Oliver Stone:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal Articles

Books and Journal Articles on Individual Films

Movies by Director videography for works of Stone in MRC

History and the Movies: Interview with Oliver Stone at UC Berkeley (includes video clips)

Books

Beaver, Frank Eugene.
Oliver Stone: Wakeup Cinema / Frank Beaver. New York: Twayne Publishers; Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan Canada; New York: Maxwell Macmillan International, c1994. Series title: Twayne's filmmakers series.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S76 B43 1994

Crisis Cinema: The Apocalyptic Idea in Postmodern Narrative Film
Edited by Christopher Sharrett. Washington, D.C.: Maisonneuve Press, 1993. Sharrett, Christopher. PostModernPositions; v. 6.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S6.C75 1993

The Films of Oliver Stone
Edited by Don Kunz. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 1997. Series title: Filmmakers series; no. 55.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 F56 1997

Kagan, Norman.
The cinema of Oliver Stone / Norman Kagan. New expanded ed. New York: Continuum, c2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 K35 2000

Kagan, Norman.
The Cinema of Oliver Stone / Norman Kagan. New York: Continuum, 1995.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 K35 2000
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 K35 1995 (earlier edition)
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S76 K35 1995(earlier edition)

Kolker, Robert Phillip.
A cinema of loneliness : Penn, Stone, Kubrick, Scorsese, Spielberg, Altman Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PN1993.5.U6 K57 2000
PFA : PN1993.5.U6 K57 2000;

Lavington, Stephen.
Oliver Stone London : Virgin, 2004.
MAIN: PN1998.3.S76 L38 2004;

Mackey-Kallis, Susan.
Oliver Stone's America: Dreaming the Myth Outward / Susan Mackey-Kallis. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1996. Series title: Film studies (Boulder, Colo.)
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 M33 1996
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S76 M33 1996

Oliver Stone a dialogue on classic filmmaking[video]
Film director Oliver Stone discusses his recent major motion picture "Alexander," with UC Berkeley dean and professor of classics Ralph Hexter. This epic film is based on one of history's most influential leaders -- Alexander the Great. Stone speaks to the lure, the responsiblity and the challenges inherent in his role as filmmaker and the challenges of representing ancient history in film.
Media Center: VIDEO/C MM488

Oliver Stone's America: a dialogue with Oliver Stone
A film by Charles Kiselyak. Widescreen version. 1 videodisc (64 min.): sd., col.; 4 3/4 in. DVD. Series title: Oliver Stone collection.
UCB Media Ctr DVD 777

Oliver Stone's USA: film, history, and controversy
Edited by Robert Brent Toplin. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, c2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 O45 2000

Penman, Ian
"Oliver Stone: Ollie the Contrarian." In: Vital Signs: Music, Movies and Other Manias / Ian Penman. pp: 123-34. London; [New York]: Serpent's Tail, c1998.
UCB Main ML3534 .P46 1998

Oliver Stone's America: a Dialogue with Oliver Stone[Videorecording]
A film by Charles Kiselyak. Oliver Stone's America is an intriguing one-on-one with the director behind the movies, an insightful interview augmented with clips and photos from his films and personal life. Includes Stone's New York University student film Last year in Vietnam. Sound, K.C. Clayton ; editing, Denise Ann Cochran ; produced, written and directed by Charles Kiselyak. 64 min. DVD 777

Riordan, James.
Stone: The Controversies, Excesses, and Exploits of a Radical Filmmaker / James Riordan; foreword by Michael Douglas. 1st ed. New York: Hyperion, c1995.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 R56 1995

Salewicz, Chris.
Oliver Stone / Chris Salewicz. 1st Thunder's Mouth Press ed. New York: Thunder's Mouth Press, 1998. Series title: Close up (New York, N.Y.)
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 S254 1998

Smith, Gavin.
"Oliver Stone: Why Do I Have To Provoke?" In: Action/spectacle cinema : a Sight and sound reader / edited by Jose Arroyo. pp: 159-68 London : British Film Institute, 2000.
Main Stack PN1995.A259 2000

Stone, Oliver.
Oliver Stone: interviews / edited by Charles L. P. Silet. Jackson, University Press of Mississippi, c2001. Series title: Conversations with filmmakers series.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 A5 2001

Walkowitz, D. J.
"Re-screening the past: subversion narratives and the politics of history." In: Screening the past : film and the representation of history / edited by Tony Barta. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.
Main Stack PN1995.2.S38 1998

Journal Articles

Anker, Roy M.
"The Kingdom Of Wish: Oliver Stone's Problem With History." Fides et Historia, 1993 25(2): 89-118.
" Critiques several of Oliver Stone's films on modern American society and history. Stone's work on the Vietnam War - Platoon (1986) and Born on the Fourth of July (1989) - and contemporary domestic corruption - 1987's Wall Street - are simplistic morality plays that too easily blame the horrors of war and the amorality of investment deals on dark forces within American capitalism. The Doors (1991) romanticizes the hedonism of the 1960's. JFK (1992) overwhelms viewers with unsupported conspiracy theories and dishonestly ignores or changes evidence to suit Stone's whims. Especially in JFK, Stone employs references to history's supposed mythic qualities to excuse his turning history into antimilitaristic wish fulfillment." [ABC-CLIO, America: History and Life]

Antonelli, Judith S.
"Oliver Stone." (media and the current state of society)(Interview) Utne Reader, n84 (Nov-Dec, 1997):102 (3 pages).
Oliver Stone claims that the mass media is currently too free to do its bidding while enjoying a certain degree of protection from the law. Stone maintains that the media should be kept on a tighter leash so as to protect the interests and sanities of people.

Bennetts, Leslie.
"Oliver Stone easing out of violence." New York Times v136 (Mon, April 13, 1987):18(N), C13(L), col 1, 28 col in.

Breskin, David.
"Oliver Stone: the Rolling Stone interview." (interview) Rolling Stone, n601 (April 4, 1991):37 (7 pages).

Carnes, Mark C.
"Past Imperfect: History According to the Movies." (interview with film director Oliver Stone) Cineaste v22, n4 (Fall, 1996):33 UCB users only
Film director Oliver Stone opines that historians consider themselves the custodians of recorded world events with a pompousness and solemnity mien. He believes that movies are a sort of initial rough draft that point out issues, inspire students and a method of attacking the current consensus of history among historians. Stone's films elicit such adverse criticism from critics, particularly historians, because he sends a dramatic message that is too defined and clear-cut.

Crary, J. M.
"A tired debate?" (Oliver Stone and his characterization of historians) Cineaste, 23: (3) 61-+ 1998

Crowdus, Gary.
"Dramatizing issues that historians don't address: an interview with Oliver Stone.(Interview)." Cineaste 30.2 (Spring 2005): 12(12).
UC users only

Crowdus, Gary.
"History, Dramatic License, and Larger Historical Truths: An Interview with Oliver Stone." Cineaste, vol. 22 no. 4. 1997. pp: 38-42.
UC users only
"Film director Oliver Stone's provocative historical films 'JFK' and 'Nixon' have elicited adverse criticism, such as his proficient fusion of newsreel footage with fictional scenes in the film JFK. The director considers dramatic license a reconstruction of what one believes has occurred, using actors, costumes, make up, the condensation of events and the invention of dialogue which occurred behind closed doors." [Expanded Academic Index]

Fischoff, Stuart.
"Oliver Stone." (Interview) Psychology Today v26, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1993):44 (7 pages).
Director Oliver Stone does not think he is confrontational or argumentative, but that he is made to look that in way the media. He criticizes his treatment by television networks in interviews with him about his film, 'JFK,' which theorizes the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

Gardels, Nathan.
"Far out on pendulum of cynicism." (motion picture director Oliver Stone's views about films and politics)(Column)(Interview) Los Angeles Times v114 (Sun, March 26, 1995):M5, col 2, 14 col in.

Gardels, Nathan.
"The David Letterman disease." (interview with film director Oliver Stone)(Revolt Against the Media Class)(Interview) New Perspectives Quarterly v12, n2 (Spring, 1995):40 (2 pages).
Film director Oilver Stone says that although his works may be considered counter culture, they depict social reality. According to Stone, the purpose of art is to challenge conventions and show both the goodness and viciousness of the human spirit.

Gentry, Ric.
"Oliver Stone: An Interview." Post Script, vol. 15 no. 3. 1996 Summer. pp: 3-15.

Gentry, Ric.
"Another Meditation on Death: An Interview with Oliver Stone." Film Quarterly Jun 2007, Vol. 60, No. 4: 54–60.
UC users only

Grimes, William.
"What debt does Hollywood owe to truth?" (Nation Institute and the Center for American Culture Studies at Columbia University sponsors debate on role of art in interpretation of history) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v141 (Thu, March 5, 1992):B1(N), C15(L), col 1, 36 col in.

Grove, Lloyd.
"Oliver Stone's mother lode; the director mines his childhood and finds some dark places indeed." Washington Post v120 (Thu, Sept 11, 1997):D1, col 3, 91 col in.

Hussein, Mahmoud; Debray, Regis.
"Oliver Stone." (film director) (Interview) UNESCO Courier (July-August, 1993):4 (7 pages).
Successful American film director Oliver Stone is known for his serious and controversial movies like 'Platoon' and 'JFK.' Stone says that making important social movies that are commercially successful is not easy.

"Oliver Stone." Film Comment 30:1 (1994) Issue p. 26-29

Packer, George.
"Decency and muck: the visions of John Sayles and Oliver Stones." Dissent v44, n3 (Summer, 1997):105 (5 pages).
UC users only
Film making is the life of both John Sayles and Oliver Stone. Both creative geniuses in the film industry, they mirror the facts of life in their films. Neither wants to implore what is not the real essence of any issue as they only reflect the fundamental truth which they believe is the 'right of every man.' For them, decency is the name of the game although it can rightfully be said that glamorous muck is much powerful than decency itself.

Richardson, Mark
"Ain't No Truth but What You Make: Oliver Stone and the Historical Film." Film Journal, vol. 1, no. 8, pp. [no pagination], February 2004.
UC users only

Rosenbaum, Ron.
"The pissing contest." (examination of personalities and work of film directors Oliver Stone and Quentin Tarantino) Esquire v128, n6 (Dec, 1997):38 (4 pages).
UC users only
"The personal conflict between directors Stone and Tarantino grew out of a perception by Tarantino that Stone mishandled his script for 'Natural Born Killers.' The personalities and work of the two are recall the polarity between writers Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald." [Expanded Academic Index]

Rowland, Mark.
"Stone unturned." (film maker Oliver Stone) (interview) American Film v16, n3 (March, 1991):40 (4 pages).
"Writer-director Oliver Stone has been involved in the creation of several movies that tackle themes of political responsibility. A three-time Oscar winner, his films have explored social justice (Salvador, Midnight Express), laissez-faire capitalism (Wall Street, Scarface), and the legacy of Vietnam (Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July). His most recent film, The Doors, offered him a chance to indulge his "bad-boy" persona. Stone says that with the film, he sought to capture the rhythm of his youth. In an interview, he discusses his years in Vietnam, his youthful experimentation with marijuana and LSD, the 1960s counterculture movement, Doors singer Jim Morrison, and the making of The Doors." [Art Index]

Sager, Mike.
"Oliver Stone: director, 58, Santa Monica.(What I've Learned)(Interview)." Esquire 142.5 (Nov 2004): 170(2).
UC users only

Sanjek, David.
"The Hysterical Imagination: The Horror Films of Oliver Stone." Post Script, Fall92, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p49-60, 12p
The article examines the horror films "Seizure" and "The Hand," both directed by Oliver Stone. Specifically, the article indicates how the films prefigure salient elements of Stone's subsequent career. Both films, the article notes, feature masculine patriarchal protagonists. They also both end violently, with the protagonists having immersed themselves in a destructive course of action that lays waste any number of the supporting characters. The article presents the plots of "Seizure" and "The Hand."

Smith, Gavin.
"'The camera for me is an actor.'" (Oliver Stone) (Interview) Film Comment v30, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1994):26 (11 pages).
"Director Oliver Stone is one of Hollywood's most prolific filmmakers, and he is one of the few to win both critical acclaim and commercial success. Stone discusses his work on such films as 'Heaven and Earth,' 'JFK,' and 'Born on the Fourth of July.'" [Expanded Academic Index]

Stone, Oliver
"A filmmaker's credo: some thoughts on politics, history, and the movies." (Oliver Stone discusses his movies)(Cover Story) Humanist v56, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1996):3 (4 pages).
UC users only
"Movie director Oliver Stone discusses 'Platoon,' 'JFK,' Nixon' and his other films. He also articulates his opinions about American society and history. He believes that money and conformity have taken hold of US society, and he often finds young people are ignorant of recent history." [Expanded Academic Index]

Sturken, Marita
"Reenactment, Fantasy, and the Paranoia of History: Oliver Stone's Docudramas." History and Theory Volume 36 Issue 4 Page 64 - December 1997
UC users only
"In the late 1980s and 1990s, American popular culture has been increasingly rife with conspiracy narratives of recent historical events. Among cultural producers, filmmaker Oliver Stone has had a significant impact on popular understanding of American culture in the late twentieth century through a series of docudramas which reread American history through the lens of conspiracy theory and paranoia. This paper examines the films of Oliver Stone—in particular Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July, JFK, and Nixon—asking why they have achieved popularity and brought about catharsis, why they are the subject of attack, and why it is useful to look beyond the debate about truth and falsehood that has surrounded them. It analyzes the ways in which Stone's status as a Vietnam veteran allowed Platoon to be accorded the authenticity of survivor discourse, whereas JFK and Nixon were subject to almost hysterical attack, not only because of Stone's assertions of conspiracy, but also because of his cinematic style of tampering with famous images. Taking these films as its point of departure, this paper examines the role of images in the construction of history, the form of the docudrama, the reenactment of historical images, fantasies of history, and ways in which paranoia part of the practice of citizenship." [Blackwell Synergy]

Talbot, Stephen.
"60s something: from Vietnam to Jim Morris, Oliver Stone keeps telling America his personal history. Does he tell it like it was?" Mother Jones v16, n2 (March-April, 1991):46 (6 pages).

Toplin, Robert Brent
"Special Editor's Introduction: Oliver Stone as Cinematic Historian" Film & History 28:1-2 (1998)
UC users only

Tyrrell, R. Emmett, Jr.
"Stone dead." (filmmaker Oliver Stone) (Editorial) American Spectator v25, n2 (Feb, 1992):11 (2 pages).
UC users only
Oliver Stone has philanthropically stepped forward to meet the needs of the country's ignoramuses. His films, 'Platoon,' 'Wall Street' and 'JFK' are all pure fantasy. 'JFK,' about the assassination of John F. Kennedy, is analyzed in detail.

Wiener, J.
"Who killed Oliver Stone?" Nation 267: (18) 7-7 NOV 30 1998

Wills, Garry.
"Dostoyevsky behind a camera: Oliver Stone is making great American novels on film." Atlantic Monthly v280, n1 (July, 1997):96 (5 pages).
UC users only
Oliver Stone's films are multi-layered, their themes taken from news stories, with melodrama and spiritualism added. Stone's work is compared with the books of Dostoyevsky. Both men's relationships with their fathers were central to their work.

Wolf, Jaime.
"Oliver Stone doesn't want to start an argument." (filmmaker) New York Times Magazine (Sun, Sept 21, 1997):54, col 1, 68 col in.
Stone makes powerful controversial movies, although 'Nixon' was not a boxoffice hit, while 'JFK' was a mega-hit. His latest film, 'U-Turn' starring Sean Penn is not full of the political controversy that his audiences expect. His filmmaking vision, and the controversies are discussed.

Articles/Reviews about Individual Films

Alexander

Ansen, David.
"Not So Great; Oliver Stone's 'Alexander' will conscript you for a long forced march. Better have an exit strategy.(Movie Review)." Newsweek (Nov 29, 2004): 60.

