Reality TV:
A Bibliography of Books and Articles in the
UC Berkeley Libraries












Books
Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual Programs

Books

Andrejevic, Mark
Reality TV : the work of being watched Lanham, Md. ; Oxford : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2004.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 A53 2004
Table of contents via Google Books

Bignell, Jonathan.
Big brother : reality TV in the twenty-first century Basingstoke [UK] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 B54 2005

Biressi, Anita
Reality TV : realism and revelation London : Wallflower, 2005.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 B57 2005

Brenton, Sam.
Shooting people : adventures in reality TV London ; New York : Verso, 2003.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 B74 2003
Contents via Google Books

Brown, Laura S.
"Outwit, Outlast, Out-Flirt? The Women of Reality TV." In: Featuring females : feminist analyses of media / edited by Ellen Cole and Jessica Henderson Daniel. 1st ed. Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, 2005.
Main Stack P94.5.W65.F43 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip058/2005004592.html
"Because of the huge variability in genre, it can be difficult to make sweeping generalizations about women in reality TV. It is still possible to observe some apparently common themes emerging from the reality shows. Reality shows do a remarkable job of reflecting the social construction of gender within dominant culture. In that regard, no matter how contrived the story lines, the stereotypes of women on reality shows appear highly consistent with those seen in other aspects of popular media. These images arise from the decision of producers and editors about who will appear and how they will appear. The author has sampled this genre extensively, watching multiple episodes of most of the shows that are discussed in this paper as well as reading show-related chat rooms, both official and unofficial, and websites. This sampling has not been systematic, nor does the author's speculations in this analysis represent formal research; rather, they are the views of an observer informed by 30 years of feminist psychology, seasoned with the real-life experience of work on one such show." [PsychInfo]

Brown, Laura S.
"The women of reality TV." In: Featuring females : feminist analyses of media / edited by Ellen Cole and Jessica Henderson Daniel. Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, 2005.
Main Stack P94.5.W65.F43 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip058/2005004592.html

Creed, Barbara.
"Big brother : peep shows to reality TV." In: Media matrix : sexing the new reality Crows Nest, NSW : Allen & Unwin, 2003.
Main Stack P96.S45.C74 2003
Contents: Film and fantasy : the perverse gaze -- Big brother : peep shows to reality TV -- Television and taboo : the limits of Sex and the city -- Women and post-porn : Romance to Annie Sprinkle -- The full monty : postmodern men and the media -- Mills & Boon dot com : the beast in the bedroom -- Cybersex : from television to teledildonics -- Queering the media : a gay gaze -- The cyberstar : digital pleasures and the new reality -- Crisis TV : terrorism and trauma -- The global self and the new reality.

Day, Nancy.
Sensational TV : trash or journalism? Published: Springfield, N.J. : Enslow, c1996.
MAIN: PN1992.8.S37 D38 1996

Docufictions : essays on the intersection of documentary and fictional filmmaking
Edited by Gary D. Rhodes and John Parris Springer. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2006.
These 18 essays examine the relationships between narrative fiction films and documentary filmmaking. Topics include the docudrama in early cinema, the industrial film as faux documentary, the fear evoked in 1950s science fiction films, the selling of "reality" in mockumentaries, and reality television and documentary forms
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.D62 D63 2006
Moffitt PN1995.9.D62 D63 2006
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.D62 D63 2006

Dovey, Jon.
Freakshow : first person media and factual television London ; Sterling, Va. : Pluto Press, 2000.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 D68 2000

Doyle, Aaron.
Arresting images : crime and policing in front of the television camera Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, 2003.
MAIN: HM1206 .D69 2003

Entertaining crime : television reality programs
Mark Fishman and Gray Cavender, editors. New York : Aldine de Gruyter, c1998.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 E58 1998

Fetveit, Arild
"Reality TV in the digital era: a paradox in visual culture?" Media, Culture & Society, Vol. 21, No. 6, 787-804 (1999)
UC users only
"The simultaneous proliferation of digital image manipulation and reality TV seems somewhat paradoxical. The death of photography is proclaimed at a time when the use of cameras to produce visible evidence is approaching an all-time high. This coexistence, it is argued, testifies to a transmutation within our visual culture. The credibility of photographical discourses has become less dependent upon common technological features and more based upon institutional warrant related to specific photographical practices. Thus, the recent efforts to negotiate and communicate standards for such practices within newsrooms and other institutions. It is further suggested that the proliferation of reality TV might be read partly as a symptom of unsettled issues in this transmutation. More precisely, it might express a longing for a lost touch with reality, prompted by the undermining of indexicality." [Sage]

Fleiss, Mike
"Reality Television." In: What's next : the experts' guide : predictions from 50 of America's most compelling people / Jane Buckingham with Tiffany Ward. New York : Harper, c2008.
Business & Economics E169.12 .B782 2008

Freeland, Cynthia
"Ordinary Horror on Reality TV." In: Narrative across Media: The Languages of Storytelling. (pp. 244-66). Lincoln, NE: U of Nebraska P, vi, 422 pp.
MAIN: PN212 .N3727 2004; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip046/2003015225.html

Glynn, Kevin
Tabloid culture : trash taste, popular power, and the transformation of American television Durham : Duke University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 G59 2000

Helms, Gabriele
"Reality TV Has Spoken: Auto/Biography Matters." In: Tracing the Autobiographical / edited by Marlene Kadar ... [et al.]. Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2005.
Main Stack PN56.A89.T72 2005

Hill, Annette.
Reality TV : audiences and popular factual television London ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 H55 2005
MOFF: PN1992.8.R43 H55 2005;
Contents via Google Books

How real is reality TV? : essays on representation and truth
Ddited by David S. Escoffery. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2006.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 H69 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0614/2006017326.html

Huff, Richard M.
Reality television Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2006.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 H84 2006
MOFF: PN1992.8.R43 H84 2006
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip069/2006007247.html

Jenkins, Henry
Convergence culture : where old and new media collide / Henry Jenkins. New York : New York University Press, 2006.
Moffitt P94.65.U6.J46 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip069/2006007358.html

Jermyn, Deborah
Crime watching : investigating real crime TV London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York : Distributed in the U.S. by Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
Main Stack PN1992.8.T78.J46 2007
Contents: The birth of Crimewatch UK: contextualising the rise of real crime TV -- From 'public service' to 'fear of crime': television, anxiety and crime appeal programming -- The persistence of vision: photography, temporality and the TV crime appeal -- Someone to watch over me: CCTV and surveillance in real crime TV -- Pleasure, fear and fortitude: women watching Crimewatch UK -- Negotiating boundaries in real crime and reality TV.

