Spike Lee:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












General Books and Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual films

General Books/Journal Articles/Videos

Aftab, Kaleem.
Spike Lee : that's my story and I'm sticking to it New York : W.W. Norton, 2005.
MOFF: PN1998.3.L477 A68 2005
PFA : PN1998.3.L477 A68 2005

Alexander, George
"Spike Lee." In: Why we make movies : Black filmmakers talk about the magic of cinema / George Alexander. 1st ed. New York : Harlem Moon, 2003.
Moffitt PN1995.9.N4.A43 2003
PFA PN1995.9.N4.A43 2003

Baker, Houston A., Jr.
"Spike Lee and the Commerce of Culture." (Black Film Issue) Black American Literature Forum v25, n2 (Summer, 1991):237 (16 pages).
UC users only
Spike Lee's first films are low-budget, minor masterpieces of cultural undercover work. The depiction of commerce and black culture in the works are explored.

Baraka, Amiri.
"Spike Lee at the Movies." In Black American Cinema. Edited by Manthia Diawara, pp. 145-53. London: Routledge, 1993.
UCB Main PN1995.9.N4 B45 1993
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.N4 B45 1993

Bernotas, Bob.
Spike Lee: Filmmaker / Bob Bernotas. Hillside, N.J.: Enslow Publishers, c1993.
Series title: People to know.
UCB Ed/Psych PN1998.3.L44 B47 1993

Blake, Richard Aloysius.
Street smart : the New York of Lumet, Allen, Scorsese, and Lee Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N49 B63 2005; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip059/2005007622.html

Boyd, Todd
"The meaning of the blues." Wide Angle; Vol.XIII nr.3-4 (July-Oct 1991); p.56-61
Considers the political effectiveness of black US directors once they work within mainstream cinema, focusing on the success to date of Spike Lee.

Breskin, David.
"Spike Lee." In: Inner views : filmmakers in conversation Expanded ed. New York : Da Capo Press, 1997
Moffitt PN1998.2.B74 1997

Byrd, Rudolph P.
"Spike Lee does the right thing." In: I call myself an artist: writings by and about Charles Johnson / edited by Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c1999.
Main Stack PS3560.O3735.Z46 1999

Carvell, T.
"Spike Lee: Madison Ave's gotta have him." Fortune 135 (7): 84-86 APR 14 1997

Christensen, Jerome
"Spike Lee, Corporate Populist." Critical Inquiry, Vol. 17, No. 3. (Spring, 1991), pp. 582-595.
UC users only

Corliss, Richard.
"Boyz of New Black City: Spike Lee's Jungle Fever Heads a Wave of Films that Convey the Harsh truths of Ghetto Rage and Anguish." (includes vignettes of other Black film directors) Time v137, n24 (June 17, 1991):64 (4 pages).

Crowdus, Gary
"Our film is only a starting point." (interview)Cineaste v 19 no4 [1992]. p. 20-4

Crowdus, Gary; Georgakas, Dan.
"Thinking About the Power of Images: An Interview with Spike Lee." (Interview) Cineaste v26, n2 (Spring, 2001):4.
UC users only
"An interview with director Spike Lee on the occasion of the release on DVD and video of Bamboozled, his latest film. Lee, who is rightly famous for raising important social issues in his films, investigates the relationship of popular culture and racial mythology in an emotionally and intellectually provocative fashion in Bamboozled. He discusses a range of topics in the interview, including the inspiration for Bamboozled; the research he carried out for it; his motivation for dedicating the film to his friend Budd Schulberg; his annoyance with the new phenomenon of the "magical nigger" in films such as The Green Mile and The Family Man, in which Negroes show up as some sort of spirit or angel but only to benefit the white characters; and his hope that the film will make viewers consider the power of images, not just in terms of race, but also in terms of how imagery is used and the social impact it has." [Art Index]

Davis, Thulani
"Local hero." (workin' 40 Acres And a Mule in Brooklyn) American Film v 14 July/Aug 1989. p. 26-7

Donalson, Melvin Burke
"Spike Lee: The Independent Auteur." In: Black directors in Hollywood / Melvin Donalson. Austin : University of Texas Press, 2003. Location Call No. Status
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.N4 D66 2003

Dyson, Michael Eric
"Out of the ghetto." (male youth in recent African-American cinema) Sight and Sound v 2 Oct 1992. p. 18-21

Dyson, Michael Eric
"Spike Lee's Neonationalist Vision." In: Reflecting Black : African-American cultural criticism / Michael Eric Dyson. Dyson, Michael Eric. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1993.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks E185.86 .D95 1993 AVAILABLE
Moffitt E185.86 .D95 1993

Fraiman, Susan.
"Spike Lee and Brian De Palma: Scenarios of Race and Rape." In: Cool men and the second sex / Susan Fraiman. New York : Columbia University Press, c2003.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks HQ1090 .F73 2003

Fraiman, Susan.
"Geometries of Race and Gender: Eve Sedgwick, Spike Lee, Charlayne Hunter-Gault." Feminist Studies 1994 20(1): 67-84.
UC users only
"Eve Sedgwick's Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (1985) presents women as mediators between men in erotic triangles. In the Central Park jogger rape case, in Spike Lee's films Do the Right Thing (1989) and School Daze (1988), and in Brian De Palma's film Casualties of War (1989), women are also objects, this time for the assertion of white and black masculinities and white male dominance, but women also reproduce race and class divisions among themselves, as illustrated by interviews with American women serving in the Gulf War conducted by Charlayne Hunter-Gault of the MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour." [ABC-CLIO America History & Life]

Fitzgerald, Sharon.
"Spike Lee: fast forward." American Visions v 10 Oct/Nov 1995. p. 20-4+.
"A profile of film director Spike Lee. Lee was first noticed ten years ago as the director, producer, writer, and costar of She's Gotta Have It. He appeared to open the door for a number of independent filmmakers, such as John Singleton, Robert Townsend, and the Hudlin and Hughes brothers. From the start, he spoke out about black powerlessness in Hollywood, a problem he has tackled head-on. His support of black artists is practically legendary, as is his marketing and entrepreneurial savvy. He is quick to admit that he has African-American detractors, however, and claims that he has never tried to present himself as a spokesperson for 35 million African-Americans. His current movie release, Clockers, and his next film, Girl 6, are also discussed." [Art Index]

Fraiman, Susan.
"Geometries of Race and Gender: Eve Sedgwick, Spike Lee, Charlayne Hunter-Gault." Feminist Studies 1994 20(1): 67-84.
UC users only
"Eve Sedgwick's Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (1985) presents women as mediators between men in erotic triangles. In the Central Park jogger rape case, in Spike Lee's films Do the Right Thing (1989) and School Daze (1988), and in Brian De Palma's film Casualties of War (1989), women are also objects, this time for the assertion of white and black masculinities and white male dominance, but women also reproduce race and class divisions among themselves, as illustrated by interviews with American women serving in the Gulf War conducted by Charlayne Hunter-Gault of the MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour." [ABC-CLIO America History & Life]

Gabbard, Krin.
"Spike Lee meets Aaron Copland." American Music, Vol. 18, No. 4. (Winter, 2000), pp. 370-390.
UC users only

Gabbard, Krin.
"Spike Lee meets Aaron Copland." Black magic : White Hollywood and African American culture New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2004.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N4.G33 2004
Moffitt PN1995.9.N4.G33 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip048/2003020083.html
Also in:
Postmodern music/postmodern thought / edited by Judy Lochhead and Joseph Auner. New York ; London : Routledge, 2002.
Music ML3845.P84 2002

Gates, Henry Louis; Spike Lee
"Final Cut." Transition No. 52 (1991), pp. 176-204
UC users only

Gates, Henry Louis.
"Spike Lee." In: The African-American century : how Black Americans have shaped our country / Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Cornel West. 1st Touchstone ed. New York : Touchstone, c2002.
Moffitt E185.96.G38 2002

Gilroy, Paul
"Spiking the argument." (the role of Spike Lee's cinema in the ethnic politics of the US) Sight and Sound v 1 Nov 1991. p. 28-30

Glicksman, Marlaine
"Lee way." (interview with Spike Lee) Film Comment v 22 Sept/Oct 1986. p. 46-9
"Part of a special section on up-and-coming film directors. Spike Lee's first feature film, She's Gotta Have It, is a unique treatment of an age-old subject: the discrepancies that exist both between the sexes and in the judgments rendered by society. Made by the 29-year-old filmmaker in 12 days on an $18,000 grant, the film focuses on the love life of Nola Darling, a young black woman who possesses what can be called a man's desire, and the three suitors who each long to possess her exclusively. The film displays a warm and generous sense of humor. All the characters are black, and, unlike those in most other films, they are real, believable people who speak black dialect intelligently. In an interview, Lee discusses the making and meaning of the film." [Art Index]

Goodman, Walter.
"When movies confront ethnic groups' sensitivities; the more skillful the film, the less potential it has for giving offense." (Living Arts Pages)New York Times, sec0 (Tue, July 13, 1999):B2(N), E2(L), col 3, 35 col in.

Harris, William A.
"Cultural engineering and the films of Spike Lee." In: Mediated messages and African-American culture : contemporary issues / Venise T. Berry, Carmen L. Manning-Miller, editors. Thousand Oaks : Sage Publications, c1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N4.M44 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.N4.M44 1996

Houston, Kerr
"Athletic Iconography in Spike Lee's Early Feature Films." African American Review, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 637-49, Winter 2004.
UC users only

Jacobsen, Kurt
"Spike Lee, film director." In: Maverick voices : conversations with political and cultural rebels / [edited by] Kurt Jacobsen. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield, c2004.
PFA CT105.M385 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0412/2003026835.html

Jones, Kent.
"Invisible Man: Spike Lee." Film Comment v33, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1997):42 (6 pages).
"A clamor of opposing rash opinions surrounds Spike Lee's films. Some people claim that Lee is basically updating old-fashioned social consciousness. Others liken him to an overgrown film student, while his less sophisticated admirers push him as an innovator. The writer examines these views in relation to Lee's films, including Jungle Fever, Girl 6, She's Gotta Have It, Clockers, School Daze, Get on the Bus, Malcolm X, Mo' Better Blues, and Crooklyn." [Art Index]

Jones, K. Maurice.
Spike Lee and the African American Filmmakers: A Choice of Colors / K. Maurice Jones. Brookfield, Conn.: Millbrook Press, c1996.
Main Stack PN1998.3.L44.J66 1996

Kermode, Mark.
"Spike Lee's films provoke and perplex. He has even been accused of "recycling racial trash". But it is this uneasiness that makes his work unmissable. (The Back Half).(Movie Review)." New Statesman (1996) 132.4634 (April 21, 2003): 38(2).

Lee, Spike.
"Dealing to do doable films: Life as a very independent independent filmmaker." In: Black genius : African American solutions to African American problems / edited by Walter Mosley ... [et al.] ; and with an introduction by Walter Mosley. 1st ed. New York : W.W. Norton, c1999.
Main Stack E185.86.B52556 1999
Moffitt E185.86.B52556 1999

Lee, Spike.
"Doing the job." (Spike Lee; interview)Sight and Sound v 3 Feb 1993. p. 10-11

Lee, Spike.
Five for Five: The Films of Spike Lee / [essays by] Terry McMillan ... [et al.] ; photographs by David Lee ; foreword by Melvin van Peebles; introduction by Spike Lee. New York : Stewart, Tabori & Chang : Distributed in the U.S. by Workman Pub., 1991.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.L44 A3 1991
UCB Morrison PN1998.3.L44 A3 1991 Morrison permanent collection; Section PC.

Lee, Spike.
"Dealing to do doable films: Life as a very independent independent filmmaker." In" Black genius : African American solutions to African American problems / edited by Walter Mosley ... [et al.] ; and with an introduction by Walter Mosley. 1st ed. New York : W.W. Norton, c1999.
Main Stack E185.86.B52556 1999
Moffitt E185.86.B52556 1999

Lee, Spike.
Spike Lee: interviews Published: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2002.
UCB MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 A5 2002

Lee, Spike.
Spike Lee's Gotta Have It: Inside Guerrilla Filmmaking / Spike Lee ; photos by David Lee. New York : Simon & Schuster, c1987.
UCB Main PN1997.S4725 L441 1987

Lindroth, Colette.
"Spike Lee and the American Tradition."Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 24 no. 1. 1996. pp: 26-31.

MacDonald, Scott
"The City as the Country: The New York City Symphony from Rudy Burckhardt to Spike Lee" Film Quarterly, Vol. 51, No. 2 (Winter, 1997-1998), pp. 2-20
UC users only

Margolin, Francois
"Spike Lee en 15 questions." (interview) Cahiers du Cinema no385 June 1986. p. vi

Massood, Paula J.
"The Quintessential New Yorker and Global Citizen: An Interview with Spike Lee." Cineaste: America's Leading Magazine on the Art and Politics of the Cinema, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 4-6, Summer 2003.
UC users only
"An interview with film director Spike Lee about his latest film, 25th Hour. Lee has long been seen as a quintessential New York filmmaker, and no film captures his love/hate relationship with the city better than 25th Hour. Adapted by David Benioff from his novel of the same title, the film follows Monty (played by Edward Norton), its drug-dealing protagonist, in his movements around the city on his last 24 hours before going to jail for a seven-year sentence. Reflecting the post-9/11 context, the film was never given a wide-scale release, and after it became clear it would not garner Oscar nominations, it quickly disappeared from theaters. In the interview, Lee discusses the film, his experiences working with Benioff and Norton, and his disappointment with the effort made by Buena Vista, his distributor." [Art Index]

McCluskey, Audrey T.
"Telling Truth and Taking Names: An Interview with Spike Lee." Black Camera 19:1 [Spring-Summer 2004] p.1-2, 9-11
UC users only
"Filmmaker Spike Lee is interviewed. He comments on how critics often seem more focused on him than on his work, working within the Hollywood system as an independent filmmaker, the portrayal of black characters in movies, female characters in his films, and other related topics." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

New, Elisa
"Film and the Flattening of Jewish-American Fiction: Bernard Malamud, Woody Allen, and Spike Lee in the City." Contemporary Literature, Vol. 34, No. 3, Special Issue: Contemporary American Jewish Literature. (Autumn, 1993), pp. 425-450.
UC users only

Patterson, Alex
Spike Lee / Alex Patterson. New York : Avon Books, c1992.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.L44 P38 1992

Perkins, E.
"Renewing the African American Cinema: The Films of Spike Lee."Cineaste XVII/4, 90; p.4-8. illus.
Discusses S.L.'s career, characterizing his work as heralding a rebirth of black US cinema; incl. brief analyses of "She's Gotta Have It", "School daze" and "Do the Right Thing".

