some critics. The show has been criticized for its "postfeminist" content and many critics believe it is not realistic. Some supporters, however, feel that focusing on male-female power relationships in certain ways neutralizes the feminist critique by making the ideas sound silly." [Magazine Index]

James, Caryn.
"Ally McBeal: The Inmates." (Living Arts Pages) (television program reviews)New York Times v147 (Mon, April 27, 1998):B5(N), E5(L), col 1, 20 col in.

Jefferson, Margo.
"You want to slap Ally McBeal, but do you like her?" (TV program Ally McBeal) Wall Street Journal (Wed, March 18, 1998):B2(N), E2(L), col 3, 30 col in.

Kaiser, David Aram; Kaiser, Jo Ellen Green.
"Ally McBeal." (television program) (television program reviews) Tikkun v13, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1998):72 (1 page).

Katz, Alyssa.
"Ally McBeal." (television program reviews) Nation v265, n20 (Dec 15, 1997):36 (3 pages).

Marek, Joan Gershen.
"'The Practice' and 'Ally McBeal': a new image for women lawyers on television." Journal of American Culture v22, n1 (Spring, 1999):77 (8 pages).
"This article analyzes the depiction of women lawyers on television. The author maintains that while television shows in the past, such as 'L.A. Law,' portrayed female lawyers as incompetent or lesser professionals than their white male counterparts, shows such as 'Ally McBeal' and 'The Practice' are offering a refreshing and realistic image of women in the profession of law." [Magazine Index]

Marin, Rick; Chambers, Veronica.
"Ally McBeal." (television program reviews) Newsweek v130, n15 (Oct 13, 1997):71 (1 page).

McKenna, S.E.
"The Queer Insistence of Ally McBeal: Lesbian Chic, Postfeminism, and Lesbian Reception." The Communication Review, 1 January 2002, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 285-314(30)

Moseley, Rachel; Read, Jacinda
""Having it Ally": Popular television (post-)feminism." Feminist Media Studies, V. 2, NO. 2, JULY, pp. 231-249, 2002
UC users only

Newman, Kathleen.
"The Problem That Has a Name: Ally McBeal and the Future of Feminism."Colby Quarterly, 2000 Dec, 36:4, 319-24.

Nochimson, Martha P.
"Ally McBeal Brightness Falls from the Air."(Review) (television program review) Film Quarterly v53, n3 (Spring, 2000):25.

Nunan, Tom
"Women rise to power in upcoming series." Electronic Media, 20: 3+, March 19, 2001.

Ouelette, L.
"Victims No More: Postfeminism, Television, and Ally McBeal." The Communication Review, 1 January 2002, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 315-335(21)

Owen, A. Susan
"Leaving the Mothership: Postmodernity and Postfeminism in Ally McBeal and Sex and the City." In: Bad girls : cultural politics and media representations of transgressive women New York : P. Lang, c2007.
MAIN: HQ1421 .O94 2007

Patton, Tracey Owens
"'Ally McBeal' and her homies: the reification of white stereotypes of the other." Journal of Black Studies Nov 2001 v32 i2 p229(32)
"This article discusses the stereotypical representations of women and ethnic minorities on the popular television show 'Ally McBeal.' The author uses Womanism, Standpoint Feminist, and Complicity Theories to analyze the show, finding that images of ethnic minority women are generally negative, and this negative stereotype is continually perpetuated throughout the media." [Expanded Academic Index]

Rosenzweig, Jane.
"Ally Mcbeal's Younger Sister." American Prospect v11, n1 (Nov 23, 1999):62.
The author examines increases in television programing centering around teenage girls. Topics including ratings, portrayals of women, and story content.

"Sex differences in pleasure from television texts: the case of Ally McBeal."
Women's Studies in Communication, 26 (1): 118, March 2003. ISSN: 0749-1409
UC users only

Stark, Steven D.
"Ally McBeal." (television program reviews) New Republic v217, n26 (Dec 29, 1997):13 (2 pages).

"Why Ally Mcbeal's Bye Was for Good."
Africa News Service July 29, 2002 p1008210u9901

Zeisler, Andi.
"What's the deal, McBeal?" Ms. Magazine v9, n5 (August-Sept, 1999):77 (2 pages).
'Ally McBeal's' sharp characterizations and sympathetic portrayals of working women have eroded to slapstick and stereotypes this season. However, ratings are up despite it's artistic descent.

Arrested Development

Brayton, Sean
"'Mexican' labor in the Hollywood imaginary." : International Journal of Cultural Studies; Dec2008, Vol. 11 Issue 4, p459-476, 18p
UC users only

Mittell, Jason.
"Narrative Complexity in Contemporary American Television." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Fall2006, Issue 58, p29-40, 12p
UC users only

Thompson, Ethan.
"Comedy Verité? The Observational Documentary Meets the Televisual Sitcom." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Fall2007, Issue 60, p63-72, 10p;
UC users only

The Beverly Hillbillies

Attallah, P.
"The unworthy discourse: situation comedy in television." In: Interpreting television : current research perspectives / Willard D. Rowland, Jr. and Bruce Watkins, editors. Beverly Hills, Calif. : Sage, c1984.
Main Stack PN1992.55.I54 1984
"Explicitly adapting a method (genre theory) from cinema studies, the author argues for the "sociological resonance" and the "relative autonomy" of genres, seeing them as logical frameworks for television interpretation. He discusses some of the difficulties of this approa?ch and offers suggestions for transcending them, principally through folding into the analysis the nature and imperatives of television not only as a technological, industrial, and economic institution, but also as a set of narrative forms and mental practices. In his application of genre theory to a specific television series-The Beverly Hillbillies-the author makes an argument for the need to consider the significance of virtually all of television. It is proposed that the critical tendency to ignore or demean some television is an integral part of the discourseabout it. Interpretative approaches to television must therefore examine the history and content of popular and academic inquiries." [Communication Abstracts]

Browne, Ray B.
"Hillbilly: A Cultural History of an American Icon." The Journal of American Culture Volume 27 Page 239 - June 2004
UC users only

Harkins, Anthony A.
"The Hillbilly in the Living Room: Television Representations of Southern Mountainers in Situation Comedies, 1952-1971." Appalachian Journal: A Regional Studies Review. 29 (1-2): 98-126. 2001-2002 Fall-Winter.

Marc, David.
Demographic vistas : television in American culture Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c1984.
Moffitt PN1992.3.U5.M26 1984
Main Stack PN1992.3.U5.M261 1984
"Attempting to avoid the quagmire of empirical research and theoretically-based criticism of television, the author argues that, since theater has exerted tremendous formal influence over both cinema and television it makes sense to define modes of theatricality on television so as to provide critical language with which to talk about it. The taxonomy subsequently developed includes 3 main types: the presentational (theatrical illusion managed by an interlocutory figure); the representational (imitation of the proscenium effect); and the documentary (reality offered as such). The first chapter of the book concludes that these 3 modes of illusion are not monolithic obstacles to the imagination of either the television-maker or the viewer; rather, they are so easily seen through as to provide a bottomless pit of satirical transformation. Chapters 2-4 are studies of a comic auteur (Paul Henning creator of the Beverly Hillbillies), a comic genre (the crime show), and a comic personality (Jackie Gleason). In the fifth chapter, the author examines late-night satirical reviews such as SNL and SCTV." [Communication Abstracts]

Otto, John Solomon
"Plain Folk, Lost Frontiersmen, and Hillbillies: The Southern Mountain Folk in History and Popular Culture." Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 5-17, Spring 1987.

Rosenberg, Neil V.
"Image and Stereotype: Bluegrass Sound Tracks." American Music, Vol. 1, No. 3. (Autumn, 1983), pp. 1-22.
UC users only

Staiger, Janet.
"The Beverly Hillbillies." In: Blockbuster TV : must-see sitcoms in the network era New York : New York University Press, c2000.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.S718 2000
Contents: Introduction -- The Beverly Hillbillies -- All in the Family -- Laverne & Shirley -- The Cosby Show.

Strangers and Kin[videorecording]
Discusses prejudices against "southern hillbillies" using old filmclips, drama, interviews, music, etc. Shows the exploitation of the mountain people by both writers and industrialists. Examines the effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Studies the cultural heritage of those who live in the southern mountains. 1984. 59 min. Video/C 2375

Cheers

Brodie, John.
"'Cheers' spawns sitcom scribes." (former producers and writers for 'Cheers') Variety v350, n13 (April 26, 1993):25 (2 pages).
Writers and producers who worked on the television situation comedy 'Cheers,' which ends its 11-year run May 20, say the show served as a training ground. Many former 'Cheers' writers are now working on current hit shows.

Christensen M., Stauth C.
"Everybody Knows Their Names." American Film 10 (2): 48-52 1984

Hilmes, Michelle.
"Where Everybody Knows Your Name: Cheers and the Mediation of Cultures." Wide Angle 1990 Apr., 12:2, 64-73.

Hundley, Heather L.
"The naturalization of beer in 'Cheers.'" Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media v39, n3 (Summer, 1995):350-359.

Long, Rob.
"Three cheers." (TV situation comedy 'Cheers' never tried to raise viewer consciousness) National Review v45, n11 (June 7, 1993):62 (2 pages).

Waters, Harry F.
"Raise a glass for 'Cheers.'" (television program's last episode) Newsweek v121, n20 (May 17, 1993):60 (1 page).
The last 'Cheers' episode, which will air May 20, 1993, is expected to draw 100 million viewers. The relationship between Diane and Sam will remain unresolved, but Woody is elected to the Boston City Council and Rebecca plans to marry a plumber.

The Cosby Show

Backstage at the last Cosby Show. (television program)
Ebony v47, n7 (May, 1992):126 (7 pages).
The hit television show 'The Cosby Show' ceased production after eight seasons. The show depicted blacks in a way that defied previous standards and set new standards that broke racial barriers.

Berry, V. T.
"From "Good Times" to "The Cosby Show": perceptions of changing televised images among black fathers and sons."In: Men, masculinity, and the media / edited by Steve Craig. Newbury Park, Calif. : Sage, Date c1992. Research on men and masculinities series ; 1; Men and masculinity research ; vol. 1.
Main Stack P94.5.M44.M46 1992
"This chapter presents the perceptions and interpretations of a specific group of low-income black adolescents as they perceive the male images of two distinctly different black, family-oriented comedy shows, "Good Times" and "The Cosby Show." it examines these three specific areas: (a) the assessment of the extent to which the environment of each show is considered a representation of real life by these youths; (b) the interpretation of black male teen images through the oldest sons on each show, J.J. Evans ("Good Times") and Theo Huxtable ("The Cosby Show"); and (c) the exploration of attitudes and values among these young people, as they relate to the father figures and their methods of discipline (James Evans' physical approach on "Good Times" and Heathcliff Huxtable's interactive approach on "The Cosby Show"). The results revealed that the majority of the respondents discussed how each show related to their own knowledge and experiences. Among the respondents, the image of a strong and manly father figure is still one who uses physical punishment, takes control of a situation, and dominates the "family environment."" [Communication Abstracts]

Cantor, Muriel G.
"The American family on television: from Molly Goldberg to Bill Cosby." Journal of Comparative Family Studies v22, n2 (Summer, 1991):205 (12 pages).
Author Abstract: This article is about the family (domestic) comedy, one of the most popular and enduring genre on television. The first section concentrates on the background and rationale for studying family life as portrayed in television's domestic comedies; the second follows the evolution of the TV family from Molly Goldberg in the 1940s when television came into American homes to the Nelsons (The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet) and the Stones (The Donna Reed Show) in the 1950s to the Huxtables (The Cosby Show) and Keatons of Family Ties in the 1980s. The focus is on how gender, race, and class have been portrayed over time, and whether the messages, issues, and themes about love and sex have changed and in what ways. After analyzing approximately 40 years of television, the article concludes by noting that the family is not always presented as conflict-free. Family members often make fun of each other; sometimes they deceive each other to get their way; and often interact by putting each other down. However, the family is basically the place where one goes for support, to solve problems that are generated from the outside, and to find solace when needed. COPYRIGHT George Kurian (Canada) 1991.

Carter, Bill.
"In the Huxtable world, parents knew best." ('The Cosby Show' series put family life in a positive light, includes related article on blacks in television shows) New York Times v141, sec2 (Sun, April 26, 1992):H1(N), H1(L), col 3, 50 col in.

Carter, Richard G.
"TV's black comfort zone for whites." (the need for more black television programs of substance and relevance) Television Quarterly v23, n4 (Fall, 1988):29 (6 pages).

Cummings, Melbourne S.
"The Changing Image Of The Black Family On Television." Journal of Popular Culture 1988 22(2): 75-85.
"Despite a pledge that it would be color-blind, television programming through the early 1980's perpetuated racism through traditional black stereotypes with such programs as the Amos 'n Andy Show and Sanford and Son. Continued protest finally brought forth such programs as The Cosby Show and 227, which work hard to negate the stereotypical image of the black American family." [America History and Life]

Curry, Jack
"The Cloning of Cosby." American Film v 12 Oct 1986. p. 49-52.

Douglas, William
Television families : is something wrong in suburbia? Mahwah, N.J. : Lawrence Erlbaum, 2003.
Main Stack HQ520.D68 2003
"This volume provides a study of television families in the context of family theory and research. The author maps the development of the American family on television, assessing the extent to which the television family has changed over time and examining the conjunction between real family life and television family life. Beginning with a look at the popular family in vaudeville, comics, and radio, the author chronicles the development of the television family from such early families as the Nelsons (The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet), Andersons (Father Knows Best), and Ricardos (I Love Lucy) through to contemporary families, such as the Huxtables (The Cosby Show), Conners (Roseanne), and Taylors (Home Improvement). In his examination of television families, he offers significant insights into the tangled relationships between fictional and real family life. He situates television family analysis in a conceptual framework that reflects the day-to-day experience of family life and considers the portrayals of family relationships, examining how these portrayals differ across time and across groups defined by ethnicity, gender, and age. The relational analysis also considers television family relationships in regard to power and effect, performance, satisfaction, and stability." [Communication Abstracts]

Douglas, William; Beth Olson
"The Family on Television: Evaluation of Gender Roles in Situation Comedy." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, Vol. 36, 1997

Frazer, June M.; Frazer, Timothy C.
'Father Knows Best' and 'The Cosby Show': Nostalgia and the Sitcom Tradition. Journal of Popular Culture, 1993 Winter, 27:3, 163-72.
UC users only
"'Father Knows Best' and 'The Cosby Show' are popular sitcoms of two different eras, the 1950-60s and the 1980s, that resemble each other despite their superficially dissimilar attitudes toward issues such as feminism. The Andersons and the Huxtables are nuclear families of the two-parents-plus-kids model, enjoying financial stability and lacking confrontation with destructive forces such as drugs. The introductions to both shows establish the centrality of the father-husband figure and promote gender stereotypes." [Magazine Index]

Fuller, Linda K.
The Cosby show: audiences, impact, and implications / Linda K. Fuller. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1992. Series title: Contributions to the study of popular culture no. 32.
UCB Main PN1992.77.C68 F84 1992
UCB Moffitt PN1992.77.C68 F84 1992

Gates, Henry Louis, Jr.
"TV's black world turns - but stays unreal." (television programs) New York Times v139, sec2 (Sun, Nov 12, 1989):H1(N), H1(L), col 1, 65 col in.

Goodman, Ellen.
"'Cosby' - the show that put parents back in charge." (Column) Washington Post v115 (Sat, May 2, 1992):A27, col 1, 16 col in.