Kavka, Misha.
Reality television, affect and intimacy : reality matters / Misha Kavka. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire [England] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.R43 K38 2008

Kilborn, R. W.
Staging the real : factual TV programming in the age of Big Brother Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York, NY : Distributed exclusively in the U.S.A. by Palgrave, 2003.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 K55 2003

Kraidy, Marwan
"Critical transculturalism and Arab reality television: a preliminary theoretical exploration." In: Global communications : toward a transcultural political economy / edited by Paula Chakravartty and Yuezhi Zhao. Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks JA85 .G56 2008

Larson, Stephanie Greco
"Reality" television, American myths and racial ideology." In: Media & minorities : the politics of race in news and entertainment Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, c2006.
MAIN: Main Stack PN1995.9.M56.L37 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip057/2005003589.html

Lasorsa, Dominic, et al.
"Television visual violence in reality programs : differences across genres." In: Television violence and public policy / edited by James T. Hamilton. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998.
Main Stack PN1992.8.V55.T46 1998

Makeover television : realities remodelled
Edited by Dana Heller. London : I. B. Tauris, c2007.
Main Stack PN1992.8.R43.M35 2007
Contents: Introduction: reading the makeover / Dana Heller -- Programming reality: control societies, new subjects and the powers of transformation / Jack Z. Bratich -- Mapping genres: broadcaster and audience perceptions of makeover television / Caroline Dover and Annette Hill -- 'Old, new, borrowed, blue': makeover television in British primetime / Nigel Morris -- Life swap: celebrity expert as lifestyle adviser / Helen Powell and Sylvie Prasad -- Make me a celebrity: celebrity exercise videos and the origins of makeover television / Vanessa Russell -- Dressing down: the Chaotic camcorder makeover of a pop star and popular genre / Jennifer Gillan -- Faking it and the transformation of identity / Joanne Morreale -- Self-made women: cosmetic surgery shows and the construction of female psychopathology / Elizabeth Atwood Gailey -- A perfect lie: visual (dis)pleasures and policing femininity in Nip/tuck / Kim Akass and Janet McCabe -- The gentle art of manscaping: lessons in hetero-masculinity from the Queer eye guys / Joanna L. Di Mattia -- Makeover morality and consumer culture / Guy Redden -- Extreme makeover: home edition: an American fairy tale / Gareth Palmer -- 'Now I am ready to tell how bodies are changed in to different bodies...' Ovid, The metamorphoses / Kathryn Fraser -- 'Makeover madness': the designable body and cosmetic surgery in Steven Meisel's fashion photography / Anne Jerslev.

Ouellette, Laurie.
Better living through reality TV : television and post-welfare citizenship / Laurie Ouellette and James Hay. Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.R43 O84 2008

Politicotainment : television's take on the real
Edited by Kristina Riegert. New York : Peter Lang, c2007.
MAIN: PN1992.6 .P63 2007; View
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0617/2006022467.html

Pullen, Christopher
Documenting gay men : identity and performance in reality television and documentary film Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2007.
MAIN: HQ76.2.U5 P85 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip075/2006038029.html
This book charts an evolution in gay identity within American reality television and documentary film. Through focusing on the performative potential of gay men, it examines the emergence of the independent gay citizen as a bold new voice rejecting subjugation within the media

Reality squared : televisual discourse on the real
Edited by James Friedman. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R4 R43 2002

Reality TV : remaking television culture
Edited by Susan Murray and Laurie Ouellette. New York : New York University Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.R43 R45 2009
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 R45 2004 [earlier edition]
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0410/2003023814.html

Roman, James W.
"Reality TV : surviving the trend." In: From daytime to primetime : the history of American television programs Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2005.
Main Stack PN1992.3.U5.R64 2005
Moffitt PN1992.3.U5.R64 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0418/2004014142.html

Rosenberg, Howard
"The blurred lines of today's "reality". In: Not so prime time : chasing the trivial on American television Chicago : Ivan R. Dee, 2004.
Main Stack PN1992.5.U5.R67 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/fy051/2004045538.html

The spectacle of the real : from Hollywood to 'reality' TV and beyond
Edited by Geoff King. Bristol, UK ; Portland, OR : Intellect, 2005.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 S64 2005

Streitmatter, Rodger.
"Reality Television." In: Sex sells! : the media's journey from repression to obsession Cambridge, MA : Westview Press, 2004.
Moffitt P96.S45.S77 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0420/2004017383.html

Survivor lessons : essays on communication and reality television
Edited by Matthew J. Smith and Andrew F. Wood. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Company, Inc., c2003.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 S87 2003
Includes bibliographical references and index. I. Lessons about reality ; 1. Individual and cultural identity in the world of reality television / Terri Toles Patkin ; 2. Contrived television reality: Survivor as a pseudo-event / April L. Roth ; 3. Who owns your personality: reality television and publicity rights / Debora Halbert ; 4. From Dragnet to Survivor: historical and cultural perspectives on reality television / Sean Baker -- II. Lessons about playing social games ; 5. Reel life: the social geometry of reality shows / Ellis Godard ; 6. The nonverbal communication of trustworthiness: a necessary Survivor skill / R. Thomas Boone ; 7. Metaphors of survival: a textual analysis of the decision-making strategies of the Survivor contestants / Kathleen M. Propp ; 8. Survivor, social choice, and the impediments to political rationality: reality TV as social science experiment / Ed Wingenbach -- III. Lessons beyond the lens ; 9. Mutual metaphors of Survivor and office politics: images of work in popular Survivor criticism / Jennifer Thackaberry ; 10. Self-help for savages: the "other" Survivor, primitivism, and the construction of American identity / Steven S. Vrooman ; 11. The communication ethics of Survivor / Marilyn Fuss-Reineck ; 12. Traveling the terrain of screened realities: our reality, our television / Marcy R. Chvasta and Deanna L. Fassett.