Pinsker, Sanford.
"Spike Lee: Protest, Literary Tradition, And The Individual Filmmaker." Midwest Quarterly 1993 35(1): 63-76.
"Contemporary expressions of African-American protest are less common in the novel and traditional literature than in rap music, street poetry, and the films of people like Spike Lee. Although he is perceived by many as an important voice of protest, Lee's recent films, including the lavishly overpraised Do the Right Thing (1989), are far too predictable and intellectually soft. Moreover, Lee's films frequently examine important issues superficially. Many other writers and artists have had wider visions and more compassion, and have been more effective in describing racism and outlining the humanity, dreams, anger, and anguish of African Americans. These writers have been black and white, and have included Richard Wright, Irving Howe, Mark Twain, and William Faulkner. Spike Lee has a keen sense for generating controversy, but his work illustrates more about the passions of the moment than the aesthetic requirements of creating well-made films." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Reid, Mark A.
"The Brand X of PostNegritude Frontier."Film Criticism, vol. 20 no. 1-2. 1995 Fall-1996 Winter. pp: 17-25.

Richardson, Riché
"Spike Lee’s Uncle Toms and Urban Revolutionaries." In: Black masculinity and the U.S. South : from Uncle Tom to gangsta / Riché Richardson. Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks E185.86 .R537 2007

Sharkey, B.
"Knocking on Hollywood's Door."American Film XIV/9, July-Aug 89; p.22-27,52,54. illus.
Reports on the status of black filmmakers in Hollywood, esp. Spike Lee and Robert Townsend, on the release of "Do the right thing".

Spike Lee, film director." In: Maverick voices : conversations with political and cultural rebels / [edited by] Kurt Jacobsen. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield, c2004.
PFA CT105.M385 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0412/2003026835.html

The Spike Lee reader
Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Sterritt, David
"He Cuts Heads: Spike Lee and the New York Experience." In: City that never sleeps : New York and the filmic imagination / edited by Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.N49 C58 2007

Sullivan, Otha Richard
"Spike Lee." In: African American millionaires / Otha Richard Sullivan ; Jim Haskins, general editor. Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons, c2005.
Bus & Econ HC110.W4.S86 2005

Tate, Greg
"Spike Lee." American Film v 11 Sept 1986. p. 48-9

Thomson, David.
"The right thing, even when it ends up wrong; Spike Lee may not always succeed, but few directors have his talent for shaking and changing audiences." New York Times, sec2 (Sun, July 25, 1999):AR7(N), AR7(L), col 1, 30 col in.

White, Armond
"Flipper-Purify And Furious-Styles (2 Characters From The Recent Films 'Jungle Fever' And 'Boyz N The Hood' By Spike Lee and John Singleton) Sight And Sound, 1991 Aug, V1 N4:8-13.

White, Armond.
"Scene on the Street: Black Cinema from Catfish Row to Stuyvesant Ave." (director Spike Lee's controversial film "Do the Right Thing")Mother Jones v14, n7 (Sept, 1989):35 (2 pages).

Willis, Sharon
"Tell the right story: Spike Lee and the politics of representative style." In: High contrast : race and gender in contemporary Hollywood film / Sharon Willis. p. 158-88. Durham, N.C. : Duke University Press, 1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S47.W56 1997

Articles and Books on Individual films

Bamboozled

Arthur, Paul.
"Bamboozled." (movie review) Film Comment v36, n6 (Nov, 2000):76.
"Spike Lee's Bamboozled takes on the intractable logic and long history of racial stereotyping in television. Marlon Wayans plays Pierre Delacroix, an embittered, Harvard-educated producer at a fledgling TV network. Told by his jive-ass white boss to create a new series to capture the "authentic" black experience, Delacroix decides to organize his own dismissal and expose the bankruptcy of TV's racial cachet in the process. He creates the The New Millennium Minstrel Show, a compendium of flagrantly vulgar blackface characters and sketches, but when the show turns out to be a ratings bonanza, Delacroix is left to grapple with the shameful psychological and political implications of his charade. Throughout the film Lee is at pains to connect current versions of black comic performance with an exploitative tradition that began with the minstrelry of the mid-19th century." [Art Index]

Barlowe, Jamie.
"You Must Never Be A Misrepresented People": Spike Lee's Bamboozled. Canadian Review of American Studies 2003 33(1): 1-15.
"Analyzes the cultural function and social and psychological effect of mimicry and minstrelsy in Spike Lee's film Bamboozled (2000). The article explores how the film challenges its audience to face the consequences of minstrelsy and mimicry for both the colonized and the colonizer through the film's satiric narrative, the reinvention of the 19th-century blackface minstrel show as a wildly successful 21st-century television show called Mantam: The New Millennium Minstrel Show. The article also places Bamboozled in the larger cultural and historical context of American entertainment to show how it responds to the complicity of film, television, and advertising in the racist history of the United States." [America History & Life]

Bates, Karen Grigsby.
"Commentary; Showcasing a Black Stereotype That Slaps Back." (Metro)(Top Story)(Spike Lee's new film 'Bamboozled')(Column) Los Angeles Times (Oct 9, 2000):B-7.

Black, Ray
"Satire's Cruelest Cut: Exorcising Blackness in Spike Lee's "Bamboozled"." The Black Scholar 33:1 [Spring 2003] p.19-24
UC users only
"Filmmaker Spike Lee's work "Bamboozled" is analyzed, and described as a "didactic masterpiece" that calls for a recognition of the misuse and abuse of the black image informing the mainstream mind, especially through television. The lead character Pierre Delacroix, portrayed by Damon Wayans, holds contempt for his own "blackness." The author posits that the complex narrative ultimately centers on just one story, Delacroix's, told from three perspectives. "Bamboozled" cites lack of respect for the black self as the cause of hate, disunity, disagreement, betrayal and black-on-black violence." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

Brooks, Xan
"Bamboozled." (movie review) Sight and Sound ns11 no5 May 2001. p. 42-3.
UC users only
"Lee's latest film is a kamikaze attack on racial stereotyping, and while it is a film of genuine importance, it is also crude, unstable, and hazardous. While Lee is intelligent enough to see that racial stereotyping is more complex than a simple them-against-us showdown, he is not rigorous enough to force his line of reasoning toward a satisfactory dramatic conclusion." [Art Index]

Corliss, Richard.
"The Shame of a Nation: In Bamboozled, Spike Lee takes furious aim at the history of racial derision in American pop culture." (The Arts/Cinema)(Brief Article)(Review) (movie review) Time v156, n15 (Oct 9, 2000):108.

Crowdus,; Georgakas, Dan.
"Thinking about the power of images: an interview with Spike Lee." Cineaste v 26 no2 2001. p. 4-9.
UC users only
"An interview with director Spike Lee on the occasion of the release on DVD and video of Bamboozled, his latest film. Lee, who is rightly famous for raising important social issues in his films, investigates the relationship of popular culture and racial mythology in an emotionally and intellectually provocative fashion in Bamboozled. He discusses a range of topics in the interview, including the inspiration for Bamboozled; the research he carried out for it; his motivation for dedicating the film to his friend Budd Schulberg; his annoyance with the new phenomenon of the "magical nigger" in films such as The Green Mile and The Family Man, in which Negroes show up as some sort of spirit or angel but only to benefit the white characters; and his hope that the film will make viewers consider the power of images, not just in terms of race, but also in terms of how imagery is used and the social impact it has. [Art Index]

Davis, Zeinabu Irene.
'Beautiful-ugly' blackface: an esthetic appreciation of Bamboozled. Cineaste v 26 no2 2001. p. 16-17.
UC users only
"Part of a special section on issues of race identity in Bamboozled, a new film directed by Spike Lee. The writer discusses the use of digital technology, color, and music in the film. Perhaps motivated by their miniscule budget of $10 million, Lee and cinematographer Ellen Kuras have opted to shoot the scenes involving the characters interacting in their daily lives on digital cameras, while scenes involving the New Millennium Minstrel Show are filmed on the more richly detailed Super 16 camera. Throughout the film, the color blue represents cold, contentious feelings and emotions. The dominance of this color is interrupted only by orange, which in some ways appears to signify a connection with ordinary common black people. Terence Blanchard's wistful and hopeful theme music is used to counterpoint the most memorable visual moments of the New Millennium Minstrel Show, when the actors apply their blackface makeup." [Art Index]

Elam, Harry J. Jr.
"Spike Lee's bamboozled." In: Black cultural traffic : crossroads in global performance and popular culture / edited by Harry J. Elam, Jr., and Kennell Jackson. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2005.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main Stack E185.625.B555 2005

Epp, Michael H.
"Raising Minstrelsy: Humour, Satire And The Stereotype In The Birth Of A Nation And Bamboozled." Canadian Review of American Studies [Canada] 2003 33(1): 17-35.
"Analyzes two cinematic works that draw on the 19th-century tradition of minstrelsy - white actors made up in blackface and performing as blacks - for decidedly different purposes: D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Spike Lee's Bamboozled (2000). The article theorizes the role of minstrelsy in mass entertainment, in particular the interrelationship between humor, satire, and the stereotype, by focusing on "the complex address of the viewing subject" in any enactment of the form. The Birth of a Nation presents blackface as authentic African American culture and simultaneously excludes African Americans from performing their own identities, thus using minstrelsy to serve racist ends. In contrast, Bamboozled uses minstrelsy to resist racism by layering narrative and filmic satire and invoking blackface to counter stereotypes." [America: History & Life]

Gubar, S.
"Racial Camp in The Producers and Bamboozled." Film Quarterly v. 60 no. 2 (Winter 2006/2007) p. 26-37
UC users only
"The writer discusses racial camp in Mel Brooks's The Producers and Spike Lee's Bamboozled. The satirizing of Nazism in The Producers and the more unnerving send-up of the stereotypes disseminated by minstrelsy in its revision, Bamboozled, depend upon alienating performances-within-the-movies that are intended to be in the worst possible taste. Lee uses camp to draw upon Brooks's somewhat different campy feature to contemplate the survival of stigmatized minorities by means of a bizarre theatricalizing of race, thus confirming James Baldwin's point that America offered a haven from genocidal violence for Jews but an entrapment within it for blacks. Brooks scorns the tastes and definitions of the racists when he celebrates the Jews' escape from the German house of bondage, but Lee derides the victims of racism as complicit guardians of America's prison house who demonstrate that African Americans continually confront the survival of racism." [Art Index]

Howe, Desson.
"'Bamboozled': Bewildering." (Weekend) Washington Post (Oct 20, 2000):N43.

Hunter, Stephen.
"Spike Lee's 'Bamboozled': Soul-Defying Success." (Style) Washington Post (Oct 20, 2000):C01.

Johnson, Brian D.
"Ebony and irony: Director Spike Lee concocts a nervy satire from the stereotyping of African-American entertainers." (Brief Article)(Review) (video recording review) Maclean's (Oct 30, 2000):55.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"On Films - Beyond Satire." New Republic (Oct 30, 2000):32.
UC users only

Klawans, Stuart
"Amos, Andy 'n' You." (Review) (movie review) Nation v271, n14 (Nov 6, 2000):34.

Landau, Saul.
"Spike Lee's revolutionary broadside." Cineaste v 26 no2 2001. p. 11-12.
UC users only
"Part of a special section on issues of race identity in Bamboozled, a new film directed by Spike Lee. Bamboozled is a revolutionary attack on racism, capitalism, and entertainment and advertising. In the film, a black television writer must come up with a "New Millennium Minstrel Show," a new gimmick that is so outrageous that the manipulative media can convince audiences to turn it into a fad. The driving force of the film's story is contemporary, unrestricted capitalism in its mad race for profits: Though the television writer is filled with hatred for the centuries of injustice that he has internalized, his worldly ambition neutralizes his rebellious instincts. Throughout, Lee punctuates the present with references to and images of the past, reminding viewers how the white Establishment has used absurd measures to have blacks entertain it in non-threatening ways. The film offers the conclusion that whites use blacks in entertainment to prevent themselves from confronting the monstrous historical crime perpetrated against a people." [Art Index]

Laski, Gregory.
"Falling Back into History: The Uncanny Trauma of Blackface Minstrelsy in Spike Lee's Bamboozled." Callaloo, Fall2010, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p1093-1115, 23p
UC users only

Lucia, Cynthia.
"Race, Media, and Money: A Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Bamboozled." Cineaste v26, n2 (Spring, 2001):10.
UC users only
"Part of a special section on issues of race identity in Bamboozled, a new film directed by Spike Lee. An introduction to the section. In the film, a television writer's re-creation of the most inflammatory of Black stereotypes (the minstrel and blackface) in order to expose them backfires when the American public embraces and is entertained by these stereotypical buffoons. The essays in the special section investigate the film's complicated and sometimes contradictory re-creation of minstrelsy and blackface, Lee's position in the media establishment he claims to expose, the very nature of White-Black relations in a White-supremacist corporate structure, and the aesthetic choices and style of the film as they add texture to the exploration of its themes. [Art Index]

Lane, Anthony.
"Bamboozled." (movie review) New Yorker v76, n30 (Oct 9, 2000):100 (2 pages).

Levy, Emanuel
"Bamboozled." (movie review)) Variety v380, n7 (Oct 2, 2000):20.

Lucia, Cynthia
"Race, Media, and Money: A Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Bamboozled." Cineaste Spring 2001 v26 i2 p10
UC users only

MacGregor, Jeff.
"TV, the movies' abused (and abusive) stepchild; 'Bamboozled,' spike Lee's savage satire of television, accurately captures the industry's empty spirit." New York Times (Sun, Oct 8, 2000):AR11(N), AR11(L), col 1, 35 col in.

"Minding the messenger: a symposium on Bamboozled." (Panel Discussion) Black Renaissance/Renaissance Noire Summer-Fall 2001 v3 i3 p8(28)
UC users only

Morris, Susan Booker
"Bamboozled: Political Parodic Postmodernism." West Virginia University Philological Papers, vol. 50, pp. 67-76, 2003.

Moss, Robert F.
"Commentary; Was Al Jolson 'Bamboozled'? The legendary blackface entertainer, dead 50 years, might not recognize himself in Spike Lee's new film, an indictment of racism through satire." (Calendar) Los Angeles Times (Oct 20, 2000):F-20.

Rainer, Peter.
"Bamboozled." (movie review) New York v33, n39 (Oct 9, 2000):88 (3 pages).

Powell, Gerald A., Jr.
A rhetoric of symbolic identity : an analysis of Spike Lee's X and Bamboozled Dallas : University Press of America, c2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N4 P68 2004

Rogin, Michael.
"Nowhere left to stand: the burnt cork roots of popular culture." Cineaste v 26 no2 2001. p. 14-15.
"Part of a special section on issues of race identity in Bamboozled, a new film directed by Spike Lee. Bamboozled offers itself as an exemplary instance of the impossibility of untying the racial knot of American mass culture. The film employs minstrelsy to attack it, but the stereotypes it traffics in are as corrosive for its black characters as its white ones. Even Lee deprives himself of any uncompromised ground." [Art Index]

Rome, Dennis.
"Bamboozled : criminal stereotypes of African Americans in cinema." In: Black demons : media's depiction of the African American male criminal stereotype Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2004.
Main Stack P94.5.A37.R66 2004

Samuels, Allison.
"Spike's Minstrel Show: Lee talks about putting blackface in the spotlight." (CONTROVERSY)(Arts and Entertainment)(Spike Lee)(Brief Article)(Interview) Newsweek (Oct 2, 2000):75.