Bundrick, Sheramy D.
"Dionysian Themes and Imagery in Oliver Stone's Alexander." Helios, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 81-96, 2009 Spring
UC users only

Carver, Terrell
"Oliver Stone's "Alexander"." Film & History v. 35 no. 2 (2005) p. 83-4
UC users only
"A review of Oliver Stone's 2004 film Alexander. In defiance of the conventions of the Hollywood biopic, this film puts the historian in charge because it is framed by Alexander the Great's general Ptolemy and his voice-over dictation, recurring at turning points along the way. Sadly, Ptolemy interrupts the action in dramaturgical terms and adds nothing to the plot (or lack thereof) every time he comes on-screen. The film sacrifices the drama expected in biopics to the merest hint at "history-speaking" through this annoying voice-over, while failing entirely to interest audiences much in someone who was surely not so dull--if he was, surely Stone could have used poetic license. Stone should have fired historical consultant Robin Lane Fox, dispensed with Ptolemy and his droning history, and hired historian Hayden White, who could have gotten on with the plot." [Art Index]

Colapinto, John.
"Stoned again.(Alexander)." Rolling Stone 963 (Dec 9, 2004): 52(2).
Film director Oliver Stone is bracing for a return to public life with his new movie Alexander after a four-year period of self-imposed exile. Oliver Stone talks about the homosexual love story in his movie and about his former Yale classmate and newly re-elected president of the United States, George W. Bush.

Corliss, Richard.
"It's His Same Old Story: Oliver Stone's Alexander is a Greek war epic that somehow still seems to be about Vietnam.(Arts/Movies)(Movie Review)." Time 164.22 (Nov 29, 2004): 148.

Courcoux, Charles-Antoine
"From Here to Antiquity: Mythical Settings and Modern Sufferings in Contemporary Hollywood's Historical Epics." Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies Volume 39.2 (Fall 2009) pp. 29-38
UC users only

Covington, Richard.
"Mighty Macedonian: Alexander the Great." Smithsonian 35.8 (Nov 2004): 72.
UC users only

Crowdus, Gary
"Dramatizing Issues That Historians Don't Address: An Interview with Oliver Stone." Cineaste v. 30 no. 2 (Spring 2005) p. 12-23
UC users only
"An interview with director Oliver Stone on the occasion of the release of his latest film, Alexander. Stone explains the appeal of Alexander the Great for him. Responding to the suggestion that his boldest interpretive step, in a historical sense, with the film is to attempt a psychological analysis of what motivated Alexander's actions, he explains his belief that there is no way to tell this story in a linear fashion. He identifies the reasons behind his portrayal of Olympias, Alexander's mother, for which he has been criticized. Other topics discussed include the film's battle scenes, the portrayal of Alexander's bisexuality, and the kind of impression of Alexander he would like audiences to take away from the film." [Art Index]

Duralde, Alonso.
"Alexan-dreck: Oliver Stone's Alexander may be bi-inclusive, but it's still a staggering disaster.(film review)(Movie Review)." The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) (Dec 21, 2004): 54(1).
UC users only

Green, Peter.
"It was his mother made him do it: why Oliver Stone's Alexander has the ring of inauthenticity.(Alexander)(The Making of Alexander)(Movie Review)(Book Review)." TLS. Times Literary Supplement 5312 (Jan 21, 2005): 16-17.

Hanson, Victor Davis.
"Gay old times? Oliver Stone perpetuates a classical myth.(sexuality in director's film, Alexander)." National Review 56.24 (Dec 27, 2004): 40.

Junkelmann, Marcus
"Weltbefreier oder Psychopath?." Antike Welt v. 36 no. 2 (2005) p. 45-9
A review of Oliver Stone's film Alexander. Although the film is on the whole bitterly disappointing, its grandiose depiction of the Battle of Gaugamela, probably the best battle scene ever screened, makes it worth seeing.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"On Films - Conquests.(Closer)(Alexander)(Movie Review)." The New Republic (Dec 27, 2004): 28.

Lane, Anthony
War-Torn: Oliver Stone's "Alexander"." The New Yorker 80:38 (6 December 2004)

McCarthy, Todd.
"An enervating epic.(Alexander)(Movie Review)." Variety 397.1 (Nov 22, 2004): 45(2).

McDonald, Neil.
"Legend, history and truth.(Film)(Alexander)(Frank Hurley)(Road to Tokyo)(DVD's)(Video Recording Review)." Quadrant 49.9 (Sept 2005): 72(3).

Mendelsohn, Daniel.
"Alexander, the movie!(Movie Review)." The New York Review of Books 52.1 (Jan 13, 2005): 43(3).

Nikoloutsos, Konstantinos P.
"The Alexander Bromance: Male Desire and Gender Fluidity in Oliver Stone's Historical Epic" Helios, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 223-250, 2008 Fall
UC users only

Pipolo, Tony.
"Responses to Oliver Stone's Alexander: Film, History, and Cultural Studies." Cineaste, Fall2010, Vol. 35 Issue 4, p63-64, 2p
UC users only

Steyn, Mark.
"Smaller than life.(Cinema)(Movie Review)." Spectator 297.9205 (Jan 8, 2005): 38(1).

White, Rob.
"Alexander.(Movie Review)." Sight and Sound 15.2 (Feb 2005): 42(2).
UC users only
"Although Oliver Stone's epic about Alexander the Great invites cheap jokes about hair dye and accents, it is the film's storytelling problems that are by far the more serious. The film is narrated retrospectively by Ptolemy, and his recollection monopolizes the narrative--for example, when there are plots against Alexander they are not really dramatized. Instead of audiences seeing conspirators whispering in corners and such like, the voice-over bluntly states that this is what happened. As a result, the film has none of the intrigue that is fundamental to many classical epics; there is no dramatic depth in the movie, no subplots to give ballast to the account of Alexander's creation of a vast empire." [Art Index]

Worthington, Ian.
"Alexander.(Movie Review)." American Historical Review 110.2 (April 2005): 533(2).
UC users only

Any Given Sunday

Denby, David.
"Any Given Sunday."(Review) (movie review) New Yorker v75, n41 (Jan 10, 2000):90 (2 pages).

Freeman, Mike.
"Stone seeks accuracy in 'Any Given Sunday'."(Oliver Stone's football movie; includes related information)(Sports Pages) New York Times (Sun, Dec 19, 1999):46(N), SP2(L), col 1, 30 col in.

Kermode, Mark.
"Any Given Sunday."(Review) (movie review) Sight and Sound v10, n4 (April, 2000):38 (3 pages)

Macnab, Geoffrey
"Any Given Sunday." Sight and Sound 11:2 (February 2001) Issue p. 58
UC users only

Mccarthy, Todd.
"Any Given Sunday."(Review) (movie review) Variety v377, n6 (Dec 20, 1999):56.

McDorman, Todd.
"Where have all the heroes gone? An exploration of cultural therapy in {Jerry Maguire}, {For the Love of the Game}, and {Any Given Sunday}." Journal of Sport & Social Issues, 30, no. 2 (May, 2006): 197-218
UC users only

Meroney, John
"Oliver Stone Throws a Hail Mary." The American Enterprise Nov 1999 v10 i6 p76
UC users only

Morgenstern, Joe.
"Any Given Sunday."(Review) (movie review) Wall Street Journal (Fri, Dec 31, 1999):W1(W), W1(E), col 1, 35 col in.

Newman, Bruce.
"Oliver Stone goes to war again, with cleats on." (in new film 'Any Given Sunday') New York Times (Sun, Nov 14, 1999):AR13(N), AR13(L), col 1, 25 col in.

Pizzello, Chris.
"Calling the plays." American Cinematographer v 81 no1 Jan 2000. p. 48-50+.
"In an interview, director Oliver Stone discusses his film Any Given Sunday. The NFL, with its distinctly American blend of brutal trench warfare on the field and smooth spin-doctoring in the skyboxes, is a subject ideally suited to the mercurial temperament of Stone, whose vehemence as a provocateur is matched by his sheer visual nerve. Stone discusses several topics in the interview, including what excited him about pro football on both a thematic and visual level; how, together with production designer Victor Kempster, cinematographer Sal Totino, and producer Clayton Townsend, he formed a visual strategy for presenting the game in a fresh and exciting way; his intentions in using technical innovations like the Image Shaker, the "Ratcam," and the bungee cam; and the technical challenges involved in making the film." [Art Abstracts]

Rushin, Steve.
"Apocalypse Sunday: For absurdity and senseless violence, the reel Oliver Stone can't match the real NFL." (SI View) Sports Illustrated v91, n25 (Dec 27, 1999):28.

Schickel, Richard.
"Any Given Sunday."(Review) (movie review) Time v154, n26 (Dec 27, 1999):168[D]+.

Born on the Fourth of July

Ansen, David.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Newsweek v114, n26 (Dec 25, 1989):74 (2 pages).

Appy, Christian.
"Vietnam According to Oliver Stone: John Wayne Rides Again." Commonweal v117, n6 (March 23, 1990):187 (3 pages).

Blake, Richard A.
"The tide of pomp: Images of war in a season of peace." (movie reviews) America v162, n3 (Jan 27, 1990):62 (3 pages).
UC users only
Comments on the images of war presented in recent films. Image of the hero; Oliver Stone's `Born on the Fourth of July'; Edward Zwick's `Glory'; Kenneth Branagh's adaptation of Shakespeare's `Henry V.'

Brooks, David.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, Dec 21, 1989):A12(W), A16(E), col 1, 20 col

Burgoyne, R.
"National identity, gender identity, and the rescue fantasy in Born on the fourth of July." Screen (London, England) v. 35 (Aut 1994) p. 211-34
UC users only
"The writer discusses national and gender identity in Oliver Stone's film Born on the Fourth of July. The narrative of the film criticizes traditional myths of masculinity based on the idea of "punitive agency," attempting to revise the gender dynamic of national identity through the metaphor of woman as nation. However, its melodramatic conventions and structures assert the significance of the masculine role in the changing national narrative; the male hero gains authority by "rescuing" the nation from its own weakness, thus reaffirming to some extent the tradition forms of gender identity as the main perspective through which national identity is realized. The film can thus be seen as an exemplary manifestation of the complexity of the Vietnam narrative, wherein the most important questions of national and gender identity, and the narrative forms that convey and strengthen them, are arranged into new and shifting configurations." [Art Index]

Canby, Vincent.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) New York Times v139, sec2 (Sun, Jan 21, 1990):H1(N), H1(L), col 1, 19 col in.

Cao, Lan.
"The details are Vietnamese, the vision, guilty American; Oliver Stone's Vietnam is like the one Genghis Khan saw. It will be there long after the invaders have gone." New York Times v143, sec2 (Sun, Jan 23, 1994):H13(N), H13(L), col 1, 41 col in.

Davis, Jack E.
"New Left, Revisionist, In-Your-Face History: Oliver Stone's Born On The Fourth Of July Experience." Film & History 1998 28(3-4): 6-17.
UC users only
"Examines director hitOliver hitStone's film "Born on the Fourth of July," adapted from memoirs written by an ex-marine and Vietnam veteran Ron Kovic. States hitOliver and Kovic collaborated on this project. Suggests hitStone's film embodies elements of both legitimate and illegitimate history. Mentions hitStone frames the movie around an historical problem, addresses critical questions about the American experience, and offers an interpretation of the recent past that approaches that found in academic scholarship." [IIPA]

Denby, David.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) New York v22, n50 (Dec 18, 1989):101 (2 pages).

Doherty, Thomas.
"Witness to War: Oliver Stone, Ron Kovic, and Born on the Fourth of July." In: Inventing Vietnam: The War in Film and Television / edited by Michael Anderegg. pp: 251-68 Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991. Culture and the moving image
Main Stack DS557.73.A5 1991
Moffitt DS557.73.A5 1991

Early, Emmett.
"Born on the Fourth of July." In: The war veteran in film Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2003.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.V44 E27 2003

Eberwein, Robert T.
"Wounds" In: Armed forces: masculinity and sexuality in the American war film / Robert Ebe New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007. Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Eilert, Richard.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Washington Post v113 (Tue, Feb 6, 1990):A25, col 4, 13 col in.

Fiorillo, C. M.
" Born on the Fourth of July" (motion picture review) Films in Review v. 41 (Mar. '90) p. 177-8.

Hinson, Hal.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Washington Post v113 (Fri, Jan 5, 1990):B1, col 1, 19 col in.

Kael, Pauline.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) New Yorker v65, n49 (Jan 22, 1990):122 (3 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) New Republic v202, n5 (Jan 29, 1990):26 (2 pages).

Kunz, Don.
"Oliver Stone's Film Adaptation of Born on the Fourth of July: Redefining Masculine Heroism." War, Literature, and the Arts, vol. 2 no. 2. 1990 Fall. pp: 1-25.

Maslin, Janet.
"Oliver Stone takes aim at the viewer's viscera." (producer, director of movie "Born on the Fourth of July") New York Times v139, sec2 (Sun, Dec 31, 1989):H9(N), H9(L), col 1, 21 col in.

McKinney, David.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Film Quarterly v44, n1 (Fall, 1990):44 (4 pages).
UC users only

Michel, Sonya.
"Danger On The Home Front: Motherhood, Sexuality, and Disabled Veterans in American Postwar Films." Journal of the History of Sexuality 1992 3(1): 109-128 20p.
UC users only

Moore, Suzanne.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v3, n91 (March 9, 1990):44.

O'Brien, Tom.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Commonweal v117, n3 (Feb 9, 1990):85 (2 pages).

Pickering, Barbara.
"Born on the Fourth of July: A Reflection of Value Transformation in Vietnam Veterans." Popular Culture Review 1997 Aug, 8:2, 53-74.

Seidenberg, Robert.
"To Hell and Back: Movies Made War Heroic for Young Ron Kovic Until a Vietcong Bullet Shattered His Illusions. Now with 'Born on the Fourth of July,' he settles the score. "(screenwriter Ron Kovic) (interview) American Film v15, n4 (Jan, 1990):28 (5 pages).
"Vietnam veteran Ron Kovic had a direct hand in shaping Oliver Stone's new film, Born on the Fourth of July. Cowritten by Kovic and Stone, the film is based on Kovic's brutally honest autobiography, which follows his life from his patriotic childhood, war heroism, and confinement to a wheelchair to his disillusionment with the war and eventual antiwar activism. The film touches on some of the most emotional moments in Kovic's life, including the inhuman treatment he suffered in squalid military hospitals, a drunken battle with his mother, his attempts to shout down Richard Nixon at the 1972 Republican Convention in Miami, and his triumphant speech at the 1976 Democratic Convention. In an interview, he discusses the making of the film." [Art Index]

Seligmann, Jean.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Newsweek v115, n3 (Jan 15, 1990):59 (2 pages).

Seligmann, Jean.
"Heroes with Handicaps; Side by Side, Two New Movies Face up to the Realities of Wheelchair Life." ("My Left Foot," "Born on the Fourth of July") Newsweek v115, n3 (Jan 15, 1990):59 (2 pages).

Sharrett, Christopher.
" Born on the Fourth of July" (motion picture review) Cineaste v. 17 no4 ('90) p. 48-50.

Shipman, David.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Contemporary Review v257, n1497 (Oct, 1990):213 (4 pages).

Shewring, Anne L.
"We didn't do that did we? Representation of the veteran experience." Journal of American & Comparative Cultures. Winter 2000. Vol. 23, Iss. 4; pg. 51, 16 pgs
UC users only
"Four films that address the issue of the returning war veteran are cited, including: (1) William Wyler's "The Best Years of Our Lives" (1946), (2) Fred Zinnemann's "The Men" (1950), (3) Hal Ashby's "Coming Home" (1978), and (4) Oliver Stone's "Born on the Fourth of July" (1989). Each deals with the experience of returning veterans from one of two conflicts, World War II or the Vietnam War. Popular culture leaves one with a sense that the experience for the Vietnam veteran was somehow different. Veteran experiences from a number of other conflicts are compared, and evidence from literature and history is examined." [IIPA]

Shor, Fran.
"Transcending the Myths of Patriotic Militarized Masculinity: Armoring, Wounding, and Transfiguration in Ron Kovic's Born on the Fourth of July." Journal of Men's Studies. Apr 30, 2000. Vol. 8, Iss. 3; p. 375
UC users only

Simon, John.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) National Review v42, n2 (Feb 5, 1990):58 (2 pages).

Sturken, Marita.
"Reenactment, Fantasy, and the Paranoia of History: Oliver Stone's Docudramas." History and Theory v36, n4 (Dec, 1997):64 (16 pages).
UC users only
"Author Abstract: In the late 1980s and 1990s, American popular culture has been increasingly rife with conspiracy narratives of recent historical events. Among cultural producers, filmmaker Oliver Stone hashad a significant impact on popular understanding of American culture in the late twentieht century through a series of docudramas which reread American history through the lens of conspiracy theory and paranoia. This paper examines the films of Oliver Stone - in particular Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July, JFK, and Nixon - asking why they have achieved popularity and brought about catharsis, why they are the subject of attack, and why it is useful to look beyond the debate about truth and falsehood that has surrounded them. It analyzes the ways in which Stone's status as a Vietnam veteran allowed Platoon to be accorded the authenticity of survivor discourse, whereas JFK and Nixon were subject to almost hysterical attack, not only because of Stone's assertions of conspiracy, but also because of his cinematic style of tampering with famous images. Taking these films as its points of departure, this paper examines the role of images in the construction of history, the form of the docudrama, the reenactment of historical images, fantasies of history, and ways in which paranoia is part of the practice of citizenship." COPYRIGHT 1997 Wesleyan University.