Trend, David.
"Reality Television." In: The myth of media violence : a critical introduction / David Trend. Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks P96.V5 T74 2007

Understanding reality television
Edited by by Su Holmes and Deborah Jermyn. London ; New York : Routledge, 2004.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 U53 2004

Journal Articles

Adam, D.
"Reality TV show ["The Experiment"] recreates famed social study." [Zimbardo study] Nature 417 (6886): 213-213 MAY 16 2002

Aslama, Minna; Pantti, Mervi
"Talking Alone: Reality TV, Emotions and Authenticity." European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 167-184, May 2006
"This article examines reality TV as an illustration of contemporary confessional culture in which the key attraction is the disclosure of true emotions. This article hopes to contribute to the understanding of the production of self-disclosure through a formal analysis of international & domestic dating, adventure & lifestyle-oriented reality shows broadcast on Finnish television between 2002 & 2004. The diverse programmes verify that reality TV shows capitalize on a variety of talk situations within one programme, but it is the monologue that is used as a truth-sign of direct access to the authentic. We also suggest that the power of monologue in the reality genre promotes the transformation of television from a mass medium to first-person medium addressing masses of individuals." [Sociological Abstracts]

Aslama, Minna; Pantti, Mervi
"Flagging Finnishness: Reproducing national identity in reality television." Television & New Media, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 49-67, 2007
"The worldwide success of reality television has received plenty of academic and public attention. All the debates seem both implicitly and explicitly to address reality TV as a global phenomenon, but little attention has been given to any national characteristics that may emerge in its localized variations. In this article, using a Finnish adventure show Extreme Escapades as a case, the authors argue that national television still plays an important role in constructing national identities; that reality television as a popular cultural product should be viewed in the context of “banal nationalism” and that the genre may indeed redefine the meaning of national television in the globalized media sphere." [Communication Abstracts]

Bannett, Jeffrey A.
"In defense of Gaydar: Reality television and the politics of the glance." Critical Studies in Media Communication 23.5 (Dec 2006): 408(18).
"The reality shows like Boy Meets Boy and Playing it Straight have exposed the difficulties of determining sexual orientation with Gaydar by highlighting stereotypes typically associated with other gay and straight men. Such programs seemingly promote the interests and well-being of stigmatized citizens at the expense of forgetting experiences that have helped people of many ages, races, classes, and sexualities stay alive."

Barton, Kristin
"Reality Television Programming and Diverging Gratifications: The Influence of Content on Gratifications Obtained." By: M.. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Jul2009, Vol. 53 Issue 3, p460-476, 17p

Baruh, Lemi.
"Publicized intimacies on reality television: an analysis of voyeuristic content and its contribution to the appeal of reality programming.(Report)." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media - June 2009 v53 i2 p190(21)
UC users only

Bondebjerg, I.
"Public discourse/private fascination: hybridization in "true-life story" genres." Media, Culture & Society, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 27-45, Jan. 1996
UC users only
"The increase in forms of television programs with blurred borderlines and hybrid genre formats makes it necessary to look at the interaction between private and public discourses and at the pragmatic dimension of reception, which is the aim of this essay. Tabloid journalism, or soft, human interest journalism, has arrived on television, and private life stories have been lifted into public discourses, changing the established forms of journalism. At the same time, new forms of television documentary-building on the documentary film traditionhave emerged, where hybridization of factual forms and fictional elements are found. It can either take the form of observation, voyeuristic images of "back stage" (Meyrowitz 1985) social and private life, dramatized true-life narratives, or highly meta-communicative forms of play with factuality and objectivity. It is not possible to formulate one very negative or very positive conclusion on the true-life story formats and the hybridization of recent television genres. One element in the explanation and evaluation of developments is the following: What is taking place is an updating of a paternalistic public service discourse to include a more democratic selection of topics and voices outside the traditionally defined area of public interest. On the other hand, these tendencies are also clearly a product of commercialism, namely, of the exploitation of all areas of life for entertainment and for the benefit, not of citizens, but of consumers." [Communication Abstracts]

Boylorn, Robin M.
"As Seen On TV: An Autoethnographic Reflection on Race and Reality Television." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Oct2008, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p413-433, 21p
UCB users only

Brancato, Jim.
"Domesticating Politics: The Representation of Wives and Mothers in American Reality Television." Film & History , Sep2007, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p49-56, 8p
UCB users only

Bratich, Jack Z.
"Nothing Is Left Alone for Too Long”: Reality Programming and Control Society Subjects." Journal Of Communication Inquiry, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 65-83, January 2006
UCB users only
"This article examines reality television as a cultural form of what Gilles Deleuze calls “control societies.” For Deleuze, the shift from disciplinary societies (enclosures, bounded spaces, institutions) to control societies (circuits, modulated spaces, networked relations) is marked by a change in the processes of subjectification. The “postindividual” or the “dividual” is characterized by interchangeability, flexibility, and mobility (in accordance with post-Fordist forms of labor). On reality TV (RTV), subjects nowbecome variables to be replaced, reversed, and transformed. More specifically, individuals' subjective limits are often tested corporeally (challenges on Fear Factor) and affectively (prank shows). We can think of RTV less as a genre than as a loose assemblage of techniques and experiments. I examine a wide range of programs, concentrating on prank shows." [Communication Studies]

Breton, S.
"Together, but alone with television: Talk shows, reality TV, and Pop stars." Esprit (6): 239-246 JUN 2003

Breyer, Richard.
"Reality TV: More Mirror Than Window." World and I 19.01 (Jan 2004): 100.

Butsch, Richard
"Reality TV: Audiences and popular factual television." Journal of Communication Volume 56 Page 226 - March 2006
UC users only
Reviews the book, Reality TV: Audiences and popular factual television by Annette Hill (2005). Reality TV has changed the landscape of American television. It has affected not only American TV but has also had a big impact on British television and has spread to numerous other countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa. In this book the author has produced one of the few studies that focus on audiences of reality TV and perhaps the first book-length study. The author sets the stage for her analysis of audiences with chapters discussing the origins and success of reality TV and discussing its various formats and their relationship to tabloid news, documentary, and popular entertainment. The author focuses on how some major themes in viewers' comments and sentiments varied with the different formats of reality TV. In two chapters, the author discusses the ethics of programs that use ordinary people and analyzes viewers' own interpretations of the ethics involved. In the end, we have a description not easily summarized in a review but one that captures the complexity and messiness of viewers' reality." [PsycINFO]

Caughie, John (ed.)
"Documentary Aesthetics." Screen, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 92-109, Spring 2003.