Simon, John.
"Taking the Low Road." (Review) (movie review) National Review v52, n21 (Nov 6, 2000):NA.

Smith-Shomade, Beretta E.
""I be smackin' my hoes" : paradox and authenticity in Bamboozled." In: The Spike Lee reader Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Tate, Greg.
"Bamboozled: white supremacy and a black way of being human. Cineaste v 26 no2 2001. p. 15-16.
"Part of a special section on issues of race identity in Bamboozled, a new film directed by Spike Lee. Bamboozled eloquently reminds us of the degree to which the dehumanization and commodification of Africans that occurred during slavery remains as a fetish in American entertainment. The film extravagantly renders the idea that blackness remains a commodity to be traded, whether in the corporate boardroom or the television sound stage. However, it largely eschews the more complicated question of how one maintains and enriches one's own humanity, when one is reduced to a racial type by the powerful." [Art Index]

Tondeur, Cristy
"Bamboozled by Blackness." Black Camera 16:1 [Spring-Summer 2001] p.4, 10-11
UC users only
"Reviews Spike Lee's feature film "Bamboozled," which considers the portrayal of Blacks in the media and the depiction of African Americans as objects ridicule. Describes the work as an innovative film, but expresses concern over Lee's tendency to offer one-dimensional representations of women." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

Turan, Kenneth.
"Movie Review; Satire, Rage Add Up to Audacious 'Bamboozled'; Spike Lee's latest draws his most powerful bead yet on racism's history in America." (Calendar)(Review) (movie review) Los Angeles Times (Oct 6, 2000):F-1.

Wallace, Michele.
"Bamboozled: the archive." In: Dark designs and visual culture / Michele Wallace. Durham : Duke University Press, 2004.
Main Stack E185.86.W344 2004

White, Armond.
"Post-art minstrelsy." Cineaste v 26 no2 2001. p. 12-14.
UC users only
"Part of a special section on issues of race identity in Bamboozled, a new film directed by Spike Lee. In zled, Lee distorts the topic of blackface to leave the audience angered and perplexed. Rather than examining the all-American phenomenon of poor black and Latino talents, who have had to go to the streets to pick up change and forge an artistic identity, the film shallowly and vigorously indicts the performers and talent brokers Lee finds embarrassing. It also hinders and exacerbates by confusing issues of show-business representation and career ethics through Lee's inherent inconsistency and apoplexy. Every point it makes about the outrage of black exploitation is neutralized by the very exaggerations of black behavior, which have been long exhibited in Lee's own films by actors he promoted. Moreover, his suggestion that black and white audiences had no sophistication about old stereotypes is offensive to the past and to the current acceptance of performers such as Eddie Murphy and Whoopi Goldberg." [Art Index]

Willett, Cynthia
"Authenticity in an Age of Satire: Ellison, Sartre, Bergson, and Spike Lee’s Bamboozled." In: Irony in the age of empire : comic perspectives on democracy and freedom / Cynthia Willett. Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c2008.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1929.P65 W55 2008

Wisner, Heather.
"Moviemakers put motion back in pictures." (dancing in motion pictures) Dance Magazine v74, n12 (Dec, 2000):60.

Clockers

Alleva, Richard.
"Clockers." (movie reviews)Commonweal v122, n18 (Oct 20, 1995):20 (2 pages).

Ansen, David.
"Clockers." (movie reviews) Newsweek v126, n13 (Sept 25, 1995):92.

Cole, C.L. and Samantha King.
"New politics of urban consumption : Hoop Dreams, Clockers, and "Amic a"." In: Sporting dystopias : the making and meaning of urban sport cultures / edited by Ralph C. Wilcox ... [et al.]. Albany : State University of New York Press, c2003.
Environ Dsgn GV706.5.S73898 2003

Denby, David.
"Clockers." (movie reviews) New York v28, n37 (Sept 18, 1995):74 (2 pages).

Harris , Keith M.
"Clockers." In: The Spike Lee reader Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Clockers." (movie reviews) New Republic v213, n14 (Oct 2, 1995):38 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Clockers." (movie reviews)Nation v261, n11 (Oct 9, 1995):399 (3 pages).

Lane, Anthony.
"Clockers." (movie reviews) New Yorker v71, n28 (Sept 18, 1995):107 (2 pages).

Massood, Paula J.
"Which Way to the Promised Land? Spike Lee's Clockers and the Legacy of the African American City." African American Review. 35(2):263-79. 2001 Summer
UC users only
"Analyzes Spike Lee's film "Clockers," suggesting that it is a deliberately self-conscious attempt to deconstruct the "hood" genre of movies about the African American urban underclass. Argues that the film uses images and story lines similar to those of conventional "hood" movies, but attempts to connect these contemporary issues to questions about the history of the African American city. Finds that the result is a "dialogue between the hood's present and past." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

Massood, Paula J.
"Boyz 'n the hood chronotope: Spike Lee, Richard Price, and the changing authorship of Clockers." In: Literature and film : a guide to the theory and practice of film adaptation / edited by Robert Stam, Alessandra Raengo. Malden, MA : Blackwell, 2005.
Main Stack PN1997.85.L515 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0420/2004015927.html

Pawelczak, Andy.
"Clockers." (movie reviews) Films in Review v 46 Nov/Dec 1995. p. 100.
"The message of Spike Lee's Clockers--guns and drugs are bad, father-figures and mothers are good--looms so large that the drama seems like an afterthought. Richard Price's novel, on which the screenplay is based, focuses on a clocker, the author's term for a street-level drug dealer. In the novel, Price gets deep inside the protagonist's skin, but the film stay strictly on the surface, and actor Mekhi Phifer does not have the presence to make the role resonate." [Art Index]

Pizzello, Stephen.
"Between "rock" and a hard place." American Cinematographer v 76 Sept 1995. p. 36-44+.
"The work of director Spike Lee and first-time cinematographer Malik Sayeed in the film Clockers is discussed. This film is a stark, unflinching look at crack's deadly impact on a fictional New York neighborhood. Lee has created a harrowing tale that is visually inventive and remarkably realistic. He appointed Sayeed as his director of photography as he liked his uncontaminated style and wanted to give him a chance. Sayeed used unusual ideas and techniques in the film, the most startling of which was a decision to shoot a considerable portion of it on Kodak's 5239 film stock, an Ektachrome reversal film that is not mass-produced. Both Lee and Sayeed felt that a unique look was required to convey a true sense of daily life in a New York housing project. Sayeed has proved that he is a young cameraman to watch." [Art Index]

Poyntz, Stuart.
"Homey, I shot the kids: Hollywood and the war on drugs." Emergency Librarian. Nov/Dec 1997. Vol. 25, Iss. 2; pg. 8, 6 pgs
UC users only

Quart, Leonard.
"Spike Lee's 'Clockers': a lament for the urban ghetto."Cineaste v22, n1 (Wntr, 1996):9 (3 pages).
"The writer examines Spike Lee's motion picture, Clockers. Based on a novel by Richard Price, the movie focuses on the life of 19-year-old Strike and other clockers--low-level drug dealers. In a dark, poignantly pessimistic manner, it evokes a Brooklyn housing project and inner-city world where violence and desperation are the norm, depicting it in a contemplative and restrained rather than action-oriented style. There is nothing gamelike or exhilarating about its violence; it is brief and grimly graphic, causing only fear and despair for the characters involved. Despite some inherent flaws--overstated symbolism, intrusive (continued) editorializing, and moments of narrative confusion--this is Lee's most deeply felt, emotionally arresting, and socially significant film." [Art Index]

Saada,-Nicolas, reviewer.
"Clockers" (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no497 Dec 1995. p. 56. Language: French.
"A review of Clockers (1995), a film by Spike Lee. Starring Harvey Keitel, John Turturro, and Delroy Lindo, this film explores the world of a small-time crook who lets his brother do a job for him. The film lacks stylistic coherence, its lighting is too precious, and the music is too loud. Furthermore, Lee avoids any equivocal issues offered by Richard Price's screenplay, which suffers considerably as a result." [Art Index]

Schickel, Richard.
"Clockers." (movie reviews)) Time v146, n12 (Sept 18, 1995):108.

Taubin, Amy.
"Clockers." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v5, n10 (Oct, 1995):45.

Travers, Peter.
"Clockers." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n717 (Sept 21, 1995):89 (2 pages).

Crooklyn

Ansen, David.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews)Newsweek v123, n21 (May 23, 1994):60.

Britt, Donna.
"Lee is Down and Out in 'Crooklyn'" (Spike Lee's latest movie) (Column)Washington Post (Fri, May 13, 1994):C1, col 1, 19 col in.

Dargis, Manohla.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v4, n12 (Dec, 1994):44 (2 pages).

Cunningham , Mark D.
" Through the looking glass and over the rainbow : exploring the fairy tale in Spike Lee's Crooklyn." In: The Spike Lee reader Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Dargis, Manohla
"Crooklyn." (motion picture review) Sight and Sound ns4 Dec 1994. p. 44-5.
"Crooklyn is Spike Lee's most personal work and decidedly his best to date. This semiautobiographical film, which he cowrote with his sister and younger brother, traces the emotional arc of the fictional Carmichael family over a few crucial months during the 1970s. As much as the dialogue or lighting, it is the music that shapes this film, filling in texture and building density." [Art Index]

Denby, David.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews)New York v27, n20 (May 16, 1994):88 (2 pages).

Hooks, Bell.
"Sorrowful Black Death is Not a Hot Ticket." (Spike Lee's 'Crooklyn' portraying sorrowful black death) Sight and Sound v4, n8 (August, 1994):10 (5 pages)
"In most Hollywood films, the death of blacks is violent, often trivialized, and mocked. There is collective cultural agreement that black death is inevitable, meaningless, and worth very little. Spike Lee attempts to confront this culture with his latest film Crooklyn, which shows a black family in crisis, culminating with the mother's death. On the surface, the film seems to represent issues of death and dying in black life as though survival matters and living bodies count, but it eventually reaffirms the usual Hollywood message about the death of blacks." [Art Index]

Johnson, Brian D.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) Maclean's v107, n21 (May 23, 1994):65.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) New Republic v210, n21 (May 23, 1994):34.

Klawans, Stuart.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) Nation v258, n24 (June 20, 1994):882 (3 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) New York Times v143 (Fri, May 13, 1994):B1(N), C5(L), col 3, 18 col in.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) New Yorker v70, n14 (May 23, 1994):95.

Salamon, Julie.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, May 12, 1994):A12(W), A13(E), col 1, 18 col in.

Schickel, Richard.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) Time v143, n20 (May 16, 1994):81.

Sterritt, David.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v86, n120 (Mon, May 16, 1994):12, col 1, 20 col in.

Travers, Peter.
"Crooklyn." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n683 (June 2, 1994):75 (2 pages).

Do The Right Thing

Screenplay

Do the Right Thing a Spike Lee Joint / Spike Lee, with Lisa Jones; photography by David Lee. New York, N.Y.: Fireside, c1989.
UCB Morrison PN1997.D63 L4 1989

Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing
Edited by Mark A. Reid. Cambridge [England]; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Series title: Cambridge film handbook series.
UCB Main PN1997.D63 S65 1997
UCB Moffitt PN1997.D63 S65 1997

Articles/Papers/Books

Aste, Mario.
"Is Stereotyping Spike Lee's Way To Do The Right Thing, Or Just A Spiked Case Of Jungle Fever?" Proceedings of the American Italian Historical Association 1999 30: 227-236.
"Analyzes Spike Lee's films Do the Right Thing (1989) and Jungle Fever (1991) to praise their achievements in fusing "aesthetics and politics into a masterful construction of racial differences." The films accurately depict racial and ethnic mentalities among blacks and Italian Americans living in New York City and succeed in presenting unflattering stereotypical characters in an affectionate way. The humanization of characters, such as Sal in Do the Right Thing and the interracial couple in Jungle Fever, undercuts both Lee's condemnation of Italian American racism and his "exposè of dueling racist stereotypes" shared by Italian American and African American patriarchs, respectively. Both films challenge viewers to explore the nature of racism, stereotypes, and racial oppression." [America History and Life]

Baraka, Amiri.
"Spike Lee at the Movies." In Black American Cinema. Edited by Manthia Diawara, pp. 145-53. London: Routledge, 1993.
UCB Main PN1995.9.N4 B45 1993;
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.N4 B45 1993

Bartley, William
"Mookie as "Wavering Hero": "Do the Right Thing" and the American Historical Romance." Literature/Film Quarterly 34:1 (2006) p. 9-18
UC users only

Bensoussan, Nicole.
"Tragic Vistas In Spike Lee's Jungle Fever And Do The Right Thing." Proceedings of the American Italian Historical Association 1999 30: 237-242.
"Examines the tragic outlooks in Spike Lee's films Do the Right Thing (1989) and Jungle Fever (1991), beginning with the real-life tragic events of fatal violence against blacks by Italian Americans in New York City that inspired the films. The author describes the films as "festive tragedy," laced with comedy but ultimately tragic as characters confront demands from "two sets of values that are each imperative and mutually exclusive." The films may reflect the eternal struggle between good and evil and the inability of humans to overcome their own duality. The "real tragedy" is that the characters - presented as allegorical cultural archetypes - are doomed and that Spike Lee cannot envision any solution to the problems of race relations." [America History and Life]

Bredella, Lothar
"The Politics of Recognition: Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing and Jungle Fever." In: (Trans)formations of cultural identity in the English-speaking world / edited by Jochen Achilles, Carmen Birkle. Heidelberg : Universitatsverlag C. Winter,c1998.
Main Stack PE2751.T73 1998

Burgess, Dana L.
"Vergilian Modes in Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing." Classical and Modern Literature: A Quarterly, vol. 11 no. 4, 1991 Summer pp: 313-16

Corliss, Richard.
"Hot time in Bed-Stuy tonight." (filmmaker Spike Lee's new movie "Do the Right Thing" inflames passions) Time v134, n1 (July 3, 1989):62.

Cardullo B.
"Black And White, In Color" ('Do The Right Thing' By Spike Lee and Chocolat By Claire Denis Hudson Review, 1990 Winter, V42 N4:613+.

Corliss, Richard.
"Hot time in Bed-Stuy Tonight." (filmmaker Spike Lee's new movie Do the Right Thing inflames passions) Time v134, n1 (July 3, 1989):62.