Gray, Herman.
"Television, Black Americans, and the American dream." Critical Studies in Mass Communication v6, n4 (Dec, 1989):376 (11 pages).
"Focuses on the relationship between representations of black life in fictional and nonfictional television, specifically the Columbia Broadcasting System documentary The Crisis of Black America: The Vanishing Family (1985) and the The Cosby Show. These representations produce an ideology that explains success and poverty by promoting individualism and middle-class values and disregarding social and structural factors." [America History and Life]
also a chapter in:
Mediated messages and African-American culture : contemporary issues / Venise T. Berry, Carmen L. Manning-Miller, editors. Thousand Oaks : Sage Publications, c1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N4.M44 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.N4.M44 1996

Gray, Herman.
"Response to Justin Lewis and Sut Jhally." (response to response by Justin Lewis and Sut Jhally in this issue, p. 114) American Quarterly v46, n1 (March, 1994):118 (4 pages).
"Justin Lewis and Sut Jhally's 'Enlightened Racism: The Cosby Show, Audiences, and the Myth of the American Dream' should analyze the intricate situations, status and interpretations that whites and blacks build for The Cosby Show. An analysis of nondiscussive and discussive methods in the show's presentation of African Americans helps understand its involvement in political discourses." [Magazine Index]

Gray, Herman.
Watching race : television and the struggle for "Blackness" / Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1995.
MAIN: PN1992.8.A34 G73 1995
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"In the late 1980s and early 1990s, television representation of African Americans exploded on the small screen. Why has this occurred and what relation do these shows have to society's idea of "blackness"? How do these shows relate to earlier television series featuring African Americans? This book seeks to offer a new look at the changing representations of African Americans on television. Starting with the portrayal of blacks on series, such as The Jack Benny Show and Amos 'n' Andy, the author details the ongoing dialogue and struggle between television representations and cultural discourse to show how the meaning of blackness has changed through the years of the television era. Drawing on analyses of The Cosby Show, Frank's Place, A Different World, In Living Color, and Roc, as well as music videos, news coverage, cultural perspectives, and advertising, this book critically examines how the political stakes, cultural perspectives, and social locations of key cultural and social formations influence the representation of "blackness" on television." [Communication Abstracts]

Haggins, Bambi L.
"There's No Place like Home: The American Dream, African-American Identity, and the Situation Comedy." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Spring99, Issue 43, p23-36, 14p

Havens, Timothy.
"'The biggest show in the world': race and the global popularity of The Cosby Show."Media, Culture & Society v22, n4 (July, 2000):371 (21 pages).
UC users only"The Cosby Show changed the face of international television distribution as profoundly as it altered American television culture. However, although many scholars have addressed the show's domestic popularity, its international acceptance remains a virtual mystery. This article investigates the various economic, textual, and audience practices that led to the Cosby Show's international success and that continue to make middle-class African-American sitcoms lucrative international fare. The Cosby Show set the representational and marketing standards that continue to determine what types of African-American shows are sold internationally and to determine where those shows are sold. Although the international syndication industry learned many lessons from the Cosby Show, including the global appeal of domestic sitcoms, this article suggests that deeper revelations regarding the importance of televisual representations of race in global programming remain unrecognized." [Communication Abstracts]

Havens, Timothy.
"'The biggest show in the world': race and the global popularity of The Cosby Show." In: The television studies reader / edited by Robert C. Allen and Annette Hill. London ; New York : Routledge, 2004.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.5 .T375 2004 DUE 06-03-11
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Inniss, Leslie B.; Feagin, Joe R.
"'The Cosby Show': the view from the Black middle class." Journal of Black Studies v25, n6 (July, 1995):692 (20 pages).
UC users only
"Black middle-class responses to 'The Cosby Show', a television series which lasted till Apr 30, 1992, are a combination of positive and negative. A sample survey of 100 Black middle class respondents found many of them happy with the positive portrayal of Blacks. At the same time, many of the respondents stressed that the program was not real in that it did not reflect the lives of the Black community in America. Some felt that the show should address serious issues." [Expanded Academic Index]

Jhally, Sut.
Enlightened racism: the Cosby show, audiences, and the myth of the American dream / Sut Jhally and Justin Lewis. Boulder: Westview Press, 1992. Series title: Cultural studies.
UCB Moffitt PN1992.77.C68 J4 1992
"The authors designed and carried out a qualitative audience study not only of opinions about the "Cosby Show" but also of attitudes toward the issues raised by commentators and critics. They structured the selection of participants so as to test certain variables that might influence viewers' interpretation of the show: race, class, and gender. The findings of the study challenge conventional notions of racial stereotyping in the United States, and demonstrate how apparently progressive programs, such as the "Cosby Show," for all its good intentions, actually contribute to. enlightened forms of racism." The authors argue that, in the post-civil rights movement era, a new structure of racial beliefs, based on subtle contradictions between attitudes toward race and class, has brought in its wake this new form of racial thought that seems on the surface to exhibit a new tolerance. However, because Americans cannot think clearly about class, they cannot, after all, think clearly about race. Therefore, the whole notion of media stereotyping must be reconsidered by examining its ideological and economic underpinnings." [Communication Abstracts]

Kelly, Ernece B.
"Black sitcoms come of age." Crisis v99, n2 (Feb, 1992):5 (2 pages).
"During the late 1960's to the late 1970's, African-Americans were simply caricatures in a predominantly white oriented TV society. The Cosby show changed the situation with humor which was not the usual one-line, put-down variety. Instead, it focused on the personalities of the characters and the situations they found themselves in. "Roc," the current black-oriented sitcom on TV delivers humor which is mature, real, and sensibly modern. Such qualities distinguish today's shows from all other previous TV sitcoms." [Magazine Index]

Larson, Mary Strom.
"Family communication on prime-time television." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media v37, n3 (Summer, 1993):349-357.
"Episodes of two of the most popular family situation comedies, "The Cosby Show" and "The Simpsons," were analyzed to determine the family communication patterns available as models for viewers. A total of 1858 communication behaviors from "The Cosby Show" and 1172 communication behaviors from "The Simpsons" were analyzed. Although communication in both families was overwhelmingly affiliative, there were significant differences in their patterns of communication. The Huxtable family presented a model of a child-centered family, with open lines of communication between parents and children; it was primarily centered on seeking and giving information. The spouses in this family were not particularly active in giving direction or setting a tone for family unity with supportive communication. The Simpson family presented a model of an adult-centered family, less focused on seeking and giving information. In this family, spouses actively gave support to each other and to their children, and actively directed their children. Therefore, these spouses could be seen as active in setting a tone for family unity and direction." [Communication Abstracts]

Larson, Mary Strom.
"Interaction between siblings in prime time television families." Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 305-315, Summer 1989
"The author content analyzed episodes of "The Cosby Show," "Family Ties," and "Growing Pains" broadcast during the 1986-1987 season. A total of 27 episodes (9 for each show) containing 1354 sibling behaviors, was examined. In general, with regard to direction, significantly more behaviors between siblings were positive (58.1%) than negative (41.9%). In both "The Cosby Show" and "Family Ties," more behavior (64.4% and 62.8% respectively) was positive than negative. In "Growing Pains," the pattern of behaviors was reversed: more behavior was negative (56.5%) than positive. The most frequently performed function was direct services (62.6%), such as giving information or negotiating agreements. In all three programs, significantly more of this behavior was positive than negative. The regulation function was next most frequent, and significantly more of it was negative than positive. In mixed gender dyads, the older sister/younger brother dyads were depicted as more supportive than were the younger sister/older brother dyads. There was significantly more positive than negative behavior in the older sister/younger brother dyads." [Communication Abstracts]

Lewis, Justin
The ideological octopus : an exploration of television and its audience. New York : Routledge, 1991.
MAIN: PN1992.6 .L49 1991
MOFF: PN1992.6 .L49 1991
"This book is divided into two parts. Part 1 examines developments in audience research, focusing on some of the more recent theoretical advances and the ideas that have informed them. Part 2 presents two empirical qualitative audience studies, based on television news and television fiction. Chapter 1 introduces television audience research, and takes a critical look at some of the research traditions that have dominated the field from the 1940s to the 1970s. Chapter 2 places the inquiry into the television audience in its contemporary theoretical context. Chapter 3 looks at the "new" audience research, arguing that much of it has evolved from the previously discussed research tradition. Chapter 4 analyzes some of the practical and methodological questions that confront audience researchers, especially those using the qualitative approach. Chapter 5 opens part 2: it introduces two empirical studies carried out in Britain and in the United States. The studies are used to illustrate the problems with the analysis of interview transcripts. Chapter 6 is an analysis of television news based on the findings of an audience study. Chapter 7 is an analysis of "The Cosby Show," based on an audience study." [Communication Abstracts]

Lewis, Justin; Jhally, Sut.
"The politics of cultural studies: racism, hegemony, and resistance." (response to Herman Gray's review of the book 'Enlightened Racism: The Cosby Show, Audiences, and the Myth of the American Dream') American Quarterly v46, n1 (March, 1994):114 (4 pages).
"The book 'Enlightened Racism: The Cosby Show, Audiences, and the Myth of the American Dream' emphasizes the ideological force of television which compensates for the growing trend in contemporary audience research to emphasize the ideological importance of television. The uncertainty of television can contribute to and reinforce its ideological prowess. Cultural studies should focus on the issue of structural determination." [Magazine Index]

Lippman, John.
"Banking on the Huxtables." (statistics regarding 'The Cosby Show') Los Angeles Times v111 (Thu, April 30, 1992):D1, col 2, 3 col in.

Merritt, Bishetta D.
"Bill Cosby: TV auteur?" Journal of Popular Culture v24, n4 (Spring, 1991):89 (14 pages)
UC users only
"Applies the auteur method of film analysis to three Bill Cosby television creations, The Bill Cosby Show, Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, and The Cosby Show, to determine whether Cosby merits the auteur label. Each series fulfills the ascribed criteria of technique, style, personality, and "signature," including their use of a "raceless" humor that has its roots in a characteristically black mode of narrative sequencing, fully qualifying Cosby as a television auteur." [America History and Life]

Merritt, Bishetta D. and Stroman, Carolyn A.
"Black Family Imagery And Interactions On Television." Journal of Black Studies 1993 23(4): 492-499.
UC users only
"Examines three half-hour network television shows featuring black families to determine the resulting television image of black family life. Randomly selected episodes of the Cosby Show, 227, and Charlie and Company from the 1985-86 season were coded for dress, wealth, role significance, occupational status, and competence. Compared with similar studies published during 1978-80, this study reveals a more positive portrayal of black families." [America History and Life]

Nelson, Carlos; George, Hermon.
"White racism and "The Cosby show": a critique." Black Scholar v25, n2 (Spring, 1995):59 (3 pages).
UC users only
"The book 'White Racism and the Cosby Show' by Mike Budd and Clay Steinman correctly observes that 'The Cosby Show' fails to comment on class and race. The excuse that this was necessary to make the show palatable for white audiences does not address the underlying role of television in reinforcing cultural hegemony. The Cosby Show's failure to address serious cultural issues is a denial of the realities facing the majority of African-Americans. Budd and Steinman's analysis should make the connection between the products of corporate media and the perpetuation of capitalist domination." [Expanded Academic]

O'Brien, Shirley J.
""You can tell me the truth about anything ... I'll still love you."" (the Cosby show as a model of child rearing) (column)Childhood Education v65, n5 (Annual, 1989):307 (2 pages).

O'Connor, John J.
"Buffeted by change, TV grasps at formulas."New York Times v135, sec2 (Sun, Oct 27, 1985):H1(N), H1(L), col 4, 50 col in.

Payne, Monica A.
"The "ideal" black family? A Caribbean view of 'The Cosby Show.'" Journal of Black Studies v25, n2 (Dec, 1994):231 (19 pages).
UC users only
"A survey of the views of Caribbeans on the television program 'The Cosby Show' showed that a majority of them found the show influential and inspirational. About 20% of adults considered it as a black program while many agreed that it is about a universal modern family. The program encouraged hardworking and successful role models of blacks and people praised it for its promotion of moral codes. A minority criticized the show for being too idealistic and for discouraging materialistic values." [Magazine Index]

Poussaint, Alvin F. Ebony v43, n12 (Oct, 1988):72 (2 pages).

"Racial stereotypes persist." (images of blacks in the mass media)
USA Today (Magazine) v117, n2519 (Aug, 1988):12 (2 pages).

"Television." (influence of Afro-Americans on recent programming)
Ebony v46, n10 (August, 1991):50 (2 pages).

Raspberry, William.
"Bill Cosby - a father who did know best." ('The Cosby Show' ends an eight-year run) (Column) Los Angeles Times v111 (Tue, April 21, 1992):B7, col 2, 15 col in.

Raspberry, William.
"Thanks, Coz." (appreciation of 'The Bill Cosby Show') (Column)Washington Post v115 (Fri, April 17, 1992):A23, col 2, 14 col in.

Staiger, Janet.
"The Cosby Show." In: Blockbuster TV : must-see sitcoms in the network era New York : New York University Press, c2000.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.S718 2000
Contents: Introduction -- The Beverly Hillbillies -- All in the Family -- Laverne & Shirley -- The Cosby Show.

Stevens, R.
"Blacks And Whites, Days And Nights + Reasons For The Success Of The 'Cosby Show'." Television Quarterly 22 (4): 77-82 1987

Troutt, David Dante.
"Alvin F. Poussaint; psychiatry goes prime time to shape persona of blacks." (consultant to "The Cosby Show") (interview) Los Angeles Times v109 (Sun, June 10, 1990):M3, col 1, 49 col in.

Tucker, Lauren R.
"Was the revolution televised?: professional criticism about "The Cosby Show" and the essentialization of black cultural expression." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media v41, n1 (Wntr, 1997):90 (19 pages).
UC users only
"This study tracks the normative beliefs about race and race relations that structure the professional commentary about The Cosby Show. These beliefs, articulated by the competing racial discourses of assimilation and pluralism, result in conflicting and contradictory definitions of race and racial difference that truncate the ability of television's professional critical community to assess the construction of Blackness in the series as a cultural statement independent of the White-American experience." [Expanded Academic Index]

Ugwu-Oju, Dympna.
"Black and no place to hide." (mother of an upper-middle-class black family shares her concerns over the influence of the Los Angeles riots and the final episode of 'The Cosby Show' on her children) (Column) New York Times v141, sec4 (Sun, May 17, 1992):E17(N), E17(L), col 4, 21 col in.

Whetstone, Muriel L.
"Cosby is back, but Black-oriented shows decline." (Bill Cosby; TV programming offers nothing but comedy: includes a related article on 'The Cosby Show' and a schedule of the new season)(The '96 TV Season) Ebony v51, n12 (Oct, 1996):54 (4 pages).
"In the 1996 Fall TV season, Bill Cosby will reappear with Phylicia Rashad in a comedy 'Cosby.' NBC has cancelled its three Black programs and CBS did not have any Black shows anyway. ABC and Fox will air some shows. Minor networks, UPN and WB will have 6 new shows. All of the shows are comedies." [Magazine Index]

Curb Your Enthusiasm

Byers, Michele; Krieger, Rosalin
"Something Old Is New Again: Postmodern Jewishness in Curb Your Enthusiasm, Arrested Development, and The O. C." In: You should see yourself : Jewish identity in postmodern American culture / edited by Vincent Brook. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2006.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks NX652.J48 Y68 2006

Caesar, Terry
"#1 Dad: Fatherhood, Reception, and Television in Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm." Studies in American Humor, vol. 3, no. 18, pp. 59-73, 2008

Thompson, Ethan .
"Comedy Verité? The Observational Documentary Meets the Televisual Sitcom." Velvet Light Trap. Fall 2007. , Iss. 60; pg. 63, 10 pgs
UC users only

Gillota, David.
"Negotiating Jewishness: Curb Your Enthusiasm and the Schlemiel Tradition." Journal of Popular Film and Television Volume 38, Number 4 / October-December
UC users only

Leverette, Marc.
"Deconstructing Larry, 'The Last Man': Larry David, Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Comedies of the Self." Studies in Popular Culture, Oct2004, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p1-17, 17p

The Daily Show

Baumgartner, Jody, and Jonathan S. Morris.
"The Daily Show effect: candidate evaluations, efficacy, and American youth." American Politics Research 34.3 (May 2006): 341(27).
UC users only
"We test the effects of a popular televised source of political humor for young Americans: The Daily Show With Jon Stewart. We find that participants exposed to jokes about George W. Bush and John Kerry on The Daily Show tended to rate both candidates more negatively, even when controlling for partisanship and other demographic variables. Moreover, we find that viewers exhibit more cynicism toward the electoral system and the news media at large. Despite these negative reactions, viewers of The Daily Show reported increased confidence in their ability to understand the complicated world of politics. Our findings are significant in the burgeoning field of research on the effects of "soft news" on the American public. Although research indicates that soft news contributes to democratic citizenship in America by reaching out to the inattentive public, our findings indicate that The Daily Show may have more detrimental effects, driving down support for political institutions and leaders among those already inclined toward nonparticipation." [Expanded Academic Index]

Baym, Geoffrey.
"The Daily Show: Discursive integration and the reinvention of political journalism." Political Communication 22.3 (July-Sept 2005): 259(18).
UC users only
"The Daily Show with Jon Stewart uses techniques drawn from genres of news, comedy, and television talk to receive journalism of critical inquiry and an advance model of deliberate democracy. The significance of the show lies in its willingness to experiment within every possibility and hence has a lot to teach about the possibilities of political journalism in the 21st century." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bennett, W. Lance
"Relief in Hard Times: A Defense of Jon Stewart's Comedy in an Age of Cynicism." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Volume 24 Issue 3 2007 Pages 278 – 283
UC users only

Boler, Megan
"The Daily Show, Crossfire, and the Will to Truth." Scan, The Journal of Media Arts 2006

Cornfield, Michael
"The Daily Show revolution." Campaigns and Elections, vol. 26, no. 8, pp. 34, September 2005
"Discusses the popularity of Jon Stewart of "The Daily Show," and how laughing at politics is an effective political tactic. The author offers three new ways that "The Daily Show" has "pioneered and perfected" making people laugh about politics, including a form of interview termed the "shambush.""