Cavender G., Bond-Maupin L.
"Fear and Loathing On Reality Television - An Analysis Of America Most Wanted and Unsolved Mysteries." Sociological Inquiry 63 (3): 305-317 SUM 1993

Cavender G., Bond-Maupin L., Jurik NC
"The construction of gender in reality crime TV." Gender & Society 13 (5): 643-663 OCT 1999
UC users only
"This article focuses on the social construction of femininity in a reality television program, America's Most Wanted. The program blurs fact and fiction in reenactments of actual crimes. The analysis focuses on its depiction of women crime victims. A prior study argues that the program empowers women to speak about their victimization. Other research suggests that such programs make women fearful. The authors compare episodes from the 1988-1989 and the 1995-1996 seasons. Although women spoke about their victimization, men spoke more often and presented master narratives about the crimes. In both seasons, the program imagery emphasized feminine vulnerability to violence from strange, devious, and brutal men and masculine technical expertise and authority as women's protection from such violence. [JSTOR]

Dauncey, Hugh
"French 'reality television'." European Journal of Communication Vol XI nr 1 (Mar 1996); p 83-106
Views the growth of such programming on French tv within the industry as a whole, noting the increase in commercialism and move away from purely 'cultural' material.

Deery, June
"Reality TV as advertainment." Popular Communication, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-20, 2004
"So far the dominant new TV genre of the 21st century, Reality TV, provides a clear example of commercial culture in which mediation is primarily designed to sell. Individuals, experiences, and even the medium itself are repeatedly marketed in a genre whose absorption of direct and indirect forms of selling is currently spearheading a conflation of advertising and entertainment. The result is what the industry refers to as "advertainment," programming designed to sell as it entertains. As "branded content," the shows themselves act as marketing vehicles in addition to attracting audiences for spot advertisers. Focusing on the genre's exchange value, this article examines Reality TV's commodification of various aspects of experience from privacy to diversity and, even more pragmatically, its development as a rich advertising vehicle for the digital era. Product placement, sponsorship, and co-production are among the techniques examined. A discussion of Reality TV's core brand identity--a special viewing access--underscores its relation to voyeurism, pornography, and, to spot advertising, all traditional techniques for attracting an audience. In many instances, the genre's high degree of commercialization signals the triumph of the market in one conspicuous area of popular communication." [Communication Abstracts]

Deery, June
"Trading Faces: The Makeover Show as Prime-Time 'Infomercial'." Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 211-14, Summer 2004.

Denham, Bryan E.; Jones, Richelle N.
"Survival of the Stereotypical: A Study of Personal Characteristics and Order of Elimination on Reality Television." Studies in Popular Culture, Spring2008, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p79-99, 21p
UC users only

DeRose, Justin; Fürsich, Elfriede; Haskins, Ekaterina V.
"Pop (Up) Goes the Blind Date: Supertextual Constraints on 'Reality' Television." Journal of Communication Inquiry, Apr2003, Vol. 27 Issue 2, p171, 19p
UC users only

Dhoest, A.
""The Pfaffs are not like the Osbournes": National inflections of the celebrity docusoap." Television & New Media, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 224-245, 2005
UC users only
"This article investigates the ongoing importance of national culture as a context to understand variations in television formats. To this end, it uses the example of the docusoap, a recent addition to the broad category of "reality TV" that crosses the border between fact and fiction and, in particular, between documentary and soap opera. The docusoap conventions have quickly spread internationally, but national variations can be distinguished. To illustrate this point, two "celebrity" docusoaps are analyzed, the American The Osbournes and its Flemish counterpart The Pfaffs. While both shows are superficially similar, they also show many differences, which are partly related to their respective national contexts. Although eccentric, The Osbournes is typically American in several respects, referring to American myths and themes. The Pfaffs, in contrast, are presented as typically Flemish, most clearly through the emphasis on their simplicity and ordinariness. The ensuing differences in tone make the program more authentic to domestic viewers." [Communication Abstracts]

Dixon, Wheeler Winston.
"Hyperconsumption in reality television: The transformation of the self through televisual consumerism." Quarterly Review of Film and Video 25.1 (Jan-March 2008): 52(12).
UC users only
The manner in which television reality shows such as 'Extreme Makeover: Home Edition', 'I Want a Famous Face' and 'The Swan' represent and encourage American consumer culture is analyzed. Such shows create an illusion that transformation of one's 'self' and life is possible through outward aid of capital alone.

Dubrofsky, Rachel E.
"Fallen Women in Reality TV." Feminist Media Studies, Sep2009, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p353-368, 16p
UC users only

Fetveit, A.
"Reality TV in the digital era: a paradox in visual culture?" Media Culture & Society 21 (6): 787+ NOV 1999
UC users only
"The simultaneous proliferation of digital image manipulation and reality TV seems somewhat paradoxical. The death of photography is proclaimed at a time when the use of cameras to produce visible evidence is approaching an all-time high. This coexistence, it is argued, testifies to a transmutation within our visual culture. The credibility of photographical discourses has become less dependent upon common technological features and more based upon institutional warrant related to specific photographical practices. Thus, the recent efforts to negotiate and communicate standards for such practices within newsrooms and other institutions. It is further suggested that the proliferation of reality TV might be read partly as a symptom of unsettled issues in this transmutation. More precisely, it might express a longing for a lost touch with reality, prompted by the undermining of indexicality." [Sage]

Fotinopoulos, Chris.
"Do reality shows teach us anything?." Screen Education 36 (Autumn 2004): 58(2).
UC users only

Garapon, P.
"French variety shows and the current boom of reality TV." Esprit (3-4): 223-230 MAR-APR 2003

Grindstaff, Laura
"Trashy or Transgressive? 'Reality TV' and the Politics of Social Control." Thresholds: Viewing Culture, vol. 9, pp. 46-55, 1995.