Talbot, Stephen.
"60s Something: From Vietnam to Jim Morris, Oliver Stone Keeps Telling America His Personal History. Does He Tell It Like It Was?" Mother Jones v16, n2 (March-April, 1991):46 (6 pages).

Toplin, Robert Brent
"The Historian and Film: A Research Agenda." Journal of American History; Dec91, Vol. 78 Issue 3, p1160-1163, 4p
UC users only
Focuses on the value of using film in an interpretation of twentieth-century American culture. 'Born on the Fourth of July'; 'Mississippi Burning'; 'Platoon'; 'The Civil War.'

Travers, Peter.
"Born on the Fourth of July." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n569 (Jan 11, 1990):29.

The Doors

Ansen, David.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) Newsweek v117, n11 (March 18, 1991):57.

Baumann, Paul.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) Commonweal v118, n9 (May 3, 1991):294 (3 pages).
UC users only

Chutkow, Paul.
"Oliver Stone and 'The Doors': obsession meets the obsessed." (making of film tribute to Jim Morrison; includes related articles) New York Times v140, sec2 (Sun, Feb 24, 1991):H1(N), col 3, 51 col in.

Corliss, Richard.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) Time v137, n10 (March 11, 1991):73.

Denby, David.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) New York v24, n12 (March 25, 1991):68.

Hopkins, Jerry.
"Mr. Mojo Rises." (new motion picture about singer Jim Morrison) American Film v15, n13 (Oct, 1990):32 (11 pages).

Horton, Robert.
"Riders on the storm." (film director Oliver Stone and his film "The Doors") Film Comment v27, n3 (May-June, 1991):57 (5 pages).

James, Caryn.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) New York Times v140, sec2 (Sun, March 24, 1991):H11(N), H11(L), col 1, 15 col in.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) New Republic v204, n13 (April 1, 1991):28.

Klawans, Stuart.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) Nation v252, n11 (March 25, 1991):388 (4 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) New York Times v140 (Fri, March 1, 1991):B1(N), C1(L), col 6, 41 col in.

O'Hop, Suzanne E.
""Enough to base a movie on?": Oliver Stone's 'The Doors.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n3 (July, 1997):163 (10 pages).
UC users only
Jim Morrison's poetry permits analysis of how and why Oliver Stone made 'The Doors.' Morrison regarded cinema as a spectacle and as a means allowing spectators to live out voyeuristic impulses. Stone was clearly influenced by Morrison's points of view, since the film treated Morrison as a mythic figure under the influence of visions, hallucinatory drugs, and promiscuity. 'The Doors' is a tribute to Morrison's poetry and its exploratory character.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) New Yorker v67, n3 (March 11, 1991):81 (3 pages).

Salamon, Julie.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, Feb 28, 1991):A8(W), A10(E), col 1, 13 col in.

Tischler, Barbara L.
"Jim Morrison, Oliver Stone, and the Quest for the Sixties." Film & History 1998 28(3-4): 38-46.
UC users only
Focusing on rock singer Jim Morrison to the exclusion of the social context that produced him, Oliver Stone's The Doors (1991) comes up short as a cinematic history of the 1960's.

Travers, Peter.
"The Doors." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n600 (March 21, 1991):83 (2 pages).

"Unorthodox behaviour: Oliver Stone and "The Doors"." (movie made on the life of Jim Morrison of The Doors music group) Economist v318, n7698 (March 16, 1991):91 (2 pages).

Heaven and Earth

Ansen, David.
"Heaven and Earth." (motion picture review) Newsweek v122, n26 (Dec 27, 1993):47.

Cao, Lan.
"The details are Vietnamese, the vision, guilty American; Oliver Stone's Vietnam is like the one Genghis Khan saw. It will be there long after the invaders have gone." New York Times v143, sec2 (Sun, Jan 23, 1994):H13(N), H13(L), col 1, 41 col in.

Denby, David.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) New York v27, n2 (Jan 10, 1994):44 (2 pages).

Dowell, Pat.
"Heaven and Earth." (motion picture review) Cineaste v. 20 no3 ('94) p. 56-7.
UC users only

Doyle, Jeff.
"Missed Saigon: Some Recent Film Representations of Vietnam." In: Crossing Cultures: Essays in the Displacement of Western Civilization / Daniel Segal, editor. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, c1992. pp: 91-99.
UCB Main CB245.C695 1992
Moffit CB245.C695 1992)

Fisher, Bob.
"Mining the Spiritual Layers of Heaven and Earth." American Cinematographer v. 75 (Feb. '94) p. 36-41.
"The work of cinematographer Robert Richardson, ASC, in director Oliver Stone's latest film on the Vietnam War, Heaven and Earth, is discussed. Part of a trilogy that includes Platoon and Born on the Fourth of July, the film looks at the war from the fresh perspective of a Buddhist Vietnamese woman, trapped between opposing political forces in her own country. Topics discussed include Richardson's research into Buddhist religion and Vietnamese literature, his attempts to impart a visual color identity on the main character's spiritual experiences to define her relationship with her environment, his cinematographic techniques, and his personal evolution as a cinematographer while working with Oliver Stone." [Art Index]

Foulkes, Julia L.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) American Historical Review v99, n4 (Oct, 1994):1272 (2 pages).
UC users only

Hayslip, Le-Ly.
"Heaven and Earth." In: Oliver Stone's USA : film, history, and controversy / edited by Robert Brent Toplin. Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2000.
Main Stack PN1998.3.S76.O45 2000

Houston, Velina Hasu.
"To the Colonizer Goes the Spoils: Amerasian Progeny in Vietnam War Films and Owning up to the Gaze." Amerasia Journal v23, n1 (Spring, 1997):69 (16 pages).
UC users only
The depiction of Amerasian children in Vietnam War films is examined. Examples of these films are 'Indochine,' 'China Gate' and 'Heaven and Earth'. Most Vietnam War films use victimization to arouse sympathy for the American soldiers to make it appear that they are the foremost victims of the Vietnam War. The purpose of these vietnam War films is not to inform the unwitting about the Amerasian or Eurasian reality but to exalt the U.S. victory in the Vietnam War.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) New Republic v210, n6 (Feb 7, 1994): 26 (2 pages).

Killmeier, Matthew A.; Kwok, Gloria Kwok
"A People's History of Empire, or the Imperial Recuperation of Vietnam? Countermyths and Myths in Heaven and Earth." The Journal of Communication Inquiry. Jul 2005. Vol. 29, Iss. 3; p. 256

Klapwald, Thea.
"Two survivors turn hell into 'Heaven and Earth'; Oliver Stone and Le Ly Hayslip collaborate on an epic film about her life in the midst of war in Vietnam." New York Times v143, sec2 (Sun, Dec 19, 1993):H22(N), H22(L), col 1, 27 col in.

Klawans, Stuart.
"Heaven and Earth." (motion picture review) Nation v258, n1 (Jan 3, 1994):30 (2 pages).

Lane, Anthony.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) New Yorker v69, n46 (Jan 17, 1994):87 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) New York Times v143 (Fri, Dec 24, 1993):B1(N), C1(L), col 2, 15 col in.

Mathews, Jack.
"The road to 'Heaven and Earth'; how Le Ly Hayslip's personal war inspired Oliver Stone." (director based film on Vietnamese woman's life story) Los Angeles Times v113 (Thu, Dec 23, 1993):F1, col 2, 32 col in.

McCarthy, Todd.
"Heaven and Earth." (motion picture review) Variety v353, n8 (Dec 27, 1993):50 (2 pages).

Pawelczak, Andy.
"Heaven and Earth." (motion picture review) Films in Review v. 45 (Mar./Apr. '94) p. 55-6.
"A review of Oliver Stone's latest movie Heaven and Earth. The third part of his Vietnam trilogy, which includes Platoon and Born On The Fourth Of July, this movie attempts to present the war from the point of view of its chief victims, the Vietnamese peasants. Although Stone's goal is admirable, the movie presents a conventional vision of history, in which the innocent are engulfed by successive waves of violence, that does not fully account for the extremes of American arrogance and triumphalism." [Art Index]

Romney, Jonathan.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v7, n286 (Jan 21, 1994):34 (2 pages).

Stephens, Rebecca L.
"Distorted Reflections: Oliver Stone's Heaven and Earth and Le Ly Hayslip's When Heaven and Earth Changed Places." Centennial Review, vol. 41 no. 3. 1997 Fall. pp: 661-69.

Stone, Robert.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) New York Review of Books v41, n4 (Feb 17, 1994):22 (3 pages).

Strick, Philip.
"Heaven and Earth." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v4, n3 (March, 1994):39 (3 pages).

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Oliver Stone returns to the Vietnam War; let the debate begin." (in his new film 'Heaven and Earth') (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v143 (Tue, Dec 7, 1993):B1(N), C17(L), col 5, 17 col in.

JFK

Alleva, Richard.
"JFK." (movie reviews) Commonweal v119, n3 (Feb 14, 1992):17 (2 pages).

Ansen, David.
"A troublemaker for our times." (Oliver Stone) Newsweek v118, n26 (Dec 23, 1991):50.
The Oliver Stone-created motion picture 'JFK,' which portrays the assassination of former Pres John F. Kennedy, asks the audience to judge both the movie for its entertainment value, and all the participants in the assassination itself.

Auchincloss, Kenneth.
"Twisted history." (Oliver Stone-created motion picture 'JFK') (Cover Story) Newsweek v118, n26 (Dec 23, 1991):46 (4 pages).
The Oliver Stone-created motion picture 'JFK' is an attempt to lend credence to the conspiracy theory of the assassination of former Pres John F. Kennedy. An analysis of the movie and the assassination itself is presented.

Auster, Albert.
"The Bacchae, the 'Missing Prince,' and Oliver Stone's Presidential Films." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 2000 Spring, 28:1, 30-35.
UC users only

Bechtel, R.
"Remembering J.F.K.: dead Kennedys and traumatic history." In: Past performance : American theatre and the historical imagination / Roger Bechtel. Lewisburg, [Pa.] : Bucknell University Press, c2007.
Main Stack PS338.H56.B43 2007

Belin, David W.
"Which Work is the Fiction?"(Oliver Stone's movie 'JFK' or the Warren Commission report) National Law Journal v14, n22 (Mon, Feb 3, 1992):17, col 1, 36 col in.

Belin, David W.
"The big 'lies' of JFK." (Oliver Stone's motion picture) New York v25, n7 (Feb 17, 1992):44 (4 pages).
Oliver Stone's movie 'JFK,' Jim Garrison's Book 'On the Trail of Assassins' and the Art and Entertainment Channel's special on the Kennedy assassination avoids evidence that that there was no conspiracy involved the assassination. Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone gunman who killed Kennedy.

Benoit, William L.; Nill, Dawn M.
"Oliver Stone's Defense of JFK." Communication Quarterly v46, n2 (Spring, 1998):127 (1 page)
UC users only

Bernstein, Richard.
"Oliver Stone, under fire over the killing of J.F.K." (film about the assassination of John F. Kennedy) New York Times v140, sec2 (Sun, July 28, 1991):H9(N), H9(L), col 1, 38 col in.

Benoit, William L.; Nill, Dawn M.
"Oliver Stone's Defense of JFK." Communication Quarterly v46, n2 (Spring, 1998):127.

Berger, Maurice; Deitcher, David.
"The Cave." (evaluation of film director Oliver Stone's movie JFK) (Column) Artforum v30, n8 (April, 1992):16 (2 pages).

Bethell, Tom.
"Conspiracy to end conspiracies." (Oliver Stone's new film 'JFK') National Review v43, n23 (Dec 16, 1991):48 (3 pages).
Oliver Stone challenges all sense of credibility with his new motion picture 'JFK.' His conspiracy theory of John F. Kennedy's assassination is blurred by the homage he pays to Jim Garrison and his relentless investigation of Clay Shaw based on his 'links' to anyone and everyone.

Billson, Anne.
"JFK." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v5, n186 (Jan 24, 1992):35.
The assassination of Pres John Kennedy was the first assassination to be extensively covered by television. Oliver Stone's movie 'JFK' does not contain new evidence, but shows that the mass media, rather than illuminating the truth, makes it easier to control the dissemination of information.

Briley, Ron.
"Teaching JFK (1991): Potential Dynamite In The Hands Of Our Youth?" Film & History 1998 28(1-2): 8-15.
UC users only

Brustein, Robert.
"JFK." (movie reviews) New Republic v206, n4 (Jan 27, 1992):26 (3 pages).

Burgoyne, Robert.
"Modernism and the Narrative of Nation in JFK." In: The Persistence of History: Cinema, Television, and the Modern Event / edited by Vivian Sobchack. pp: 113-25. New York: Routledge, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.2.P47 1996

Butler, L. D., Koopman C., Zimbardo, P. G.
"The Psychological Impact Of Viewing The Film JFK - Emotions, Beliefs, And Political Behavioral Intentions." Political Psychology 16: (2) 237-257 Jun 1995

Canby, Vincent.
"J.F.K." (Living Arts Pages) (movie reviews) New York Times v141 (Fri, Dec 20, 1991):B1(N), C1(L), col 5, 29 col in.

Carnes, Mark C.
"Past Imperfect: History According to the Movies." (interview with film director Oliver Stone) Cineaste v22, n4 (Fall, 1996):33
UCB users only

Christensen, Jerome.
"The Time Warner Conspiracy: JFK, Batman, and the Manager Theory of Hollywood Film." Critical Inquiry. 28(3):591-617. 2002 Spring

Cockburn, Alexander.
"John and Oliver's bogus adventure." (Oliver Stone's movie on John Kennedy) Sight and Sound v1, n10 (Feb, 1992):22 (3 pages).

Cockburn, Alexander.
"J.F.K. and "JFK." (historical accuracy of Oliver Stone's motion picture) (Beat the Devil) (Column) Nation v254, n1 (Jan 6, 1992):6 (2 pages).
The film "JFK" contends that Pres Kennedy's assassination was a right-wing conspiracy to stop him from withdrawing the US from Vietnam. Kennedy actually oversaw a massive military build-up, increased the US presence in Vietnam, and approved the destabilization of foreign governments.

Collier, Peter.
"Ollie uber Alles: Oliver Stone's triumph of the will." (Cover Story) American Spectator v25, n4 (April, 1992):28 (4 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"Who killed J.F.K.?" (film maker Oliver Stone's 'JFK') Time v138, n25 (Dec 23, 1991):66 (5 pages).
Oliver Stone's new movie 'JFK' will create renewed interest in conspiracy theories about the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Various conspiracy theories are described, in addition to details about the production of the film.

Crowdus, Gary.
"Clarifying the Conspiracy." (interview with film director Oliver Stone on the conspiracy theory in the movie 'JFK') (Through the Looking Glass: A Critical Overview of Oliver Stone's JFK) (Interview) Cineaste v19, n1 (Wntr, 1992):25 (3 pages).
UCB users only
'JFK' offers two conspiracy theories on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. One is the assassination plot itself and the other is the cover-up. The film offers only a hypothesis, but one based on comprehensive documentation of which many of its critics seem unaware. In fact, 'JFK' is so cerebral that major actors have to be signed on to give viewers something familiar to focus on. Its aim is not so much to pinpoint the conspirators as to urge viewers to at least turn from the Warren Commission report in favor of their own research and perhaps question the government's idea of covert operations.

Crowdus, Gary.
"Getting the Facts Straight." (interview with screenplay writer Zachary Sklar, co-author of the movie 'JFK' with director Oliver Stone) (Through the Looking Glass: A Critical Overview of Oliver Stone's JFK) (Interview) Cineaste v19, n1 (Wntr, 1992):28 (5 pages).