Crowdus, Gary
Editorial (Lee 'Do The Right Thing' And Moore 'Roger And Me') Cineaste, 1990, V17 N4:2-2.

Davis, Z.
"What Is The Right Thing?, A Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing - Black Independent Or Hollywood Iconoclast." Cineaste, 1990, V17 N4:36-37.

DeGenaro, William.
"Challenging Ideas, Stories, and Rhetorics: Film and Politics in a Working Class Basic Writing Classroom." In: In our own voice: graduate students teach writing / Tina LaVonne Good, Leanne B. Warshauer, [editors]. pp: 38-45 Boston: Allyn and Bacon, c2000.
Main Stack PE1404.I38 2000

Denzin, Norman K.
"Selling Images of Inequality: Hollywood Cinema and the Reproduction of Racial and Gender Stereotypes: Do the Right Thing." In: The Blackwell companion to social inequalities / edited by Mary Romero and Eric Margolis. Malden, MA : Blackwell, 2005.
Full-text available online [UCB users only]
Main Stack HM821.B55 2005

Denzin, Norman K.
" Do the right thing: race in the USA.." In: Images of postmodern society : social theory and contemporary cinema / Norman K. Denzin. London ; Newbury Park : Sage Publications, 1991.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S6.D4 1991

Desmet, Christy
"Racism, Misogyny, and the 'Othello' Myth: Inter-racial Couples from Shakespeare to Spike Lee." Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England 20 (2007)
UC users only

"Do the Right Thing." (Spike Lee's new film on racism) (editorial)
Christian Science Monitor v81, n157 (Tue, July 11, 1989):20, col 1, 12 col in.

Fabe, Marilyn.
"Political cinema: Spike Lee's Do the right thing." In: Closely watched films : an introduction to the art of narrative film technique / Marilyn Fabe. Berkeley : University of California Press, c2004.
Main Stack PN1995.9.E9.F17 2004
Moffitt PN1995.9.E9.F17 2004
PFA PN1995.9.E9.F17 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0413/2004000202.html

Fraiman, Susan.
"Geometries Of Race and Gender: Eve Sedgwick, Spike Lee, Charlayne Hunter-Gault." Feminist Studies 1994 20(1): 67-84.
UC users only
"Eve Sedgwick's Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (1985) presents women as mediators between men in erotic triangles. In the Central Park jogger rape case, in Spike Lee's films Do the Right Thing (1989) and School Daze (1988), and in Brian De Palma's film Casualties of War (1989), women are also objects, this time for the assertion of white and black masculinities and white male dominance, but women also reproduce race and class divisions among themselves, as illustrated by interviews with American women serving in the Gulf War conducted by Charlayne Hunter-Gault of the MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Gilliam, Dorothy.
"Give Spike Lee a Break." (director of movie 'Do the Right Thing') (column) Washington Post v112 (Mon, July 10, 1989):D3, col 4, 14 col in.

Glicksman, Marlaine.
"Spike Lee's Bed-Stuy BBQ." ("Do the Right Thing" film underscores racial tensions in Brooklyn; interview with director Spike Lee) (interview) Film Comment v25, n4 (July-August, 1989):12 (5 pages).
"In Do the Right Thing, director/actor/writer Spike Lee explores race relations in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn. The film, which culminates in the destruction of a local pizzeria, has sparked controversy because it seems to endorse the use of violence in self defense. Always topical, Lee's films present a black insider's perspective on the contradictions and celebrations of African-American life. They are also distinguished by their ability to present characters who are neither all good nor all bad. In an interview, Lee discusses the making of and controversy over Do the Right Thing." [Art Index]

Goodman, Ellen.
"Women in Spike Lee's World." (women in movie 'Do the Right Thing') (column) Washington Post v112 (Tue, July 18, 1989):A23, col 2, 13 col in.

Grant, W. R.
"Do the Right Thing Meets the Press." " In: Post-soul Black cinema : discontinuities, innovations, and breakpoints, 1970-1995 New York : Routledge, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N4 G69 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip047/2003017036.html

Grant, W. R.
"Do the Right Thing Revisited." " In: Post-soul Black cinema : discontinuities, innovations, and breakpoints, 1970-1995 New York : Routledge, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N4 G69 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip047/2003017036.html

Grant, W. R.
"Pre-Production, Film Trade Unions, and Doing the Right Thing." In: Post-soul Black cinema : discontinuities, innovations, and breakpoints, 1970-1995 New York : Routledge, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N4 G69 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip047/2003017036.html

Grant, William.
"Reflecting the Times: Do the Right Thing Revisited." In: Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing. / edited by Mark A. Reid. pp: 16-30. Cambridge [England]; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Cambridge film handbook series
Main Stack PN1997.D63.S65 1997
Moffitt PN1997.D63.S65 1997

Grant, William.
"Do the right thing revisited -- The check is in the mail -- Pre-production, film trade unions, and doing the right thing -- Do the right thing meets the press." In: Post-soul Black cinema : discontinuities, innovations, and breakpoints, 1970-1995 / William R. Grant, IV. New York : Routledge, 2004.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N4.G69 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip047/2003017036.html

Hanson, Philip
"The Politics of Inner City Identity in Do the Right Thing." South Central Review: The Journal of the South Central Modern Language Association, vol. 20, no. 2-4, pp. 47-66, Summer 2003.
UC users only

Hirschman E.
"The Semiotics Of Ethnicity - Using Consumption Imagery To Decode Lee, Spike 'Do The Right Thing'." Semiotica, 1994, V98 N1-2:109-137.

Horowitz, M.
"Public Enemy Number One." ( American Film XIV/10, Sept 89; p.15.
Reports on the controversy created by the anti-Semitic remarks of Professor Griff, a musician who worked on "Do the Right Thing".

Johnson, Victoria E.
"Polyphony and Cultural Expression: Interpreting Musical Traditions in Do the Right Thing." Film Quarterly, vol. 47 no. 2, 1993-1994 Winter pp: 18-29
Examines Spike Lee's use of multiple musical forms in "Do the Right Thing" and how these relate to character and incident.

Jones J.
"What Is The Right Thing?, A Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing." Cineaste, 1990, V17 N4:34-35.

Katsahnias, Iannis; Saada, Nicolas
"A propos de Do The Right Thing -- Interview) Cahiers du Cinema no421 June 1989. p. 9-11

Kaufman, Michael T.
"In a new film, Spike Lee tries to do the right thing; the filmmaker says he wants his movie to make people talk about racism - 'the most pressing problem in the U.S." ('Do the Right Thing') New York Times v138, sec2 (Sun, June 25, 1989):H1(N), H1(L), col 2, 52 col in.

Kempton, Murray.
"The Pizza is Burning!" (Spike Lee's film, Do The Right Thing, now appears in book form) New York Review of Books v36, n14 (Sept 28, 1989):37 (2 pages).

Kempton, Murray.
"Spike Lee's Self-Contempt." (film "Do the Right Thing" undermines its own purpose as a study of racial hatred) (column)Washington Post v112 (Thu, August 3, 1989):A27, col 4, 15 col in.

Kennedy L.
"What Is The Right Thing, A Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing - Women On The Edge Of Male Violence." Cineaste, 1990, V17 N4:39-39.

Kulczycky, Ted.
"By Any Meanings Necessary: Conflict and its Resolution in Do the Right Thing." Cineaction, 1996, Issue 40, p48-56, 9p
UC users only

Lightning, Robert K.
"Do the Right Thing: Generic Bases." Cineaction, 1996, Issue 40, p44-47, 4p
UC users only

Lyne, William
"No Accident: From Black Power to Black Box Office." African American Review, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 39-59, Spring 2000.
UC users only

Lee, Kun Jong
"Towards Interracial Understanding and Identification: Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing and Chang-rae Lee's Native Speaker." Journal of American Studies, 11/01/2010, Vol. 44 Issue 4, p741-757, 17p
UC users only

Lee, Spike.
Do the Right Thing : A Spike Lee Joint / Spike Lee, with Lisa Jones; photography by David Lee. New York, N.Y.: Fireside, c1989.
Morrison Rm PN1997.D63.L4 1989

Lindroth, Colette
"Spike Lee and the American Tradition." Literature/Film Quarterly XXIV/1, Jan 96; p.26-31. illus., bibliogr.
The constant emphasis on ethical choice in "Do the Right Thing" links the film to a tradition of US literature concerned with morality.

LoBrutto, Vincent.
"Political objectives through cinematic storytelling: Do the right thing." In: Becoming film literate : the art and craft of motion pictures / Vincent LoBrutto ; foreword by Jan Harlan. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, c2005.
Main Stack PN1994.L595 2005
Moffitt PN1994.L595 2005
PFA PN1994.L595 2005

Lubiano, Wahneema
"But compared to what?: reading realism, representation, and essentialism in School daze, Do the right thing, and the Spike Lee discourse." Black American Literature Forum, Vol. 25, No. 2, Black Film Issue. (Summer, 1991), pp. 253-282.
UC users only

Lubiano, Wahneema
"But compared to what?: reading realism, representation, and essentialism in School daze, Do the right thing, and the Spike Lee discourse." In: Representing Blackness : issues in film and video / edited with an introduction by Valerie Smith. p. 97-122. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c1997. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N4.R47 1997
Moffitt PN1995.9.N4.R47 1997

Lubiano, Wahneema
"But compared to what?: reading realism, representation, and essentialism in School daze, Do the right thing, and the Spike Lee discourse." Black American Literature Forum 25:2 [Summer 1991]
"The Spike Lee discourse and his production offer a site for examining possibilities of oppositional, resistant, or subversive cultural production as well as the problems of productions that are considered oppositional, resistant, or subversive without accompanying analysis sustaining such evaluation." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

Lyne, William.
"No Accident: From Black Power to Black Box Office." African American Review, 2000 Spring, 34:1, 39-59.

MacDonald,-Scott
"The city as the country: the New York City symphony from Rudy Burckhardt to Spike Lee." Film Quarterly v 51 Winter 1997/1998. p. 2-20. "City symphony" films provide a general sense of life in a particular metropolis, often by highlighting characteristic aspects of city life over the course of a composite day. The writer discusses Swiss-born Rudy Burckhardt's extensive film documentation of New York City and Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing, the greatest American city symphony movie. [Art Index]

Marriott, Michel.
"Brooklyn's Reactions to a Film on Racism: Spike Lee's Movie Inspires Debate Where It Was Made." ("Do the Right Thing") (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v138 (Mon, July 3, 1989):11(N), 21(L), col 1, 20 col in.

McKelly, James C.
"The Double Truth, Ruth: 'Do the Right Thing' and the Culture of Ambiguity." African American Review v32, n2 (Summer, 1998):215 (13 pages).
UC users only

McWilliams, Dean
"Bakhtin in Brooklyn : language in Spike Lee's Do the right thing." In: Carnivalizing difference : Bakhtin and the other / edited by Peter I. Barta ... [et al.]. London ; New York : Routledge, 2001.
Main Stack PG2947.B3.C379 2001

Messaris, Paul.
"The Polarizing Tendency of Mass Media: Press Reviews of "Do the Right Thing. " (reviews of Spike Lee's film) Mass Comm Review v20, n3-4 (Summer-Fall, 1993):220 (9 pages)

Mitchell W.J.T.
"Seeing Do The Right Thing." Critical Inquiry, 1991 Spring, V17 N3:596-608.
UC users only

Mitchell W.J.T.
"The Violence of Public Art: "Do the Right Thing"." Critical Inquiry, Vol. 16, No. 4. (Summer, 1990), pp. 880-899.
UC users only

Musser C.
"What Is The Right Thing, A Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing - L-O-V-E And H-A-T-E." Cineaste, 1990, V17 N4:37-38.

Muwakkil S.
"What Is The Right Thing, A Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing - Spike Lee and the Image Police." Cineaste, 1990, V17 N4:35-36.

Muyumba, Walton.
"Folklore and Signifying: The Black Film Aesthetic in Spike Lee's 'Do The Right Thing'." The Literary Griot: International Journal of Black Expressive Cultural Studies, vol. 5 no. 2. 1993 Fall. pp: 12-24.

Olaniyan, Tejumola.
"'Uplift the Race!' Coming to America, Do the Right Thing, and the Poetics of 'Othering'." Cultural Critique, vol. 34. 1996 Fall. pp: 91-113.
UC users only

Orenstein, Peggy.
"Spike's Riot." (film director Spike Lee's controversial new film "Do the Right Thing") Mother Jones v14, n7 (Sept, 1989):32 (7 pages).

Ostendorf, Berndt.
"PC, or Do the Right Thing") European Contributions to American Studies [Netherlands] 1993 23: 209-227.
Outlines the national identity crisis surrounding America's increasing ethnic diversity in the late 20th century and examines how Spike Lee's film Do the Right Thing (1989) comments on America's uneasiness over multiculturalism and "political correctness." [America: History and Life]

Pierson, Stephen.
"Defamiliarizing (Re)Presentation: The Poetics Of Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing. Proceedings of the American Italian Historical Association 1999 30: 243-252.
"Presents a semiotic interpretation of Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing (1989) based on the tenets in Juri Lotman's Semiotics of Cinema (1976). Analyzes the images, sound, and sequencing of shots to argue that the language of Do the Right Thing, particularly the soliloquies in the film, defamiliarizes the viewer's perception of the world and challenges the exclusive binary between reality and representation. White viewers are compelled to assume an unfamiliar, African American perspective vis-à-vis the film, and their negotiations become part of the movie's significance. Artistic cinema creates an intertextual dialogue with the perceived world and functions to modify "the beholder's conventional wisdom about the nature of things."" [America: History & Life]

"Racism, 1989." (Racism portrayed in Spike Lee's Film "Do the Right Thing" is Alive and Well in America) (column)
Progressive v53, n10 (Oct, 1989):10. Pub Type: Column.

Radtke, Jennifer.
"Do The Right Thing in Black and White: Spike Lee's Bi-Cultural Method." Midwest Quarterly v41, n2 (Wntr, 2000):208.

Ramsey, Guthrie P., Jr.
"Muzing New Hoods, Making New Identities: Film, Hip-Hop Culture, and Jazz Music." Callaloo: A Journal of African-American and African Arts and Letters, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 309-20, Winter 2002.
UC users only

"Right or Wrong?" (Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing")
Economist v312, n7611 (July 15, 1989):88 (2 pages).

Rosenbaum, Jonathan.
"Say the right thing (Do the right thing)." In: Movies as politics / Jonathan Rosenbaum. Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P6.R67 1997
Moffitt PN1995.9.P6.R67 1997
PFA PN1995.9.P6.R67 1997 os

Ross, A.
"Ballots, Bullets, or Batmen: Can Cultural Studies Do the Right Thing?"Screen XXXI/1, Spring 90; p.26-44. illus., bibliogr.
Cultural criticism, focusing on "Batman" and "Do the Right Thing".