Fox, Julia R., Glory Koloen, and Volkan Sahin.
"No joke: a comparison of substance in The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and broadcast network television coverage of the 2004 presidential election campaign." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 51.2 (June 2007): 213(15).

Hariman, Robert
"In Defense of Jon Stewart." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Volume 24 Issue 3 2007 Pages 273 – 277
UC users only

Hart, Roderick P.; Hartelius, E. Johanna
" The Political Sins of Jon Stewart." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Volume 24 Issue 3 2007 Pages 263 – 272
UC users only

Heflin, Kristen. "Laughter helps interpret the news." Television Quarterly 36.3-4 (Spring-Summer 2006): 26(6).
"The Daily Show with John Stewart, the television comedy program presents critical commentary on the press and politicians that are often missing in the traditional news and is regarded as a government appointee who investigates complaints by private persons against the government that attracts the attention to the success and shortcomings of US democracy. The show has covered issues related to political and social institutions exposing the inner working of press and politics by providing a valuable insight into the functioning of the systems to adults as found by the Pew Research Center." [Expanded Academic Index]

Holbert, R. Lance, Jennifer L. Lambe, Anthony D. Dudo, and Kristin A. Carlton.
"Primacy effects of The Daily Show and national tv news viewing: young viewers, political gratifications, and internal political self-efficacy." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media
"This study examines program ordering effects derived from viewing CNN television news relative to The Daily Show on the political gratifications associated with both types of information sources. Internal political self-efficacy is assessed as an individual-difference moderator. Main primacy effects are found on the gratifications associated with both national television news viewing and The Daily Show viewing. However, The Daily Show primacy effect on the political gratifications associated with national television news viewing was isolated among those participants who retain low internal political self-efficacy. Ramifications for these findings are outlined and future lines of research are summarized." [Expanded Academic Index]

Holcomb, C.
"Anyone can be president": Figures of speech, cultural forms, and performance ." Rhetoric Society Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 71-96, 2007
McKain, Aaron.
"Not necessarily not the news: Gatekeeping, remediation, and The Daily Show." Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA) 28.4 (Dec 2005): 415(16).
"'The Daily Show' (TDS), the most prominent news parody was awarded a Peabody for its coverage of the 2000 presidential election, two Emmys for comedy writing, a Television Critics Association nomination for outstanding achievement in news and information. The way in which the notion of artificial news events both emboldens and mutes TDS' critical voice and offers some predictions for how these interactions would continue to evolve in the future is presented." [Expanded Academic Index]

Pavlik, John V.
"Fake news: One man's experience on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." Television Quarterly 36.1 (Fall 2005): 44(7).
"The experience of the guest on The Daily Show. as a chair of a department of journalism and media studies, came to be on this popular show specializing in "fake news" is described. The humorous experiences include an interview set up that was a Fake-news for a comedy show and not real news." [Expanded Academic Index]

Smolkin, Rachel.
"What the mainstream media can learn from Jon Stewart: no, not to be funny and snarky, but to be bold and to do a better job of cutting through the fog." American Journalism Review 29.3 (June-July 2007): 18(8).
UC users only

Warner, J.
"Political culture jamming: The dissident humor of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." Popular Communication, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 17-36, 2007
"Contemporary politicians have wholeheartedly embraced commercial branding techniques, saturating the public sphere with market tested, emotional messages designed to cultivate trust in their political “brand,” thus working against the ideal of a democratic public sphere. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart “jams” the seamless transmission of the dominant brand messages by parodying the news media's unproblematic dissemination of the dominant brand, broadcasting dissident political messages that can open up space for questioning and critique. The Daily Show works, not by rational argumentation buttressed by facts and logic but by using an aestheticized (and very funny) parodic discourse to combat the aestheticized (and very serious) political branding techniques. Consequently, it is uniquely positioned to make its rebellious voice heard." [Communication Abstracts]

Ellen

Bociurkiw, Marusya.
"It's Not About the Sex: Racialization and Queerness in Ellen and The Ellen Degeneres Show." Canadian Woman Studies. Winter/Spring 2005. Vol. 24, Iss. 2/3; p. 176
UC users only

Bowman, James.
"The morality of the wasteland." The New Criterion v 16 Dec 1997. p. 55-9.
"The writer discusses the treatment of moral issues in American television shows. He discusses the treatment of homosexuality in the television sitcom Ellen, in which the lead character played by Ellen DeGeneres recently "came out" as a lesbian. He also discusses the controversial drama series Nothing Sacred, which centers around a sexy young inner-city priest. He points out that such shows contribute to the breakdown of moral certainties that may have interfered with the representations of sexual license that are becoming the industry's stock-in-trade." [Art Abstracts]

Cragin, Becca
"Lesbians and serial TV : Ellen finds her inner adult" In: The new queer aesthetic on television : essays on recent programming / edited by James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2006.
Main Stack PN1992.8.H64.N49 2006

"Don't touch that dial!"(presentation of women in the media and sponsorship of situation comedy show, Ellen)(includes related article and list of sponsors' addresses) off our backs v27, n6 (June, 1997):5 (1 page).
There have been protests from religious groups against the depiction of a situation comedy character as a lesbian. Sponsors are listed so that supporters of the show can contact them and express their gratitude at the increased visibility for gays and lesbians.

Dow, Bonnie J.
"Ellen, Television, and the Politics of Gay and Lesbian Visibility." Critical Studies in Media Communication June 2001 v18 i2 p123
Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 2001 Speech Communication Association. "The discourses constructing the coming-out of Ellen DeGeneres/Ellen Morgan, star of and lead character in the ABC television sitcom Ellen, were permeated with implications of authenticity and liberation, illustrating the continuing power of the confessional ritual described by Michele Foucault in The History of Sexuality. In contrast to the popular interpretation of the coming-out as an escape from repression, media treatment of the Ellen phenomenon was productive, in Foucault's sense, constructing a regulatory discourse that constrained the implications of gay visibility on commercial television by channeling it through a narrative of psychological autonomy, through television norms for representing homosexuality, and through an overarching strategy of personalization. I conclude with a discussion of the problems of "poster-child politics" as exemplified by the Ellen discourse." [Expanded Academic Index]

Handy, Bruce.
"Roll over, Ward Cleaver." (actress/comedian Ellen DeGeneres to play openly gay lead character on situation comedy 'Ellen')(includes history of controversial issues on TV and individuals' opinions about the... Time v149, n15 (April 14, 1997):78 (6 pages).
"DeGeneres explains that coming out personally and playing a character coming out has been very 'freeing.' She no longer has to fear that reporters or others will discover information confirming that she is a lesbian. Her character 'Ellen,' like herself, comes to terms with her sexual identity slowly and reluctantly." [Magazine Index]

Handy, Bruce.
"He called me Degenerate?" (situation comedy star Ellen DeGenerate)(Cover Story)(Interview) Time v149, n15 (April 14, 1997):86 (1 page).
UC users only
DeGeneres reveals that she came out personally and as 'Ellen' on the situation comedy, not to make a political statement, but to be able to live a more honest life. She also thought the show would benefit if the character Ellen discovered her sexual identity.

Handy, Bruce.
"Roll over, Ward Cleaver." (actress/comedian Ellen DeGeneres to play openly gay lead character on situation comedy 'Ellen')(includes history of controversial issues on TV and individuals' opinions about the 'Ellen' episode)(Cover Story) Time April 14, 1997 v149 n15 p78(6)
UC users only

Hubert, Susan J.
"What's Wrong with This Picture? The Politics of Ellen's Coming Out Party." Journal of Popular Culture, 1999 Fall, 33:2, 31-36.

Kane, Courtney
"Only real surprise on 'Ellen' was lineup of advertisers." (ABC TV situation comedy) The New York Times May 2, 1997 v146 pC2(N) pD2(L) col 3 (16 col in)

Lowry, Brian.
"Love and money: no losses for 'Ellen'; whether the reason is increased acceptance of gays or the media blitz, sponsors want to be there when the character comes out." Los Angeles Times v116 (Sat, April 26, 1997):F1, col 5, 27 col in.

McCarthy, Anna.
"Ellen: making queer television history." GLQ: a journal of lesbian and gay studies (7:4) 2001, 593-620

Mikels, Elaine; Rice, Carrie Bree.
"Ellen: what's the big deal?" (importance of Ellen De Generes identifying herself as a lesbian in a situation comedy)(includes related article) off our backs v27, n6 (June, 1997):20 (1 page).
"Ellen De Geneeres has identified herself as a lesbian in a situation comedy and this has major significance in symbolizing greater acceptance of lesbians and gay men by society. The TV show can confer validation for someone who has lived through an initial fear of being a lesbian and consequent therapy, and who only accepted being a lesbian and felt happy about this after joining lesbian groups in the 1970s and 1980s. Society has to make further progress on this issue, but the TV show has helped with this goal." [Magazine Index]

Shugart, Helene A.
"Parody as Subversive Performance: Denaturalizing Gender and Reconstituting Desire in Ellen." Text & Performance Quarterly, Apr2001, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p95, 19p;

Zoglin, Richard
"Friends and layabouts." (television situation comedies) Time March 20, 1995 v145 n11 p74(1)
UC users only
"A new wave of sitcoms seems to be built around people who spend much of their time sitting around, talking, and apparently doing little else. 'Ellen' and 'Pig Sty' are two examples, with perhaps the most blatant example being 'Friends.'" [Expanded Academic Index]

Friends

Auster, Albert
"It's friendship...." (popularity of 'Friends' television program) Television Quarterly Summer 1996 v28 n3 p2(6)

Billen, Andrew.
"A sofa is all you need." (television series 'Friends') New Statesman (1996) v126, n4342 (July 11, 1997):41 (1 page).
"The television program 'Friends' depicts the complicated and sometimes hard relationships that exist among young adult friends and their relations with their parents. The show's unoriginal theme is salvaged only by the well-made and coherent scripts." [Magazine Index]

Chidester, Phil
"May the Circle Stay Unbroken: Friends, the Presence of Absence, and the Rhetorical Reinforcement of Whiteness." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Volume 25 Issue 2 2008 Pages 157 – 174
UC users only

Henkin, Stephen .
"Fluff and the Right Stuff: Friends and Carnivale." (Television Program Review)World and I, March 2004 v19 i3 p69
UC users only

Kessler, Kelly
"Politics of the sitcom formula : Friends, Mad about you, and the Sapphic second banana." In: The new queer aesthetic on television : essays on recent programming / edited by James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2006.
Main Stack PN1992.8.H64.N49 2006

Medhurst, Andy. Friends of yours. Sight and Sound ns6 Oct 1996. p. 16-18.
"The U.S. television comedy series Friends is now a full-blown media phenomenon. Much of its success stems from the way it draws on established traditions of American comedy but infuses them with new flavors. Its clearest cousin, in some ways, is Cheers, but what makes Friends so refreshing and innovative is that it invites not just amusement but also emotional attachment. This makes it in many ways similar to thirtysomething, except that both the ages of the characters and the cultural moments of the programs are different. Politically, Friends is marked by a soft-liberal inclusiveness, dealing with lesbian characters, a hint at homosexual bonding between two male characters, and even class and ethnicity, although it remains resolutely white. The core of the show's success is the fantasy that adulthood does not entail growing up, and its key concept is "becoming," dealing as it does with potential, flux, and life on the verge." [Art Abstracts]

Poniewozik, James
"Reconsidering Friends: The kids-in-the-city sitcom just wanted to be liked, not admired. But in spite of itself, it helped redefine the idea of normal family life." (Arts/Television)(Critical Essay) Time April 19, 2004 v163 i16 p68 (1230 words)
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Roman, James W.
"The sitcom : innocence versus urban chic." In: From daytime to primetime : the history of American television programs / James Roman. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2005.
Main Stack PN1992.3.U5.R64 2005
Moffitt PN1992.3.U5.R64 2005
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Sandell, Jillian.
"The personal is professional on TV: I'll be there for you: 'Friends' and the fantasy of alternative families." (TV and American Culture) American Studies v39, n2 (Summer, 1998):141 (15 pages).
"The television show 'Friends' can be regarded as part of a new tradition of shows about groups of young people sharing their lives together. However, this show is also significant for its unusual portrayal of family and domestic life. It is not merely a celebration of friendships, as it shows a 'family' with many concerns about what it means to establish a kinship network from friends and neighbours. It is possible to argue that the fantasy of alternative families presented by 'Friends' contains an element of excluding racial and ethnic others." [Expanded Academic Index]

Schneider, Michael
"With friends like these ..." (impact of Friends sitcom on the genre) Michael Schneider. Variety March 22, 2004 v394 i6 p1(2) (1317 words)

What 'Friends' has going for it ... that 'Ally McBeal' and 'The X-Files' didn't have. (Living Arts Pages) Caryn James. The New York Times May 20, 2002 pB1(N) col 2 (25 col in)

Zoglin, Richard
"Friends and layabouts." (television situation comedies) Time March 20, 1995 v145 n11 p74(1)
UC users only
"A new wave of sitcoms seems to be built around people who spend much of their time sitting around, talking, and apparently doing little else. 'Ellen' and 'Pig Sty' are two examples, with perhaps themost blatant example being 'Friends.'" [Expanded Academic Index]

The Goldbergs

SEE Jews in Film & TV bibliography

The HoneymoonersLucy

Schmitz, Neil
"Humor's Body: Jackie Gleason, Roseanne, and Some Others." Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 97-109, Summer 2000.

Simon, Ron.
"Ralph Kramden and The Honeymooners Turn the Big 5 0 (sort of): Jackie Gleason still represents a comic reflection of postwar urban America." Television Quarterly 36.1 (Fall 2005): 59(6).
Fifty years on, The Honeymooners remains a comic reflection of post war urban America with Ralph Kramden epitomizing the ardent but misguided believer in personal advancement. The honeymooners is authentic and real, with Gleason projecting an in-your -face immediacy of frustration and desperation.

I Love Lucy

Bryant, J.
"Emma, Lucy And The American Situation Comedy Of Manners." Journal of Popular Culture 13 (2): 248-256 1979
UC users only

Carson, Tom.
"The crystal ball: more than 30 years ago, I Love Lucy foretold the future of the sitcom."American Film v14, n9 (July-August, 1989):14 (1 page).

Chunovic, Louis.
One foot on the floor: the curious evolution of sex on television from I love Lucy to South Park / Louis Chunovic. New York TV Books, c2000.
UCB Main PN1992.3.U5 C44 2000

Davies, Judy; Smith, Carol R.
"Race, gender, and the American mother: political speech and the maternity episodes of 'I Love Lucy' and 'Murphy Brown.'" (TV and American Culture)American Studies v39, n2 (Summer, 1998):33 (31 pages).
"The pregnancy and birth stories in 'I Love Lucy' in 1952 to 1953 and 'Murphy Brown' in 1992 can be regarded as the most significant American media representations of pregnancy since the 1940s. In each case, the television representation of pregnancy can be interpreted as highlighting the significance of concepts of femininity and whiteness for the evolving construction of national identity. For both 'I Love Lucy' and 'Murphy Brown,' maternity is the site where national identity is constructed." [Expanded Academic Index]

Desjardins, Mary.
"Lucy and Desi: Sexuality, Ethnicity, and TV's First Family." In: Television, history, and American culture: feminist critical essays / edited by Mary Beth Haralovich and Lauren Rabinovitz. pp: 56-74 Durham [N.C.]: Duke University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1992.6.T414 1999

Doty, Alexander.
"The Cabinet of Lucy Ricardo: Lucille Ball's star image." Cinema Journal v 29 Summer 1990. p. 3-22.