Crowdus, Gary.
" History, Dramatic License and Larger Historical Truths: An Interview with Oliver Stone." Cineaste v22, n4 (Fall, 1996):38 (5 pages).
UCB users only

Crowdus, Gary.
"Getting the Facts Straight." Cineaste; 1992, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p28-32, 5p UCB users only
An interview with Zachary Sklar, coauthor of the screenplay of the film "JFK," directed by Oliver Stone, is presented. He details how he got involved in the "JFK" project and discusses the instruction and guidance that Stone gave him. He then explains the reasons why the script went through at least five subsequent drafts.

Crowdus, Gary.
"Striving for Authenticity." (interview with Jane Rusconi, research coordinator for the movie 'JFK') (Through the Looking Glass: A Critical Overview of Oliver Stone's JFK) (Interview) Cineaste v19, n1 (Wntr, 1992):33 (2 pages).

Denby, David.
"JFK." (movie reviews) New York v25, n1 (Jan 6, 1992):50 (2 pages).

Dershowitz, Alan M.
"Suppression of the facts grants Stone a broad brush." (Oliver Stone's interpretation of John F. Kennedy's assassination in the movie 'J.F.K.') (Column) Los Angeles Times v111 (Wed, Dec 25, 1991):B7, col 5, 19 col in.

Doherty, Thomas
"Seamless matching." (movie JFK) National Forum Summer 1997 v77 n3 p39(4) (2191 words)
UC users only
"Oliver Stone's "JFK" is an exceptionally up-to-date, state of the art film with excellent cinematography. Regarded by movie watchers as a landmark in American film history, JFK captured the interest of the people and helped them to understand a historical event. The 189-minute film, however, may be considered an act of history manipulation since the events presented may be taken by viewers as actual occurrences and no t as a reenactment of what might have happened." [Expanded Academic Index]

Dowell, Pat.
"Last Year at Nuremberg: The Cinematic Strategies of JFK." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992. pp: 8-14.
UC users only
Oliver Stone succeeds in integrating both conventional and radical cinematic devices in his movie 'JFK.' These devices include brief cameos by well-known actors, flashbacks and flashforwards, intercutting of real and recreated television news footage, mixing factual with speculative scenes and classic-style revelatory monologues. The result is a fragmentary sequence of scenes that nevertheless conveys the theme coherently and forcefully, that a web of conspiracy was behind John F. Kennedy's assassination.

Doyle, Jeff.
"Missed Saigon: Some Recent Film Representations of Vietnam." In: Crossing Cultures: Essays on Literature and Culture of the Asia-Pacific / Daniel Segal, editor. pp: 91-99. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, c1992.
Main Stack CB245.C695 1992
Moffitt CB245.C695 1992

Edwards, Keith.
"JFK." (movie reviews) Films in Review v43, n3-4 (March-April, 1992):115 (2 pages).

Ehrenstein, David.
"JFK - a new low for Hollywood." Advocate, n594 (Jan 14, 1992):78 (4 pages).
Oliver Stones film, 'JFK,' is based largely on the theories of New Orleans, LA, former district attorney Jim Garrison, who prosecuted a gay man, Clay Shaw, for conspiring to kill Pres Kennedy. In the film, Shaw is portrayed as a sinister sadomasochist.

Ephron, Nora.
"The tie that binds." (history and art; motion picture "JFK") Nation v254, n13 (April 6, 1992):453 (3 pages).
Oliver Stone's film 'JFK' has been unfairly criticized by the press for distorting the facts of the Kennedy assassination. Films about historical events must distort facts to impose a narrative structure on the events and make a compelling and entertaining movie.

Epstein, Edward Jay.
"The second coming of Jim Garrison." (motion picture 'JFK') Atlantic v271, n3 (March, 1993):89 (5 pages).
Oliver Stone's film 'JFK' is based on a conspiracy developed by district attorney Jim Garrison that failed to stand up in court. The film further distorts reality by misrepresenting fiction for fact.

Evica, George Michael.
"Deconstructing the DA: The Garrison Image in 'JFK.' "(former New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison as portrayed in the movie) (Through the Looking Glass: A Critical Overview of Oliver Stone's JFK) Cineaste v19, n1 (Wntr, 1992):17 (3 pages).
UCB users only

Fenster, Mark.
"Uncovering the Plot: Conspiracy Theory as Narrative." In: Conspiracy theories : secrecy and power in American culture / Mark Fenster. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1999.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Anthropology HV6275 .F45 1999
Main (Gardner) Stacks HV6275 .F45 1999
Moffitt HV6275 .F45 1999

Garber, Marjorie.
"Character Assassination: Shakespeare, Anita Hill, and JFK." In: Media Spectacles / edited by Marjorie Garber, Jann Matlock & Rebecca L. Walkowitz. pp: 23-39. New York: Routledge, 1993.
Main Stack P92.U5.M444 1993
Moffitt P92.U5.M444 1993

Gabel, Peter.
"The spiritual truth of 'JFK.'" (Oliver Stone's motion picture) Tikkun v7, n2 (March-April, 1992):48 (4 pages). Oliver Stone contends that the findings of the Warren Commission were myths so he produced the motion picture 'JFK' as a countermyth. The movie deals with the spiritual issues surrounding American society and the death of John F. Kennedy.

Gardels, Nathan; Conners, Leila.
"Splinters to the brain." (interview with filmmaker Oliver Stone) (Time, Form and Ethics in the Wake of Modernism) (Interview) New Perspectives Quarterly v9, n2 (Spring, 1992):51 (3 pages).
Filmmaker Oliver Stone claims that truth has many interpretations. His film 'JFK,' which is similar to the Japanese film 'Rashomon,' explored different angles on Pres John F. Kennedy's assassination. In essence, the questions raised were not political but philosophical.

Gates, David.
"Bottom line: how crazy is it?" (conspiracy theory of John F. Kennedy assassination) Newsweek v118, n26 (Dec 23, 1991):52 (3 pages).
The Oliver Stone-created motion picture 'JFK,' which portrays the assassination of former Pres John F. Kennedy, demonstrates that Stone thoroughly researched his topic. An brief overview of the actual assassination is presented.

Georgakas, Dan.
"The 'Threat' of the New Frontier: The Kennedy Imagage in JFK." Cineaste, 1992, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p19-20, 2p,
UCB users only

Gitlin, Todd.
"The stoning of Oliver and the fascination of JFK." (Oliver Stone) Tikkun v7, n2 (March-April, 1992):52 (4 pages).
The American media has strongly criticized Oliver Stone for his interpretation of John F. Kennedy's assassination in the movie 'JFK.' However, the public was drawn to the movie and have related to Stone's pervading questions about the political issues, supposed conspiracy and

Georgakas, Dan.
"The 'Threat' of the New Frontier: The Kennedy Image in JFK." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992. pp: 19-20.
'JFK' suggests that secret state-big business conspirators were behind John F. Kennedy's assassination. The film enhances the mythical New Frontier Kennedy image which, it alleges, triggered the assassination. Director Oliver Stone's sanitized Kennedy, pitted against elusive assassination plotters, muddles up an otherwise clear conspiracy hypothesis. Viewers, however, need not agree with the film's Kennedy portrayal to accept the validity of the conspiracy scenario which raises disturbing thoughts as to how powerful a secret minority of the government can be.

Gunzenhauser, Randi.
"'All Plots Lead toward Death': Memory, History, and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy." Amerikastudien/American Studies, vol. 43 no. 1. 1998. pp: 75-91.
"Examines three texts that remember John F. Kennedy's assassination: Don DeLillo's bestseller Libra (1988), Oliver Stone's movie JFK (1991), and the CD-ROM The JFK Assassination: A Visual Investigation (1993). The discursive plotting of Kennedy's death by white, heterosexual males is considered intratextually as a means of stabilizing male identity in the 1960's. Read intertextually, the book, the movie, and the CD-ROM also confront their readers with a mode of controlling memory through "postmodern" notions of masculinity and its Others - femininity, homosexuality, and modernism. The past is read through the present, the present through its plottings of the past." [ABC-CLIO, America: History & Life]

Grenier, Richard.
"On the trail of America's paranoid class: Oliver Stone's JFK." (film director; 'JFK' the motion picture) National Interest, n27 (Spring, 1992):76 (9 pages).
Oliver Stone's motion picture 'JFK' has received scathing criticism from the press and other segments of society, while at the same time stirring patriotic sentiments with some. The motion picture is based on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Many feel the movie's underlying theme is unfounded, and that the film is heavy with political innuendos aimed at the US government. Most political analysts have dismissed 'JFK's' thesis as a fallacy, a mere manifestation of Stone's outrage at America's involvement in the Vietnam war, which he has nurtured since the Woodstock days.

Grenier, Richard.
"JFK." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4634 (Jan 24, 1992):16 (2 pages).

Grundmann, Roy.
"Gays, Women and an Abstinent Hero: The Sexual Politics of JFK." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992. pp: 20-22.
UC users only

Johnson, Brian D.
"JFK." (movie reviews) Maclean's v104, n52 (Dec 30, 1991):25.
UC users only

Jones, Robert A.
"Mr. Stone's not so fine adventure." (journalistic criticism of the movie 'JFK') Los Angeles Times v111 (Sun, Jan 12, 1992):A3, col 1, 18 col in.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"JFK." (movie reviews) New Republic v207, n11-12 (Sept 7, 1992):34 (2 pages).

Keller, James R.
"Oliver Stone's JFK and the 'Circulation of Social Energy' and the 'Textuality of History'." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 21 no. 2. 1993 Summer. pp: 73-78.<
UC users only
"The movie 'JFK' has been subject to controversy because it suggests the possibility of a well-designed conspiracy and cover-up in the assassination. Such reactions are expected, however, since the film's ultimate objective is to generate public interest in the issue. The subsequent public outrage and controversy would then provide the impetus for social change; in this case, a more thorough review of all documents related to the assassination." [Expanded Academic Index]

Kopkind, Andrew.
"JFK: the myth." (Oliver Stone's motion picture) (Editorial) Nation v254, n2 (Jan 20, 1992):40 (2 pages).
The vociferous reaction against Oliver Stone's movie "JFK" is rooted in the fact that the Kennedy assassination was a watershed event in recent American history that mythologized John Kennedy. Stone's film is propaganda, but his iconoclasm is to be commended.

Lambert, Patricia.
False witness: the real story of Jim Garrison's investigation and Oliver Stone's film JFK / Patricia Lambert. New York: M. Evans, c1998.
UCB Law Lib KF5052.5.K45 L36 1998

Lardner, George, Jr.
"On the set: Dallas in wonderland; how Oliver Stone's version of the Kennedy assassination exploits the edge of paranoia." (column) Washington Post v114 (Sun, May 19, 1991):D1, col 2, 85 col in.

Larder, George.
"... Or just a sloppy mess?" (critique of Oliver Stone's new film 'JFK') (Column) Washington Post v114 (Sun, June 2, 1991):D3, col 3, 20 col in.

Lipkin Steve.
"Defining Docudrama: In The Name of the Father, Schindler's List, and JFK." In: Why Docudrama?: fact-fiction on film and TV / edited by Alan Rosenthal. pp: 370-83 Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, c1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H5.W58 1999

Maslin, Janet.
"Oliver Stone manipulates his puppet." (direction of 'J.F.K.') New York Times v141, sec2 (Sun, Jan 5, 1992):H13(N), H13(L), col 5, 14 col in.

McCombs, Phil.
"Oliver Stone, returning the fire: in defending his 'JFK' conspiracy film, the director reveals his rage and reasoning." Washington Post v115 (Sat, Dec 21, 1991):F1, col 2, 61 col in.

Medhurst, Martin J.
"The Rhetorical Structure of Oliver Stone's JFK." Critical Studies in Mass Communication, vol. 10 no. 2. 1993 June. pp: 128-43.
UC users only
Author Abstract: Oliver Stone's JFK is a mythopoetic discourse that functions as cinematic rhetoric. Through the lens of the Adamic Myth, the author examines the film as a metaphoric interpretation or parable of the human condition. Members of the viewing audience are invited to participate in this mythic structure by emulating the actions of the protagonist, thus becoming instruments of sociopolitical change. COPYRIGHT Speech Communication Association 1993. >

Model, F. Peter.
"You've Seen the Movie, Now Read the Book(s)...." (feature film 'JFK')(includes related article on other films about the John F. Kennedy assassination) (Column) Wilson Library Bulletin v66, n7 (March, 1992):51 (3 pages).

Petras, James.
"The Discrediting of the Fifth Estate: The Press Attacks on JFK." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992. pp: 15-17.
UC users only

Phillips, William W.
"JFK" The Journal of American History. Dec 1992. Vol. 79, Iss. 3; p. 1264 (3 pages)
UC users only

Pilger, John.
"Death in Dallas." (Oliver Stone's film on the John F. Kennedy assassination, 'JFK') (Column) New Statesman & Society v4, n171 (Oct 4, 1991):10 (2 pages).

"Plunging into the labyrinth." (director Oliver Stone) (Interview) Time v138, n25 (Dec 23, 1991):74 (3 pages).
Oliver Stone believes there was a conspiracy to kill John F. Kennedy, and has set out to show it in his new film 'JFK.' The director explains why he believes important facts were covered up.

Powers, Richard Gid.
"From Camelot to Graceland: History and Popular Culture Studies from the Perspective of the Twenty-First Century." In: Eye on the Future: Popular Culture Scholarship into the Twenty-First Century/ edited Marilyn F. Motz, et. al. pp: 33-47. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, c1994.
Main Stack HM101.E97 19941

Rafferty, Terrence.
"JFK." (movie reviews) New Yorker v67, n47 (Jan 13, 1992):73 (3 pages).

Raskin, Marcus
"JFK and the Culture of Violence." The American Historical Review, Vol. 97, No. 2. (Apr., 1992), pp. 487+486+488 -499.

Reeves, Thomas C.
"JFK" The Journal of American History. Dec 1992. Vol. 79, Iss. 3; p. 1262 (7 pages)

Rogin, Michael.
"Body and Soul: JFK." In: Media Spectacles / edited by Marjorie Garber, Jann Matlock & Rebecca L. Walkowitz. pp: 3-21. New York: Routledge, 1993.
Main Stack P92.U5.M444 1993
Moffitt P92.U5.M444 1993
Available online via Google books

Rogin, Michael.
"'JFK': The Movie." (motion picture about the assassination of John F. Kennedy) (Cover Story) American Historical Review v97, n2 (April, 1992):500 (6 pages).

Romanowski, William D.
"Oliver Stone's JFK: Commercial Filmmaking, Cultural History, and Conflict." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 21 no. 2. 1993 Summer. pp: 63-71.
UC users only
"The movie 'JFK' has been subject to controversy since it debunks previously held theories regarding the Kennedy assassination. The combination of fact and fiction in the movie proved effective in rousing public interest in the subject. Dir Oliver Stone proved the effectivity of motion pictures in generating interest in social and historical issues." [Expanded Academic Index]

Rosenstone, Robert A.
"JFK: Historical Fact/Historical Film." In: Why Docudrama?: fact-fiction on film and TV / edited by Alan Rosenthal. pp: 333-39 Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, c1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H5.W58 1999

Sharrett, Christopher.
"Conspiracy Theory and Political Murder in America: Oliver Stone's JFK and the Facts of the Matter." In: The new American cinema / edited by Jon Lewis. pp: 217-47. Durham : Duke University Press, 1998.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.N47 1998

Sharrett, Christopher.
"Debunking the Official History." Cineaste, 1992, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p11-14, 4p,
UC users only

Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr.
"'JFK': truth and fiction." (historical accuracy of Oliver Stone's movie about President Kennedy's assassination uses legitimate concerns over possible conspiracy in reckless and paranoid way) (Column) Wall Street Journal (Fri, Jan 10, 1992):A10(W), A8(E), col 4, 31 col in.

Sheehan, Henry.
"JFK." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v1, n10 (Feb, 1992):48 (3 pages).

Simon, Art.
Dangerous knowledge: the JFK assassination in art and film / Art Simon. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 1996. Culture and the moving image.
Moffitt NX652.K45.S56 1996

Simon, Art.
"The Making of Alert Viewers: The Mixing of Fact and Fiction in JFK." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992. pp: 14-15.

Simon, John.
"JFK." (movie reviews) National Review v44, n4 (March 2, 1992):54 (2 pages).

Simon, Art.
"The Making of Alert Viewers." Cineaste, 1992, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p14-15, 2p
UC users only

Specter, Michael.
"Explosive imagery of 'J.F.K.' igniting debate in audiences." (Oliver Stone's movie creates renewed interest in conspiracy theories of assassination of President Kennedy, but fails most historical tests... New York Times v141 (Mon, Dec 23, 1991):A1(N), A1(L), col 1, 27 col in.