Subotnik, Rose Rosengard.
"The closing of the American dream? : a musical perspective on Allan Bloom, Spike Lee, and doing the right thing." In: Deconstructive variations : music and reason in western society / Rose Rosengard Subotnik. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1996.
Music ML3800.S898 1996

Sanoff, Alvin P.
"Doing the Controversial Thing." (Director Spike Lee's movie "Do the Right Thing") U.S. News & World Report v107, n2 (July 10, 1989):51.

Sharkey, B. and Davis, T.
"Knocking on Hollywood's Door." (Article). American Film XIV/9, July-Aug 89; p.22-27,52,54.
Reports on the status of black filmmakers in Hollywood, esp. Spike Lee and Robert Townsend, on the release of "Do the right thing".

Shore, Mitchell.
"Multiculturalism and Spike Lee's Mixed Messages." Cineaction, 1996, Issue 40, p57-65, 9p
UC users only

Silverberg, Cory.
"More than Violence: a reading of intergenerational relationships in Do the Right Thing and Jungle Fever." Cineaction, 1996, Issue 40, p66-72, 7p
UC users only

Sklar R.
"What Is The Right Thing, a Critical Symposium on Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing." Cineaste, 1990, V17 N4:32-33.
Five critics and practitioners give their perspectives on Spike Lee's "Do the right thing", addressing issues of politics, race, and gender, as well as the film's representation of African-American women and its moral ambiguity.

"Spike Lee's Self-Contempt." (film "Do the Right Thing" undermines its own purpose as a study of racial hatred) (column)
Washington Post v112 (Thu, August 3, 1989):A27, col 4, 15 col in.

Subotnik, Rose Rosengard.
"The closing of the American dream? : a musical perspective on Allan Bloom, Spike Lee, and doing the right thing." In: Deconstructive variations : music and reason in western society / Rose Rosengard Subotnik. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1996.
Music ML3800.S898 1996

Taubin, Amy
"Fear of a Black Cinema." Sight and Sound, vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 26-28, August 2002.
UC users only
"Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing is discussed as part of a series celebrating the top ten films made since 1968. Lee's third feature was his first to deal with relationships between black characters and white characters. Directly inspired by a series of incidents of racial violence and police brutality, Lee's movie struck a nerve. He was attacked for inciting black youth to riot in the streets, for sabotaging the upcoming mayoral campaign of David Dinkins, and for turning back the clock to the fiery racial conflicts of the 1960s. However, the uproar surrounding the work obscured the brilliance of the film itself: its bold, ingenious formal hybridity, its unforced emotional range from exuberance to despair, and the way its individual images and actions are packed with contradictory meanings." [Art Index]

Van Gelder, Lawrence.
"Summer in the City." (Spike Lee's latest movie, 'Do the Right Thing') New York Times v137 (Fri, Aug 5, 1988):19(N), C6(L), col 1, 8 col in.

Wallace, Michele
"Invisibility blues: Michele Wallace on doing the real thing." (the portrayal of women in Do the Right Thing) Artforum International v 28 Oct 1989. p. 20-2

White, Armond.
"Rebirth of a nation." In: American movie critics : an anthology from the silents until now / edited by Phillip Lopate. New York : Library of America : Distributed to the trade by Penguin Putnam, c2006.
Main Stack PN1995.A448 2006
Moffitt PN1995.A448 2006
PFA PN1995.A72 2006

White, Armond.
"Scene on the Street: Black Cinema from Catfish Row to Stuyvesant Ave." (director Spike Lee's controversial film "Do the Right Thing") Mother Jones v14, n7 (Sept, 1989):35 (2 pages).

Reviews

Doherty Thomas
"Do The Right Thing." Film Quarterly, 1989 Winter, V43 N2:35-40.
UC users only

Grant, E.
"Do the Right Thing." (Review). Films in Review XL/10, Oct 89; p.484-486.

Jacobson, Harlan
"Do the Right Thing." (Review). Film Comment v 25 July/Aug 1989. p. 68-9

Kempton M.
"Do The Right Thing." New York Review Of Books, 1989 Sep 28, V36 N14:37-38.

Milne, Tom
"Do The Right Thing." Monthly Film Bulletin LVI/666, July 89; p.202-204.

Nowell-Smith, G.
"Do The Right Thing." Sight & Sound, 1989 Fall, V58 N4:281-281.

Pedersen C.
"Do The Right Thing." American Studies In Scandinavia, 1989, V21 N2:109-112.

Pierson, Stephen.
"Defamiliarizing (Re)Presentation: The Poetics Of Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing." Proceedings of the American Italian Historical Association 1999 30: 243-252.
"Presents a semiotic interpretation of Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing (1989) based on the tenets in Juri Lotman's Semiotics of Cinema (1976). Analyzes the images, sound, and sequencing of shots to argue that the language of Do the Right Thing, particularly the soliloquies in the film, defamiliarizes the viewer's perception of the world and challenges the exclusive binary between reality and representation. White viewers are compelled to assume an unfamiliar, African American perspective vis-à-vis the film, and their negotiations become part of the movie's significance. Artistic cinema creates an intertextual dialogue with the perceived world and functions to modify "the beholder's conventional wisdom about the nature of things." [America History and Life]

Radtke, Jennifer
"Do The Right Thing in Black and White: Spike Lee's Bi-Cultural Method." (Critical Essay) Midwest Quarterly v41, n2 (Wntr, 2000):208.
UC users only

Reynaud, Berenice
"Do The Right Thing." Cahiers du Cinema no423 Sept 1989. p. iv

Taubin, Amy
"Fear of a black cinema." Sight & Sound; Vol.XII nr.8 (Aug 2002); p.26-28
Spike Lee's "Do the right thing" is considered as a possible contender in a "top ten movies of all time" list. Incl. quotations from contemporary reviews.

Wehrle, J. Mark
"Do the Right Thing." Teaching Sociology, Vol. 19, No. 1. (Jan., 1991), pp. 127-128.
UC users only

Willis, Sharon.
"Tell the Right Story: Spike Lee and the Politics of Representative Style." In: High contrast : race and gender in contemporary Hollywood film / Sharon Willis. Durham, N.C. : Duke University Press, 1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S47.W56 1997
Compar Ethn PN1995.9.S47.W56 1997
PFA PN1995.9.S47.W56 1997)

Four Little Girls

Acham, Christine
"We shall overcome : preserving history and memory in 4 little girls." In: The Spike Lee reader Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Britt, Donna.
"Celebrating Life Before Martyrdom." (Spike Lee's documentary, '4 Little Girls')(Column) Washington Post v121, n44 (Fri, Feb 13, 1998):B1, col 1, 17 col in.

Byrd, Chris.
"4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Sojourners v27, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1998):63 (2 pages).

Capino, José B.
"4 Little Girls: The Wounds of History." In: American cinema of the 1990s: themes and variations / edited by Chris Holmlun. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2008.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Collins, James.
"4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Time v151, n7 (Feb 23, 1998):86 (2 pages).

Davis, Jack E.
"Four Little Girls." (movie reviews) Journal of American History v85, n3 (Dec, 1998):1194 (3 pages).
UC users only

"Honoring the Memory of 4 Little Girls.:
American Cinematographer, v. 79 (Jan. '98) p. 65-8+
The work of cinematographer Ellen Kuras on director Spike Lee's documentary film 4 Little Girls is discussed. The film, Lee's first feature-length documentary, relates the horrifying and heart-wrenching story of the 1963 racially motivated Alabama church bombing that took the lives of four African-American girls who were attending Sunday school. Although using the traditional mix of still photographs, interviews, and archival footage, the film is enlivened by the use of such tools as swing-and-tilt lenses, Super 8, and tinting. Kuras used an Arriflex 16SR-3 Highspeed fitted with a Super 16 gate; other equipment included an entire set of Zeiss close-focus prime lenses and a set of SwingShift lenses. The film is a remarkably unconventional-looking piece of nonfiction that packs a visual as well an emotional knockout punch.

Klawans, Stuart.
"4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Nation v265, n4 (July 28, 1997):35 (2 pages).

Leonard, John.
"Four Little Girls." (television program reviews) New York v31, n7 (Feb 23, 1998):135 (2 pages).

Mask, Mia L.
"4 Little Girls." (Review)Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):80 (3 pages).
UC users only
"A review of a video release of Spike Lee's documentary film 4 Little Girls. Lee has teamed up with filmmaker Sam Pollard for this documentary about the Birmingham, Alabama, church bombings of September 15, 1963, a terrible tragedy that took the lives of four young black girls and resulted in more active participation of African-American communities in the civil-rights movement. The first half of the film relies too heavily on recollections of the girls' virtue, vitality, and promise, thus making it top heavy with personal sentiment, compromising historical depth and a more probing examination of white racism. However, 4 Little Girls does poignantly capture the systemic institutional racism of elected public officials who created an environment where the Ku Klux Klan functioned as an extension of the state." [Art Index]

Maslin, Janet.
"4 Little Girls." (Review) New York Times v146 (Wed, July 9, 1997):B1(N), C11(L), col 4, 19 col in.

McCarthy, Todd.
"4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Variety v367, n11 (July 21, 1997):38.

Millner, Denene.
"Remembering Four Little Girls." (Spike Lee's documentary on the 1963 bombing murder in Birmingham of Carole Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Welsey and Carol Robertson while they were in Sunday School) American Visions v13, n1 (Feb-March, 1998):36.
"4 Little Girls, a documentary directed by Spike Lee, tells the story of the four young black girls who died when a bomb destroyed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, on September 15, 1963. The bomb, which was planted by a Ku Klux Klansman strongly opposed to integration, ensured that Carole Denise McNair, 11, and Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, and Carole Rosamond Robertson, all 14, became martyrs for the civil rights struggle. Bomb survivors, the children's families and friends, witnesses, prosecutors, activists, and those who defended segregation are all featured in the documentary film, which is to be shown on HBO." [Art Index]

Morgenstern, Joe.
"4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Fri, July 18, 1997):A13(W), A13(E), col 1, 7 col in.

Rudolph, Eric.
"Honoring the memory of 4 little girls." American Cinematographer v 79 Jan 1998. p. 65-8+.
"The work of cinematographer Ellen Kuras on director Spike Lee's documentary film 4 Little Girls is discussed. The film, Lee's first feature-length documentary, relates the horrifying and heart-wrenching story of the 1963 racially motivated Alabama church bombing that took the lives of four African-American girls who were attending Sunday school. Although using the traditional mix of still photographs, interviews, and archival footage, the film is enlivened by the use of such tools as swing-and-tilt lenses, Super 8, and tinting. Kuras used an Arriflex 16SR-3 Highspeed fitted with a Super 16 gate; other equipment included an entire set of Zeiss close-focus prime lenses and a set of SwingShift lenses. The film is a remarkably unconventional-looking piece of nonfiction that packs a visual as well an emotional knockout punch." [Art Index]

Smith, Valerie
"Remembering Birmingham Sunday: Spike Lee's 4 Little Girls." In: American cinema and the southern imaginary / edited by Deborah E. Barker and Kathryn McKee. Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN1995.9.S66 A44 2011

Weinraub, Bernard.
"A tale of evil in the South retold." (Spike Lee's documentary film, 'Four Little Girls,' recounts the 1963 Baptist church bombing that killed four African American children, in Birmingham, Alabama) New York Times v146, sec2 (Sun, July 6, 1997):H9(N), H9(L), col 1, 30 col in.

Get On the Bus

Ansen, David.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Newsweek v128, n18 (Oct 28, 1996):74.

Boykin, Keith.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Advocate, n719 (Oct 29, 1996):63 (3 pages).

Denby, David.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) New York v29, n41 (Oct 21, 1996):52 (2 pages).

Felperin, Leslie.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v7, n7 (July, 1997):40 (2 pages).
" Spike Lee's film Get on the Bus centers on a group of black men who board a bus for the Million Man March in Washington, D.C. Reggie Rock Bythewood's script fills the bus with a microcosm of the male African-American community. The fact that the setup hardly ever seems contrived is due to the energetic realism of the dialogue, Lee's direction, and the power of the performances by some of the best black American actors alive today.' [Art Index]

Gilroy, Paul.
"Million Man Mouthpiece." (Spike Lee's 'Get on the Bus') Sight and Sound v7, n8 (August, 1997):16 (3 pages).
"An examination of Spike Lee's "Get on the bus" which looks at a tension between the political premise of the film and whether that is adequately expressed by stereotypical characterisation."

Coe, Jonathan.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) New Statesman (1996) v126, n4342 (July 11, 1997):43.

"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v88, n237 (Fri, Nov 1, 1996):12, col 2, 1 col in.

Klawans, Stuart.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Nation v263, n16 (Nov 18, 1996):35 (2 pages).

Kauffman, Stanley.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) New Republic v215, n19 (Nov 4, 1996):26 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) New York Times v145 (Wed, Oct 16, 1996):B1(N), C11(L), col 4, 16 col in.

McCarthy, Todd.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Variety v364, n10 (Oct 7, 1996):86 (2 pages).

McKelly, James C.
"The Double Truth, Ruth: 'Do the Right Thing' and the Culture of Ambiguity." African American Review v32, n2 (Summer, 1998):215 (13 pages).

Morgenstern, Joe.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Wed, Oct 16, 1996):A16(W), A18(E), col 1, 21 col in.

Sterritt, David.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v89, n26 (Thu, Jan 2, 1997):12, col 2, 2 col in.

Thompson, Andrew O.
"Magic Bus." (Interview). American Cinematographer LXXVII/11, Nov 96; p.56-60,62,64-66.
"The work of director Spike Lee and cinematographer Elliot Davis on the motion picture Get on the Bus is discussed. The film deals with a three-day bus trip of black men from the First AME Zion Church in Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., to attend the 1995 Million Man March. Shot in 18 days on a very low budget, the movie is filmed in a very documentary-like style in Super 16 format, with color changes from yellow to blue or vice versa as signals of emotional progressions or the isolation of a member from the group. Davis's chief camera was an Aaton XTR-Prod, and Kodak's 7298 was the dominant film stock in use." [Art Index]

Travers, Peter.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n746 (Oct 31, 1996):76.

Watkins , S. Craig
"Reel men : Get on the bus and the shifting terrain of Black masulinities." In: The Spike Lee reader Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Wheatley, Edward
"Spike Lee's Get on the Bus: Mr. Chaucer Goes to Washington." Film and History, pp. (no pagination), 2001.

White, Jack E.
"Get On the Bus." (movie reviews) Time v148, n19 (Oct 21, 1996):78.