Hall, Alice.
"Viewers' perceptions of reality programs." Communication Quarterly 54.2 (May 2006): 191(21).
This article describes a series of focus group interviews of young adults about reality programs. The interviews were conducted to investigate audiences' understandings of the nature, realism, and gratifications of the programming category. A central element defining reality programs was the perception that the behavior of the cast members was a reflection of their own will and personality and that their actions had consequences in terms of the outcome of the show. These factors also contributed to perceptions of the shows' realism. Participants reported enjoying the programs because of their humor and their unpredictability, which seemed to contribute to the creation of suspense and to greater involvement. Implications for further research are discussed. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

Hallenberger, G.
"TV fiction in a reality TV age." Studies in Communication Sciences, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 169-181, 2004
"For some time now, it looks like television fiction has been losing importance. Current trends in television programming belong to the segment of non-fiction--quizzes, real-life soaps, docu-soaps, court shows, casting shows. These types of programs not only pose a threat to television fiction by taking up timeslots formerly occuped by fiction in many countries but also some of them have acquired special importance. Quite a few--like Who Wants to be a Millionaire, broadcast by Germany's market leader RTL, have turned into trademark programs, contributing considerably to the respective station's public image. The position of television fiction is obviously undergoing changes. This essay attempts to examine some of the whys and hows of this process. As today's television is mainly driven by economic considerations, these come first. As an interim result, it will hopefully become apparent that there are in fact good reasons why fiction plays only a minor role in the current development of television content. But--and this is the key argument the author poses--this is only the surface of the process in question. Below that surface, something quite different is happening. As an epilogue, the conclusion puts it in a broader context." [Communication Abstracts]

Harry, Joseph C/
"Cheaters: "Real" Reality Television as Melodramatic Parody." Journal of Communication Inquiry, Jul2008, Vol. 32 Issue 3, p230-248, 19p
UC users only

Hearn, Alison
"Image Slaves: The phenomenon of reality television represents the increasing trend toward the corporate colonization of the 'real.'" Bad Subjects Issue #69, June 2004

Hearn, Alison
"John, a twenty-year old Boston Native with a great sense of humor": on the spectacularization of the self and the incorporation of identity in the age of reality television." International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, 2:2, June 2006.
This essay explores the nature of the labour performed by reality show participants and argues that it involves the self-conscious development and management of public persona based on templates of the ‘self' supplied by corporate media culture. This labour of self-presentation operates simultaneously as work for the television industry and as a form of image-entrepreneurship for the individual participants.

Hearn, Alison
"Insecure: narrative and economies of the branded self on transformation television." Continuum. 22:4, August 2008.

Hight, Craig
"Debating Reality-TV." Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies Volume 15, Number 3 / November 1, 2001, Pages: 389 - 395
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Hird, Christopher
"Tougher Than Fiction." Sight and Sound, vol. 11, no. 11, pp. 5, November 2001.

Holbrook, Alice; Singer, Amy E.
"When Bad Girls Go Good." Journal of Popular Film & Television; Spring2009, Vol. 37 Issue 1, p34-43, 10p
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"This article examines the ways in which VH1's Flavor of Love Girls: Charm School (2007) conceptualized ideas of reality and the self. Drawing upon interviews, theoretical research, and the authors' observations, we find that the ideas of reality and the self that Charm School employed rely on very traditional boundaries between reality and unreality, ordinariness and celebrity. These contrast sharply with ideas of the self and reality propounded by Charm School contestants and, ironically, by reality television in general." [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR][Ebsco]

Holmes, S.
"But this time you choose!": approaching the "interactive" audience in reality TV." International Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 213-232, June 2004
"The concept of interactivity has gained increasing currency in relation to television. At the level of programming, at least, this has been made visible with the rise of reality television. Phrases such as "You decide!" (Big Brother), "But this time you choose!" (Pop Idol), and "If you want to have your say" (The Salon) proliferate in contemporary television, articulating a rhetoric that insists pressingly upon a "new" participatory relationship between viewer and screen. The aim of this article is to consider the political implications of this shift for existing approaches to audience-text relations in television and cultural studies." [Communication Abstracts]

Holmes, Su
""Reality goes pop!": reality TV, popular music, and narratives of stardom in Pop Idol." Television & New Media, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 147-172, May 2004
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"The reality pop programs began with the New Zealand (in 1999) and Australian Popstars (in 2000) and the phenomenally successful format then traveled around the globe, creating groups in Belgium, the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Japan, Argentina, the United States, France, and Ireland. Popstars (on ITV1) began in the United Kingdom in January 2001-ultimately creating the now defunct band Hear'say-and was rapidly followed by the domestic spinoffs Soapstars (on ITV1 in 2001) and Pop Idol (on ITV1) and, most recently, the second series of the Popstars franchise, Popstars: The Rivals (on ITV1 in 2001). The reality pop programs Popstars (broadcast in 2000 in the United Kingdom) and Pop Idol (broadcast in 2001-2002 in the United Kingdom) have occupied a central place in the phenomenal rise of reality TV. More specifically, with their bid to place the entire notion of stardom at center stage, they raise important methodological and theoretical issues concerning the conceptualization of fame in reality TV. A central emphasis of the article is the importance of considering how reality TV demands a more thorough engagement with existing critical and theoretical concepts if the form is to sustain long-term academic analysis. Taking the British series of Pop Idol as the primary focus, the author explores this with respect to the concept of stardom, drawing particularly on the work of Richard Dyer and John Ellis. Pop Idol also raises crucial questions about the politics of interactivity in reality TV, a power dynamic that is ultimately configured around the program's mediation of stardom.." [Communication Abstracts]

Hopson, Mark C.
"'Now Watch Me Dance': Responding to Critical Observations, Constructions, and Performances of Race on Reality Television." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Oct2008, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p441-446, 6p
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Hubbard, Laura; Mathers, Kathryn.
"Surviving American empire in America: The anthropology of reality television." International Journal of Cultural Studies, Dec2004, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p441-459, 19p
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Jagodzinski, Jan
"The Perversity of (Real)ity TV: A Symptom of Our Times." JPCS: Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture & Society, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 320-29, Fall 2003.
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Jagodzinski, Jan
"The Truman Show: a symptom of our times? Or, a cure for an escape attempt!(Article)." Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture & Society 10.1 (April 2005): 61(18).
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"This essay argues from a Lacanian perspective as to why "reality television" has become so pervasive in postmodern consumerist society. Against the widely held claim that such reality programming is democratically therapeutic in its effects to provide citizens a public forum to be seen and heard, another thesis is presented: such television programs reinforce the very perversity they claim to cure. By focusing on the film, The Truman Show, this perversity is exposed through a Lacanian reading of its redemptive fantasy. The essay ends with the question of impossibility: to what extent can the fantasy of "reality television" be traversed?" [Expanded Academic Index]