Staiger, Anet.
"Cinematic Shots: The Narration of Violence." The Persistence of History: Cinema, Television, and the Modern Event. In: The Persistence of History: Cinema, Television, and the Modern Event / edited by Vivian Sobchack. pp: 39-54. New York: Routledge, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.2.P47 1996

Steel, Ronald.
"Mr. Smith goes to the Twilight Zone: Oliver Stone's riveting offense against history." (politics of film, 'JFK') New Republic v206, n5 (Feb 3, 1992):30 (3 pages).
Stone's thesis that Pres Kennedy was murdered by conservative forces in the US government who opposed US withdrawal from Vietnam is foolish sentimentality. It cheapens the seriousness of his film and his reputation as a serious director.

Stern, Sheldon M.
"A Prosecutor Takes on the JFK Assassination." Reviews in American History. Mar 2008. Vol. 36, Iss. 1; p. 142 (9 pages)
UC users only

Stone, Oliver.
"Who Defines History? Oliver Stone's Address to the National Press Club." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992. pp: 23-24.
UC users only

Stone, Oliver.
"On Nixon and JFK." In: Oliver Stone's USA: film, history, and controversy Edited by Robert Brent Toplin. pp: 249-98. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, c2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 O45 2000

Sturken, Marita.
"Reenactment, fantasy, and the paranoia of history: Oliver Stone's docudramas." History and Theory v36, n4 (Dec, 1997):64 (16 pages).
"Author Abstract: In the late 1980s and 1990s, American popular culture has been increasingly rife with conspiracy narratives of recent historical events. Among cultural producers, filmmaker Oliver Stone hashad a significant impact on popular understanding of American culture in the late twentieht century through a series of docudramas which reread American history through the lens of conspiracy theory and paranoia. This paper examines the films of Oliver Stone - in particular Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July, JFK, and Nixon - asking why they have achieved popularity and brought about catharsis, why they are the subject of attack, and why it is useful to look beyond the debate about truth and falsehood that has surrounded them. It analyzes the ways in which Stone's status as a Vietnam veteran allowed Platoon to be accorded the authenticity of survivor discourse, whereas JFK and Nixon were subject to almost hysterical attack, not only because of Stone's assertions of conspiracy, but also because of his cinematic style of tampering with famous images. Taking these films as its points of departure, this paper examines the role of images in the construction of history, the form of the docudrama, the reenactment of historical images, fantasies of history, and ways in which paranoia is part of the practice of citizenship." COPYRIGHT 1997 Wesleyan University.

"Through the Looking Glass: A Critical Overview of Oliver Stone's JFK." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992. pp: 8-35.

Sturken, Marita.
"Reenactment, Fantasy, and the Paranoia of History: Oliver Stone's Docudramas." History and Theory v36, n4 (Dec, 1997):64 (16 pages).

Toplin, Robert Brent
JFK." Journal of American History; Dec92, Vol. 79 Issue 3, p1266-1268, 3p
UC users only

Travers, Peter.
"JFK." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n622 (Jan 23, 1992):48 (2 pages).

Turan, Kenneth.
"JFK." (movie reviews) Los Angeles Times v111 (Fri, Dec 20, 1991):F1, col 2, 25 col in.

Vogel, Amos.
" JFK: The Question of Propaganda." Antioch Review v50, n3 (Summer, 1992):578 (8 pages).

von Bothmer, Bernard
"Oliver Stone's JFK: Political Assassination, Kennedy, and Vietnam." War, Literature & the Arts: An International Journal of the Humanities; 2005, Vol. 17 Issue 1/2, p242-251, 10p
UC users only
"The article presents a critique of director Oliver Stone's 1991 movie "JFK." It cites two main reasons for the success of the film and considers the validity of Stone's thesis concerning how the violent death of U.S. President John F. Kennedy influenced the progression of the Vietnam War. The author contends that Stone is mistaken in his argument that Kennedy would have withdrawn from Vietnam had he lived." [Ebsco]

Wall, James M.
"JFK." (movie reviews) Christian Century v109, n3 (Jan 22, 1992):59 (2 pages).

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Hollywood questions studio's role in 'JFK'." (what are the moral and ethical responsibilities of Warner Brothers releasing a film asserting that Lee Harvey Oswald did not act alone) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v141 (Tue, Dec 24, 1991):B1(N), C9(L), col 1, 33 col in.

Welsh, Jim.
" JFK: Why Were We in Vietnam?" (movie reviews) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n3 (July, 1992):263 (4 pages).

Welsh, Jim
"JFK: Why Were We in Vietnam?." Literature/Film Quarterly. 1992. Vol. 20, Iss. 3; p. 263 (4 pages)
UC users only

Wharton, Dennis; Gerard, Jeremy.
"Stone holds own in Gotham 'JFK' debate." (Oliver Stone; "Hollywood and History: the Debate Over JFK" panel)(includes related article on Senate Intelligence Committee hearings) Variety v346, n8 (March 9, 1992):5 (2 pages).
Stone defended the mixture of history and dramatic fabrication in his film about the conspiracy to murder Pres Kennedy. Director Nora Ephron, writer Norman Mailer, author Edward Jay Epstein, and 'Nation' editor Victor Navasky were also on the panel.

White, Hayden.
"The Modernist Event." In: The Persistence of History: Cinema, Television, and the Modern Event / edited by Vivian Sobchack. pp: 17-38. New York: Routledge, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.2.P47 1996

"Who defines history?" (film director Oliver Stone's speech at the National Press Club) (Through the Looking Glass: A Critical Overview of Oliver Stone's JFK) (Transcript) Cineaste v19, n1 (Wntr, 1992):23 (2 pages).
Media criticism of the film 'JFK' for its alleged distortion of history ignores the fact that no accepted history of the John F. Kennedy assassination has been fully documented. Only few Americans believe even the official Warren Commission report, whose single-bullet conclusion is an absurd myth. 'JFK' suggests a plausible theory, in the light of more recent scandals such as Watergate break-in and cover-up, that some top public officials had conspired to kill the President. Thus, the mediamen attacking 'JFK' would do better to search for the truth about the assassination.

Wicker, Tom.
"Does 'J.F.K.' conspire against reason?" (Oliver Stone's new movie "J.F.K." seems slanted) New York Times v141, sec2 (Sun, Dec 15, 1991):H1(N), H1(L), col 1, 53 col in.

Will, George F.
"'JFK': paranoid history." (criticism of Oliver Stone's movie, JFK) (Column) Washington Post v115 (Thu, Dec 26, 1991):A23, col 6, 20 col in.

Will, George F.
"Oliver Stone gives paranoia a bad name. ("JFK" motion picture is a travesty) (Column) Los Angeles Times v111 (Tue, Dec 24, 1991):B7, col 3, 17 col in.

Yarbrough, Jeff.
"Heart of stone." (writer-director Oliver Stone) (Interview) Advocate, n600 (April 7, 1992):44 (6 pages).
Oliver Stone of 'JFK' fame defends his films from charges of homophobia. While he personally admits having had homosexual experience, he asserts that it is the artist's right to depict his gay characters in any manner he likes, negative though it may be.

Natural Born Killers

Alleva, Richard.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Commonweal v121, n17 (Oct 7, 1994):22 (2 pages).
UC users only

Ansen, David.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Newsweek v124, n9 (August 29, 1994):54 (2 pages).

Atkinson, Michael
"The Movies Made Me Do It: How Much Are "Natural Born" Killers Affected By Film Violence?" The Village Voice 44:18 (11 May 1999) p. 58-59
UC users only
"Surveys films described as "copycat crime" source material, mentioning violent scenes and the real-life acts of violence in which the criminals reenacted parts of films including "The Basketball Diaries," "A Clockwork Orange," "RoboCop," "The Deer Hunter," "Child's Play," "Money Train," and more. States that the hitOliver hitStone film "Natural Born Killers" might be the "ne plus ultra" for "sheer inspirational force" and for the "highest number of captured killers who have directly credited the film." Considers legal actions filed against the directors and distributors of violent films, and quotes expert researchers on violent media and violent behavior." [IIPA]

Bailey, John.
"Bang Bang Bang Bang Ad Nauseum." In: Screening violence / edited and with an introduction by Stephen Prince. pp: 79-85 New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2000. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1995.9.V5.S395 2000

Barker, Martin.
"Violence." Sight and Sound, vol. 5 no. 6. 1995 June. pp: 10-13.
Discusses the various positions taken on the possible social effects of screen violence; makes particular reference to "Natural born killers".
Barker, Martin
"Violent critics." Sight & Sound Vol V nr 8 (Aug 1995); p 64
Continuation of the debate on violence in "Natural born killers".

Beller, Jonathan L.
"Identity through Death/The Nature of Capital: The Media-Environment for Natural Born Killers." Post-Identity 1998 Summer, 1:2, 55-67.

Bischof, Dan.
Incitement lawsuit against Stone, Natural Born Killers dismissed. > News Media & the Law v25, n2 (Spring, 2001):22 (1 page).
The author discusses the dismissal of Byers v. Edmondson, in which a US District Court for Louisiana ruled there was no evidence that director Oliver Stone or other producers of the film 'Natural Born Killers' had knowingly intended to incite violence.

Blake, Richard A.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) America v171, n7 (Sept 17, 1994):22 (2 pages).
UC users only

Bowman, James.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4790 (Jan 20, 1995):18.

Boyle, Karen.
"What's Natural about Killing? Gender, Copycat Violence and Natural Born Killers." Journal of Gender Studies. 10 (3): 311-21. 2001 Nov.
UC users only

"The business." (censoring 'Natural Born Killers') Sight and Sound v4, n12 (Dec, 1994):4 (2 pages).
The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) fears that the film 'Natural Born Killers' will have negative influence on the young, the naive and the socially marginalized. The BBFC does not wish to make the film available in Britain as censors cannot monitor the films parents let their children see. However, 'Natural Born Killers' will get over the obstacle presented by the BBFC's stance on the strength of its producer Warner Bros' name.

"Can Pistols Get Smarter? A young couple watch Oliver Stone's 'Natural Born Killers,' then launch a shooting spree. Now a lawsuit asks: did the film incite violence?" (Nation) Newsweek v134, n5 (August 2, 1999):42.

Chang, Chris.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Film Comment v30, n4 (July-August, 1994):38 (2 pages).
UC users only
"From its opening sequence, Oliver Stone's impressive new film, Natural Born Killers, lurches into visual overdrive. The film employs wild camera movements, canted angles, grotesque caricatures, and a delirious blend of media usually associated with music video and experimental films. As the movie follows the exploits of a murderous couple played by Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis, it is continuously punctured by slices of dark humor." [Expanded Academic Index]

Corliss, Richard.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Time v144, n9 (August 29, 1994):66 (2 pages).

Courtwright, David T.
"Way Cooler Than Manson: Natural Born Killers (1994)." Film & History 1998 28(3-4): 28-36.
UC users only
" Examines the plot of hitOliver hitStone's film "Natural Born Killers" and discusses the influence of violent movies on the public. Notes the response from audiences and critics. Mentions the film is a commentary on random violence in the United States. Remarks on the ending of the film, stating "hitStone didn't even pick the right ending." Concludes that this film is a misfired attempt at berserker satire with self-contradictory religious overtones: essentially a failed experiment. Indicates this does not mean that hitStone is a failed director." [IIPA]
Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994) represents a flawed attempt to explore violence in American society and its exploitation by the media.

Dean, Peter.
"'Natural Born Killers' under fire in U.K.; parliament debating home video censorship." Billboard v108, n21 (May 25, 1996):77 (2 pages).
UK's members of parliament led by David Alton censured British Board of Film Classification Dir. James Ferman for allowing the video release of the uncut version of Oliver Stone's 'Natural born Killers.' In a House of Commons motion, Alton stated that the movie presents psychological harm to children and that stricter regulations should be in place to protect children from movies that feature violence. Alton and other MP's requested the government to ban the release of the movie and review its censorship rules.

Denby, David.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) New York v27, n35 (Sept 5, 1994):46 (2 pages). Pub Type: Review.

Douglas, Susan J.
"The Devil Made Me Do It: Is Natural Born Killers the Ford pinto of movies?" (motion picture that inspired copycat murders sued as unprotected speech) Nation v268, n13 (April 5, 1999):50.
There have been many cases where violent episodes are partially blamed on motion pictures that inspired people to perform acts that they saw onscreen. The film Natural Born Killers has inspired several copycat crimes, despite the ironic intent of the film. The 1995 crime spree of Sarah Edmondson and Ben Darrus was reportedly inspired by the film. Author John Grisham urged that a product liability suit against the film and a suit alleging that the film qualifies as unprotected speech is underway.

Easterbrook Gregg.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Washington Post v117 (Sun, Sept 18, 1994):C7, col 4, 24 col in.

Gibeaut, John.
"Deadly inspiration." (movie-inspired crime) (includes related article on proposed restrictions on television content) ABA Journal v83 (June, 1997):62 (6 pages).
Claims that motion pictures and other artistic media provoke violence have been made before, and scientific evidence of the last 20 years does point to a link. The film 'Natural Born Killers' may have set a record, however, with at least 14 murderers having claimed to be emulating the film. The television industry has reacted to legislative threats by agreeing to V-chip technology, a voluntary ratings system enabling parents to shield

Gross, Larry.
"Exploding Hollywood." Sight and Sound vol. 5 no. 3. 1995 Mar. pp: 8-9.
Oliver Stone's film 'Natural Born Killers' is an attack on Hollywood's portrayal of violence which makes the audience question the basic tenets of Hollywood's action films. The film fails as an artistic piece but it demands respect for its analysis of the mainstream cinema. The director of the film does not present solutions to the problems of action films but deserves appreciation for his courage to direct a film that boldly depicts the failings of the genre.

Hampton, Howard.
"American maniacs." ('Natural Born Killers' and 'Forrest Gump') Film Comment v30, n6 (Nov-Dec, 1994):2 (3 pages).
'Forrest Gump' and 'Natural Born Killers' show opposite sides of the American psyche. Gump represents a need to seek a simpler life where the bad things in life just pass by, where Micky and Mallory of 'Natural Born Killers' represent the glorification of violence and irrationality.

James, Nick.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v5, n3 (March, 1995):44 (2 pages).
"Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers is played for grim laughs throughout, with its two main characters, Mickey and Mallory, as overblown cartoon killers. The film's black humor is so strained and hysterical that all satiric intent is dissipated. The director's proclaimed target is the pernicious leveling effect of media saturation on moral questions. Stone is so afraid that his audience will not realize that he is engaged in parody, however, that he restates everything over and over." [Art Abstracts]

Jousse, Thierry
"Natural born killers." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no484 Oct 1994. p. 50-3.
"The writer discusses Oliver Stone's latest film Natural Born Killers (1994). This film is a manic combination of the violent images we have seen in a hundred other films. An explosion of violent images, sound, colors, and sensations, it is a film that takes cinema to its limits."

Katz, Jon.
"Natural Born Killjoy." Wired, vol. 2 no. 12. 1994 Dec. pp: 126-33.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Citizen Cain." (movie "Natural Born Killers" can teach about the horrors of violence) New Republic (July 12, 1999):28.
UC users only
"Filmmaker Oliver Stone's film "Natural Born Killers" has unfairly been lumped into a category of films that are partially blamed for the violence in US society, including the shooting at Columbine High School, CO. The film is in fact a nuanced critique of violence, and young people could learn from watching it." [Magazine Index]

Klawans, Stuart.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Nation v259, n8 (Sept 19, 1994):284 (3 pages).

Kornatowska, Maria; Appleyard, Bryan.
"'High Noon' to 'Natural Born Killer.'" (full circle for Hollywood imagery; includes related article on Hollywood's dual role in the destruction and support of the US image)(reprinted from Gazeta, May 6-8, 1995; and... World Press Review v42, n8 (August, 1995):30 (2 pages).
American movies as reflections of US culture are analyzed. During the New Wave period, Europeans meditated, Americans produced action in 'High Noon.' 'Forrest Gump' is examined, along with Natural Born Killers' which seems almost a parody of the images created by James Dean and Marlon Brando.
Kroll, Jack.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Newsweek v124, n9 (August 29, 1994):55.