Girl 6

Bouquet, Stephane
"Girl 6." Cahiers du Cinema no. 502 (May 1996) p. 75
"A review of Girl 6, Spike Lee's latest film. The central character in this film is an unemployed actress who, fed up and in debt, eventually ends up in the telephone sex industry, where, as "Girl 6," she acts as her clients want her to and becomes very successful. Lee deals with the morals in the film with an incredible clumsiness, but his film is worth a look if only because he had the audacity to take on one of the cheapest manifestations of contemporary sex." [Art Index]

Denby, David
"Girl 6." (movie reviews) New York April 1, 1996 v29 n13 p48(2)

Fitzgerald, Sharon
"Spike Lee: Fast forward." American Visions 10:5 [October-November 1995]
Motion picture director Shelton "Spike" Lee is profiled. Lee's ninth film, Girl 6," will be opeing in a few months.

hooks, bell
"Talk now, pay later: women in the sex industry in Spike Lee's 'Girl 6'." Sight & Sound v. ns6 (June 1996) p. 18-20+
"A discussion of Spike Lee's Girl 6. The power of desire to seduce and to lead us in dangerous directions is explored in this film. Even though it overtly deals with the issue of racism, everyone in the film understands that in the world of representations that they are working with, whiteness is the essential ingredient necessary for ultimate fulfillment. The film subtly critiques the hegemony of white images of glamor even as it explicitly shows the way black women enter a movie industry where their beauty marks them for roles as sexual servants. Lee does not exploit the objectification of women but explores the eroticization of stardom, of attention. His film acts as critical intervention, opening up a cinematic space where women can disinvest and disengage with old representations. This exciting intervention will be overlooked if the film is seen through the eyes of a narrowly focused feminism." [Art Index]

Kauffmann, Stanley .
"Girl 6." (movie reviews) The New Republic April 29, 1996 v214 n18 p26(2) DD>UC users only

Klawans, Stuart
"Girl 6." (movie reviews) The Nation April 29, 1996 v262 n17 p35(2)
UC users only

Kroll, Jack
"Girl 6." (movie reviews) Newsweek March 25, 1996 v127 n13 p72(1)

Maslin, Janet
"Girl 6." (movie reviews) The New York Times March 22, 1996 v145 pB3(N) pC3(L) col 1

Rothery, Nikki
"Deconstructing black desire." Sight & Sound; Vol.VI nr.7 (July 1996); p.64
Takes issue with Bell Hooks' article arguing in favour of Spike Lee's "Girl 6".

Travers, Peter
"Girl 6." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone April 18, 1996 n732 p77(2)

He Got Game

Denby, David.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews) New York v31, n18 (May 11, 1998):52 (2 pages)

"Denzel Washington, Ray Allen star in Spike Lee's movie about the turning point in a father and son's life in 'He Got Game.'"(Cover Story)Jet v93, n23 (May 4, 1998):32 (5 pages).

Falcon, Richard.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v8, n10 (Oct, 1998):44 (2 pages).
"The arresting opening to this film declares Spike Lee's passionate love of basketball and his continuing commitment to producing mythic cinema from an African-American perspective. The film feels like a large expansive work that sprawls at the edges, an impression fostered in part by Lee's trademark multiple perspective sequences." [Art Index]

Geiger, Jeffrey
"'The Game behind the Game': Spatial Politics and Spike Lee's He Got Game." In: Race and ethnicity in New York city / edited by Jerome Krase, Ray Hutchison. Amsterdam ; Boston : Elsevier, 2004.

Johnson, Brian D.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews) Maclean's v111, n18 (May 4, 1998):68.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews) New Republic v218, n22 (June 1, 1998):24.

Klawans, Stuart.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews)Nation v266, n20 (June 1, 1998):35 (2 pages).

Levy, Emanuel.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews) Variety v370, n11 (April 27, 1998):57 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews) New York Times v147 (Fri, May 1, 1998):B27(N), E16(L), col 3, 14 col in.

Sterritt, David.
"He Got Game." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v90, n114 (Fri, May 8, 1998):15, col 1, 14 col in.

Wise, Mike.
"Looking into the shadows at courtside; Spike Lee, renowned fan, gambled that real players would enhance his drama about the hustle surrounding basketball." (film 'He Got Game') New York Times v147, sec2 (Sun, April 26, 1998):AR15(N), AR15(L), col 1, 38 col in.

Jungle Fever

Articles

Aste, Mario.
"Is Stereotyping Spike Lee's Way To Do The Right Thing, Or Just A Spiked Case Of Jungle Fever?" Proceedings of the American Italian Historical Association 1999 30: 227-236.
"Analyzes Spike Lee's films Do the Right Thing (1989) and Jungle Fever (1991) to praise their achievements in fusing "aesthetics and politics into a masterful construction of racial differences." The films accurately depict racial and ethnic mentalities among blacks and Italian Americans living in New York City and succeed in presenting unflattering stereotypical characters in an affectionate way. The humanization of characters, such as Sal in Do the Right Thing and the interracial couple in Jungle Fever, undercuts both Lee's condemnation of Italian American racism and his "exposè of dueling racist stereotypes" shared by Italian American and African American patriarchs, respectively. Both films challenge viewers to explore the nature of racism, stereotypes, and racial oppression." [America History and Life]

Bensoussan, Nicole.
"Tragic Vistas In Spike Lee's Jungle Fever And Do The Right Thing." Proceedings of the American Italian Historical Association 1999 30: 237-242.
"Examines the tragic outlooks in Spike Lee's films Do the Right Thing (1989) and Jungle Fever (1991), beginning with the real-life tragic events of fatal violence against blacks by Italian Americans in New York City that inspired the films. The author describes the films as "festive tragedy," laced with comedy but ultimately tragic as characters confront demands from "two sets of values that are each imperative and mutually exclusive." The films may reflect the eternal struggle between good and evil and the inability of humans to overcome their own duality. The "real tragedy" is that the characters - presented as allegorical cultural archetypes - are doomed and that Spike Lee cannot envision any solution to the problems of race relations." [America History and Life]

Bredella, Lothar
"The Politics of Recognition: Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing and Jungle Fever." In: (Trans)formations of cultural identity in the English-speaking world / edited by Jochen Achilles, Carmen Birkle. Heidelberg : Universitatsverlag C. Winter, c1998.
Main Stack PE2751.T73 1998

Carilli, Theresa.
"Italian/American Performance Style in My Cousin Vinny and Jungle Fever." VIA: Voices in Italian Americana, 1997 Spring, 8:1, 33-44.

Corliss, Richard.
"Boyz of New Black City": Spike Lee's Jungle Fever heads a wave of films that convey the harsh truths of ghetto rage and anguish. (includes vignettes of other Black film directors) Time v137, n24 (June 17, 1991):64 (4 pages).

Ellis, David.
"Lost in the Jungle." (movie Jungle Fever is unclear about its message regarding interracial relationships) Time v137, n25 (June 24, 1991):13.

Grenier, Richard.
"Spike Lee Fever." (critical analysis of director Spike Lee's views as represented by the movie 'Jungle Fever') Commentary v92, n2 (August, 1991):50 (4 pages).

Kroll, Jack.
"Spiking a Fever": A Black-white Affair is the Catalyst for Spike Lee's Panoramic View of a Culture in a Color Bind. (director/producer of Jungle Fever) (includes interview with Spike Lee) (Cover Story) Newsweek v117, n23 (June 10, 1991):44 (4 pages).

Mazzocco, Angelo.
"Of Spike Lee's Jungle Fever." VIA: Voices in Italian Americana, 1995 Fall, 6:2, 186-88.

Paulin, Diana R.
"De-Essentializing Interracial Representations: Black and White Border-Crossings in Spike Lee's Jungle Fever and Octavia Butler's Kindred." Cultural Critique, vol. 36 no. -. 1997 Spring. pp: 165-93.

Richolson, J.M.
"He's Gotta Have It." (Interview). Cineaste XVIII/4, 91; p.12-15. illus.
Spike Lee discusses his latest film "Jungle Fever" and its depiction of racism.

Troutman, Denise
"African American Women: Talking That Talk." In: Sociocultural and historical contexts of African American English / edited by Sonja L. Lanehart. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia : John Benjamins Pub. Co., c2001.
Main Stack PE3102.N44.S63 2001

Wartenberg, Thomas E.

"Jungle Fever: Souring on Forbidden Fruit." In: Unlikely couples : movie romance as social criticism / Thomas E. Wartenberg. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.L6.W37 1999

Reviews

Billson, Anne.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v4, n167 (Sept 6, 1991):31 (2 pages).

Blake, Richard A.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) America v165, n3 (August 3, 1991):73 (2 pages).

Bowman, James.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) American Spectator v24, n8 (August, 1991):35.

Denby, David.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) New Yorker v71, n35 (Nov 6, 1995):118 (11 pages).

Denby, David.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) New York v24, n24 (June 17, 1991):76 (3 pages).

Early, Gerald.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4614 (Sept 6, 1991):18.

Grant, E.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Films in Review XLII/7-8, July-Aug 91; p.258-259.

Grenier, Richard.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Commentary v92, n2 (August, 1991):50 (4 pages).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Maclean's v104, n24 (June 17, 1991):55.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) New Republic v205, n5 (July 29, 1991):28 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Nation v253, n2 (July 8, 1991):64.

O'Pray, Michael.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v1, n5 (Sept, 1991):39.

Quart, Leonard.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Cineaste v19, n4 (Fall, 1992):99.
Reviewed on the occasion of its video release.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) New Yorker v67, n17 (June 17, 1991):99 (2 pages).

Saltman, Benjamin.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Film Quarterly v45, n2 (Winter, 1991):37 (5 pages).

Simon, John.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) National Review v43, n13 (July 29, 1991):48 (2 pages).

Travers, Peter.
"Jungle Fever." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n607 (June 27, 1991):75 (2 pages).

Wallace, Michele
"Boyz n the hood and Jungle fever." In: Black popular culture / a project by Michele Wallace ; edited by Gina Dent. Seattle : Bay Press, 1992.
Main Stack N72.S6.D57 v.8

Wallace, Michele.
"Boyz n the hood and Jungle fever." In: Dark designs and visual culture / Michele Wallace. Durham : Duke University Press, 2004.
Main Stack E185.86.W344 2004

Wehrle, J. Mark
"Jungle Fever." Teaching Sociology, Vol. 20, No. 1. (Jan., 1992), pp. 88-89.
UC users only

Malcolm X

Adedoyin, John.
Malcolm X." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4693 (March 12, 1993):18.

Alexander, Karen.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v3, n3 (March, 1993):46 (2 pages).

Alleva, Richard.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)Commonweal v120, n1 (Jan 15, 1993):18 (3 pages).

Ansen, David.
"The Battle for Malcolm X": Spike Lee's upcoming movie on the prophet of black pride ignites a debate. Newsweek v118, n9 (August 26, 1991):52 (3 pages).

Ansen, David.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) Newsweek v120, n20 (Nov 16, 1992):74.

Baecque, Antoine de
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) Cahiers du Cinema no464 Feb 1993. p. 52-3

Bowman, James.
"Heroic Failures: The 'Malcolm X' Phenomenon." The New Criterion, vol. 11 no. 5. 1993 Jan. pp: 11-16.

Boyd, Herb.
"Malcolm after Mecca: Pan-Africanism and the OAAU." Cineaste: America's Leading Magazine on the Art and Politics of the CinemaCineaste, vol. 19 no. 4. 1993. pp: 11-12.
UC users only

Bowman, James.
"Heroic Failures: The 'Malcolm X' Phenomenon."The New Criterion, vol. 11 no. 5. 1993 Jan.: 11-16.

Boyd, Herb.
"1992: Year of the X." (Spike Lee's movie, merchandising Malcolm X) Black Scholar v23, n1 (Wntr-Spring, 1993):22 (5 pages).

Boyd, Todd.
"Popular culture and political empowerment: The Americanization and death of Malcolm X." Cineaste, Mar1993, Vol. 19 Issue 4, p12, 2p
UC users only

Canby, Vincent.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)New York Times v142 (Wed, Nov 18, 1992):B1(N), C19(L), col 3, 30 col in.

Cashmore, Ellis.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v5, n229 (Nov 20, 1992):31 (2 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)Time v140, n21 (Nov 23, 1992):64 (2 pages).

Corson, Keith.
"Bringing Malcolm to the Masses: The Long Journey from Page to Screen." Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture & Society, Jan-Mar2010, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p70-88, 19p
UC users only

Crowdus, Gary; Georgakas, Dan.
"Our Film is Only a Starting Point: An Interview with Spike Lee." (By Any Reviews Necessary: Malcolm X Symposium) (Interview) Cineaste v19, n4 (Fall, 1992):20 (5 pages).
UC users only

Davies, Jude.
"Iconicity: Image and Narrative in Spike Lee's Malcolm X." In: Gender, Ethnicity and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film / Jude Davies and Carol R. Smith. pp: 90-102. Edinburgh : Keele University Press, 1997. BAAS paperbacks
Main Stack PN1995.9.M64.D38 1997

Denby, David.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)New York v25, n46 (Nov 23, 1992):70 (2 pages).

Denby, David.
"Movies: Spike Lee Vows to Do the Right Thing with an Epic 'Malcolm X.'" (filmmaker Spike Lee) (Fall Preview) (Cover Story)New York v25, n36 (Sept 14, 1992):50 (2 pages).

Doherty, Thomas.
"Malcolm X: In Print, on Screen." Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, 2000 Winter, 23:1, 29-48.
UC users only

Dyson, Michael Eric.
"Malcolm X: The Man, The Myth, The Movie." (Cover Story)Christian Century v109, n38 (Dec 23, 1992):1186 (4 pages).

Everett, Anna
""Spike, don't mess Malcolm up" : courting controversy and control in Malcolm X." In: The Spike Lee reader Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Gates, Henry Louis, Jr.
"Just Whose 'Malcolm' Is It, Anyway?" (Spike Lee's new film biography of Malcolm X) (Interview)New York Times v141, sec2 (Sun, May 31, 1992):H13(N), H13(L), col 1, 62 col in.