Javors, Irene Rosenberg.
"Reality TV escape from reality?(Culture Notes)." Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association 7.1 (Spring 2004): 35(1).
"The article reflects on the favorite television programs in America. Reality TV seems to be the favorite flavor of the moment. From "Survivor" to "Extreme Makeover," Americans are consuming these programs as fast as they are being produced. In fact, ratings showed that more Americans watched a recent interview with millionaire hotel heiress Paris Hilton than Diane Sawyer's interview with President George W. Bush after the capture of Saddam Hussein. In a country where there is 24-hour, seven-days-a-week news coverage, Americans are inundated with reporting on just about every subject imaginable. With news programs, it is not enough that there is a reporter narrating the information; there is also often a split screen where an endless ticker-tape of news flashes by. We are in an information glut. We are becoming desensitized to what is happening around us. Desensitization is a psychological defense against an experience of what I term as "too muchness." Paradoxically, we are turning to reality TV as a form of entertainment. Television as a medium offers us enough of a safe distance from reality to allow us to witness it as passive viewers without having to risk anything. As therapists, all of this reality TV needs to serve as an alarm bell ringing out the message: DANGER! The dance between the media and its viewers is rapidly turning into a danse macabre." [PsychInfo]

Johnson, Katie N.
"Televising the Panopticon: The Myth of 'Reality-Based' TV." American Drama, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 1-26, Spring 1999.

Jones, Janet Megan.
"Show Your Real Face: A Fan Study of the UK Big Brother Transmissions (2000, 2001, 2002): Investigating the Boundaries between Notions of Consumers and Producers of Factual Television." New Media & Society, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 400-21, September 2003.

Kachgal, Tara.
""Look at The Real World. There's always a gay teen on there": Sexual citizenship and youth-targeted reality television." Feminist Media Studies; Nov2004, Vol. 4 Issue 3, p361-364, 4p
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Kavka, M.
"The queering of reality TV." Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 220-223, 2004
"We tend to assume, not without good reason, that reality television programs reflect the status quo of their culture of production, the author notes in this article. Hence, in American programming, the token black participants on Survivor or Big Brother (one from each sex, of course), the automatic equation of stand-out pecs and cleavage with standards of attractiveness, the assumption that external modeling (of houses or bodies) makes for internal improvements, even the braying repetitions of reality televison vocabulary such as "It's just a game" and "being on a journey." Such normative touchstones are necessary for reality television to uphold its claim of showing ordinary people, and criticism of reality TV prods a skeptical finger not only at the assumption that the bodies and situations seen on the screen are ordinary but also at the conflation of normative values with such questionable representations of "reality." At the same time, however, such programs are structurally dependent on a heightening element to transform representations of the ordinary from the unwatchable to something worth watching." [Communication Abstracts]

Kilborn, Richard
"'How Real Can You Get?': Recent Developments in 'Reality' Television." European Journal of Communication, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 421-39, December 1994.
Examines significant features of 'reality' programming and considers reasons for its popularity.
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Kilborn, Richard
"Reality TV: The work of being watched." Media, Culture & Society 27 (4): 624-626 JUL 2005

Kjus, Yngvar
"Everyone Needs Idols : Reality Television and Transformations in Media Structure, Production and Output." European Journal of Communication; Sep2009, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p287-304, 18p

Kohm, Steven A.
"The people's law versus Judge Judy justice: two models of law in American reality-based courtroom TV." Law & Society Review 40.3 (Sept 2006): 693-727.

Kraidy, Marwan.
"Reality Television, Gender, and Authenticity in Saudi Arabia." Journal of Communication, Jun2009, Vol. 59 Issue 2, p345-366, 22p
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Lauzen, Martha M., David M. Dozier, and Elizabeth Cleveland.
Genre matters: an examination of women working behind the scenes and on-screen portrayals in reality and scripted prime-time programming. " Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 55 (Oct 2006): 445(11).
"A content analysis of prime-time programming on the six US broadcast networks revealed unexpected differences between scripted programs and reality programs. Past research posited and found that women working in powerful behind-the-scenes roles are associated with greater on-screen representation of female characters and more egalitarian portrayals of conflict and its resolution. Although our hypotheses were confirmed for scripted programs, the presence of women behind the scenes on reality programs was negatively related to on-screen representation. Further, women behind the scenes on reality programs were less effective at eliminating gender differences in the portrayal of conflict resolution." [Expanded Academic Index]

Leone, Ron, Wendy Chapman Peek, and Kimberly L. Bissell.
"Reality television and third-person perception.(Survey)." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 50.2 (June 2006): 253(17).
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Lunt, Peter.
"Liveness in Reality Television and Factual Broadcasting." The Communication Review 7.4 (Oct-Dec 2004): 329(7).
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"The emergence of reality TV and the use of live-shot material in documentary programs are salient features of contemporary television, raising a variety of challenges for critical analysis. We present here a number of pieces that reflect on“liveness”in different genres (reality TV, news, and documentary) from diverse theoretical perspectives. In the first paper, Peter Lunt introduces the papers and sets the scene by developing key themes in the analysis of liveness. The papers by Nick Couldry and Jane Roscoe discuss reality TV. John Corner analyzes the use of live-shot material in documentaries. Finally, Thornborrow and Fitzgerald unravel the deployment of devices for representing reports of live events in news." [Expanded Academic Index]

Marc, D.
"Reality TV: Remaking television culture" Television Quarterly 35 (3-4): 81-83 SPR-SUM 2005

Marc, David, and Robert J. Thompson.
"Boring!: How reality programs prospered, proliferated and are now turning off many viewers." Television Quarterly 36.1 (Fall 2005): 36(8).
The 1990s marked a period of unprecedented decay in broadcast journalism, resulting in the freefall of broadcast news standards in prime time. The most successful reality series usually synthesize elements of cinema verite with familiar elements of dramatic genre s.

Marchessault, Janine
"Reflections on the dispossessed: video and the 'Challenge for change' experiment." Screen Vol XXXVI nr 2 (Summer 1995); p 131-146
A consideration of one of the first experiments in reality tv which took place in 1967 in Canada with the instigation by the National Film Board of a 'Challenge for change' programme with its aim of giving the disenfranchised and marginal communities of Canada access to the media.

Mascaro, Thomas A.
"The Network Executive Did It: Law & Order Indicts Network Programming Practices for Ethical Lapses in Reality TV." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 149-57, Winter 2004.
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An analysis of the episode "Swept Away" on NBC's Law & Order illustrates that ethics of entertainment television relates not only to network programming executives but also to producers, crew members, cast, and viewers. Current trends in reality television based on ridicule strain the bounds of what ethical people should consider proper.