Gates, Anita .
"The good, the bad, the Lucy: a legacy of laughs; endlessly lovable, but damaging, too." ('I Love Lucy') The New York Times Oct 14, 2001 s0 pAR30(N) pAR30(L) col 5 (35 col in)

Landay, Lori,
"Millions "Love Lucy": Commodification and the Lucy Phenomenon." NWSA Journal - Volume 11, Issue 2 1999 UC users only
"The ideology of mass consumer culture is central to all the levels of the Lucy phenomenon: in individual episodes that revolve around commodities, in the "good life" portrayed in the series, in Ball's public persona as "just a housewife," in the myriad of products tied to the series in the fifties (comic books, paper dolls, furniture, clothes), as a syndicated series, and in the nostalgic products popular today. At the core of the phenomenon is a juxtaposition of public and private embodied in both the character of Lucy and her creator, the popular public woman Lucille Ball. A textual reading of the episode "Lucy Does a TV Commercial" in the contexts of other aspects of the Lucy phenomenon (Ball's public persona, audience knowledge of the "real" marriage of Ball and Arnaz), and other popular articulations of gender and middle-class life in the postwar era suggests how the Lucy phenomenon was framed by and broke the frames of commodification. Overall, the series offers consumption as the solution to Lucy's dissatisfaction, an example of the consumerist-ethos that presented private solutions to public problems. However, at the same time that the phenomenon participated in the mass consumer economy, the show's comedy played on conflicts and anxieties about consumption and domesticity." [Project Muse]

Marc, David.
Prime time, prime movers: from I love Lucy to L.A. law--America's greatest TV shows and the people who created them / David Marc and Robert J. Thompson. 1st ed. Boston: Little, Brown, c1992 .
UCB Moffitt PN1992.3.U5 M264 1992

Marc, David.
"The sitcom sensibility; TV suburbomythology: why we loved Lucy, what Father really knew best." (situation comedy, "I Love Lucy,""Father Knows Best") (column) Washington Post v112 (Sun, June 25, 1989):B1, col 1, 47 col in.

Mellencamp, Patricia.
"Situation Comedy, Feminism, and Freud: Discourses of Gracie and Lucy." In: Studies in entertainment: critical approaches to mass culture / edited by Tania Modleski. pp: 80-95 Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c1986. Theories of contemporary culture; v. 7
Electronic location: http://www.netlibrary.com/summary.asp?id=646
Main Stack P96.C76.S781 1986
Bus & Econ P96.C76.S781 1986
Moffitt P96.C76.S781 1986

The Goldbergs

Brook, Vincent
"The Americanization of Molly: how mid-fifties TV homogenized The Goldbergs (and got "Berg-larized" in the process)." Cinema Journal v. 38 no. 4 (Summer 1999) p. 45-67

Brook, Vincent.
"From the Cozy to the Carceral: Trans-Formations of Ethnic Space in The Goldbergs and Seinfeld." Velvet Light Trap. 44:54-67. 1999 Fall
UC users only
"In this comparative analysis of The Goldbergs(1949-1950) and Seinfeld (1989-1998), theoretical notions of space and ethnicity are applied to two quintessentially Jewish situation comedies—one the first successful situation comedy on television, the other America's most popular situation comedy of the 1990s—to determine how the two series' ethnospatial constructions reflect historical changes in the larger televisual institution and American society. The ethnological framework of this study builds on Werner Sollors's binary scheme of descent-based and consent-based structures in American culture. Applying Sollors's schema to the two Jewish situation comedies then, descent-based structures would seem to fit quite snugly with the Bronx-dwelling, Yiddish-speaking immigrant Goldbergs, as would consent-based modes with the yuppie Manhattanite, Jewish-in-name-only Seinfeld and company. Yet, although Seinfeld's dismissal of descent-based ethnicity in favor of a consensual social practice is patently displayed in the series, terms such as "mature free agents," "architects of our fate," and "choosers of spouses," "destinies," and, most especially, "political systems," hardly seems commensurable with the postmodern show "about nothing."" [Communication Abstracts]

Brook, Vincent
Something ain't kosher here : the rise of the "Jewish" sitcom / Vincent Brook. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2003.
Main Stack PN1992.8.J48.B76 2003

Weber, Donald.
"The Jewish-American World of Gertrude Berg: The Goldbergs on Radio and Television." In: Talking back: images of Jewish women in American popular culture." / edited by Joyce Antler. pp: 85-99 Hanover, NH: Brandeis University Press, published by University Press of New England, c1998. Brandeis series in American Jewish history, culture, and life.
Main Stack E184.J5.T25 1998

Weber, Donald.
"Memory and Repression in Early Ethnic Television: The Example of Gertrude Berg and The Goldbergs." In: The other fifties : interrogating midcentury American icons / edited by Joel Foreman. pp: 144-67. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c1997.
Main Stack E169.12.F67 1997

Rowan and Martin's Laugh-in

Gordon, S.
"Sock it to 'em Judy." [Laugh-in world of Bowan and Martin]. Look v. 32(October 1 1968) p. 72-6

Porter, G.B.
"Sock it to me." [Rowan and Martin laugh-in]. Newsweek v. 71(February 26 1968) p. 96

Rowan, D., et. al.
"Verry interesting: but wild [Laugh-in]." Time v. 92 (October 111968) p. 50-4+

Mary Tyler Moore Show

Billen, Andrew
"Girl power." New Statesman Apr 23, 2001
"The most interesting then-and-now contrast, however, is provided by The Mary Tyler Moore Show of the early Seventies and today's Ally McBeal. Moore, as Mary Richards, got a responsible if illdefined job as an assistant producer in a TV newsroom, having, at the age of 30, emerged from a failed relationship. Although one in ten American women at the time was supporting herself with her own wages, this was a novelty as far as TV was concerned." [ProQuest] UC users only

"Broadcast News: and now, this...." (journalism as portrayed in the Mary Tyler Moore television program and in the movie Broadcast News) (editorial)
Columbia Journalism Review v26, n6 (March-April, 1988):19 (1 page).

Comstock, Jamie; Krystyna Strzyzewski.
"Interpersonal interaction on television: family conflict and jealousy on primetime. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media Summer 1990 v34 n3 p263-282
Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 1990 Broadcast Education Association "Primetime television programs were analyzed for the presence of interpersonal predicaments, specifically family conflict and situations involving jealousy, envy, and rivalry. The portrayal of these situations was evaluated according to relevant prosocial and antisocial criteria. Findings suggest that the predicaments are common in television relationships and predominantly are depicted in a prosocial manner across situation comedies, family dramas, and nighttime soaps. Gender differences, however, are prevalent within the televised interaction patterns. In addition, the frequently of these predicaments varies across program type." [Expanded Academic Index]

Crozier, Susan.
"Making it after all: a reparative reading of The Mary Tyler Moore Show." International Journal of Cultural Studies, Mar2008, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p51-67, 17p

Dow, Bonnie J.
"Feminist Criticism and The Mary Tyler Moore Show." In: Critical questions: invention, creativity, and the criticism of discourse and media / edited by William L. Nothstine. pp: 97-101 New York: St. Martin's Press, c1994.
Main Stack PN4061.C7 1994
Moffitt PN4061.C7 1994

Dow, Bonnie J.
"Hegemony, feminist criticism and 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show.'" (Gender and Empowerment) Critical Studies in Mass Communication v7, n3 (Sept, 1990):261 (14 pages).
Author Abstract: "This essay claims that the feminist premise of The Mary Tyler Moore Show is contradicted by the patriarchal relationships and role definitions developed within its narrative, hegemonic devices that are bolstered by the conventions of the situation comedy genre. The conclusion explores the ideological tension produced by the show's narrative that allows for differing evaluations of the program's message, and discusses the implications for feminist criticism of television's hegemonic patterns." COPYRIGHT Speech Communication Association 1990. [Expanded Academic Index]

Gates, Anita.
"The gruff, the fatuous, the competent." (similarities between situation comedies 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show,' 'The Larry Sanders Show,' and 'News Radio') New York Times v144, sec2 (Sun, April 9, 1995):H33(N), H33(L), col 1, 10 col in.

Juergens, Jennifer and Steinauer, Joan
"They didn't love Lucy." Incentive Oct 1997
Using examples from I Love Lucy, the Bob Newhart Show, and the Mary Tyler Moore Show, the changing role of women in the workplace is examined.
UC users only

Putterman, Barry
"The granfaloon family: The Mary Tyler Moore show, The odd couple, and their idiot children." In: On television and comedy : essays on style, theme, performer, and writer / by Barry Putterman. p. 107-21. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c1995.
On order for Main UCB

Rabinowitz, Dorothy.
"Watching the Sitcoms." Commentary 1975 60(4): 69-71.
"The recent television shows Americans like most are CBS's Saturday night situation comedies. These include "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "All in the Family," "The Jeffersons," and "The Bob Newhart Show." In the new breed of situation comedy, writers and performers are required not as much to sustain a plot line as to render social types; "to satirize, rather than to tell a story." The audience must know enough to recognize the types. "There is comfort as well as fun" in these shows, which tell us "that it is for our faults we are loved, really, not in spite of them." [Art Abstracts]

Rapping, Elayne
"You've come which way, baby?" Women's Review of Books, XVII (10/11): 20, July 2000. ISSN: 0738-1433
Discusses the social force of television in shaping our perspectives, especially in terms of representation of women and feminist influence.
Available in full text to UCB users via Contemporary Women's Issues

Rebeck, Victoria A.
"From Mary to Murphy: codependent no more." (television shows) (column) Christian Century v106, n31 (Oct 25, 1989):948 (2 pages).
UC users only

Teich, Jessica.
"Thoroughly modern Mary: why we're still watching TV's first workaday feminist." ('The Mary Tyler Moore Show') (Column) Washington Post v118 (Sun, Feb 5, 1995):C5, col 1, 18 col in.

Williams, Carol Traynor.
"It's Not So Much, 'You've Come A Long Way, Baby' - As 'You're Gonna Make It After All' Journal of Popular Culture 1974 7(4): 981-989 9p

M*A*S*H

Baker, Michael.
"Koreans don't cry as real M*A*S*H folds; tent hospital closes, but a nation still battles sitcom's stereotyping." (television show based on mobile hospital unit during the Korean War gave Americans a lasting and... Christian Science Monitor v89, n138 (Thu, June 12, 1997):1, col 3, 24 col in.

Carson, Tom.
"Network novelties." Film Comment v 24 Mar/Apr 1988. p. 70-2.
"The "dramady," a new type of television program, is not as innovative asit pretends to be. Shows like The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd,Hooperman, Frank's Place, Beverly Hills Buntz, and The "Slap" MaxwellStory use film and do not have a laugh track, but there is little elsethat is genuinely new about them. The mixture of laughs and sentiment ismerely an inversion of the techniques used by Hill Street Blues and St.Elsewhere, which in turn took their cues from sitcoms like MASH and MaryTyler Moore. The coercive and the mechanical are so ingrained in networktelevision that any deliberate attempt to avoid them looks spurious. Setting out to do something consciously artistic has never worked well inany other kind of mass-culture art, so it is probably not the bestapproach to making a network sitcom." [Art Abstracts]

Chung, Tong Soo.
"Koreans: the people that 'MASH' forgot?" Los Angeles Times v102, secC (Sun, Feb 6, 1983):3, col 1, 12 col in.

Freedman, Carl.
"History, fiction, film, television, myth: the ideology of MASH." Southern Review v26, n1 (Wntr, 1990):89 (18 pages).

Hofeldt, Roger L.
"Cultural Bias In M*A*S*H." Society 1978 15(5): 96-99.
Characterization, plot device, and resolution in the television situation comedy, M*A*S*H, are representative of traditions in the American national character and as such reflect cultural images which the audience can easily relate to; 1972-78.

Homans, Peter.
"Psychology And Popular Culture: Psychological Reflections On M*A*S*H." Journal of Popular Culture 1983 17(3): 3-21.
"Employs the concepts of "psychological modernism" and "psychological traditionalism" in an analysis of "politically-toned situation comedy." M*A*S*H, along with the earlier All in the Family and the Mary Tyler Moore Show, provided their audiences with situations in which the ambivalent role of tradition in contemporary life was worked out." [America History & Life]

Kim, Sophia.
"They're happy 'MASH' is over." Los Angeles Times v102, secC (Sun, Feb 6, 1983):3, col 1, 28 col in.

Marc, David.
"The world of Alda and 'Hawkeye.'" ('M*A*S*H,' a retrospective) Television Quarterly v23, n4 (Fall, 1988):15 (10 pages).

McGrory, Mary.
"M*A*S*Hing Nixon, Carter and Ford." (column)Washington Post v106, secB (Sun, Feb 27, 1983):B1, col 1, 23 col in.

Rosenberg, Howard.
"Striking camp:"Mash" says goodbye." Los Angeles Times v102, secVI (Tue, March 1, 1983):1, col 1, 20 col in.

Sawyer, Corrine Holt
"Word play humor in MASH" (with list of episodes) Journal of Popular Film and Television v 11 no1 Spring 1983. p. 42-52

Schrag, Robert L.
"From yesterday to today: a case study of M*A*S*H's Margaret Houlihan." (Gender Issues in the Communication Classroom)(Teaching Aid Reviews)Communication Education v40, n1 (Jan, 1991):112 (4 pages).

Weis, Elisabeth
"M*A*S*H notes." In: Play It Again, Sam: Retakes on Remakes / edited by Andrew Horton and Stuart Y. McDougal; with an afterword by Leo Braudy. pp: 310-26. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1998.
Media Center PN1995.9.R45.P58 1998
Main Stack PN1995.9.R45.P58 1998

Wittebols, James H.
Watching M*A*S*H, watching America: a social history of the 1972-1983 television series / by James H. Wittebols. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland and Co., c1998.
UCB Main PN1992.77.M2854 W58 1998

Worland, Rick.
"The other living-room war: prime time combat series, 1962-1975." (Critical Essay) Journal of Film and Video v50, n3 (Fall, 1998):3 (20 pages).
"Issues discussed concern the portrayal of combat in prime time television in the US during the Vietnam War. The television programs 'Combat,' 'The Rat Patrol,' and 'MASH' are contextualized within America's changing attitudes towards the war, and the programs' themes that supported or condemned the military are detailed." [Magazine Index]

Yardley, Jonathan.
"Marinated in the past; a good education is well-steeped in history."Washington Post v107 (Mon, Jan 16, 1984):B1, col 1, 31 col in.

Yardley, Jonathan.
"The mish-MASH': when watching TV masquerades as education." Washington Post v107 (Mon, Dec 19, 1983):C1, col 1, 29 col in.

Monty Python

For books/articles about Monty Python feature-length films, see Comedy Videography

Chapman, Graham
OJRIL: the completely incomplete Graham Chapman; unpublished scripts from Monty Python's pipe-smoking genius / Graham Chapman; edited by Jim Yoakum; [four words] foreword by Eric Idle. lst U.S. ed. Washington, D.C.: Brassey's, c1999.
UCB Main PR6053.H362 A3 1999

Hewison, Robert
Monty Python, the case against irreverence, scurrility, profanity, vilification, and licentious abuse / Robert Hewison. 1st Evergreen ed. New York: Grove Press, 1981. Series title: An Evergreen book E-787.
UCB Main PN1999.P9 H4

Honigmann, David
"All Fish, No Punchlines." (Why "Monty Python" is overrated) Listener 122:3133 (1989:Sept. 28) 37

"An Interview, Of Sorts, With Monty Python's Flying Circus."
Cinéaste 7:1 (1975:Fall) 18

Johnstone, Iain
"Monty Python: The Early Years." Listener 101:2617 (1979:June 28) 873

Larsen, Darl
Monty Python, Shakespeare and English Renaissance drama / Darl Larsen; foreword by William Proctor Williams. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2003.
Main Stack PR2976.L23 2003

Monty Python : complete and utter theory of the grotesque
Edited by John O. Thompson. London : BFI Publishing, 1982.
Main Stack PN199.P9.M61 1982

Monty Python's big red book / [edited by Eric Idle]. London : Methuen, 1999.
Main Stack PN6175.M6 1999

Mulrine, Anna.
"Off to the flying circus: comedy's new stars silly-walk in the footsteps of Monty Python." (the influence of 'Monty Python's Flying Circus' television program on younger comedians and television comedy writers)(Brief Article) U.S. News & World Report v124, n11 (March 23, 1998):64 (2 pages).

Pretorius, Elizabeth J.
"Humor as Defeated Discourse Expectations: Conversational Exchange in a Monty Python Text." Humor: International Journal of Humor Research. 3 (3): 259-276. 1990.