Gates, Henry Louis, Jr. and Spike Lee
"Generation X." Transition, No. 56. (1992), pp. 176-190.
UC users only

Georgakas, Dan.
"Who Will Speak for El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz?: Hagiography and a Missing Identity in Malcolm X." (By Any Reviews Necessary: Malcolm X Symposium) Cineaste v19, n4 (Fall, 1992):15 (2 pages).
UC users only

Harrell, Al
"Malcolm X: one man's legacy, to the letter." American Cinematographer v 73 Nov 1992. p. 28-32+

Hoberman, J.
" Heroes and Memories." Sght & Sound III/3, Mar 93; p.6-9.
Analysis of Hollywood's 1990's tendency to produce films based on historical events in the 1960's which mythologise the events and their protagonists, e.g. "Hoffa", "JFK" and "Malcolm X".

hooks, bell.
"Consumed by Images." (analysis of the movie Malcolm X) (Culture Wars) Artforum v31, n6 (Feb, 1993):5 (2 pages).

hooks, bell.
"Malcolm X: consumed by images." Z Magazine, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 36-37, March 1993

hooks, bell.
"Male Heroes and Female Sex Objects: Sexism in Spike Lee's Malcolm X." (By Any Reviews Necessary: Malcolm X Symposium) Cineaste v19, n4 (Fall, 1992):13 (3 pages).
UC users only

Horne, Gerald.
"Myth" and the Making of "Malcolm X.". American Historical Review v98, n2 (April, 1993):440 (11 pages).
UC users only
"Credits Spike Lee, in his 1992 film Malcolm X, with having posed a powerful alternative rendering of postwar black history to challenge the established central narrative of the civil rights movement. The author laments nevertheless that neither of these constructions comes to grips with an important but neglected chapter of African-American history: the fate of the black Left represented by W. E. B. Du Bois, Paul Robeson, Ben Davis, Claudia Jones, and many others. The repression of the black Left in connection with the Cold War undermined internationalism among African Americans and provided fertile ground for the growth of narrow black nationalisms that were regarded by the power elites as less threatening." [ABC-CLIO America History and Life]

Horovwitz, Bruce.
"When X equals $." (marketing of Spike Lee's film, 'Malcolm X')Los Angeles Times v111 (Tue, Nov 3, 1992):D1, col 2, 31 col in.

Jacoby, Tamar.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)Commentary v95, n2 (Feb, 1993):27 (5 pages).

Johnson, Brian D. "Malcolm X." (movie reviews)
Maclean's v105, n47 (Nov 23, 1992):68 (2 pages).

Jones, Jacquie.
"Spike Lee Presents Malcolm X: The New Black Nationalism." (By Any Reviews Necessary: Malcolm X Symposium) Cineaste v19, n4 (Fall, 1992):9 (3 pages).
UC users only

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) New Republic v207, n26 (Dec 21, 1992):26 (2 pages).

Kennedy, Lisa.
"Is Malcolm X the Right Thing?" (the making of the movie and analysis of director Spike Lee's body of work) (Cover Story)Sight and Sound v3, n2 (Feb, 1993):6 (5 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)Nation v255, n19 (Dec 7, 1992):713 (4 pages).

Lee, Jonathan Scott.
"Spike Lee's Malcolm X as Transformational Object." American Imago, 52.2 (1995) 155-167
UC users only

Lee, Spike.
By any means necessary : the trials and tribulations of the making of Malcolm X-- New York : Hyperion, c1992.
MOFF: PN1997.M256633 L4 1992
PFA : PN1997.M3424 L4

Lester, Julius.
"Black Supremacy and Anti-Semitism: Religion in Malcolm X." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 4. 1993. pp: 16-17.
UC users only

Locke, John.
"Adapting the Autobiography: The Transformation of Malcolm X." Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 4. 1993. pp: 5-7.
UC users only

Locke, J. et al.
" By Any Means Necessary. Malcolm X Symposium." (Special Section).Cineaste XIX/4, 93; p.4-18,20-24.
Nine essays on Spike Lee's "Malcolm X" touch on how the film reflects various cinematic, sociological and political problematics; also incl. recommended readings on the film and an interview with Spike Lee.

Marable, Manning.
"Malcolm as Messiah: Cultural Myth vs. Historical Reality in Malcolm X." Cineaste: America's Leading Magazine on the Art and Politics of the Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 4. 1993. pp: 7-9.
UC users only

Master, Kim.
"By Any Means Necessary"; over-budget and unrepentant, Spike Lee gets his way with 'Malcolm X.' (film producer Spike Lee accuses Warner Brothers of racism when they criticize budgetary overruns of movie) Washington Post v115 (Sun, June 21, 1992):G1, col 2, 62 col in.

Meier, August; Bracey, John.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) Journal of American History v80, n3 (Dec, 1993):1197 (3 pages).
UC users only

Norman, Brian
"Reading a 'Closet Screenplay': Hollywood, James Baldwin's Malcolms and the Threat of Historical Irrelevance." African American Review, vol. 39, no. 1-2, pp. 103-18, Spring 2005.
"Norman attempts to read a "closest screenplay" of James Baldwin's written version of a film about Malcolm X. For Baldwin, his un-filmed screenplay is an index to America's failure to invest in Black history and artistic production. Nevertheless, the awkwardness of a "closest screenplay" becomes a great asset in a text whose very title bespeaks an inability to fit Malcolm X into a narrative location: "One Day, When I was Lost: A Scenario Based on Alex Haley's 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X'." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

Painter, Nell Irvin.
"Malcolm X Across the Genres." (motion picture 'Malcolm X' and book 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X') American Historical Review v98, n2 (April, 1993):432 (8 pages).
UC users only
"Discusses Spike Lee's 1992 feature film Malcolm X, pointing to the film's several fictions and its exclusion of important figures in the actual life of Malcolm Little/X. In this way, the film closely follows the book The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The film explains the genius of the Nation of Islam in rehabilitating incarcerated working-class black men but avoids discussion of the organization's apocalyptic vision of racial formation and redemption. Lee's film stays within Malcolm X's racialized ideologies and fails to transcend the recent black nationalist thinking; it therefore excludes an understanding of the intra-racial divisions that were a leading motif in Malcolm X's life." [ABC-CLIO America History and Life]

Pasternak, Judith.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) Tikkun v8, n2 (March-April, 1993):58 (2 pages).

Powell, Gerald A., Jr.
A rhetoric of symbolic identity : an analysis of Spike Lee's X and Bamboozled Dallas : University Press of America, c2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N4 P68 2004

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) New Yorker v68, n41 (Nov 30, 1992):160 (3 pages).

Reed, Adolph, Jr.
"Trouble with X." (movie reviews)Progressive v57, n2 (Feb, 1993):18 (2 pages).

Reid, Mark A.
"The Brand X of PostNegritude Frontier." Film Criticism vol. 20 no. 1-2. 1995 Fall-1996 Winter. pp: 17-25.
Analyses "Malcolm X" in terms of a theory of the 'postnegritude process' of resistance, negotiation and merchandising as a response to racism.

Rhines, Jesse.
"Spike Lee, Malcolm X, and the Money Game: The Compromises of Crossover Marketing."Cineaste, vol. 19 no. 4. 1993. pp: 17-18.
UC users only

Romeny, Jonathan.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)New Statesman & Society v6, n242 (March 5, 1993):34 (2 pages).

Rosenbaum, Jonathan.
"Hollywood radical (Malcolm X)." In: Movies as politics / Jonathan Rosenbaum. Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P6.R67 1997
Moffitt PN1995.9.P6.R67 1997
PFA PN1995.9.P6.R67 1997 os

Rule, Sheila.
"Malcolm X: The Facts, the Fictions, the Film." (black leader's life and political evolution are subjects of director Spike Lee's new film 'Malcolm X') New York Times v142, sec2 (Sun, Nov 15, 1992):H1(N), H1(L), col 1, 45 col in.

Salamon, Julie.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)Wall Street Journal (Thu, Nov 19, 1992):A13(W), A11(E), col 1, 23 col in.

Sawhill, Ray
"Malcolm Zzzzz..." (Review). Modern Review I/6, Dec-Jan 92-93; p.6-7.

Simon, John.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)National Review v44, n25 (Dec 28, 1992):45 (3 pages).

Slethaug, Gordon E.
"Spike Lee, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X: The Politics of Domination and Difference." In: I sing the body politic : history as prophecy in contemporary American literature / edited by Peter Swirski. Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS169.H5 I2 2009

Steele, Shelby.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)New Republic v207, n26 (Dec 21, 1992):27 (5 pages).

Sterritt, David.
"Behind the 'Malcolm X' Film:" a need to set things straight. (hopes that the film 'Malcolm X' will correct some long standing misconceptions about his life) Christian Science Monitor v84, n253 (Tue, Nov 24, 1992):1, col 1, 33 col in.

Sterritt, David.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v84, n249 (Wed, Nov 18, 1992):14, col 2, 34 col in.

Stevens>Maurice E.
"Subject to countermemory: disavowal and black manhood in Spike Lee's Malcolm X." (III. Dis/Identifications). (African American identity)(Critical Essay) Signs Autumn 2002 v28 i1 p277(26)
UC users only

Taylor, Clyde.
"The Malcolm Ghost In The Media Machine." Black Scholar 1992 22(4): 37-41.
Discusses the life and political thought of black activist Malcolm X as portrayed by filmmaker Spike Lee in his film Malcolm X.

Terry, Gayle Pollard.
"Spike Lee; Espousing the Multiple Messages of his Malcolm X." (Interview) Los Angeles Times v111 (Sun, Nov 29, 1992):M3, col 1, 61 col in.

Thompson, Anne.
"Malcolm, Let's Do Lunch." (Spike Lee plans movie biography of Malcolm X) Mother Jones v16, n4 (July-August, 1991):24 (7 pages).

Trescott, Jacqueline.
"The Battle over Malcolm X;" Spike Lee vs. Amiri Baraka: who should immortalize the man on film, and how?Washington Post v114 (Sun, August 18, 1991):G1, col 2, 56 col in.

Turvey,-Malcolm.
"Black Film Making in the USA: The Case of Malcolm X." Wasafiri: Journal of Caribbean, African, Asian and Associated Literatures and Film, 1993 Autumn, 18, 53-56.

Verniere, James.
"Doing the Job." (director Spike Lee talks about his film Malcolm X) (Cover Story) (Interview)Sight and Sound v3, n2 (Feb, 1993):10 (2 pages).
Discusses Spike Lee's cinematic achievements with particular reference to "Malcolm X", plus the director's comments on this film.

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Spike Lee's Request: Black Interviewers Only." (for interviews about the director and his new movie 'Malcolm X') (Living Arts Pages)New York Times v142 (Thu, Oct 29, 1992):B3(N), C22(L), col 1, 21 col in.

Welsh, James M.
"Malcolm X." (movie reviews)Films in Review v44, n3-4 (March-April, 1993):128 (2 pages).

White, A.
"Malcolm X'd again." In: American movie critics : an anthology from the silents until now / edited by Phillip Lopate. New York : Library of America : Distributed to the trade by Penguin Putnam, c2006.
Main Stack PN1995.A448 2006
Moffitt PN1995.A448 2006
PFA PN1995.A72 2006

Whitaker, Mark.
"Malcolm X: The Black Martyred Hero Still Haunts Our Conscience." A new film burnishes the myth. (Cover Story)Newsweek v120, n20 (Nov 16, 1992):66 (6 pages).

Mo' Better Blues

Anderson, Pat
"Mo' Better Blues." (motion picture review) Films in Review v 41 Nov/Dec 1990. p. 555

Byrd, Rudolph P.
"One meaning of Mo' better blues." In: I call myself an artist: writings by and about Charles Johnson / edited by Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c1999.
Main Stack PS3560.O3735.Z46 1999

Elise, Sharon; Umoja, Adewole.
"Spike Lee Constructs the New Black Man: Mo' Better." (Section II: Black Male Socialization Theory and Concepts) Western Journal of Black Studies v16, n2 (Summer, 1992):82 (8 pages).

Gabbard, Krin
"Signifyin(g) the Phallus: "Mo' Better Blues" and Representations of the Jazz Trumpet." Cinema Journal Vol. 32, No. 1 (Autumn, 1992), pp. 43-62
UC users only

Harrell, Al
"Variations on the Mo' better blues." American Cinematographer v 71 Sept 1990. p. 42-4+

Johnson, Charles Richard
"One meaning of Mo' better blues." In: I call myself an artist : writings by and about Charles Johnson / edited by Rudolph P. Byrd. p. 165-74. Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1999.
Main Stack PS3560.O3735.Z46 1999

Katsahnias, Iannis,
"Mo' Better Blues." (motion picture review)Cahiers du Cinema no437 Nov 1990. p. 80-1

Merod, Jim.
A World Without Whole Notes: The Intellectual Subtext of Spike Lee's 'Blues.' ('Mo' Better Blues')" Boundary 2 v18, n2 (Summer, 1991):238 (14 pages).
UC users only

School Daze

Cousins, Linwood H.
"Black Higher Learnin': Black Popular Culture and the Politics of Higher Education." In: Imagining the academy : higher education and popular culture / edited by Susan Edgerton ... [et al.]. New York : RoutledgeFalmer, 2005.
Educ/Psych LC191.94.I53 2005
Grad Svcs LC191.94.I53 2005
Main Stack LC191.94.I53 2005 Edgerton, Susan (ed.); Holm, Gunilla (ed.); Daspit, Toby (ed.); Farber, Paul (ed.). (2005). Imagining the Academy: Higher Education and Popular Culture. (pp. 247-66). New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer, ix, 284 pp.

Lee, Spike
"Class act." (School daze takes an unorthodox look at black student life) American Film v 13 Jan/Feb 1988. p. 57+

Lee, Spike.
Uplift the Race: The Construction of School Daze / Spike Lee, with Lisa Jones. New York: Simon & Schuster, c1988.
UCB Morrison PN1997.S31353 L41 1988

Lubiano, Wahneema
"But compared to what?: reading realism, representation, and essentialism in School daze, Do the right thing, and the Spike Lee discourse." Black American Literature Forum, Vol. 25, No. 2, Black Film Issue. (Summer, 1991), pp. 253-282.
UC users only

Lubiano, Wahneema
"But compared to what?: reading realism, representation, and essentialism in School daze, Do the right thing, and the Spike Lee discourse." In: Representing Blackness : issues in film and video / edited with an introduction by Valerie Smith. p. 97-122. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c1997. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N4.R47 1997
Moffitt PN1995.9.N4.R47 1997

Lubiano, Wahneema
"But compared to what?: reading realism, representation, and essentialism in School daze, Do the right thing, and the Spike Lee discourse." Black American Literature Forum 25:2 [Summer 1991]
"The Spike Lee discourse and his production offer a site for examining possibilities of oppositional, resistant, or subversive cultural production as well as the problems of productions that are considered oppositional, resistant, or subversive without accompanying analysis sustaining such evaluation." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

Lynton, Linda
"School Daze: black college is background." American Cinematographer v 69 Feb 1988. p. 67-72

Reynaud, Berenice
"School Daze." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no406 Apr 1988. p. 35-6

Wilson-McCormick, Ketwana
""School Daze": A Reflection - Sixteen Years Later." Black Camera 19:1 [Spring-Summer 2004] p.3-4
UC users only
"Spike Lee's "School Daze," a glimpse into Southern black college life, is discussed. The film, based in part on Lee's own experiences, focuses on various types of prejudices within the black community, including skin color, sexism, economic status, and educational attainment. Looking back on the movie sixteen years after its 1988 release, the issues raised in the film continue to be relevant." [International Index to Black Periodicals]

Thomas, M.
"Linguistic Variation in Spike Lee's School Daze." College English 56 (8): 911-927 DEC 1994

She Hate Me

Ansen, David
"Putting Spike on the Spot; Filmmaker Spike Lee jousts with NEWSWEEK's David Ansen about Lee's latest joint, 'She Hate Me'." (Interview) Newsweek August 16, 2004 p66 (1162 words)
UC users only

Foundas, Scott
"She Hate Me." Variety July 26, 2004 v395 i10 p56(1) (1020 words)

Lane, Anthony.
"Baby Shower." The New Yorker, August 2, 2004 v80 i21 p086
UC users only

Lee, Nathan
"She Hate Me." Film Comment July-August 2004 v40 i4 p74

Spencer, Liese.
"She Hate Me." Sight and Sound. Oct 2004. Vol. 14, Iss. 10; p. 66 (2 pages)
UC users only
"Spike Lee's She Hate Me tells the story of Jack, a biotechnology employee turned full-time sperm donor. There is no emotional or intellectual logic to its many storylines, nothing to be gained from their juxtaposition, and a complete lack of subtlety in their presentation. A fairly gruesome mess of knockabout sex scenes, it is hard to imagine that this film would have been released had it not had Lee's name on it." [Art Index]

Stockwell, Anne
"He don't hate me: Spike Lee gives his most revealing interview ever about homophobia, the down Low, queer bashing, gay parenting, and She Hate Me, his winning new lesbian comedy." (film)(Interview) The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) August 17, 2004 p66(4) (2264 words)
UC users only

Yaffe, David
"Spike Lee's Blind Spots on Lesbianism." Chronicle of Higher Education, vol. 50, no. 48, pp. B12, August 2004.