Mast, Jelle.
"New directions in hybrid popular television: a reassessment of television mock-documentary." Media, Culture & Society, Mar2009, Vol. 31 Issue 2, p231-250, 20p
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McCarthy, Anna.
"Reality Television: a Neoliberal Theater of Suffering." Social Text, Winter2007, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p17-41, 25p
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McVey, Cynthia.
"Reality bites: do participants in reality TV shows really know what they are getting into? Cynthia McVey argues that informed consent isn't all it's cracked up to be.(Comment and analysis)(Column)." New Scientist 183.2458 (July 31, 2004): 16(1).
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Mendible, Myra
"Humiliation, Subjectivity, and Reality TV." Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 335-38, November 2004.

Metzl, Jonathan
"From scopophilia to Survivor: a brief history of voyeurism." Textual Practice, Volume 18, Number 3, November 2004, pp. 415-434(20)
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"This article traces the history of the term "voyeurism" from its psychoanalytic origins in the 1950s to contemporary uses in popular culture and post-Freudian, biological psychiatry. It begins with an overview of the psychoanalytic foundations of the term, paying particular attention to the ways Freudian theory helped shape clinical definitions of voyeurism in American psychiatry in the mid-twentieth century. Subsequently, it follows popular and psychiatric concepts of voyeurism through the 1970s and 1980s, leading to current TV programmes and internet sites, and definitions of voyeurism in present-day academic psychiatry. Reading against the assumption, common in social science literature, that there are distinct forms of 'pathological' and 'normal' voyeurism, I argue that medical and popular notions of voyeurism developed in relation to one another in ways that help explain their configuration in the present day. Such overlap is evident in many contemporary uses of 'voyeurism' in popular culture, as well as in the (relatively few) psychiatric research articles still concerned with 'voyeurism' as a mental illness. I conclude by arguing for a rethinking of the boundaries of voyeurism, and a rethinking of voyeurism itself, based on consideration of the ways voyeurism is a relational concept forged between medical and popular sensibilities." [Ingenta]

Miller, Edward D.
"Fantasies of Reality: Surviving Reality-Based Programming." Social Policy 31.1 (Fall 2000): 6.
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Mongin, O.
"Reality television in France: Polemics regarding images of violence." Esprit (6): 4-5 JUN 2001

Moorti, Sujata; Ross, Karen
"Reality Television: Fairy Tale or Feminist Nightmare?" Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 203-05, Summer 2004.
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Moseley, Rachel
"Makeover Takeover on British Television." Screen, vol. 41, no. 3, pp. 299-314, Fall 2000.
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Nabi, R.L., E.N. Biely, S.J. Morgan, and C.R. Stitt.
"Reality-Based Television Programming and the Psychology of Its Appeal." Media Psychology 5.4 (Nov 1, 2003): 303(28).
"Despite the general presence of reality-based television programming for more than a decade and its recent increasing popularity, the extant literature on the phenomenon is limited. In Study 1, we considered how the viewing public constructs the so-called genre of reality-based TV. Multidimensional space analysis based on the Q-sort responses of 38 city residents indicated reality-based TV shows (a) are largely distinct from most major programming genres, although they do not form a particularly cohesive genre of their own, and (b) are viewed as only moderately real. In Study 2, we evaluated the lay hypothesis that reality-based TV is popular because it appeals to the voyeuristic nature of the U.S. population. We also considered other gratifications received from viewership as well as personality traits that might predict reality-based TV consumption. The results of a survey of 252 city residents suggested that (a) the role of voyeurism in the appeal of reality-based television is questionable, (b) regular viewers receive different and more varied gratifications from their viewing than do periodic viewers, and (c) impulsivity seeking and need for cognition do not predict overall reality-based TV viewing, although they might predict viewing of particular programs. Future research directions proposed include investigating dimensions that might distinguish different breeds of reality-based programming and studying the more specific cognitive and emotional elements that contribute to the "genre's" appeal." [Expanded Academic Index]

O'Hehir, Andrew
"Reality Bites." Sight and Sound, vol. 12, no. 9, pp. 6, September 2002.

Orbe, Mark P.
"Representations of Race in Reality TV: Watch and Discuss." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Oct2008, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p345-352, 8p

Papacharissi, Zizi, and Andrew L. Mendelson.
"An exploratory study of reality appeal: uses and gratifications of reality TV shows.(Report)." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 51.2 (June 2007): 355(16).

Pelham, Fran
"Reality TV: Taking the Shows to Another Level." Popular Culture Review, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 155-60, Summer 2002.

Penzhorn, Heidi
"The interactive nature of reality television: an audience analysis." Communicare, Dec2006, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p85-102, 18p

Penzhorn, Heidi; Pitout, Magriet.
"A critical-historical genre analysis of reality television." Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory & Research, 2007, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p62-76, 15p

Raphael, Chad
""Political economy of real-TV." Jump Cut nr 41 (May 1997); p 102-109
Offers a rough categorization of reality-based tv programming; sketches the industrial context from which they emerged; points to the economic problems they were meant to solve; and suggests how textual and audience studies might link reality tv to shifts in the US political economy since the mid-1980's.

Reiss, S.; Wiltz, J.
"Why people watch reality TV." Media Psychology, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 363-378, 2004
"Reiss (2000a) put forth a comprehensive theory of human motivation, variously called sensitivity theory or the theory of 16 basic desires. The theory borrows heavily from the philosophical ideas of Aristotle, but it differs from Aristotle in its analysis of individuality. Previous reports on sensitivity theory addressed diverse applications such as spirituality, interpersonal relationships, developmental disabilities, and sports. In this article, the theory is applied to understanding reality television. The authors assessed the appeal of reality television by asking 239 adults to rate themselves on each of 16 basic motives using the Reiss Profile Standardized Instrument and to rate how much they watched and enjoyed various reality television shows. The results suggested that the people who watch reality television had above-average trait motivation to feel self-important and, to a lesser extent, vindicated, friendly, free of morality, secure, and romantic as compared with large normative samples. The results, which were dose dependent, showed a new method for studying media. This method is based on evidence that people have the potential to experience 16 different joys. People prefer television shows that stimulate the feelings they intrinsically value the most, which depends on individuality." [Communication Abstracts]

Ringrose, Jessica; Walkerdine, Valerie.
"Regulating The Abject." Feminist Media Studies; Sep2008, Vol. 8 Issue 3, p227-246, 20p
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In this paper, through an examination of mostly British make-over television programs we examine how the feminine has become a new site of limitless possibility and endless consumption, the fulcrum of intensifying processes of neo-liberal reinvention of continuously making over the self into successful, post-feminist bourgeois subjects. We argue that the central premise of contemporary make-over programs is the question: “Is the transformation of abject subjects possible?” We also suggest the focal object of transformation in many shows is the working class woman who fails both as subject/object of self-reflexivity, desire, and consumption. We argue it is her mind and body that represents a core site of abjection--a subjectivity designated as uninhabitable and therefore also a central site of regulation. It is upon the working class woman's mind and body that the drama of possibility and limitation of neo-liberal reinvention is played out. We also argue that it is perhaps in reference to that which is made abject and uninhabitable that it becomes possible to talk about class as a dynamic of identifying against what we must not be, and which fuels incessant attempts to refashion selves into generalized and normalized bourgeois feminine subjects.