Rubenstein, Lenny
"Monty Python Strikes Again: An Interview with Michael Palin." Cinéaste 14:2 (1985) 6

Sterritt, David. Rhodes, Lucille.
"Monty Python: Lust for Glory." Cineaste: America's Leading Magazine on the Art and Politics of the Cinema. 26 (4): 18-23. 2001 Fall.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Monty Python's second film : a first draft
By Graham Chapman ... [et al.]. London : Methuen, 1999. (Main Stack PN1997.M658.M66 1999)

Monty Python and the Holy Grail: screenplay
By John Cleese... [et al.]. London : Methuen, 2002. (Main Stack PN1997.M68.M66 2002)

Day, David D.
"Monty Python and the Medieval Other." In: Cinema Arthuriana : essays on Arthurian film / edited by Kevin J. Harty. New York: Garland Pub., 1991.
Main Stack PN1995.9.A75.C5 1991

Day, David D.
"Monty Python and the holy grail : madness with a definite method." In: Cinema Arthuriana : twenty essays / edited by Kevin J. Harty. Rev. ed. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2002.
Main Stack PN1995.9.A75.C5 2002

Godzich, Wlad.
"The Holy Grail: The End of the Quest." North Dakota Quarterly. 51 (1): 74-81. 1983 Winter.

Harty, Kevin J.
"The Damsel 'in Dis Dress': Gender Bending in the Arthuriad." Arthuriana. 14 (1): 79-82. 2004 Spring.

Hoffman, Donald L.
"Not dead yet : Monty Python and the holy grail in the twenty-first century." In: Cinema Arthuriana : twenty essays / edited by Kevin J. Harty. Rev. ed. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2002.
Main Stack PN1995.9.A75.C5 2002

Murrell, Elizabeth.
"History revenged: Monty Python translates Chretien de Troyes's 'Perceval, or the Story of the Grail' (again)." Journal of Film and Video Spring 1998 v50 i1 p50(13)

Neufeld, Christine M.
"Coconuts in Camelot: Monty Python and the Holy Grail in the Arthurian Literature Course." Florilegium. 19: 127-47. 2002.

Rosello, Mireille.
"Interviews with the Bridge-Keeper: Encounters between Cultures as Phantasmagorized in Monty Python and the Holy Grail." In: Poetics of the Americas : race, founding, and textuality / edited by Bainard Cowan and Jefferson Humphries. Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1997.
Main Stack PN843.P64 1997)

Murphy Brown

Benoit, William L.; Anderson, K. Kerby.
"Blending politics and entertainment: Dan Quayle versus Murphy Brown."Southern Communication Journal v62, n1 (Fall, 1996):73 (13 pages).

Bozell, L. Brent, III.
"'Murphy' continues the big lie." (Dan Quayle and the 'Murphy Brown' television program) (Column)Los Angeles Times v111 (Sun, Sept 20, 1992):M5, col 5, 15 col in.

Broder, David S.
"Values count." (Dan Quayle's criticism of 'Murphy Brown' over the depiction of single parenthood) (Column) Washington Post v115 (Sun, May 24, 1992):C7, col 1, 22 col in.

Clift, Eleanor.
"The Murphy Brown policy." (Dan Quayle's speech on family values) Newsweek v119, n22 (June 1, 1992):46 (1 page).
Dan Quayle's attack on the family values presented on the television program Murphy Brown, sends contradictory political messages. The administration opposes abortion and yet Quayle criticizes single mothers. The American family and cultural values have become political issues.

Collins, Claudia.
"Viewer letters as audience research: the case of Murphy Brown." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media v41, n1 (Wntr, 1997):109 (23 pages).

Crotty, Mark.
"Murphy Would Probably Also Win the Election: The Effect of Television as Related to the Portrayal of the Family in Situation Comedies." Journal of Popular Culture,1995 Winter, 29:3, 1-15.
"In response to criticisms of television programming, the author analyzes the media's influence on their viewers' perceptions of the world, discussing the extent and nature of television's impact and focusing on the portrayal of the family in television comedies. From their beginnings in radio, situation comedies have always stressed the value of the family. Far from undermining the importance of families and traditional values, television comedies have tended to confirm their value." [America History & Life]

Davies, Judy; Smith, Carol R.
"Race, gender, and the American mother: political speech and the maternity episodes of 'I Love Lucy' and 'Murphy Brown.'" (TV and American Culture)American Studies v39, n2 (Summer, 1998):33 (31 pages).
"The pregnancy and birth stories in 'I Love Lucy' in 1952 to 1953 and 'Murphy Brown' in 1992 can be regarded as the most significant American media representations of pregnancy since the 1940s. In each case, the television representation of pregnancy can be interpreted as highlighting the significance of concepts of femininity and whiteness for the evolving construction of national identity. For both 'I Love Lucy' and 'Murphy Brown,' maternity is the site where national identity is constructed." [Magazine Index]

Dow, Bonnie J.
"Femininity and feminism in 'Murphy Brown.'" (Special Issue: Feminist Criticism) Southern Communication Journal v57, n2 (Wntr, 1992):143 (13 pages).
Author Abstract: "While past examples of feminist rhetorical criticism have emphasized women as communicators, analysis of communication about women can illustrate the existence of recurring rhetorical strategies that devalue women. As an example, analysis of the situation comedy Murphy Brown illustrates how the program's female title character enacts a patriarchal interpretation of the excesses of liberal feminist ideology. Murphy Brown functions to reinforce the dichotomy between femininity and feminism that is an inherent problem of liberal feminism, demonstrating the need for greater critical attention to the range of feminist theories available for evaluation of rhetorical artifacts." COPYRIGHT Southern States Communication Association 1992. [Expanded Academic Index]

Elliott, Stuart.
"Contretemps lifts ad rate for 'Murphy.'" (television program 'Murphy Brown' receives boost from attack by Vice President Dan Quayle) (Column)New York Times v141 (Thu, Sept 17, 1992):C8(N), D10(L), col 4, 17 col in.

"Goodbye to all that." (analysis of three television programs that reflected changing social values)(Weekend Journal)(Editorial)
Wall Street Journal, n112 (Fri, June 5, 1998):W13(W), W13(E), col 1, 15 col in.

Goodman, Ellen.
"Farewell, Ms. Brown." (end of situation comedy "Murphy Brown" leaves a big gap in television depiction of strong women)(Column) Washington Post v121, n136 (Sat, May 16, 1998):A15, col 6, 20 col in.

Goodman, Ellen.
"Single mothers, many values." (reflections on Dan Quayle's remarks blaming the Los Angeles riots on lack of family values) (Column) Washington Post v115 (Sat, May 23, 1992):A1, col 1, 15 col in.

Hartman, Ann.
"Murphy Brown, Dan Quayle, and the American family." (Editorial) Social Work v37, n5 (Sept, 1992):387 (2 pages).

Kolbert, Elizabeth.
"Over 'Murphy Brown,' art is bigger than life." (Dan Quayle and 'Murphy Brown's' reply to the vice president's remarks about single parents) (National Pages) (The 1992 Campaign)New York Times v142 (Wed, Sept 23, 1992):A17(N), A21(L), col 2, 17 col in.

Lauter, David; Gerstenzang, James.
"Critique of TV show puts White House into center of controversy." (Vice President Dan Quayle assails 'Murphy Brown,' single-parent families) Los Angeles Times v111 (Thu, May 21, 1992):A1, col 1, 17 col in.

Mandese, Joe.
"Murphy Brown flap 'irresponsible': producer Diane English sees her creation as sensitive 'real person.'" (Interview) Advertising Age v63, n38 (Sept 21, 1992):1 (2 pages).
"Television producer and writer Diane English is both appalled and flattered by VP Dan Quayle's criticism of the program 'Murphy Brown' as harming family values. She feels that is is a responsible program and that the administration has alienated an important group of voters that like the show. None of its advertisers has dropped the program, although there has been pressure from small groups. Television has a responsibility only to accurately reflect society's moral values, not to improve or downgrade them." [Magazine Index]

McConnell, Frank.
"Frank & Celeste & Dan: the unthinkable 'Murphy Brown.'" Commonweal v119, n13 (July 17, 1992):19 (2 pages).
"Vice Pres Dan Quayle's denunciation of the TV show 'Murphy Brown' is hypocritical and ridiculous. TV once presented women as people whose only reason for being was the family. The character of Murphy Brown represents a woman in control of both her professional and sex lives." [Magazine Index]

Miner, Madonne M.
""Like a natural woman": nature, technology, and birthing bodies in 'Murphy Brown.'" Frontiers v16, n1 (Jan, 1996):1 (18 pages).
"The episode of 'Murphy Brown' in which Murphy gives birth to a son, glorifies the technocratic, patriarchical and capitalistic society of which women have little control. The episode implies that female nature needs to be appropriated and improved upon by male technology. To be considered normal and natural, women have to rely on male technology. Murphy's lack of control over her body is made humorous, which is a blatant insult to the female race." [Magazine Index]

"Murphy Brown's baby." (the politics of family values and Dan Quayle) (Editorial)
Wall Street Journal (Mon, Sept 21, 1992):A10(W), A12(E), col 1, 13 col in.

"Murphy Brown, national menace." (US vice president Dan Quayle criticizes TV program)
off our backs v22, n7 (July, 1992):5 (1 page).
"US vice president Dan Quayle took exception to and criticized Murphy Brown, a character in a popular TV sitcom. He was particularly concerned that such a program which had a wide audience would jeopardize the traditional values of American society such as family ties, religion and nationalism. He also aired his objections on abortion, homosexual parents, elementary sex education and single parenthood. His popularity declined as a result of his statements." [Magazine Index]

"Quayle links family values, L.A. riots." (vice president Dan Quayle)
Facts on File v52, n2688 (May 28, 1992):385 (2 pages).
Vice Pres Dan Quayle blamed the Los Angeles riots on family breakdowns and lack of values in the inner cities of the US. Quayle criticized the television show 'Murphy Brown' for setting a poor moral example for Americans.

Rebeck, Victoria A.
"From Mary to Murphy: codependent no more." (television shows) (column) Christian Century v106, n31 (Oct 25, 1989):948 (2 pages).

Rosenthal, Andrew.
"Get ready, America: Murphy responds." (television situation comedy 'Murphy Brown' returns with response to Dan Quayle) (National Pages) (The 1992 Campaign) New York Times v141 (Fri, Sept 4, 1992):A7(N), A12(L), col 1, 9 col in.

Snortland, Ellen.
"'Values' is code for 'Dad is the boss.'" (Dan Quayle's comments on single mothers and family values) (Column) Los Angeles Times v111 (Fri, May 22, 1992):B7, col 3, 16 col in.

Stabiner, Karen.
"Murphy, go for more than laughs." (in its last season, television show Murphy Brown may tackle issue of breast cancer)(Column) Los Angeles Times v116 (Thu, June 12, 1997):B9, col 3, 13 col in.

"An unmarried woman and a political fight." (Murphy Brown television program) U.S. News & World Report v112, n21 (June 1, 1992):10 (1 page).
Dan Quayle's remarks about the Murphy Brown television program and the star's decision to have a child out of wedlock have led to arguments about American values. The remarks were made because of the Bush administration's decision to concentrate on family values during the 1992 campaign.

Vobejda, Barbara.
"Can a sitcom change society? Debate rises over popular culture's effect on American values." (after Dan Quayle criticizes the program 'Murphy Brown' for undermining family values) Washington Post v115 (Thu, May 21, 1992):A1, col 2, 24 col in.

Whitehead, Barbara Dafoe.
"What is Murphy Brown saying?" (television program glamorizes single motherhood) Washington Post v115 (Sun, May 10, 1992):C5, col 4, 23 col in.

Yang, John E.; Devroy, Ann.
"Quayle: 'Hollywood doesn't get it;' administration struggles to explain attack on TV's Murphy Brown." (Dan Quayle commenting on social aspects of single parenthood) Washington Post v115 (Thu, May 21, 1992):A1, col 3, 23 col in.

Zoglin, Richard.
"Sitcom politics." (television industry's supposed liberal values) (Cover Story) Time v140, n12 (Sept 21, 1992):44 (4 pages).
"Many celebrities have begun to respond to Vice President Dan Quayle's highly-publicized criticisms of the entertainment industry for its liberalism and supposed hostility to family values. In fact, most television shows respect the family bond."

[The Adventures of] Ozzie and Harriet
Baker, Debra.
"Beyond Ozzie and Harriet." (developments in domestic relations law)ABA Journal v84 (Sept, 1998):58 (6 pages).
"Changes in family law have been great since the 1950s and can include developing antenuptial contracts, visitation problems when grandparents and stepparents demand such rights, dissolution problems when unmarried couples decide they no longer want to live together, and helping infertile couples interested in reproductive technology. Modern situation comedies on television can depict these new realities and differ greatly from the nostalgic domestic relations view depicted by the 1950s Ozzie and Harriet show." [Magazine Index]

Barringer, Felicity.
"Dialogue that lingers: 'Hi, mom.' 'Hi, pop.' 'Hi, David.' Hi, Rick.'" ('Ozzie and Harriet' television program low adventure by today's standards) New York Times v144, sec4 (Sun, Oct 9, 1994):E7(N), E7(L), col 1, 27 col in. <

Coontz, Stephanie.
"'Leave It To Beaver' and 'Ozzie and Harriet': American Familes in the 1950s." In: The way we never were : American families and the nostalgia trap New York, NY : BasicBooks, c1992.
MAIN: HQ535 .C643 1992
MOFF: HQ535 .C643 1992

Curtis, Gregory.
"A defense of the drama of quotidian life: leave Ozzie and Harriet alone." New York Times Magazine (Sun, Jan 19, 1997):40, col 1, 24 col in.
A man reminisces about the nature of the Ozzie and Harriet Nelson family TV show of the 1950s. The show was not set in an unreal time, so different with its sunny family harmony from now, rather it is timeless in showcasing the small daily things that keeps family together, no matter what the era.

Denis, Christopher
Favorite families of TV Secaucus, N.J. : Carol Pub. Group, c1992.
MOFF: PN1992.8.F33 D46 1992

Garvey, John.
"An incoherent culture: life after 'Ozzie & Harriet.'" (US society's changing cultural mores)Commonweal v120, n12 (June 18, 1993):10 (2 pages).
American culture was much more cohesive and community-orientated during World War II. After the war, this sense of commonality began to diminish. Now, there are many diverse groups that are all struggling to be heard and represented. A new vision of society is needed.

Goodman, Walter.
"Black stereotypes: reflections of Ozzie and Harriet." (how blacks on television) New York Times v144 (Sun, Jan 22, 1995):H32(N), H32(L), col 1, 22 col in.

"Harriet Nelson, 85, matriarch of 'Ozzie and Harriet' show." (Obituary)
New York Times v144 (Tue, Oct 4, 1994):C19(N), B8(L), col 4, 9 col in.

Hoffman, Alice.
"Move over Ozzie and Harriet; once, TV only showed typical happy families. A crop of new series offers everything but." New York Times v137, sec2 (Sun, Feb 14, 1988):H1(N), H1(L), col 4, 36 col in.

Holmes, John R.
"The wizardry of Ozzie: breaking character in early television." (Ozzie and Harriet Nelson) Journal of Popular Culture v23, n2 (Fall, 1989):93 (10 pages). 1 of 4

Joslyn, James and Pendleton, John.
"The Adventures Of Ozzie And Harriet." Journal of Popular Culture 1973 7(1): 23-41.
Discusses the cultural influence of the Ozzie and Harriet television program, 1950's-66, and its demise due to cultural and social change; includes interviews with the Nelsons.

King, Peter H.
"'Ozzie and Harriet' - an epilogue." (death of Harriet Nelson is a metaphor for death of perfect suburban life) (Column) Los Angeles Times v113 (Sun, Oct 9, 1994):A3, col 1, 17 col in.

Leo, John.
"Sneer not at 'Ozzie and Harriet.'" (On Society) U.S. News & World Report v113, n10 (Sept 14, 1992):24 (1 page).
The assault on the nuclear family began in the 1960s with movements such as feminism that emphasized individuals rather than institutions such as the family. The 'family values' controversy is only the latest phase of that particular battle.

Leibman, Nina C.
Living room lectures : the fifties family in film and television Austin : University of Texas Press, 1995.
Main Stack PN1992.8.F33.L45 1995

McMillan, Susan Carpenter.
"Ozzie & Harriet for the '90s: Ozzie & Harriet." (considering the nuclear family) (Column) Los Angeles Times v112 (Tue, May 25, 1993):B7, col 5, 17 col

Taylor, Ella.
Prime-time families television culture in postwar America Berkeley : University of California Press, 1990, c1989
Full-text online (UCB users only)
MAIN: PN1992.8.F33 T391 1989
MOFF: PN1992.8.F33 T39 1989

Roseanne

Batty, Nancy.
"America's Worst Nightmare ... Roseanne!" Paradoxa: Studies in World Literary Genres 1997, 3:3-4, 539-55.