MacDonald, Scott.
"Re-envisioning the American West: Babette Mangolte's 'The Sky on Location,' James Benning's 'North on Evers,' Oliver Stone's 'Natural Born Killers,' and Ellen Spiro's 'Roam Sweet Home.'" American Studies v39, n1 (Spring, 1998):115 (32 pages).
The films 'The Sky on Location,' 'North on Evers,' 'Natural Born Killers' and 'Roam Sweet Home' portrayed the importance of the American West in the understanding of the so-called American experience. In 'The Sky on Location,' director Babette Mangolte focused on landscapes that displayed the loneliness of the West. On the other hand, 'North on Evers' emphasized the interaction between the society and the land. While 'Natural Born Killers' bemoaned the loss of the freedom in the West, 'Roam Sweet Home' accepted not only the West's aging and changes but also their consequences.

McCarthy, Todd.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Variety v356, n3 (August 15, 1994):43 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) New York Times v143 (Fri, August 26, 1994):B1(N), C1(L), col 2, 28 col in.

Noel, Danie C.
"'I Have Seen the Future, Brother: It Is Murder': Apocalypse Noir in Natural Born Killers and Leonard Cohen's 'The Future'." Literature and Theology 1998 Mar, 12:1, 39-49.

Parkinson, Brian
"Violence and make-believe." Sight & Sound Vol V nr 7 (July 1995); p 64
Parkinson from the University of Leicester takes issue with Martin Barker's piece on "Natural born killers" (June 1995); questions Barker's implication that the content of any message is only determined by the surrounding discourses.

Pawelczak, Andy
"Natural born killers." (motion picture review) Films in Review v 45 Nov/Dec 1994. p. 57-8.
Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers is a delirious meditation on violence and American culture. State of the art technology is used to deliver Stone's vision. The movie veers between the exhilarating and the irritating, the compelling and the boring, and the funny and the disturbing.

Phillips, Kendall R.
"Violence and crime : Oliver Stone's Natural born killers." In: Controversial cinema : the films that outraged America / Kendall R. Phillips. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.S284 P45 2008

Pizzello, Stephen.
" Natural born killers blasts big screen with both barrels." American Cinematographer v. 75 (Nov. '94) p. 36-46+.
An overview of the production of Oliver Stone's film Natural Born Killers. Natural Born Killers tracks the bloody exploits of two romantically entangled serial killers across America. Shot by cinematographer Robert Richardson, the film possesses a unique visual style that is a striking example of cinematic experimentation. In crafting the film's garish, eye-popping psychological mindscapes, Stone and Richardson united a broad variety of shooting formats with front- and rear-projection photography, bits of heavy-metal animation, stock footage, and clips from other films. They further enhanced the hallucinatory mix with offbeat lighting schemes; unusual angles; subjective camera techniques; a broken, stream of consciousness editing style; and a daring sound track that juxtaposes wildly diverse musical samples.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) New Yorker v70, n27 (Sept 5, 1994):106 (2 pages).

Rosenbaum, Ron.
"The pissing contest." (examination of personalities and work of film directors Oliver Stone and Quentin Tarantino) Esquire v128, n6 (Dec, 1997):38 (4 pages).
The personal conflict between directors Stone and Tarantino grew out of a perception by Tarantino that Stone mishandled his script for 'Natural Born Killers.' The personalities and work of the two are recall the polarity between writers Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Salamon, Julie.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, August 25, 1994):A10(W), A10(E), col 1, 21 col in.

Sandler, Adam.
"Grisham vs. Stone: 'Killer' opponents - murder sparks novelist to call for action." (John Grisham; Oliver Stone's violent 'Natural Born Killers') Variety v363, n7 (June 17, 1996):11 (2 pages).
Grisham is accusing Stone's 'Killers' with inspiring the murder of his friend William Savage. He is calling for films to be classified as products, and subject to lawsuits for the adverse consequences they provoke.

Savage, David G.; Harrison, Eric.
"Supreme Court declines to bar movie lawsuit." (brought against filmmaker Oliver Stone, for allegedly inciting violence with his film 'Natural Born Killers') Los Angeles Times (Tue, March 9, 1999):A3, col 5, 25 col in.

Schiff, Stephen.
"The Last Wild Man." New Yorker, 1994 Aug 8. pp: 40-55.
Stone is an old-fashioned Hollywood director, a demanding taskmaster who likes to party and womanize, and is also into psychedelic drugs and Buddhist mysticism. 'Natural Born Killers' is the most radical film yet from the Oscar-winning director who is known for taking chances.

Schweizer, Peter.
"Bad Imitation." (Oliver Stone movie finds murderous admirers: 'Natural Born Killers')National Review v50, n25 (Dec 31, 1998):23.
UC users only
"A civil suit against 'Natural Born Killers' director Oliver Stone and film distributor Warner Bros, alleges that Ben Darrus' and Sarah Edmondson's March 1995 Oklahoma-Louisiana random murder rampage was spurred by the film. The crime victims' lawsuit has Hollywood worried about future liability for copycat violence claims." [Expanded Academic Index]

Sharrett, Christopher.
"Natural Born Killers." (motion picture) (movie reviews) Cineaste v21, n1-2 (Wntr-Spring, 1995):83 (2 pages).
UC users only
"A review of Natural Born Killers, a film directed by Oliver Stone. Stone aims at attacking not just movie conventions but also illusionism itself. He presents a film that is deliberately created to look like what it is--a construct, like all other media products. He wants to focus attention on the media's manipulation of consciousness as well as its distortion of the public agenda. The problem is that this focus strays in several very incompatible directions." [Art Abstracts]

Simon, John.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) National Review v46, n18 (Sept 26, 1994):72 (2 pages).

Smith, Gavin.
"Oliver Stone: Why Do I Have to Provoke?" Sight and Sound vol. 4 no. 12. 1994 Dec. pp: 8-12.
"Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers is a savage, surreal satire about the American media's exploitative processing of crime and violence into amoral spectacle. The film is unafraid to implicate itself in the sadism of spectacle, making its point through punishing, unrelieved harshness and in-your-face excess. A busy collage of visual innovation driven by a compelling industrial/alternative rock soundtrack and laced with ambiguous cheap thrills, it is undoubtedly Stone's piece de resistance and ranks among mainstream cinema's greatest formal experiments. In an interview, Stone discusses such subjects as the relationship between crime, media, society, and the film's style; the questions the film's form raises about the medium of cinema; and the director's doubts about cinema as a medium." [Art Abstracts]

Sweeney, Gael.
"The Trashing of White Trash: Natural Born Killers and the Appropriation of the White Trash Aesthetic." Quarterly Review of Film and Video. 18 (2): 143-55. 2001 Apr.
UC users only

Travers, Peter.
"Natural Born Killers." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n690 (Sept 8, 1994):83 (3 pages).

Weinraub, Bernard.
"How a movie satire turned into reality." (Oliver Stones' 'Natural Born Killers') (The Living Arts Pages) New York Times v143 (Tue, August 16, 1994):B1(N), C15(L), col 1, 20 col in.

Wills, Garry.
"Dostoyevsky behind a camera: Oliver Stone is making great American novels on film." Atlantic Monthly v280, n1 (July, 1997):96 (5 pages).
Oliver Stone's films are multi-layered, their themes taken from news stories, with melodrama and spiritualism added. Stone's work is compared with the books of Dostoyevsky. Both men's relationships with their fathers were central to their work.

Wise, Christopher.
"The Politics Of Ecstasy: Postmodernity, Ethics, And Native American Culture In Oliver Stone's The Doors And Natural Born Killers." West Georgia College Studies in the Social Sciences 1995 33: 41-68.
Explores how Jim Morrison, singer of the rock band The Doors, emblematized 1960's youth culture's attitudes toward the Vietnam War, drug use, and romanticized notions of Native American culture and examines the postmodern treatment of such themes in two films directed by Oliver Stone, The Doors (1991) and Natural Born Killers (1994).

Nixon

Alleva, Richard.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Commonweal v123, n2 (Jan 26, 1996):19 (2 pages).
UC users only

Ambrose, Stephen E.
"The Nixon inside Stone's head; the 'beast' is the director's own warped view of history." (Oliver Stone's film biography of Richard M. Nixon)(Column) Washington Post v119 (Sun, Jan 7, 1996):C3, col 1, 35 col in.

Ambrose, Stephen E.
"Nixon: Is It History?" In: Oliver Stone's USA: film, history, and controversy Edited by Robert Brent Toplin. pp: 202-16. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, c2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 O45 2000

Ambrose, Stephen E.
"Nixon: An Oliver Stone Film." The Journal of American History. Mar 1996. Vol. 82, Iss. 4; pg. 1530, 4 pgs
UC users only

Arroyo, Jose.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v6, n3 (March, 1996):48 (2 pages).
UC users only
"Nixon provides an ideal subject for director Oliver Stone. While focusing on Nixon himself, Stone can still discourse on the rise of the military-industrial complex, the Vietnam War, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, how the combination of greed and power can lead to evil, and how the media has corrupted American political and social life. One of the many interesting things about the film is that these issues are looked at from the center of power." [Art Abstracts]

Auster, Albert.
"The Bacchae, the 'Missing Prince,' and Oliver Stone's Presidential Films." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 2000 Spring, 28:1, 30-35.
UC users only

Barnes, Fred.
"Not the One: 'Nixon's' Inaccuracies." (Oliver Stone biographical film of 1995) New Republic v214, n4 (Jan 22, 1996):10 (2 pages).
UC users only
"Too much of Stone's film crosses the bounds of docudrama and invents whole episodes, especially the 1968 television appearance where Nixon uses a slogan from a youngster's sign in the crowd, 'bring us together.' Several other facts about the 1968 campaign are also garbled." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bingham, Dennis.
"Oliver Stone's Nixon and the Unmanning of the Self-Made Man." In: Masculinity: bodies, movies, culture / edited by Peter Lehman. pp: 257-78 New York : Routledge, 2001. AFI film readers.
Main Stack PN1995.9.M46.M34 2001

Blake, Richard A.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) America v174, n2 (Jan 27, 1996):24 (2 pages).

Bruning, Fred.
"A Haunting Portrait of America's Alter Ego." (Oliver Stone's vision in motion picture, "Nixon")(Column) Maclean's v109, n2 (Jan 8, 1996):11.
UC users only
" Oliver Stone confronts the corruption of the American government under the Nixon administration in his movie "Nixon." While the movie deals with political issues such as Vietnam and Watergate, it also tackles Nixon's underdeveloped emotional characteristics" [Expanded Academic Index]

Carnes, Mark C.
"Past Imperfect: History According to the Movies. (interview with film director Oliver Stone)(Interview) Cineaste v22, n4 (Fall, 1996):33 (5 pages).

Cohen, Jacob.
"Nixon ... Not." (Oliver Stone's film and book on Richard M. Nixon)(Column) National Review v48, n1 (Jan 29, 1996):57 (3 pages).
Oliver Stone is paranoid and completely dishonest in his portrayal of former Pres Nixon. Stone lies about Nixon's role as VP, and about CIA and Mafia conspiracies against Cuban Pres Fidel Castro ending up causing the assassination of Pres John F. Kennedy.

Collins, C. A.
"The iconography of hope and despair in Ferlinghetti's and Stone's representations of Richard Nixon." In: Literary texts & the arts : interdisciplinary perspectives / edited by Corrado Federici & Esther Raventos-Pons. New York : P. Lang, 2003.
Main Stack PN695.L57 2003

Colson, Charles W.
"When history is up for grabs." (Oliver Stone's film, 'Nixon,' offers an inaccurate portrait of Richard Nixon, distorts American history in a dangerous way)(Column) New York Times v145 (Thu, Dec 28, 1995):A17(N), A21(L), col 2, 27 col in.

Corliss, Richard.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Time v146, n25 (Dec 18, 1995):74.

Crowdus, Gary.
"History, Dramatic License and Larger Historical Truths: An Interview with Oliver Stone." Cineaste v22, n4 (Fall, 1996):38 (5 pages).

Denby, David.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) New York v29, n1 (Jan 8, 1996):44 (4 pages).

Dowd, Maureen.
"Nix 'Nixon' - tricky pix; Stone and Nixon, two of a kind." (film director Oliver Stone's new movie 'Nixon' presents biased view of former President Richard Nixon)(Column) New York Times v145 (Thu, Dec 21, 1995):A23(N), A29(L), col 1, 16 col in.]

Ehrlichman, John D.
"Nixon, Stone - and Me." (historical errors in Oliver Stone's film 'Nixon')(Column) Newsweek v127, n2 (Jan 8, 1996):44.
"The former aide to Pres Nixon takes issue with 'Nixon,' which Stone admits was not meant to be history, and the heavily footnoted accompanying book, which purports to be a scholarly work. He claims Nixon was not a drunk, nor was he fraught with guilt over the death of Pres Kennedy." [Expanded Academic Index]

Freedman, Carl.
"An American Tragedy: On Oliver Stone's…Nixon." Film International, 2006, Vol. 4 Issue 19, p14-25, 10p

Gentry, Ric.
"A splintered vision of America." American Cinematographer v 77 Mar 1996. p. 36-42+.
"The work of director Oliver Stone and cinematographer Robert Richardson on Stone's film Nixon is discussed. The film, an epic biography of America's 37th president, marks the 10th teaming of the Stone/Richardson duo, which has become one of film's most important and innovative collaborations. Nixon's $42-million budget meant that the production team had to work fast, averaging 25 to 30 setups a day. This led to the use of a more static camera as opposed to time-consuming kinetic camera moves; Richardson sees this as adding a kind of stateliness to the film. However, Nixon features virtually all manner of formats, techniques, and cameras, including video and doctored stock footage." [Art Abstracts]

Goodman, Walter.
"With the facts in service to the drama." (Charlie Rose's interview of Oliver Stone regarding Stone's controversial new film, 'Nixon') (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v145 (Wed, Jan 3, 1996):B2(N), C9(L), col 4, 21 col in.

Grunberg,-Serge, reviewer.
"Nixon." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no500 Mar 1996. p. 116. Language: French.
"A review of the film Nixon (1996), directed by Oliver Stone. The merit of this film certainly does not lie in its rather affected directing style, which is also evident in Stone's other films JFK and Natural Born Killers; it is to be found in the incredible performance of Anthony Hopkins, playing a nerve-ridden, perspiring Nixon. The film stresses the poor social origins of Nixon, his obsession with gaining revenge on the establishment, and his overwhelming fear of ending up a loser." [Art Abstracts]

Hertzberg, Hendrik.
"Stoned Again." (Oliver Stone; Richard Nixon and historical perspectives)(Column) New Yorker v71, n43 (Jan 8, 1996):4 (2 pages).
Oliver Stone delivers a sympathetic character assessment of Richard Nixon in his new film "Nixon." Compared to Newt Gingrich's historical analysis, which implies from 1965 to 1995 liberals embarked on a thirty-year experiment in destroying America, Stone gives a rational account of history.

Hoff, Joan.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) American Historical Review v101, n4 (Oct, 1996):1173 (2 pages).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Maclean's v108, n52 (Dec 25, 1995):85 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) New Republic v214, n4 (Jan 22, 1996):26 (2 pages).

Kissinger, Henry A.
"Stone's Nixon." (Oliver Stone's movie, 'Nixon')(Column) Washington Post v119 (Wed, Jan 24, 1996):A19, col 1, 32 col in.

Kissinger, Henry A.
"Stone leaves the truth on cutting-room floor." (criticism of 'Nixon' motion picture by Oliver Stone) Los Angeles Times v115 (Sun, Jan 21, 1996):M2, col 4, 22 col in.

Klawans, Stuart.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Nation v262, n3 (Jan 22, 1996):34 (2 pages).

Krohn, Bill.
"L'Amerique au coeur des tenebres." Cahiers du Cinema no499 Feb 1996. p. 44-7+. Language: French.
"The American cinema of 1995 is discussed. David Fincher's Seven, Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys, Oliver Stone's Nixon, and especially Martin Scorsese's Casino reveal a religious, almost esoteric tone through the quite different experiences of these films. The fact that what was the best film of a poor year for Hollywood Casino did not even feature in the list for the best film of the National Society of Film Critics, demonstrates that the simple, unpretentious, popular films continue to be ignored by the critics." [Art Abstracts]

Linville, Susan E.
"Standing Pat: The First Lady in Oliver Stone's Nixon." Women's Studies, Jan/Feb2002, Vol. 31 Issue 1, p1, 31p, 2bw;
UC users only

Maslin, Janet.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) New York Times v145 (Wed, Dec 20, 1995):B1(N), C11(L), col 3, 30 col in.