She's Gotta Have It

Bollag, Brenda.
"NY Independent Cinema at Cannes: Jim Jarmusch's Down by law and Spike Lee's She's Gotta Have It." Film Quarterly XL/2, Winter 86-87; p.11-13.
UC users only
On similar approaches to narrative the two films.

Chevrie, Marc
"She's Gotta Have It." (Review). Cahiers du Cinema no385 June 1986. p. 40

Ferncase, Richard K.
"Brooklyn broach: She's gotta have it (1986)." In: Outsider features : American independent films of the 1980s / Richard K. Ferncase. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1996.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.F44 1996
PFA PN1993.5.U6.F44 1996

Films & Filming,
"She's Gotta Have It." (Review). Feb 87. (Short Review)./389, Feb 87; p.42-43. illus., cred.

Films in Review,
"She's Gotta Have It." (Review). XXXVII/11, Nov 86; p.549-550.

Fusco, Coco.
"She's Gotta Have It." (Review). Cineaste XV/3, 87; p.24. illus., cred.

Glicksman, Marlaine
"Lee way." (interview with Spike Lee) Film Comment v 22 Sept/Oct 1986. p. 46-9
"Part of a special section on up-and-coming film directors. Spike Lee's first feature film, She's Gotta Have It, is a unique treatment of an age-old subject: the discrepancies that exist both between the sexes and in the judgments rendered by society. Made by the 29-year-old filmmaker in 12 days on an $18,000 grant, the film focuses on the love life of Nola Darling, a young black woman who possesses what can be called a man's desire, and the three suitors who each long to possess her exclusively. The film displays a warm and generous sense of humor. All the characters are black, and, unlike those in most other films, they are real, believable people who speak black dialect intelligently. In an interview, Lee discusses the making and meaning of the film." [Art Index]

Katsahnias,-Iannis
"She's Gotta Have It." (Review) Cahiers du Cinema no391 Jan 1987. p. 46-7

Milne, Tom
"She's Gotta Have It." (Review). Monthly Film Bulletin LIV/638, Mar 87; p.85-86.

Perkins, E.
"Renewing the African American Cinema: The Films of Spike Lee."Cineaste XVII/4, 90; p.4-8. Discusses S.L.'s career, characterizing his work as heralding a rebirth of black US cinema; incl. brief analyses of "She's Gotta Have It", "School Daze" and "Do the Right Thing".

Reynaud, Berenice
"She's Gotta Have It." (Review) Afterimage v 14 Dec 1986. p. 3-4

Simmonds, Felly Nkweto
""She's Gotta Have It": The Representation of Black Female Sexuality on Film." Feminist Review, No. 29. (Summer, 1988), pp. 10-22.
UC users only

Stanton, Louise
"She's Gotta Have It." Films in Review v 37 Nov 1986. p. 549-50

Tate, G.
"Spike Lee." American Film XI/10, Sept 86; p.48-49. Brief profile of filmmaker S.L. and production report on "She's gotta have it".

Wallace, Michele.
"Doin' the right thing: ten years after She's gotta have it." In: Dark designs and visual culture / Michele Wallace. Durham : Duke University Press, 2004.
Main Stack E185.86.W344 2004

Summer of Sam

Ansen, David
"Spike Stew: Lee's 'Summer' gumbo." Newsweek, July 12, 1999 v134 i2 p65
UC users only

Bailey, Beth; Farber, David.
"Summer of Sam." (Review) (movie review) Journal of American History v86, n3 (Dec, 1999):1447 (2 pages).

Bailey, Beth; David Farber
"Summer of Sam." The Journal of American History, Vol. 86, No. 3, (Dec., 1999), pp. 1447-1448.
UC users only

Feinstein, Howard
"Summer of Spike." (Review) The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) July 6, 1999 p57
UC users only

Flory, Dan
"The epistemology of race and Black American film noir : Spike Lee's Summer of Sam as lynching parable." In: Film and knowledge : essays on the integration of images and ideas / edited by Kevin L. Stoehr. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2002.
Main Stack PN1994.S8176 2002
PFA PN1994.F4255 2002
Critical race theorists Charles Mills, Lewis Gordon, and David Theo Goldberg have sketched an epistemology of racialized thinking such that whiteness is characterized as a cognitive blindness with respect to the moral. Not knowing the relevant moral facts due to white privilege thus obscures knowing what the proper moral action is. The essay argues that, similarly, Spike Lee's film noir-influenced Summer of Sam critiques a group of young white men whose fear of difference prevents them from recognizing the relevant moral facts. The film thus performs philosophical work by broadening criticisms of race to include analyzing fear of difference.

Flory, Dan
"Race and Black American film noir : Summer of Sam as lynching parable." In: The Spike Lee reader Edited by Paula J. Massood. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2007, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.L44 S65 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0718/2007021066.html

Kehr, Dave
"Summer of Sam." (motion picture review) Film Comment v 35 no4 July/Aug 1999. p. 75.
"Spike Lee's Summer of Sam, set in summer 1977 among mainly Italian-American characters in New York City, examines the breakdown of social order. The movie is mainly centered around the contrast between two characters: the continually unfaithful Vinny, played by John Leguizamo, and the romantic and responsible Ritchie, played by Adrien Brody. Their story unfolds against the background of a series of sex-related killings carried out by a psychotic gunman who calls himself Son of Sam. Lee's composition leaves something to be desired because his climaxes tend to get misplaced in the general commotion of the movie. Although his episodes of formal invention create vibrant, localized effects, their style ultimately remains more suited to television commercials and music videos." [Art Index]

Macnab, Geoffrey,
"Summer of Sam." (motion picture review)Sight and Sound ns10 no2 Feb 2000. p. 57-8.
UC users only
"This sprawling, brilliantly acted character study is set in the New York during the heatwave of 1977 when serial killer David Berkowitz was terrorizing the city. Director Lee's real focus is on the relationships between members of a close-knit neighborhood in the Bronx, however, and in one of his best movies yet, he touches on love, friendship, and betrayal.'" [Art Index]

Massood, Paula J.
"Summer of Sam." (motion picture review) Cineaste v 25 no2 2000. p. 62-4.
UC users only
"A review of the video release Summer of Sam, directed by Spike Lee. Combining the actual story of David Berkowitz, or the Son of Sam, who went on a cross-borough killing spree, with fictional characters to create what can only be called an impressionistic history of the events of the summer of 1977, the film demonstrates what happens once New York's system of separate ethnic and racial enclaves is disrupted criminally, sexually, culturally, racially or ethnically." [Art Index]

"One Crazy 'Summer': Spike Lee's new film revisits the Son of Sam--whether we want to or not." (Nation) Newsweek July 5, 1999 v134 i1 p22
UC users only

Pizzello, Stephen.
"Spike Lee's seventies flashback." American Cinematographer v 80 no6 June 1999. p. 50-2.
UC users only
"In an interview, director Spike Lee discusses a range of topics regarding his latest motion picture, Summer of Sam. These topics include the film's significance in terms of its portrayal of how David Berkowitz's serial killings in New York in the summer of 1977 affected and changed the lives of eight million citizens, Lee's emphasis on the media's presentation and distortion of the event, the research he carried out in preparation for the movie, his work with director of photography Ellen Kuras, and the very fast pace he maintains on the set." [Art Index]

Slocum, J. David
"Summer of Sam." The American Historical Review, Vol. 104, No. 4. (Oct., 1999), pp. 1429-1430.
UC users only

Thompson, Andrew O.
"Psycho killer." American Cinematographer v 80 no6 June 1999. p. 38-42+.
UC users only
"The work of director of photography Ellen Kuras for Spike Lee's new motion picture Summer of Sam is discussed. The movie uses a memorable piece of New York history as its backdrop: David Berkowitz's serial killings of women with long brunette hair, perpetrated in the city between July 1976 and August 1977. The frenzy surrounding the killings is used as a sounding board for Lee's themes of social conformity and media-fueled paranoia. To achieve an imagery suggestive of the sweltering summer of 1977, Kuras used a mix of stocks to shoot the film, as well as antique suede filters--used in front of the lens during day shooting--and a color palette of mostly burnt orange, red, and yellow. The lenses used included Zeiss Superspeeds, Zeiss Standards, and two Cooke zooms. A number of Lee's trademark shots were used throughout, including moving dolly shots." [Art Index]

Travers, Peter. Summer of Sam.(Review) Rolling Stone, n818 (August 5, 1999):80 (1 page).

The 25th Hour

Cañadas, Ivan
"Spike Lee's 'Uniquely American [Di]vision': Race and Class in 25th Hour." Bright Lights Film Journal, vol. 63, 2009 Feb

Corliss, Richard.
"25th Hour: STARRING: Edward Norton, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Barry Pepper DIRECTED BY: Spike Lee.(Arts/Holiday Movie Preview)(Movie Review)." Time 160.26 (Dec 23, 2002): 72.
UC users only

Gilbey, Ryan.
"25th Hour.(Reviews)(Movie Review)." Sight and Sound 13.3 (March 2003): 58(1).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Beauty Among the Ruins: Redemption is a mirage in post- 9/11 New York, and on the Iran-Iraq border.(25th Hour)(Movie Review)." Maclean's (Jan 20, 2003): 45.

Kermode, Mark.
"Spike Lee's films provoke and perplex. He has even been accused of "recycling racial trash". But it is this uneasiness that makes his work unmissable. (The Back Half).(Movie Review)." New Statesman (1996) 132.4634 (April 21, 2003): 38(2).
UC users only

Klawans, Stuart.
"The year in pictures.(Gangs of New York, 25th Hour)(Movie Review)." The Nation 276.3 (Jan 27, 2003): 36.
UC users only

Taubin, Amy.
"Going down.(analysis of Spike Lee's new film, '25th Hour')." Sight and Sound 13.4 (April 2003): 12(4).
Spike Lee's new film, '25th Hour' is the first major motion picture to be shot in post 9/11 New York. The article examines the process of updating the screenplay to include the collapse and aftermath of the World Trade Center, and the effect of those events on the film industy in New York.

When the Levees Broke

Aftab, Kaleem
"Interview: America's greatest disaster." Sight & Sound v. ns17 no. 1 (January 2007) p. 45
UC users only
"In an interview, filmmaker Spike Lee discusses the making of his documentary about the destruction of New Orleans, Mississippi, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts. Topics addressed include the importance of researcher Judy Avey to the project, why the film was made in four acts, the reason for describing the film as a requiem, the government's slow response to the disaster in New Orleans, and Lee's new dramatic series called NoLa." [Art Index]

Bowman, Michael S.; Bowman, Ruth Laurion.
"Telling Katrina Stories: Problems and Opportunities in Engaging Disaster." Quarterly Journal of Speech, Nov2010, Vol. 96 Issue 4, p455-461, 7p
UC users only

Callenbach, Ernest
"When the Levees Broke." Film Quarterly v. 60 no. 2 (Winter 2006/2007) p. 4-10
UC users only
"When the Levees Broke is an emotionally draining reminder that Hurricane Katrina is an ominous signature moment" for the future of the country. A monumentally effective account of the human cost of the greatest natural disaster in U.S. history, Spike Lee's film is also a call to meditation and reflection. It offers testimonies rather than a voice of God to outline the significance of events. Working in a social context far broader than that of any of his features, Lee intertwines his stories to create a heartbreaking landscape of loss, anger, and also defiance." [Art Index]

Doherty, Thomas; Toplin, Robert Brent.
"When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts." Journal of American History, Dec2006, Vol. 93 Issue 3, p997-999
UC users only

Foster, Kevin Michael; Blakes, Tifani; Mckay, Jenny.
"Documenting Tragedy and Resilience: The Importance of Spike Lee's When the Levees Broke." Urban Education, Jul2008, Vol. 43 Issue 4, p488-496

Parasher, Prajna.
"Specters and Images: When the Levees Broke - A Requiem in Four Acts." International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies, Jun2011, Vol. 8 Issue 2, p162-174, 13p
UC users only

Sicinski, M.
"When the Levees Broke." Cineaste v. 32 no. 1 (Winter 2006) p. 54-6
UC users only

Taubin, A.
"This Is America" [S. Lee's When the levees broke]. Film Comment v. 43 no. 1 (January/February 2007) p. 47-8
"Part of a special section on the movie highlights of 2006. Spike Lee's documentary When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts was the year's most damning indictment of the government's negligence. The story of the flooding of New Orleans and its after effects is presented more or less chronologically. Acts One and Two look at the period from the first warnings about Hurricane Katrina to the beginning of the evacuation of the survivors five days after the levees gave way and the city flooded. Acts Three and Four follow the stories of the survivors into the spring of 2006 and also delve further into the failures of government agencies, primarily the Army Corps of Engineers and FEMA. What makes the film an invaluable document and an indelible emotional experience are the interviews with survivors of the disaster, some of whom lost everything." [Art Index]

Walker, Janet.
"Moving testimonies and the geography of suffering: Perils and fantasies of belonging after Katrina." Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, Feb2010, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p47-64, 18p
UC users only

Weik von Mossner, Alexa.
"Reframing Katrina: The Color of Disaster in Spike Lee's When the Levees Broke." Environmental Communication, Jun2011, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p146-165, 20p
UC users only





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