Bettie, Julie.
"Class Dismissed? Roseanne and the Changing Face of Working-Class Iconography." Social Text, 1995 Winter, 14:4 (45), 125-49.
UC users only

Billen, Andrew.
"A post-modern finale to Roseanne." (television series) New Statesman (1996) v126, n4339 (June 20, 1997):40 (2 pages).
The television series 'Roseanne' ended by departing from its original premise of portraying an average working class family. The sitcom finally ended because of its failure to elicit the kind of laughter it used to provoke among its audiences.

Dresner, Zita Z.
"Roseanne Barr: Goddess or She-Devil." Journal of American Culture, 1993 Summer, 16:2, 37-43.

Dutka, Elaine.
"Slightly to the left of normal." (interview with TV personality Roseanne Barr) (interview) Time v133, n19 (May 8, 1989):82 (2 pages).

Freed, Roseanne.
"The gripes of wrath: Roseanne's bitter comedy of class." Television Quarterly v28, n1 (Wntr, 1996):30 (11 pages).
The public and critical reactions to the working class character portrayed by television performer Roseanne are discussed. Rosanne is praised for redefining family entertainment through her skeptical view of traditional family values.
"The television show 'Roseanne' has benefitted society by its comedy of working class problems. The show's critics have missed this and considered it merely vulgar, whereas the show has given voice to realistic social problems such as imperfect parents, beleaguered mothers and a plucky blue collar spirit. Blue collar families that suffer from the economy finally gained a voice on TV, and the definition of family entertainment in America has been broadened thanks to the show." [Magazine Index]

Lahr, John.
Dealing with Roseanne. New Yorker v71, n20 (July 17, 1995):42 (19 pages).
"Roseanne rose from radical-feminist comedienne to the most powerful woman in show business, one of few performers in history with total creative control. Her comedic portrayal of the working class woman is meant to shock. Her management of 'Roseanne' and the new 'Absolutely Fabulous' are profiled." [Magazine Index]

Lee, J.
"Subversive sitcoms: Roseanne as inspiration for feminist resistance." Women's Studies, Mar92, Vol. 21 Issue 1, p87, 15p
UC users only

Mayerle, Judine.
"Roseanne How Did You Get Inside My House? A Case Study of a Hit Blue-Collar Situation Comedy." Journal of Popular-Culture, 1991 Spring, 24:4, 71-88.
UC users only

Rowe, Kathleen-K.
"Roseanne: Unruly Woman as Domestic Goddess." Screen, 1990 Winter, 31:4, 408-419.

Schmitz, Neil.
"Humor's Body: Jackie Gleason, Roseanne, and Some Others." Arizona Quarterly 2000 Summer, 56:2, 97-109.

Waters, Harry F.; Huck, Janet.
"Networking women." (women in television) Newsweek v113, n11 (March 13, 1989):48 (6 pages).

Seinfeld

Andersen, Kurt.
"The culture industry: why we want our television shows to die before they get old." (final episodes of 'Seinfeld,' 'Ellen,' 'Murphy Brown,' and 'The Larry Sanders Show') New Yorker v74, n12 (May 18, 1998):29 (2 pages).
May 1998 will see Americans pouring over final episodes of four of television's characteristically baby boomer inspired sitcoms. In the 30 years since the much anticipated final episode of 'The Fugitive,' television viewers have become accustomed to spectacular finales.

Auster, Albert.
"Much ado about nothing: some final thoughts on Seinfeld."Television Quarterly v29, n4 (Fall, 1998):24 (10 pages).
"The television series Seinfeld continued the tradition of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H* and Cheers as a highly rated critically acclaimed television series that helped define contemporary American comedy. The series was pitched as a show about nothing and was frequently criticized for surreal situations going too far. The success of the series was carried on the backs of the actors and writers." [Magazine Index]

Brodesser, Claude.
"'Seinfeld' verdict in: show was without peer.(May 14, 1998 final episode" Variety v371, n2 (May 18, 1998):36 (1 page).

Brook, Vincent.
"From the Cozy to the Carceral: Trans-Formations of Ethnic Space in The Goldbergs and Seinfeld." Velvet Light Trap. 44:54-67. 1999 Fall
UC users only
"In this comparative analysis of The Goldbergs(1949-1950) and Seinfeld (1989-1998), theoretical notions of space and ethnicity are applied to two quintessentially Jewish situation comedies—one the first successful situation comedy on television, the other America's most popular situation comedy of the 1990s—to determine how the two series' ethnospatial constructions reflect historical changes in the larger televisual institution and American society. The ethnological framework of this study builds on Werner Sollors's binary scheme of descent-based and consent-based structures in American culture. Applying Sollors's schema to the two Jewish situation comedies then, descent-based structures would seem to fit quite snugly with the Bronx-dwelling, Yiddish-speaking immigrant Goldbergs, as would consent-based modes with the yuppie Manhattanite, Jewish-in-name-only Seinfeld and company. Yet, although Seinfeld's dismissal of descent-based ethnicity in favor of a consensual social practice is patently displayed in the series, terms such as "mature free agents," "architects of our fate," and "choosers of spouses," "destinies," and, most especially, "political systems," hardly seems commensurable with the postmodern show "about nothing."" [Communication Abstracts]

Brook, Vincent.
Something ain't kosher here : the rise of the "Jewish" sitcom New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2003.
MAIN: PN1992.8.J48 B76 2003

Caesar, Terry
"#1 Dad: Fatherhood, Reception, and Television in Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm." Studies in American Humor, vol. 3, no. 18, pp. 59-73, 2008

Collins, James.
"Goodbye, already: as the Seinfeld hoopla hits an annoying crescendo, historical perspective is in order." Time v151, n19 (May 18, 1998):82 (4 pages).
The final episode of the extremely popular long-running sitcom will air on May 14, 1998, on NBC. A tremendous amount of hype has surrounded the show and its demise. Great shows of the past are among topics discussed.

Dominguez, Robert.
"Seinfeld episode still angers Puerto Ricans." (National Puerto Rican Coalition finds continued tainting of Latinos by writers)(Brief Article)Hispanic v11, n7-8 (July-August, 1998):16 (1 page).

Gencarella Olbrys, Stephen.
"Seinfeld 's Democratic Vistas." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Dec2005, Vol. 22 Issue 5, p390-408, 19p,

Gunster, Shane.
""All about Nothing": Difference, Affect, and Seinfeld." Television & New Media, May2005, Vol. 6 Issue 2, p200-223, 24p
UC users only

Hibbs, Thomas S.
Shows about nothing : nihilism in popular culture from the Exorcist to Seinfeld Dallas : Spence Pub., 1999.
Main PN1995.9.N55 H53 1999

Hibbs, Thomas S.
"Normal nihilism as comic : Seinfeld, Trainspotting, and Pulp fiction." In: Shows about nothing : nihilism in popular culture / Thomas S. Hibbs. Waco, Tex. : Baylor University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN1995.9.N55 H53 2012

Hirsch, Irwin; Hirsch, Cara.
"Seinfeld's Humor Noir: A Look at Our Dark Side." (Jerry Seinfeld)Journal of Popular Film and Television v28, n3 (Fall, 2000):116.
UC users only

Hurd, Robert.
"Taking "Seinfeld" Seriously: Modernism in Popular Culture." New Literary History, Fall2006, Vol. 37 Issue 4, p761-776, 16p;
UC users only

Johnson,Carla.
"Luckless in New York: the schlemiel and the schlimazl in Seinfeld."Journal of Popular Film and Television v 22 Fall 1994. p. 116-24.
UC users only
"The television comedy show Seinfeld regularly employs theschlemiel/schlimazl shtick evolved from Yiddish folklore and literature. The show's roots in Jewish folklore, literature, and humor may,ironically, explain its present popularity in the United States. Jewishexperience has come to mirror the frustrations of mainstream America inthe 1990s, with its shrinking opportunities, claustrophobic urbanization,limitations on movement, and stalling of the American dream. The show'sunexpected success thus attests to a new sensibility on the part ofAmerican viewers; confronted with an increasingly grim landscape, they find a way to laugh at their troubles in humor characterized byalienation and frustration." [Art Abstracts]

Krieger, Rosalin.
"Does He Actually Say the Word Jewish?" -- Jewish Representations in Seinfeld." Journal For Cultural Research, Vol 7:4 October 2003.
UC users only

Leverette, Marc.
"Deconstructing Larry, 'The Last Man': Larry David, Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Comedies of the Self." Studies in Popular Culture, Oct2004, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p1-17, 17p

Long, Rob.
"Jerry built: the success of 'Seinfeld' was an implicit rebuke to PC pieties - and a confirmation of America's unpredictable spirit." (political correctness and the success of Jerry Seinfeld's television program) National Review v50, n2 (Feb 9, 1998):32 (2 pages).
"'Seinfeld' should be missed by conservatives because of its iconoclastic assault on politically correct truisms. The sociopathic behavior of its characters is not to be feared or taken seriously. The show was an excuse to laugh for 21 minutes a week, and met that responsibility admirably." [Magazine Index]

Marin, Rick; Hammer, Joshua.
"The last laugh." (the last episode of the 'Seinfeld' television program)(includes related interview with Jerry Seinfeld and his collaborator Larry David) Newsweek v131, n16 (April 20, 1998):48 (9 pages).
"A viewing of the last episode of the 'Seinfeld' show is described, although the plot cannot be revealed. The last episode has been kept secret, although it is expected to garner one of the largest television audiences and advertisers are paying up to $2 million for 30 seconds of commercial time." [Magazine Index]

McConnell, Frank.
"No way to exit." (critique of the last 'Seinfeld' episode) Commonweal v125, n11 (June 5, 1998):20 (2 pages).
The last 'Seinfeld' episode was expectedly absurd with the characters landing in prison for being themselves. Not too many people got the joke and deemed the episode ridiculous and unfunny.

Miller, Patrick D.
"Good-bye Seinfeld." (television program)(Editorial)Theology Today v55, n2 (July, 1998):147 (5 pages).
"Much of the appeal of the television comedy 'Seinfeld' can be attributed to its talented actors and writers. The show about "nothing" focused on everyday life and made it interesting and funny. The portrayal of casual sex and superficial relationships conveyed a disturbing message, however. Moreover, the popularity of 'Seinfeld' points to the significant role television plays in shaping morality." [Magazine Index]

Mills, Nicolaus.
"So long, Jerry Seinfeld."Dissent v45, n3 (Summer, 1998):89 (4 pages).
"The end of the television program 'Seinfeld,' drew an estimated 76 million viewers. Considered as the leading sitcom of the nineties, the show lasted nine seasons and had a weekly audience of 30 million. It generated an annual $200 million dollars in profit for NBC. The show's popularity stemmed from the ability of the main characters to tackle political correctness and various views on academic life." [Magazine Index]

Moore, David W.
"Close to half the country may watch final episode of "Seinfeld."" Gallup Poll Monthly, n392 (May, 1998):19 (2 pages).
"Gallup poll results showed that almost half of all Americans expect to watch the last episode of the television program 'Seinfeld.' The survey, based on telephone interviews with a randomly selected national sample of 1,007 respondents and conducted on Apr 17-19, 1998, revealed that 44% of Americans will be watching the program in its last episode. About half of Americans also regard themselves as 'Seinfeld' fans while more than half think of the show's characters as likable." [Magazine Index]

Morreale, Joanne
"Sitcoms Say Goodbye: The Cultural Spectacle of Seinfeld's Last Episode." Journal of Popular Film and Television v28, n3 (Fall, 2000):108.
UC users only

Morris, Barbra S.
"Why Is George So Funny? Television Comedy, Trickster Heroism, and Cultural Studies." English Journal. 88 (4): 47-52. 1999.

O'Brien,-Geoffrey.
"Sein of the Times." New York Review of Books, 1997 Aug 14, 44:13, 12-14.

Paolucci, Paul; Richardson, Margaret.
"Dramaturgy, humor, and criticism: How Goffman reveals Seinfeld's critique of American culture." Humor: International Journal of Humor Research, 2006, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p27-52, 26p
UC users only

Pierson, David P.
"A show about nothing: 'Seinfeld' and the modern comedy of manners." Journal of Popular Culture v34, n1 (Summer, 2000):49 (1 page).
UC users only
Criticism of the television series 'Seinfeld' is presented, with particular focus on the absurd quality of acting trivial, everyday situations. The comedy's critical observations of social manners and the dramatic interpretation of civility are emphasized.

Purdy, Jedediah.
"Terminal irony: escaping the Seinfeld perplex." Utne Reader, n89 (Sept-Oct, 1998):26 (4 pages).
Contemporary irony is a countercharge partially to the growth of hypocrisy in private life, where feelings have come to draw remorselessness and frequently insincere concern. Irony also serves as a defense against pompousness and self-seriousness.

Rapping, Elayne
" The 'Seinfeld' syndrome." (negative aspects of situation comedies on television)(Culture)(Column) The Progressive Sept 1995 v59 n9 p37(2)
UC users only
"Situation comedies such as 'Seinfeld' portray adults as irresponsible and immature. Shows such as these allow people to forget about their problems, but most of the shows are unrealistic programs that promote the decline of work and family life." [Expanded Academic Index]

Sadler, William J.; Haskins, Ekaterina V.
"Metonymy and the Metropolis: Television Show Settings and the Image of New York City." Journal of Communication Inquiry, Jul2005, Vol. 29 Issue 3, p195-216, 22p

Seinfeld and philosophy : a book about everything and nothing
Edited by William Irwin. Chicago : Open Court, c2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks B68 .S44 2000

Seinfeld, master of its domain : revisiting television's greatest sitcom
Edited by David Lavery with Sara Lewis Dunne. New York : Continuum International Pub. Group, 2006.
MAIN: PN1992.77.S4285 S43 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip062/2005030744.html

Smith, Chris.
"Jerry Seinfeld: making something out of nothing." (television actor and comedian)(Oral History)(Interview) New York v31, n13 (April 6, 1998):182 (2 pages).
Seinfeld's eponymous television series began as an idea he discussed with fellow comedian Larry David. The idea called for two New York comedians to make fun of trivialities of daily life. The shows advances in comedic tone account in large measure for its success, according to Seinfeld.

Storey, Robert.
"A Critique of Recent Theories of Laughter and Humor, with Special Reference to the Comedy ofSeinfeld." Interdisciplinary Literary Studies: a Journal of Criticism & Theory. 2(2):75-92. 2001 Spring

Vaught, Jennifer.
"Shakespeare in a Sitcom?: Intertextual Allusions to Hamlet in Seinfeld's Parody "Junk Mail"." Interdisciplinary Humanities, Fall2003, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p28-37, 10p
UC users only

Watson, Mary Ann.
"The Seinfeld doctrine - "no hugging, no learning" - imprints the 1990s." Television Quarterly v29, n3 (Summer, 1998):52 (3 pages).
"'Seinfeld' depicts a self-absorbed, cynical era and has been called the "defining sitcom" of the 1990s. 'Seinfeld' rejects morality and offers viewers a license to laugh at unpolitically correct situations. Some episodes reflect an unsophisticated attitude toward life, but friends in real life and on TV should appear more like angels." [Magazine Index]

Zehme, Bill.
"Jerry and George and Kramer and Elaine: exposing the secrets of Seinfeld's success." (television situation comedy 'Seinfeld')Rolling Stone, n660-61 (July 8, 1993):40 (7 pages).
"'Seinfeld' has been a hit comedy TV show for four years despite its focus on ordinary characters in mundane situations. Four actors from the show discuss their characters' similarities to their real personalities." [Expanded Academic Index]

Zurawik, David.
"A "too-Jewish"/not-Jewish-enough Jew for the '90s : Seinfeld." In: The Jews of prime time / David Zurawik. Hanover, NH : Brandeis University Press/University Press of New England, c2003.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.J48 Z87 2003

Sex and the City

Albert Auster.
"Sex and the City." (television program, HBO) Television Quarterly Wntr 2002 v32 i4 p52(4)
" Home Box Office Television's 'Sex and the City' is unique in portraying women who discuss and act toward men the way many men have long treated women. Although sexual behavior is a theme, the show is essentially about the loneliness in searching for intimacy, romance, and viable relationships." [Expanded Academic Index]

Arthurs, Jane.
"Sex and the City and Consumer Culture: Remediating Postfeminist Drama." Feminist Media Studies. 3 (1): 83-98. 2003 Mar.
UC users only

Barger, Lilian Calles.
"What I learned from sex and the city: seeking a spirituality of the body." (Culture)(Critical Essay) Sojourners August 2004 v33 i8 p38(4)
UC users only

Bernard, Sarah
"Sex maniacs: whom does 'Sex and the City' really speak to." (Review) New York Oct 4, 1999 v32 i38 p13(1)
A discussion of why gay men are fans of the TV show 'Sex in the City' is presented. Gays like the show because they identify with concerns of the women characters and feel that the show presents a gay man's perspective.