McGrory, Mary.
"Reconstructing Nixon." (reaction to Oliver Stone's movie 'Nixon' and the revisionism now surrounding presidency of Richard M. Nixon)(Column) Washington Post v119 (Tue, Jan 2, 1996):A2, col 4, 18 col in.

McGuire, Stryker; Ansen, David.
"Hollywood's Most Controversial Director Oliver Stone Takes On Our Most Controversial President Richard Nixon." (includes interview with Stone)(Cover Story) Newsweek v126, n24 (Dec 11, 1995):64 (7 pages).
Stone, learning from criticism of 'JFK,' sticks close to history in 'Nixon,' but the film will stir controversy nonetheless. Anthony Hopkins plays Nixon as a Shakespearean tragic figure, both sinister and human. The eavesdropping on Nixon's private emotions may the the most controversial part.

Morgenstern, Joe.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, Dec 21, 1995):A10(W), A12(E), col 1, 16 col in.

Pawelczak, Andy.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Films in Review v47, n3-4 (March-April, 1996):62 (2 pages).
A review of Oliver Stone's film Nixon. Starring Anthony Hopkins and an immense cast, the three-hour long movie is at times incisive and at other times leaden and flat. Hopkins's performance is more impersonation than acting, but he gets many of the details right in a film that is an honorable attempt to portray Nixon the man.

Powers, John.
"The new Stone age; with his epic 'Nixon,' the director makes a bid for respectability." (Oliver Stone's new film) Washington Post v119 (Sun, Dec 17, 1995):G1, col 4, 49 col in.

Reeves, Richard.
"Nixon revisited by way of the creative camera." (analysis of Oliver Stone's 'Nixon' motion picture, and how presidents are portrayed in the movies) New York Times v145, sec2 (Sun, Dec 17, 1995):H1(N), H1(L), col 6, 34 col in.

Rich, Frank.
"The stoning of Stone." (journalists are too critical of Oliver Stone's film, 'Nixon,' for taking artistic license with regard to history)(Column) New York Times v145 (Wed, Dec 27, 1995):A11(N), A15(L), col 1, 17 col in.

Rogers, Stephen F.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Films in Review v47, n3-4 (March-April, 1996):63 (2 pages).
"Oliver Stone's film Nixon ostensibly purports to be a biography of Richard Nixon, but in reality the main focus is on the Watergate affair and the various motives of the players involved in the scandal. Just as in his film JFK, Stone has been accused of tampering with the facts to create his own version of history. However, Nixon succeeds brilliantly in portraying a powerful but repressed personality, with Stone's greatest achievement being his ability to motivate his audience to think and to question the "official" versions of history." [Art Abstracts]

Rosenfeld, Steven S.
"Stone's Nixon, Nixon's Vietnam; What the Movie Misses: there was a Method to the Madness." (Oliver Stone's portrayal of Richard Nixon in the movie 'Nixon')(Column) Washington Post v119 (Fri, Jan 5, 1996):A21, col 1, 18 col in.

Safire, William.
"The way it really was not." (criticism of television programs and films that claim to be factually based but are not)(Column) New York Times v145 (Mon, Nov 27, 1995):A13(N), A15(L), col 1, 15 col in.

Sharrett, Christopher.
"The Belly of the Beast: Oliver Stone's 'Nixon' and the American Nightmare." Cineaste v22, n1 (Wntr, 1996):4 (5 pages). UCB users only
The Hollywood claims that Richard Nixon's story is classical and worthy of epic treatment raises the question whether or not Hollywood understands classical literature. Oliver Stone's treatment of the former US president presents the concept that Nixon is the product of his culture. Although Stone avers that the pathological side of American society has produced the likes of Nixon, he absolves him of most of the Watergate guilt by portraying him a victim of circumstances.

Smith, Gavin.
"The Dark Side: Oliver Stone on His Film Nixon." Sight & Sound ns6 (Mar. '96) p. 6-9.
Film director Oliver Stone believes that the making of 'Nixon' has given him a deeper understanding of Nixon's character. The numerous contradictions in Nixon's life inspired him to make the film. Stone depicts Nixon as a manic-depressive and chronicles his rise to power and loss therof. He feels that capturing a mood on camera is more important than providing information and details. Stone also discusses the shooting techniques he used and compares 'Nixon' with his other films.

Simon, John.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) National Review v48, n2 (Feb 12, 1996):57 (2 pages).

Smith, Gavin.
"The dark side." Sight and Sound ns6 Mar 1996. p. 6-9.
In an interview, director Oliver Stone discusses his recent film Nixon. Among the topics addressed are Stone's identification with his main character, the structure of the film, the film's ending, its optical effects, and its use of transcripts.

Sterritt, David.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v88, n253 (Wed, Dec 20, 1995):14, col 1, 22 col in.

"Stone, John F.
"The Perfidious President and 'The Beast': Evil in Oliver Stone's Nixon." In: The changing face of evil in film and television / edited by Martin F. Norden. Amsterdam ; New York, NY : Rodopi, 2007.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) S

"Stone's Nixon." (film on US Pres. Richard Nixon) Tikkun March-April 1996 v11 n2 p7(2)
"Media representation of US Pres. Richard Nixon's administration has become increasingly sympathetic of his policies regarding the Vietnam War. In particular, Oliver Stone's film 'Nixon' portrays Nixon as a flawed individual whose neuroses were to blame for the Watergate scandal ." [Expanded Academic Index]
UC users only

Sturken, Marita.
"Reenactment, Fantasy, and the Paranoia of History: Oliver Stone's Docudramas." History and Theory v36, n4 (Dec, 1997):64 (16 pages).
UC users only
"Author Abstract: In the late 1980s and 1990s, American popular culture has been increasingly rife with conspiracy narratives of recent historical events. Among cultural producers, filmmaker Oliver Stone hashad a significant impact on popular understanding of American culture in the late twentieht century through a series of docudramas which reread American history through the lens of conspiracy theory and paranoia. This paper examines the films of Oliver Stone - in particular Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July, JFK, and Nixon - asking why they have achieved popularity and brought about catharsis, why they are the subject of attack, and why it is useful to look beyond the debate about truth and falsehood that has surrounded them. It analyzes the ways in which Stone's status as a Vietnam veteran allowed Platoon to be accorded the authenticity of survivor discourse, whereas JFK and Nixon were subject to almost hysterical attack, not only because of Stone's assertions of conspiracy, but also because of his cinematic style of tampering with famous images. Taking these films as its points of departure, this paper examines the role of images in the construction of history, the form of the docudrama, the reenactment of historical images, fantasies of history, and ways in which paranoia is part of the practice of citizenship." COPYRIGHT 1997 Wesleyan University.

Taylor, John H.
"Nixon on the Rocks.: (Oliver Stone's movie about Richard Nixon) American Spectator v29, n3 (March, 1996):22 (5 pages).
Oliver Stone's movie about Richard Nixon is inaccurate and full of lies according to Nixon's family and friends. Despite the controversy surrounding the movie and the amount of money the Walt Disney Co. spent on promotions, the movie failed to make money.

Thomas, Evan.
"Whose obsession Is It, Anyway?" Oliver Stone can't resist linking Nixon to JFK's assassination. But he's wrong.(nw film 'Nixon')(Cover Story) Newsweek v126, n24 (Dec 11, 1995):68 (2 pages).
"Stone's new film 'Nixon' follows historical events more closely than 'JFK,' but he again refers to a conspiracy behind the Kennedy assassination. In the film, Nixon is haunted by his involvement in a plot to assassinate Fidel Castro, which somehow got distorted and turned onto Kennedy." [Expanded Academic Index]

Travers, Peter.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n726 (Jan 25, 1996):63 (2 pages).

Wall, James M.
"Nixon." (movie reviews) Christian Century v113, n3 (Jan 24, 1996):67.

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Professor Stone resumes his presidential search; four years ago, Oliver Stone was accused of distorting history in 'J.F.K.' With 'Nixon,' he returns to the fray." New York Times v145, sec2 (Sun, Dec 17, 1995):H11(N), H11(L), col 1, 48 col in.

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Stone's Nixon is a blend of demonic and tragic." (Oliver Stone is directing new film 'Nixon,' based on the life of Richard M. Nixon) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v144 (Tue, May 30, 1995):B1(N), C13(L), col 1, 25 col in.

Wills, Garry.
"Son of Nixon." (Oliver Stone's film on Richard Nixon) Esquire v125, n1 (Jan, 1996):68 (7 pages). Wills, Garry.
Anthony Hopkins portrays Richard Nixon in a new film about the former President. The actor, whose features do not resemble Nixon's, still manages to accurately exude the aura of the complex and moody man. Other roles and aspects of the film are discussed.

Platoon

Aufderheide, Patricia, et al.
"Platoon On Inspection: A Critical Symposium." Cineaste v. 15 no4 ('87) p. 4-11.

Baker, Scott.
"Response to the Film, 'Platoon': An Analysis of the Vietnam Veteran as Journalist-critic and "Priest."" Southern Communication Journal v55, n2 (Wntr, 1990):123 (21 pages).
Author Abstract: This article explores the response of a Vietnam veteran to the film, Platoon. The rhetoric reveals two voices, the veteran as journalist-critic and as "priest." These voices combine to mystify rather than explain the Vietnam experience, resulting in the mystification of knowledge itself. This form of priestly rhetoric, it is argued, serves a hierarchy of power and knowledge that endures as long as the mysteries of Vietnam persevere through periodic invocation by members of a priestly class. In light of past orientations to the cultural priesthood and the social mystery, this veteran's rhetoric is viewed as ironic. COPYRIGHT Southern States Communication Association 1990.

Bates, Milton J.
"Oliver Stone's 'Platoon' and the Politics of Romance." Mosaic, v27, n1 (March, 1994):101 (21 pages).
UC users only
"Oliver Stone's motion picture 'Platoon' is perceived by some as an ideologically neutral film because of its intense realism. In making the movie, Stone himself seems to have tried to emphasize realism rather than the historical or political context of the Vietnam War. However, the film is actually an indictment of the American middle class for sending mostly working-class soldiers to fight in the Vietnam War. The apparent absence of ideology in the film arises from some viewers' unconscious repression. Stone also blurs his message by his use of the conventions of literary romance." [Expanded Academic Index]

Beck, Avent.
"The Christian Allegorical Structure of 'Platoon.' "(Vietnam Revisited: Mythological Journeys/Narrative Structures) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n3 (July, 1992):213 (10 pages).
UC users only
Oliver Stone's Vietnam War film 'Platoon' builds upon a foundation of Christian allegory in presenting a tale of good versus evil. The characters' names are drawn from scriptural sources: Chris, the hero, is Christ; Elias is Christ's forerunner Elijah and Barnes is the beast. A scriptural motif and numerous biblical references and allusions align the story along biblical lines, from Genesis to Revelations. A detailed examination of Stone's use of scriptural elements and imagery is presented.

Canby, Vincent.
"Platoon." (movie reviews) New York Times v136 (Fri, Dec 19, 1986):26(N), C12(L), col 5, 27 col in.

Cao, Lan.
"The details are Vietnamese, the vision, guilty American; Oliver Stone's Vietnam is like the one Genghis Khan saw. It will be there long after the invaders have gone." New York Times v143, sec2 (Sun, Jan 23, 1994):H13(N), H13(L), col 1, 41 col in.

Cardullo, Bert.
"Viet Nam Revisted. The Hudson Review, vol. 40 no. 3. 1987 Autumn. pp: 458-464.

Christopher, Renny.
"Negotiating the Viet Nam War Through Permeable Genre Borders: Aliens as Viet Nam War Film; Platoon as Horror Film." Lit: Literature Interpretation Theory, vol. 5 no. 1. 1994. pp: 53-66.

Combs, Richard.
"Platoon" (review) Sight & Sound v. 56 (Spring '87) p. 136-8.

Crowdus, Gary.
"Platoon" Cineaste v21, n4 (Fall, 1995):52 (2 pages) UCB users only

Doyle, Jeff.
"Missed Saigon: Some Recent Film Representations of Vietnam." In: Crossing Cultures: Essays in the Displacement of Western Civilization / Daniel Segal, editor. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, c1992. pp: 91-99.

Eberwein, Robert.
"Bodies, Weapons: Platoon." In: Armed forces: masculinity and sexuality in the American war film / Robert Ebe New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)

"Face to Face with Reality of Platoon." American Cinematographer v. 68 (Apr. '87) p. 66+.

Grindon, Leger.
"Platoon: Contesting the Cold War." In: American cinema of the 1980s : themes and variations / edited by Stephen Prince. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 A8578 2007
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6 A8578 2007

Hilbish, D. Melissa.
"'Isn't It Just a Movie'? Lessons Learned from Oliver Stone and Platoon." Reader: Essays in Reader-Oriented Theory, Criticism, and Pedagogy, 1997 Fall-1998 Spring, 38-39, 42-62.

Jeffords, Susan.
"Masculinity as Excess in Vietnam Films: The Father/Son Dynamic of American Culture." Genre, vol. 21 no. 4. 1988 Winter. pp: 487-522.

Keller, James R.
"Discretion and valor: Prince Hal's Platoon." Literature-Film Quarterly 33.2 (April 2005): 110(7).
UC users only
Oliver Stone's 1986 film Platoon is based on the Shakespeare's play Henraid and Henry the Fourth, Part I, which comments on the America's class politics, on the civic responsibilities of America's privileged, and on civil strife, imperialism, and military honor. Comparison between the role-played by the two principal protagonists, Chris Taylor and Prince Hal of the film and the play respectively is discussed.

Kinney, Judy Lee.
"Gardens of Stone, Platoon, and Hamburger Hill: Ritual and Remembrance." In: Inventing Vietnam: The War in Film and Television / edited by Michael Anderegg. pp: 153-65 Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991. Culture and the moving image
Main Stack DS557.73.A5 1991
Moffitt DS557.73.A5 1991

Kinsley, Michael.
"From 'Rambo' to 'Platoon.'" (column) Washington Post v110 (Wed, Feb 18, 1987):A19, col 1, 15 col in.

Klein, Michael.
"Historical Memory, Film, and the Vietnam Era." In: From Hanoi to Hollywood: The Vietnam War in American Film / edited by Linda Dittmar and Gene Michaud. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, c1990. pp: 19-40.
Main DS557.73.F76 1990
Moffitt DS557.73.F76 1990

Kramer, Sydelle.
"Platoon" (review) Cineaste v. 15 no3 ('87) p. 49-50.

Lichty, Lawrence W.
"Fragments of War: Platoon." In: American History/American Film: Interpreting the Hollywood Image / edited by John E. O'Connor and Martin A. Jackson. pp: 273-287. New York: Ungar, c1979.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.A875
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6.A875

Mat-Ami, Bar On.
"Platoon and the Failure of War." In: Sexual Politics and Popular Culture / edited by Diane Raymond. pp: 211-18. Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, c1990.
Educ/Psych HQ1233.S49 1990
Main Stack HQ1233.S49 1990

Norman, Michael.
"'Platoon' grapples with Vietnam." (movie) New York Times v136, sec2 (Sun, Dec 21, 1986):H17(N), H17(L), col 1, 45 col in.

Palmer, William J.
"Symbolic Nihilism in Platoon." In: America Rediscovered: Critical Essays on Literature and Film of the Vietnam War / edited by Owen W. Gilman, Jr., Lorrie Smith. pp: 256-274. New York: Garland, 1990. Garland reference library of the humanities; vol. 986
Main Stack PS228.V5.A44 1990
Moffitt PS228.V5.A44 1990

Porteous, Katrina.
"History Lessons: Platoon." In: Vietnam Images: War and Representation / edited by Jeffrey Walsh and James Aulich. pp: 153-159. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988.
Main Stack NX504.V54 1988

Ringnalda, Donald.
"Unlearning to Remember Vietnam." In: America Rediscovered: Critical Essays on Literature and Film of the Vietnam War / edited by Owen W. Gilman, Jr., Lorrie Smith. pp: 64-74. New York: Garland, 1990. Garland reference library of the humanities; vol. 986
Main Stack PS228.V5.A44 1990
Moffitt PS228.V5.A44 1990

Salamon, Julie.
"Platoon." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, Dec 18, 1986):22(W), 24(E), col 1, 19 col in.

Salamon, Julie.
"On film: success of 'Platoon' surprises all."Wall Street Journal (Thu, Jan 15, 1987):22(W), 21(E), col 1, 18 col in.