Billen, Andrew .
"Sex and the City." (Review) New Statesman (1996) Feb 12, 1999 v128 i4423 p47(2)
UC users only

Brasfield, Rebeeca.
"Rereading: Sex and the City: Exposing the Hegemonic Feminist Narrative." Journal of Popular Film & Television, Fall2006, Vol. 34 Issue 3, p130-139, 10p
UC users only

Byers, Michele; Krieger, Rosalin.
"From Ugly Duckling to Cool Fashion Icon: Sarah Jessica Parker's Blonde Ambitions." Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies, Summer2007, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p43-63, 21p
UC users only
Carter, Bill
"Serious tone adds to success of 'Sex and the City.'" The New York Times August 13, 2001 pC1(N) pC1(L) col 2 (25 col in)

Comella, Lynn.
"(Safe) Sex and the City: On Vibrators, Masturbation, and the Myth of 'Real' Sex." Feminist Media Studies. 3 (1): 109-12. 2003 Mar.

Cramer, Janet M.
"Discourses of Sexual Morality in Sex and the City and Queer as Folk." Journal of Popular Culture, Jun2007, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p409-432, 24p
UC users only
Dana, Will
"Sex and the City." (Review) Rolling Stone June 24, 1999 i815 p73(1)

Franklin, Nancy
"Sex and the City." (television program reviews) The New Yorker July 6, 1998 v74 n18 p74(4)

Frutkin, Alan James
"The return of the show that gets gay life right; on 'Queer as Folk,' the sexual battle lines are sharply drawn; on 'Sex and the City,' everyone just tries to get along." The New York Times Jan 6, 2002 pAR33(N) pAR33(L) col 1 (35 col in)

Gates, Anita
"If 'Sex and the City' moved to the 30's they'd call it 'The Women.'" ('The Women') (television program review) The New York Times June 16, 2002 s0 pSP15(N) col 1 (35 col in)

Gerhard, Jane.
"Sex and the City." Feminist Media Studies, Mar2005, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p37-49, 13p

Gray, Jennifer B.
"Interpersonal Communication and the Illness Experience in the Sex and the City Breast Cancer Narrative." Communication Quarterly, Nov2007, Vol. 55 Issue 4, p397-414, 18p

Gutierrez, Gabriella Muhs
"Slim, selfish, it's just not me: HBO series `Sex and the City' reminds us how not to live our lives." (Opinion). (Gabriella Gutierrez y Muhs, narrative)(Brief Article)(Column) National Catholic Reporter Nov 16, 2001 v38 i4 p20(2)
UC users only

Handyside, Fiona.
"It's Either Fake or Foreign: The Cityscape in Sex and the City." Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, Sep2007, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p405-418, 14p;

Hass, Nancy
"Yes, 'sex' sells, in the city and elsewhere; a comedy about dating in Manhattan and laughing in the face of chastity." (popularity of HBO TV series 'Sex and the City')(Living Arts Pages) The New York Times July 13, 1999 pB8(N) col 1 (35 col in)

Holden, Stephen
"Tickets to fantasies of urban desire; each drama seems an isolated orb." The New York Times July 20, 1999 pB1(N) pE1(L) col 3 (46 col in)

James, Caryn
"Sex and the City." (television program reviews) The New York Times June 5, 1998 v147 pB28(N) pE32(L) col 3 (6 col in)

Jefferson, Margo.
"Finding refuge in pop culture's version of friendship." (The Arts) The New York Times July 23, 2002 pB2(N) pE2(L) col 3

Jermyn, Deborah.
"Still something else besides a mother? Negotiating celebrity motherhood in Sarah Jessica Parker's star story." Social Semiotics, Jun2008, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p163-176, 14p

Katz, Alyssa
"Sex and the City." (television program reviews) The Nation August 24, 1998 v267 n6 p36(1)
UC users only

Kenny, Mary.
"Sex and the City means family values: many people have a low opinion of the cult TV soap, but not Mary Kenny, who sees 'the forces of conservatism' in it." (Television Program Review) Spectator August 16, 2003 v292 i9132 p26(1) (1084 words)
UC users only

Kim, L. S.
"Sex and the Single Girl" in Postfeminism: The F Word on Television. Television & New Media, Nov2001, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p319, 16p;

Koulouris, Niki
"Escape in kitten heels: Sex and the City." (TV Eye)(Television Program Review). Metro Magazine Wntr 2003 i135 p202(2) (930 words) )

Markle, Gail. "Can Women Have Sex Like a Man?": Sexual Scripts in Sex and the City." Sexuality & Culture, Winter2008, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p45-57, 13p

Martin, James .
"Sex--and reality--in the city." (tv, etc.)(the series Sex and the City)(Television Program Review) America Feb 16, 2004 v190 i5 p17 (1336 words)
UC users only

Maurer, Kathrin.
"Sex in the City: Nostalgic Pleasure in Prime Time Television." In: Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery. Conference (13th : 2003 : Colorado Springs, Co.) The image of the city in literature, media, and society; selected papers [from the] 2003 conference [of the] Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery. Pueblo, Co. : The Society, 2003
Main Stack On order

Negra, Diane.
"Quality Postfeminism? Sex and the Single Girl on HBO." Genders. 39 2004

Orenstein, Catherine
"What Carrie Could Learn From Mary." (Editorial Desk)(unlike the feminist characters in 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show,' the female characters in 'Sex and the City' are a caricature of a generation of young women that take the gains made by feminism for granted)(Column) The New York Times Sept 5, 2003 pA19 col 01 (21 col in)

Owen, A. Susan
"Leaving the Mothership: Postmodernity and Postfeminism in Ally McBeal and Sex and the City." In: Bad girls : cultural politics and media representations of transgressive women New York : P. Lang, c2007.
MAIN: HQ1421 .O94 2007

Raymond, Joan
"Sex and the Single Girl: 'Sex and the City' shows us single women who are anything but desperate. They're looking for men, sure, but it's just shopping, not survival." (Brief Article) Newsweek August 2, 1999 v134 i5 p60
UC users only

Reading Sex and the City
Edited by Kim Akass and Janet McCabe. London : I. B. Tauris, 2004.
Main Stack PN1992.8.C66.R42 2004
Salamon, Julie
"The relevance of 'Sex' in a city that's changed." ('Sex in the City' after Sept. 11) The New York Times July 21, 2002 s0 pAR1(N) pAR1(L) col 3 (35 col in)

Sanders, James
"'Sex' and the Mythic Movie Dream of New York City." (Arts and Leisure Desk)(Sex and the City)(Television Program Review) The New York Times Feb 22, 2004 pAR17 col 01 (41 col in)

Sikes, Gini
"Sex and the cynical girl: a gentler approach." (HBO's 'Sex and the City,' stars Sarah Jessica Parker, in TV version of Candace Bushnell's book of the same title) The New York Times April 5, 1998 v147 s2 pAR37(N) pAR37(L) col 1 (21 col in)

Stillion Southard, Belinda A.
"Beyond the Backlash: Sex and the City and Three Feminist Struggles." Communication Quarterly, May2008, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p149-167, 19p

Theilade, Karen Due
"Visual culture, public stories and personal experience: Young heterosexual women discuss Sex and The City." Women's Studies Journal, V. 17, NO. 1, pp. 26-48, 2001

Thornham, Sue
"Starting To Feel Like A Chick." Feminist Media Studies; Mar2007, Vol. 7 Issue 1, p33-46, 14p

Tierney, John
"TV gives sex in New York a bad name; a show says you have to be stylish, selfish and below 14th Street." (comments on HBO's "Sex and the City")(The Big City) . The New York Times July 15, 1999 s0 pB1(L) col 1 (17 col in)

Tropp, Laura
"Faking a Sonogram": Representations of Motherhood on Sex and the City." Journal of Popular Culture, Oct2006, Vol. 39 Issue 5, p861-877, 17p
UC users only
Tukachinsky, Riva H.
"Feminist And Postfeminist Readings Of Romantic Narratives." Feminist Media Studies; Jun2008, Vol. 8 Issue 2, p181-196, 16p
This paper examines the reception and interpretation of romantic narratives among fifteen Israeli heterosexual women viewers of the TV series Sex and the City. Based upon the dialogue carried out by the participants in two discussion groups and individual interviews, I map the different strategies employed by the viewers in interpreting the show, as situated within their worldviews concerning issues such as romance and romantic relationships, power relations, and social gender roles. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Vineberg, Steve
"The courage to aim both high and low: 'Sex and the City' is TV's most daring comedy, in its subject matter and in its willingness to explore dangerous emotions." The New York Times July 22, 2001 s0 pAR28(N) pAR28(L) col 1 (35 col in)

The Simpsons

The Simpsons Archive

Allen, John L. Jr.
"'Simpsons,' pop culture and Christianity." (religious factors that creep into popular TV show)(Column) National Catholic Reporter July 17, 1998 v34 n34 p25
UC users only

Beiler Ryan
"Don't Have a Sacred Cow, Man!" (Matt Groening) Sojourners Sept 2001 v30 i5 p50 (1095 words)
UC users only

Brown, Mike
"Skeptical 'Simpsons' episode spoofs aliens, pseudoscience. (animated television series)(News and Comment) > Skeptical Inquirer Sept-Oct 1997 v21 n5 p8(3)
UC users only
"A popular, half-hour, prime-time, network television series has produced an outstanding episode of an 'alien encounter' that would entertain skeptical viewers. This episode of 'The Simpson's' spoofs characters from other television programs past and present, such as Mr. Spock of the 'Star Trek' series and agents Mulder and Scully of the 'The X-Files' series. It effectively, with much humor, trashes the branch of pseudoscience dealing with extra-terrestrial encounters." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bybee, Carl; Overbeck, Ashley.
"Homer Simpson explains our postmodern identity crisis, whether we like it or not: Media literacy after "The Simpsons."." Simile, Feb2001, Vol. 1 Issue 1,
UC users only
Cantor, Paul A.
"In praise of television: the greatest TV show ever." ('The Simpsons')(includes related article on a visit to Springfield, Oregon) The American Enterprise Sept-Oct 1997 v8 n5 p34(4)
" 'The Simpsons,' a realistic depiction of everyday life in a US town in cartoons, is considered as having ushered the golden age of TV cartoons. The show's creativeness and consistently good quality have remained unmatched by other TV shows. So far, the greatest challenge that the show has overcome is the creation of the cartoon-within-the cartoon, with the cartoon show 'Itchy and Scratchy.'" [Expanded Academic Index]

Cantor, Paul A.
"The Simpsons: Atomistic Politics and the Nuclear Family." Political Theory, Vol. 27, No. 6. (Dec., 1999), pp. 734-749.
UC users only
""The Simpsons" may seem like a mere television cartoon, but the show does have something to tell us about America and the American family. Although it is mainly known for the way it makes fun of American institutions, the show presents the family in a whole web of institutions that make up the small-town American way of life, including schools and the church. Thus, "The Simpsons" presents a positive image of the nuclear family, precisely because it presents the family in the context of larger social and political institutions." [Philosopher's Index]

Carson, Tom
"The Gospel Accordingly to Homer." (influence of cartoon television show "The Simpsons") Esquire July 1999 v132 i1 p32

Cherniavsky, Eva. ""Karmic realignment": transnationalism and trauma "The Simpsons."" Cultural Critique, Winter 1999, Issue 41, p139-157, 19p

Corliss, Richard
"The Cartoon Character: Bart Simpson: Talk AboutArrested Development--This Kid Has Been 10 for 11 Years! And WeHope He Stays There. Deplorable, Adorable, Bart Is a Brat for the Ages."Time 151:22 [8 June 1998] p.204-205

Creating prime-time comedy : The Simpsons
One in a series of satellite seminars which investigate how prime-time television is conceptualized and created. The creative team and cast who produced the animated comedy The Simpsons, discuss how each show evolves from original idea, through script and storyboard development and into production. Includes clips from the show and a call-in question-and-answer session. This seminar is presented at the Museum of Television and Radio, Los Angeles, California" (November 14, 1996)
Media Center VIDEO/C 4657

Dalton, Lise. Mazur, Eric Michael. Siems, Monica.
"Homer the Heretic and Charlie Church: Parody, Piety, and Pluralism in The Simpsons." In: God in the details : American religion in popular culture / edited by Eric Michael Mazur and Kate McCarthy. pp: 231-47. New York : Routledge, 2001.
Main Stack BL2525.G625 2001

Dart, John
"Simpsons have soul." (religious satire on The Simpsons show) . The Christian Century Jan 31, 2001 v118 i4 p12
UC users only

Dobson, Hugo.
"Mister Sparkle Meets the Yakuza: Depictions of Japan in The Simpsons." Journal of Popular Culture, Feb2006, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p44-68, 25p;
UC users only
Donnelly, Kevin.
"The Simpsons and South Park." In: The television genre book / edited by Glen Creeber; associate editors, Toby Miller and John Tulloch. pp: 74-75. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1992.55.T45 2001

Eliscu, Jenny
"Homer and me." (interview with "Simpsons" creator Matt Groening)(Interview) Rolling Stone Nov 28, 2002 i910 p50(9)
Matt Groening talks about his successful "Simpsons" animated series, which is entering its fourteenth season on the Fox network. In an interview, Groening talks about his career, his childhood and the success of his animated show.

Englandkennedy, Elizabeth.
"Media Representations of Attention Deficit Disorder: Portrayals of Cultural Skepticism in Popular Media." Journal of Popular Culture, Feb2008, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p91-117, 27p
UC users only

Felperin, L.
"Animated cool." Sight & Sound v. ns9 no. 3 (Mediawatch 1999) p. 16-7
"Adult-oriented series like The Simpsons and King of the Hill have made animation a ratings success story in the 1990s. Since being launched as a 30-minute sitcom in 1989, The Simpsons has regularly featured in top 20 lists of the highest-rated shows on American television, and it has proved similarly successful in Britain. One of the interesting knock-on effects of adult-friendly animated series on television has been that children's animated feature films are now starting to include jokes aimed specifically at the adults who are theoretically accompanying children viewers." [Art Index]

Ferrari, Chiara.
"Dubbing The Simpsons: Or How Groundskeeper Willie Lost His Kilt in Sardinia." Journal of Film & Video, Summer2009, Vol. 61 Issue 2, p19-37, 19p
UC users only

Frank, Lisa
"The evolution of the seven deadly sins: from God to the Simpsons." Journal of Popular Culture Summer 2001 v35 i1 p95(11)
UC users only
"Outlines the development of the idea of the "seven deadly sins" and analyzes their continuing influence on American culture during the 1990's. The ideas of pride, envy, wrath, lust, gluttony, covetousness, and sloth have their roots in the Bible and in early Christian history but in modern times have been accepted as part of human character and in many ways have been turned into virtues. The author portrays this transformation through an analysis of how each of the sins has been treated by the television cartoon series The Simpsons. The characters in the series embody many of the traits as natural and, although they are objects of humor, present the sins as part of human nature and beneficial." [America: History and Life]

Glynn, Kevin.
"Bartmania: The Social Reception of an Unruly Image." Camera Obscura. 38:61-90. 1996 May

Goldberg, Johah
Homer Never Nods: The importance of The Simpsons. National Review May 1, 2000 v52 i8 pNA
UC users only

Gray, Jonathan.
"Imagining America: The Simpsons Go Global." Popular Communication, 2007, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p129-148, 20p;

Gray, Jonathan.
"Television Teaching: Parody, The Simpsons, and Media Literacy Education." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Aug2005, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p223-238, 16p;

Henry, Matthew.
"The Triumph of Popular Culture: Situation Comedy, Postmodernism, and The Simpsons ." Studies in Popular Culture XVII:1 (October1994): 85-99.

Henry, Matthew.
"'Don't Ask me, I'm Just a Girl': Feminism, Female Identity, and The Simpsons." Journal of Popular Culture; Apr2007, Vol. 40 Issue 2, p272-303, 32p
UC users only
Henry, Matthew.
"'The Whole World's Gone Gay!': Smithers' Sexuality, Homer's Phobia, and Gay Life on the Simpsons." Popular Culture Review. 13(1):19-33. 2002 Jan

Herron, Jerry
"Homer Simpson's Eyes and the Culture of Late Nostalgia." Representations, No. 43. (Summer, 1993), pp. 1-26.
UC users only

Hudes, Karen.
"It's the sitcom cartoons that have character." (cartoon characters in 'The Simpsons' and characters in 'Third Rock From the Sun' are more complex than the characters in 'Ally McBeal' and 'Dharma and Greg') New York Times v147, sec2 (Sun, March 8, 1998):AR36(N), AR36(L), col 1, 24 col in.