Schneider, Tassilo.
"From Cynicism to Self-Pity: Apocalypse Now and Platoon." Cinefocus, vol. 1 no. 2. 1990 Fall. pp: 49-59.

Schechter, Harold; Semeiks, Jonna.
"Leatherstocking in 'Nam: Rambo, Platoon, and the American Frontier Myth." Journal of Popular Culture, Spring91, Vol. 24 Issue 4, p17-25, 9p
UC users only

Shute, Jenefer P.
"Platoon." (movie reviews) Tikkun v4, n2 (March-April, 1989):83 (3 pages).

Springer, Claudia.
"Antiwar Film as Spectacle: Contradictions of the Combat Sequence." Genre, vol. 21 no. 4. 1988 Winter. PAGES: 479-486.

Stone, John
"Evil in the Early Cinema of Oliver Stone: Platoon and Wall Street as Modern Morality Plays." (Critical Essay) Journal of Popular Film and Television v28, n2 (Summer, 2000):80.
UC users only
"A special issue on the changing portrayal of good and evil in film and television. Writer and director Oliver Stone's movies Platoon and Wall Street have a large number of similarities. Both depict a young male character who is placed in the position of having to choose between the opposing philosophies of his superiors. As a result, the two movies are examples of the narrative form in which conflicts between allegorical depictions of good and evil provide plenty of scope for the drawing of moral lessons. The writer discusses the symbolic construction of the two villains in the films, Barnes and Gekko, and analyzes how the viewer's interest in the dramatic contexts in which they thrive means that evil must serve a different and untraditional didactic function." [Art Abstracts]

Stone, Oliver.
" One From the Heart." American Film v. 12 (Jan./Feb. '87) p. 17-19+.

Stone, Oliver.
"On Nixon and JFK." In: Oliver Stone's USA: film, history, and controversy Edited by Robert Brent Toplin. pp: 249-98. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, c2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 O45 2000

Szamuely, George.
"Hollywood goes to Vietnam." (movies about the Vietnamese conflict) Commentary v85, n1 (Jan, 1988):48 (6 pages).

Sturken, Marita.
"Reenactment, Fantasy, and the Paranoia of History: Oliver Stone's Docudramas." History and Theory v36, n4 (Dec, 1997):64 (16 pages).

Szamuely, George.
"Hollywood goes to Vietnam." (movies about the Vietnamese conflict) Commentary v85, n1 (Jan, 1988):48 (6 pages).

Tanner, Louise.
"Platoon" (review) Films in Review v. 38 (Mar. '87) p. 171-2.

Taylor, Clyde.
"The Colonialist Subtext in Platoon." In: From Hanoi to Hollywood: The Vietnam War in American Film / edited by Linda Dittmar and Gene Michaud. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, c1990. pp: 171-74.
Main DS557.73.F76 1990
Moffitt DS557.73.F76 1990

Toplin, Robert Brent
"The Historian and Film: A Research Agenda." Journal of American History; Dec91, Vol. 78 Issue 3, p1160-1163, 4p
UC users only
Focuses on the value of using film in an interpretation of twentieth-century American culture. 'Born on the Fourth of July'; 'Mississippi Burning'; 'Platoon'; 'The Civil War.'

Salvador

Caldwell, John. "Salvador" and Noriega." Jump Cut, Jul 1992, Issue 37, p15-29, 15p

Graden, Dale T.; Martin, James W.
"Oliver Stone's Salvador (1986): Revolution for the Unacquainted." Film & History, Sep-Dec1998, Vol. 28 Issue 3/4, p18-27, 10p
UC users only

Stone, J.F.
"Manifestations of foreign culture through paradox in Salvador." Journal of Popular Film & Television, Winter92, Vol. 19 Issue 4, p180, 6
UC users only

Valis, Noël.
"Fear and Torment in El Salvador." Massachusetts Review, Spring2007, Vol. 48 Issue 1, p117-131, 15p
UC users only

Talk Radio

Kunz, Don.
"Oliver Stone's Talk Radio." Literature Film Quarterly, 1997, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p62, 6p,
UC users only

U-Turn

Blake, Richard A.
"U-Turn." (movie reviews) America Nov 1, 1997 v177 n13 p24(3)
UC users only

Corliss, Richard.
"U Turn." (Review) Time v150, n14 (Oct 6, 1997):109 (1 page).

Higuinen, Erwan
"U-turn" (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinéma no521 Jan 1998. p. 59. Language: French.
"A review of U-Turn, Oliver Stone's latest film. The story centers on the character played by Sean Penn, whose car breaks down in Superior, a small town in Arizona that becomes a trap from which it is impossible to leave and where the slightest transgression has catastrophic consequences. The destruction of a man by a community that represents a tainted old American utopia is presented by employing practically all the genres of Hollywood film, particularly film noir." [Art Abstracts]

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"U Turn." (Review) New Republic v217, n17 (Oct 27, 1997):26 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"U Turn." (Review) New York Times v147 (Fri, Oct 3, 1997):B18(N), E18(L), col 1, 13 col in.

Rhodes, Eric Bryant.
"U Turn." (Review) Film Quarterly v52, n2 (Winter, 1998):44 (1 page).
UC users only
"U-Turn represents Oliver Stone's highest aesthetic achievement to date. A purely fictional story adapted from John Ridley's novel Stray Dogs, it is a conscious and much welcome strategic retreat from political controversy. In many ways it reveals what Stone's career could have been had he taken a detour around political disputes. It is a departure for Stone because it is the most humorous picture he has made, and he is working on a much more manageable scale than with previous films. In contrast to his epics, Stone has compressed a long story into conventional feature-length time through the use of images in a visual shorthand. However, it stands little chance of being appraised on its own merits because it is an Oliver Stone film." [Art Abstracts]

Strick, Philip.
"U Turn." (Review) Sight and Sound v8, n5 (May, 1998):54 (2 pages).
UC users only
Despite the attempt to achieve a low-cost movie, Oliver Stone's regular obsessions permeate this film. The film's humor, however, makes a difference; Stone has come up with a raucously joke-filled black comedy. A little-less hysteria on the director's part would have helped the performances.

Thompson, Andrew-O.
"Desert noir." American Cinematographer v 78 Oct 1997. p. 34-6+.
"The work of cinematographer Robert Richardson on director Oliver Stone's movie, U-Turn, is examined. A modern-day film noir set in the American Southwest, the movie is a thriller that relates the story of loner-on-the-run Bobby Cooper (Sean Penn), a quintessential drifter who becomes stranded in a defunct mining town when his car breaks down, only to become a pawn in a double-crossing scheme involving the locals. Shot over six weeks in Superior, Arizona, U-Turn was filmed in 1.85:1 aspect ratio using a Panaflex Platinum camera, complemented by a high-speed Panastar for slow-motion shots and two hand-cranked cameras. Almost 75 percent of the movie was shot on Kodak's 5239 160 ASA color reversal stock, a stock originally developed for research and design purposes." [Art Abstracts]

W.

Ansen, David.
"Not Much Dubya in Stone's 'W'" Newsweek, 10/20/2008, Vol. 152 Issue 16, p58-59, 2p
UC users only

Clover, Joshua
"Based on Actual Events." Film Quarterly; Spring2009, Vol. 62 Issue 3, p8-9, 2p

Kauffmann, Stanley
"Presidents and others." New Republic; 12/3/2008, Vol. 239 Issue 10, p28-30, 3p
UC users only

Wall Street

Arsenault, Raymond
"Wall Street" (1987): The Stockbroker's Son and the Decade of Greed." Film & History 28:1-2 (1998)
UC users only
" Provides an analysis of hitOliver hitStone's film "Wall Street" (1987) and argues that the film "stands alone as a serious cinematic effort to dissect the economic mania of the Reagan years." Describes the film as emotionally and intellectually engaging and states that it is incredibly accurate in its details of stock market economics. Offers a comparison between imprisoned stock market maven Ivan Boesky and the character of Gordon Gekko and describes the film as too personal to lead to effective social criticism." [IIPA]

Boozer, Jack.
"Wall Street: The Commodification of Perception." In: Florida State University Conference on Literature and Film (14th : 1989)Cultural power/cultural literacy : selected papers from the Fourteenth Annual Florida State University Conference on on Literature and Film. pp: 76-95. Tallahassee: Florida State University Press ; Gainesville, FL : Orders to University Presses of Florida, c1991.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.F57 1989
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6.F57 1989

Boozer, Jack.
"Wall Street: The Commodification of Perception." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 1989 Fall, 17:3, 90-99

Crockford,-Julian.
"'It's All about Bucks, Kid. The Rest Is Conversation': Framing the Economic Narrative from Wall Street to Reality Bites." Post Script 2000 Winter-Spring, 19:2, 19-33.

Denzin, N. K.
"Nouveau capitalists on Wall Street." In: Images of postmodern society : social theory and contemporary cinema / Norman K. Denzin. London ; Newbury Park : Sage Publications, 1991.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S6.D4 1991

Dickenson, Ben.
"Greed is Good." In: Hollywood's new radicalism : war, globalisation and the movies from Reagan to George W. Bush / Ben Dickenson. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York, NY : In the United States and Canada distributed by Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.P6 D53 2006
Moffitt PN1995.9.P6 D53 2006

Durmaz, Hakan.
"Film: A Surface for Writing Social Life." In: Critical textwork : an introduction to varieties of discourse and analysis / [edited by] Ian Parker and the Bolton Discourse. pp: 103-14 Buckingham; Philadedlphia: Open University Press, 1999.
Main Stack P302.C686 1999

Fridson, Martin S.
"Wall Street." In: Oliver Stone's USA: film, history, and controversy. Edited by Robert Brent Toplin. pp: 120-34 Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, c2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S76 O45 2000

O'Brien, Tom.
"Screen--Stoned on Greed: Douglas & Sheen on Wall Street." Commonweal. Feb 12, 1988. Vol. 115, Iss. 3; p. 88 (2 pages)

Starkey, Ken.
"Eleven Characters in Search of an Ethic, or The Spirit of Capitalism Revisited." Studies in Cultures, Organizations & Societies, Mar99, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p179-194, 16p
UC users only

Stone, John
"Evil in the Early Cinema of Oliver Stone: Platoon and Wall Street as Modern Modality Plays." (Critical Essay) Journal of Popular Film and Television v28, n2 (Summer, 2000):80.
UC users only
"A special issue on the changing portrayal of good and evil in film and television. Writer and director Oliver Stone's movies Platoon and Wall Street have a large number of similarities. Both depict a young male character who is placed in the position of having to choose between the opposing philosophies of his superiors. As a result, the two movies are examples of the narrative form in which conflicts between allegorical depictions of good and evil provide plenty of scope for the drawing of moral lessons. The writer discusses the symbolic construction of the two villains in the films, Barnes and Gekko, and analyzes how the viewer's interest in the dramatic contexts in which they thrive means that evil must serve a different and untraditional didactic function." [Art Abstracts]

Winn, J. Emmett.
"Every Dream Has Its Price: Personal Failure and the American Dream in Wall Street and The Firm." Southern Communication Journal, Summer2003, Vol. 68 Issue 4, p307-318, 12p

World Trade Center

Alleva, Richard.
"Passion play: Oliver Stone's World Trade Center'.(Screen)." Commonweal 133.16 (Sept 22, 2006): 24(2).

Calhoun, John
"Ultimate Survivors." American Cinematographer v. 87 no. 8 (August 2006) p. 64-8, 70-3
UC users only
"The production of director Oliver Stone's new film World Trade Center is discussed. This film tells the story of two Port Authority officers rescued from the rubble of the Twin Towers, New York. It was shot by Irish cinematographer Seamus McGarvey, who claims that the production team sought to preserve at least a sense of the notion of truth and the veracity of the image. By and large, the film's style is "spare." McGarvey shot it in Super 35mm-width aperture from a 1.85:1 extraction with a Panaflex Platinum and a Panavised Arri 435, using Primo and Hylen lenses, and Kodak's Vision2 500T 5218, 200T 5217, and Ektachrome 100D 5285 stock. Locations such as the glass-fronted lobby of one of the towers and a concourse beneath the World Trade Center were re-created at Playa Vista, the old Hughes Aircraft Plant in California. The writer goes on to highlight the lighting and/or shooting challenges posed by the major re-created locations." [Art Index]

Canavan, Gerry.
"Performance. Terror and mismemory: resignifying September 11 in World Trade Center and United 93." In: Portraying 9/11 : essays on representations in comics, literature, film and theatre / edited by Véronique Bragard, Christophe Dony and Warren Rosenberg. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks HV6432.7 .P683 2011

Gentry Ric.
"Another Meditation On Death: An Interview With Oliver Stone." Film Quarterly. Summer 2007. Vol. 60, Iss. 4; p. 54 (7 pages)
UC users only

Gravois, John.
"Professors of Paranoia?(World Trade Center and Pentagon Attacks, 2001)." The Chronicle of Higher Education 52.42 (June 23, 2006): NA.

Harnden, Toby.
"Stone's 9/11 is conventional, but still insulting.("World Trade Center", movie production)(Oliver Stone)." Spectator (August 26, 2006): NA.

Hoberman, J.
"Unquiet America." Sight and Sound 16.10 (Oct 2006): 20(4).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Oliver Stone: Redemption in the Ruins." Maclean's, 8/7/2006, Vol. 119 Issue 30, p49-51, 3p
UC users only

Kellner, Douglas.
"Representations of 9/11 in Hollywood Film: United 93 and World Trade Center." In: Cinema wars: Hollywood film and politics in the Bush-Cheney era Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
Full text available online [UCB users only])

Lewis, Michael J.
"Hollywood Does 9/11." Commentary, Oct2006, Vol. 122 Issue 3, p40-45, 6p;
UC users only

Muntean, Nick.
""It was Just Like a Movie"." Journal of Popular Film & Television, Summer2009, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p50-59, 10p

Randell, Karen
""It was like a movie" : the impossibility of representation in Oliver Stone's World Trade Center." In: Reframing 9/11 [electronic resource] : film, popular culture and the "war on terror" / edited by Jeff Birkenstein, Anna Froula and Karen Randell. New York : Continuum, 2010.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Rich, B. Ruby
"Out of the rubble." Sight & Sound v. ns16 no. 10 (October 2006) p. 14-18
UC users only
"Part of a special section on the film world's response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. A discussion of Oliver Stone's new film World Trade Center, which is released in cinemas on September 29, 2006. With this film, Stone draws on the real life rescue of two police officers from the rubble of the twin towers of the World Trade Center to create a story of patriotic sacrifice, courage, and faith. What remains questionable, however, is whether it is possible for all viewers to ignore the blood that has subsequently been shed in response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11." [Art Index]

Robey, T.
"World Trade Center." Sight & Sound v. ns16 no. 11 (November 2006) p. 84
UC users only
"A review of Oliver Stone's World Trade Center (2006). The script for this film is adapted by Andrea Berloff from the testimonies of New York cops John McLoughlin and Will Jimeno and their wives Donna and Alison. In this sense, it has every right to put aside political context and bring us into the human specifics of the day itself. However, Stone's failures are precisely failures of specificity, and despite a whole array of flawless effects shots his staging is not up to the job. In the end, World Trade Center is a drab disaster movie that resorts to the broad, performance led strokes of a Towering Inferno rather than the radically choppy, docudrama urgency of a United 93." [Art Index]

Ross, Deborah.
"Exercise in patriotism.(World Trade Center)(Movie review)." Spectator (Sept 30, 2006): NA.

Sánchez-Escalonilla, Antonio
"Hollywood and the Rhetoric of Panic: The Popular Genres of Action and Fantasy in the Wake of the 9/11 Attacks." Journal of Popular Film and Television Volume 38, Number 1 / January-March 2010
UC users only

Thirion, Antoine
"Devenir Stone." Cahiers du Cinema no. 615 (September 2006) p. 28
"A review of World Trade Center, a film by Oliver Stone. This orthodox film is based on the accounts of two Port Authority policemen who were trapped under the ruins of the World Trade Center during the events of September 11, 2001. Setting the film underground like this avoids having to show images that would satisfy the terrorists, while also providing an allegory of America's isolation from the rest of the world." [Art Index]

Tubrett, Dion.
"Mourning and Misfortune: 9/11 and the domestic terror of pedophilia." CineAction 70 (Summer 2006): 51(8).

Verini, Bob.
"Anatomy of a Scene: World Trade Center." Scr(i)pt; 2006, Vol. 12 Issue 4, p46-51, 6p



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