Hull, Margaret Betz.
"Postmodern Philosophy Meets Pop Cartoon: Michel Foucault and Matt Groening." Journal of Popular Culture. 34(2):57-67. 2000 Fall
UC users only
"Considers how late-20th-century pop cartoonist Matt Groening has applied the concepts of French social theorist Michel Foucault in his television series The Simpsons and book School is Hell, particularly Foucault's work Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (1977)." [America: History and Life]

Knox, Simone
"Reading the Ungraspable Double-Codedness of "The Simpsons"." Journal of Popular Film & Television 34:2 (Summer 2006) p. 72-81 p. 72-81
UC users only

Kutnowski, Martin.
"Trope and Irony in The Simpsons' Overture." Popular Music & Society, Dec2008, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p599-616, 18p
UC users only

Larson, Mary Strom.
"Family communication on prime-time television." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. Summer 1993. Vol. 37, Iss. 3; p. 349 (9 pages)
UC users only

Leaving Springfield : the Simpsons and the possibilities of oppositional culture / edited by John Alberti. Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2004. Contemporary film and television series.
Main Stack PN1992.77.S58.L43 2004
Moffitt PN1992.77.S58.L43 2004

Lewis, Todd V.
"Religious rhetoric and the comic frame in The Simpsons." Journal of Media & Religion. Vol 1(3), 2002, pp. 153-165

Lloyd, Robert
"Cartoon from hell." (cartoonist Matt Groening's new television cartoon show, "The Simpsons") American Film Oct 1989 v15 n1 p112(1)

MacGregor, Jeff
"More than sight gags and subversive satire." (TV show 'The Simpsons' continues to have high-quality shows) The New York Times June 20, 1999 s2 pAR27(N) pAR27(L) col 1 (25 col in)

Meskill, Carla.
"Through the Screen, into the School: Education, subversion, ourselves in The Simpsons." Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, Mar2007, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p37-48, 12p
UC users only
Mittell, Jason.
"Cartoon Realism: Genre Mixing and the Cultural Life of The Simpsons." Velvet Light Trap. 47:15-28. 2001 Spring
UC users only Argues that the show's cartoon realism enables it to sustain a 'cultural life' resulting from the interplay of genre conventions, industrial practices, and audience perceptions.

Neumann, Anne Waldron.
"The Simpsons." Quadrant 40(12 (332)):25-29. 1996

Orr, Brian L.
"'I'm Bart Simpson, Who the Hell Are You?': A Study in Postmodern Identity (Re)Construction." Journal of Popular Culture. 37(1):56-82. 2003 Aug

Ott, Brian L.
""I'm Bart Simpson, who the hell are you?" A study in postmodern identity (re)construction." Journal of Popular Culture August 2003 v37 i1 p56(27) (9993 words)
UC users only
"Examines the television series The Simpsons, which first aired in 1990, and three of its main characters, Bart, Homer, and Lisa, to show how they offered models of postmodern identity - how to be and how to be different. Moreover, television consumers found within the program the resources to create and re-create their own identities. One resource was related merchandise, but, more significantly, the information about the program and its characters that the show's fans sought out and exchanged created a postmodern, popular culture community. Bart represents the rebel, Homer the glutton of consuming pleasure, and Lisa the evolving "genius, feminist, vegetarian, musician, and moral center." [America: History and Life]

Owen, David.
"Taking Humor Seriously." The New Yorker. 76(3):64-75. 2000 Mar 13

Parisi, Peter.
"Black Bart" Simpson: Appropriation and Revitalization in Commodity Culture. Journal of Popular Culture 1993 27(1): 125-142.
"During the summer of 1990, a national merchandising blitz flooded stores with T-shirts depicting Bart Simpson, the main character of the popular television program "The Simpsons." As a militant underachiever, Bart Simpson caught the imagination of millions of Americans who celebrated his impish disrespect for authority. During the same summer, African Americans appropriated the image of Bart Simpson, darkened his complexion and refigured him into various images that came to be known as "Black Bart." The Black Bart image drew on the original persona but altered it to celebrate and lampoon black culture. Though a highly commodified image, Black Bart also seemed to be connected to the African tradition of the trickster, though displaying a decidedly postmodern twist." [America: History and Life]

Pinsky, Mark I.
The Gospel according to the Simpsons : the spiritual life of the world's most animated family Louisville : Westminster John Knox Press, c2001.
MAIN: PN1992.77.S58 P56 2001

Prime-time animation a conversation with the creators of The Simpsons, King of the Hill, and South Park[Video]
Los Angeles, CA : The Museum, [1998]
Panel: Matt Groening, Mike Judge, Trey Parker, Matt Stone. One in a series of satellite seminars which investigate how prime-time television is conceptualized and created. This film explores the creation of prime time animation in conversation with the four writers of "The Simpsons," "King of the Hill," and "South Park," who have set the look, style and content of prime time television animation for the past decade. Includes clips from the shows and a call-in question-and-answer session.
Media Center VIDEO/C 5668

Rushkoff, Douglas.
"Mediasprawl: Springfield U. S. A." Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies. 3: 128-36. 2003 Fall.

Sadownick, Doug
"Groening against the grain." (cartoonist Matt Groening includes gay characters in his work) (Cover Story) (interview) The Advocate Feb 26, 1991 n571 p30(6)

"The Simpsons." Journal of Popular Film & Television, Summer2006, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p72-81, 10p
UC users only
The Simpsons and philosophy : the d'oh! of Homer
Edited by William Irwin, Mark T. Conard, and Aeon J. Skoble. Chicago, Ill. : Open Court, c2001.
Contents: Pt. 1. The characters.Pt. 2. Simpsonian themes. TheThePt. 3.TheTheThePt. 4. The Raja Halwani;Aeon J. Skoble;Eric Bronson;Gerald J. Erion,Joseph A. Zeccardi;Mark T. Conard --William Irwin,J.R. Lombardo;Deborah Knight;Carl Matheson;Dale E. Snow,James J. Snow --James Lawler;Paul A. Cantor;Jason Holt;Daniel Barwick;David Vessey; Jennifer L. McMahon --James M. Wallace Homer and Aristotle /Lisa and American anti-intellectualism /Why Maggie matters: sounds of silence, East and West /Marge's moral motivation / Thus spake Bart: on Nietzsche and the virtues of being bad /Simpsons and allusion: "worst essay ever" /Popular parody: The Simpsons meets the crime film /Simpsons, hyper-irony, and the meaning of life /Simpsonian sexual politics /i didn't do it: ethics and The Simpsons.moral world of the Simpson family: a Kantian perspective /Simpsons: atomistic politics and the nuclear family /Springfield hypocrisy /Enjoying the so-called "iced cream": Mr. Burns, satan, and happiness /Hey-diddily-ho, neighboreenos: Ned Flanders and neighborly love /function of fiction: the heuristic value of Homer /Simpsons and the philosophers. A (Karl, not Groucho) Marxist in Springfield / ;David L.G. Arnold;Kelly Dean Jolley."And the rest writes itself": Roland Barthes watches The Simpsons /What Bart calls thinking /
Main Stack B68 .S55 2001

Walden, George
"Better than a Booker any time." (appreciation of 'The Simpsons' television program as one of the leading cultural statements of the 1990s) New Statesman (1996) Nov 22, 1999 v128 i4463 p31
UC users only

Wood, Andrew; Todd, Anne Marie.
'Are We There Yet?': Searching for Springfield and The Simpsons’ Rhetoric of Omnitopia." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Aug2005, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p207-222, 16p
UC users only

South Park

Albiniak, Paige , John M. Higgins.
"Restraining order: we know how South Park, sex and the city are cleaned up for station sales." Broadcasting & Cable March 15, 2004 v134 i11 p1(2) (888 words)

Bruna, Katherine Richardson
"Addicted to Democracy: South Park and the Salutary Effects of Agitation (Reflections of a Ranting and Raving South Park Junkie)." Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy. May 2004

Chaney, Michael A.
"Coloring Whiteness and Blackvoice Minstrelsy: Representations of Race and Place in Static Shock, King of the Hill and South Park." Journal of Popular Film and Television. 31 (4): 167-75. 2004 Winter.
UC users only
"The author argues that the cartoons Static Shock, King of the Hill, and South Park represent appropriations of racially marked cultural forms. Although transgressing traditional boundaries of white masculinity, these representations of interracial exchange demarcate the spatial boundaries of difference that signify the superiority of white subjects." [Expanded Academic Index]

Donnelly, Kevin.
"The Simpsons and South Park." In: The television genre book / edited by Glen Creeber; associate editors, Toby Miller and John Tulloch. pp: 74-75. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1992.55.T45 2001

Gardiner J.K.
"South Park, Blue Men, Anality, and Market Masculinity." Men and Masculinities, January 2000, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 251-271(21)
UC users only

Hurley, James S.
"Marketing Transgression; or, Capital Talks Shit." Minnesota Review: A Journal of Committed Writing. 50-51: 197-207. 1999 Oct.

Katz, Alyssa
"South Park." (television program reviews) The Nation Feb 16, 1998 v266 n5 p35(2) (1360 words)
UC users only

Klinghoffer, David
"South Park." (television program reviews) National Review March 9, 1998 v50 n4 p48(2) (1117 words)
UC users only

Larsen D.
"South Park's Solar Anus, or, Rabelais Returns: Cultures of Consumption and the Contemporary Aesthetic of Obscenity." Theory, Culture & Society, August 2001, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 65-82(18)
UC users only

Nixon, Helen
"Adults watching children watch South Park." Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy Sept 1999 v43 i1 p12(5)
"The cartoon television programme, South Park, has proved very popular with a wide range of viewers. The programme centres around four 8-year old boys and the way it handles various topics is very controversial and politically incorrect. It was first aired on a late-night slot but rapidly got huge viewing figures both in the US and in Australia. Children copy the phrases they hear on South Park and it is universally popular because children enjoy cartoons, the humour is simple and immediate and children feel they are doing something naughty by watching it." [Expanded Academic Index]

Ressner, Jeffrey
"Gross and grosser." (television comedy 'South Park') Time March 23, 1998 v151 n11 p74(3) (1709 words)
UC users only

Rhodes, Carl
"Coffee and the Business of Pleasure: The Case of Harbucks vs. Mr. Tweek." Culture and Organization volume 8, Number 4 / 2002
"In this paper, I examine the representation of organizations in the television cartoon series South Park. In particular the South Park episode 'Gnomes' is reviewed - this episode contains a direct parody of the role and conduct of organizations in society as its story revolves around a 'fictitious' coffee chain, Harbucks', attempt at a hostile takeover of a small town coffee shop. Drawing on the episode's roman a clef (or perhaps cartoon a clef) depiction of the global coffee retailing organization Starbucks, it is argued that this popular culture representation offers opportunities to critique and debate organizational behaviour in a way not available to modes of representation common to Organization Studies. Following Bakhtin's model of the carnival, South Park is read as exemplary of a subversive culture of folk humour that mocks, satirises and undermines official institutions - a culture rich in understandings of contemporary organizations and their relationship with society." [Author's abstract]

Savage, William J., Jr.
"'So Televisions's Responsible!': Oppositionality and the Interpretive Logic of Satire and Censorship in The Simpsons and South Park." In: Leaving Springfield : the Simpsons and the possibilities of oppositional culture / edited by John Alberti. pp: 197-224. Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2004. Contemporary film and television series.
Main Stack PN1992.77.S58.L43 2004
Moffitt PN1992.77.S58.L43 2004

Sienkiewicz, M., et. al.
"Beyond a Cutout World: Ethnic Humor and Discursive Integration in "South Park"." [Part of a special issue on animated television sitcoms]. Journal of Film and Video v. 61 no. 2 (Summer 2009) p. 5-18
UC users only

Ugly Betty

Amaya, Hector.
"Citizenship, diversity, law and Ugly Betty." Media, Culture & Society, Sep2010, Vol. 32 Issue 5, p801-817, 17p
UC users only

Avila-Saavedra, Guillermo.
"A Fish Out of Water: New Articulations of U.S.-Latino Identity on Ugly Betty." Communication Quarterly, Apr2010, Vol. 58 Issue 2, p133-147, 15p
UC users only

Beck, Bernard.
"Come Into My Parlor: Rendition, Ugly Betty, and Rude Awakening from the American Dream." Multicultural Perspectives, 2008, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p150-154, 5p
UC users only

Esch, Madeleine Shufeldt.
"Rearticulating Ugliness, Repurposing Content: Ugly Betty Finds the Beauty in Ugly." Journal of Communication Inquiry, Apr2010, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p168-183, 16p
UC users only

Esposito, Jennifer.
What Does Race Have to Do with Ugly Betty? An Analysis of Privilege and Postracial(?) Representations on a Television Sitcom." Television & New Media, Nov2009, Vol. 10 Issue 6, p521-535, 15p
UC users only

Hernandez, Lee.
"Ugly Betty's Last Days." Hispanic, Apr/May2010, Vol. 23 Issue 2, p64-66, 3p
UC users only

Miller, Jade L.
"Ugly Betty goes global: Global networks of localized content in the telenovela industry." Global Media & Communication; Aug2010, Vol. 6 Issue 2, p198-217, 20p
UC users only

Will and Grace

Battles, Kathleen; Wendy Hilton-Morrow.
"Gay characters in conventional spaces: Will and Grace and the situation comedy genre." Critical Studies in Media Communication March 2002 v19 i1 p87(19)
UC users only
"Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 2002 Speech Communication Association. This paper explores how Will & Grace, which has been heralded in the popular press for its positive representations of gay men, situates the potentially controversial issue of homosexuality within sap and familiar popular culture conventions, particularly those of the situation comedy genre. This paper draws on feminist and queer theory to examine the liabilities of relying on these familiar situation comedy conventions, demonstrating how the program equates gayness with a lack of masculinity, relies on sexual tension and delayed consummation, infantilizes the program's most potentially subversive characters, and emphasisizes characters' interpersonal relationships rather than the characters' connection to the larger social world. Additionally it argues that by inviting mainstream audiences to read the program within familiar televisual flames, Will & Grace can be read as reinforcing heterosexism and, thus, can be seen as heteronormative." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bolonik. Kera
"Oy gay!" (analysis of television program Will & Grace). The Nation 277.16 (Nov 17, 2003): p42. (1421 words)
UC users only

Cooper, Evan .
"Decoding Will and Grace: mass audience reception of a popular network situation comedy." Sociological Perspectives 46.4 (Winter 2003): p513(533).
UC users only

Holleran, Andrew
"The Alpha Queen." (analysis of Will & Grace television show). The Gay & Lesbian Review 7.3 (Summer 2000): p65. (1654 words)

Kanner, Melinda
"Can Will and Grace be "queered"? " (Essay). (gay themes in the television program 'Will and Grace'). The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide 10.4 (July-August 2003): p34(2). (1973 words)
UC users only
The popular network television comedy, Will and Grace, was the first television series that focused on the intimacies of an urban gay male culture and achieved significant criticism and rating success as the lead character of the series was a homosexual. It was concluded that such shows would be useful in making gays more familiar and less the others to the heterosexual audience.

Kylo-Patrick, R. Hart
"Representing Gay Men on American Television." The Journal of Men's Studies 9.1 (Fall 2000): p59. (10598 words)
UC users only

Quimby, Karin
"Will & Grace: negotiating (gay) marriage on prime-time television." Journal of Popular Culture 38.4 (May 2005): p713(19). (7375 words)
UC users only

Shugart, H. A.
"Reinventing privilege: the new (gay) man in contemporary popular media." Critical Studies in Media Communication, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 67-91, March 2003
"In recent years, the gay man/heterosexual woman couple configuration has become a genre unto itself in mediated popular culture, resulting in unprecedented mainstream visibility for gay men. Major mainstream films, such as My Best Friend's Wedding, Object of My Affection, and The Next Best Thing, showcase the combination as their centerpiece, as does the highly rated prime-time network situation comedy Will & Grace. In this essay, the author assesses this particular performance of gay identity in order to discern what qualities render it-as presented in this configuration-not only acceptable but popular given the heteronormative visibilities that characterize the mainstream audience to which it is directed. The author argues that, in these texts, homosexuality is not only recoded and normalized in these representations as consistent with privileged male heterosexuality but also is articulated at extending heterosexual male privilege. In so doing, blatant sexism is reinvented and legitimized, and gay male identity simultaneously is defined by and renormalizes heteronormativity." [Communication Abstracts]



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