Rose, Randall L., and Stacy L. Wood.
"Paradox and the consumption of authenticity through reality television." Journal of Consumer Research 32.2 (Sept 2005): 284(13).
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"We position reality television within the broader category of consumer practices of authenticity seeking in a postmodern cultural context. The study draws on relevant perspectives from consumer research, literary criticism, sociology, and anthropology to argue that viewers of reality television encounter three elements of paradox in the process of constructing authenticity. The negotiation of each paradox exceeds the process of coping with or resolving their inherent contradictions to encompass the creation of new values. We argue that consumers blend fantastic elements of programming with indexical elements connected to their lived experiences to create a form of self-referential hyperauthenticity." [Expanded Academic Index]

Rosenbaum, Steven.
"Peeping Tom TV.("reality" television)." Television Quarterly 31.2-3 (Summer-Fall 2000): 52(5).
The "reality television" programs are mass entertainment and the trend will probably continue. High-quality programming will probably win the largest audiences eventually but there will still be a market for shows that simulate reality.

Saye, Neal
"No 'Survivors,' No 'Ameriacan Idol,' No 'Road Rules' in the 'The Real World' of Big Brother: Consumer/Reality, Hyper/reality, and Post/reality in 'Reality' TV." Studies in American Culture, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 9-15, Fall 2004.

Shouse, B.
"Social psychology - Reality TV puts group behavior to the test." ["The Experiment" - Zimbardo Stanford Prison Experiment] Science 294 (5545): 1262-1263 NOV 9 2001
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Shugart, Helene A.
"Ruling Class: Disciplining Class, Race, and Ethnicity in Television Reality Court Shows." Howard Journal of Communications, 1096-4649, Volume 17, Issue 2, 2006, Pages 79 – 100
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Simpson, Philip L.
"America's Scariest Home Videos: Serial Killers and Reality Television." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 103-23, Winter 2003.
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Squires, Catherine.
"Race and Reality TV: Tryin' to Make It Real--but Real Compared to What?" Critical Studies in Media Communication, Oct2008, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p434-440, 7p
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Strout, Erin
"Reality Bites-or Does It?" Chronicle of Higher Education, vol. 51, no. 5, pp. A26-A27, September 2004.

Sujata, Moorti, and Ross Karen.
"Reality television." Feminist Media Studies 4.2 (July 2004): 203(29).
UC users only

Taddeo, Julie; Dvorak, Ken
"Introduction: Reality TV as Film and History." Film & History ; May2007, Vol. 37 Issue 1, p16-17, 2p
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Thompson, Robert.
"Reality and the future of television." Television Quarterly 31.4 (Wntr 2001): 20(6).
The popularity of so-called "reality" television shows such as 'Survivor' is partly due to the close relation between voyeurism and television. Reality programs also fit the multi-channel environment and the possibilities provided by emerging technologies.
UC users only
"This article works from the established assumption that narratives produced for local audiences are always going to operate in some relation to established discourses of local or national cultural identities. In the case of Australian television soap operas, this is not in any way a radical assumption, given the formats routine construction of a recognizable version of the local-everyday as the ground on which its narratives are staged. In this article, the author argues that it is likely, in the case of certain versions of reality TV that draw on the soap opera format for their narrative and formal structures, that reality TVs representations of the real and the everyday are going to operate similarlyindigenizing even the most international of formats and genres. Thus, the way to examine the local in the global may well be through mapping processes of appropriation and adaptation rather than through the proposition of any thoroughgoing specificity or uniqueness." [Communication Abstracts]

Tropiano, Stephen
"Playing It Straight: Reality Dating Shows and the Construction of Heterosexuality." Journal of Popular Film & Television 37:2 (Summer 2009) p. 60-69
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Turner, G.
"Cultural identity, soap narrative, and reality TV." Television & New Media, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 415-422, 2005
UC users only
"This article works from the established assumption that narratives produced for local audiences are always going to operate in some relation to established discourses of local or national cultural identities. In the case of Australian television soap operas, this is not in any way a radical assumption, given the formats routine construction of a recognizable version of the local-everyday as the ground on which its narratives are staged. In this article, the author argues that it is likely, in the case of certain versions of reality TV that draw on the soap opera format for their narrative and formal structures, that reality TVs representations of the real and the everyday are going to operate similarlyindigenizing even the most international of formats and genres. Thus, the way to examine the local in the global may well be through mapping processes of appropriation and adaptation rather than through the proposition of any thoroughgoing specificity or uniqueness." [Communication Abstracts]

Turner, G.
"The mass production of celebrity: "Celetoids", reality TV and the "demotic turn"." International Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 153-165, 2006
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" In Understanding Celebrity, the author coined the term "the demotic turn" as a means of characterizing the increasing production of "ordinary" celebrities through reality TV and DIY celebrity Web sites. Refusing the idea that this necessarily constituted a democratizing process-"hence the term "demotic"-"the author wanted to examine the role that the access to mass-mediated fame plays within the construction of cultural identities. In this article, the author develops this idea a little further by asking whether the shrinking distance between TV and "reality," and between the famous and the "ordinary," means that we need to reconsider our understandings of what kind of cultural apparatus the media has become." [Communication Abstracts]

Turner, Leigh.
"Cosmetic surgery: the new face of reality TV.(Reviews)." British Medical Journal 328.7449 (May 15, 2004): 1208(1).

Warman, M.
"Reality TV - Realism and revelation." TLS--The Times Literary Supplement (5331): 26-26 JUN 3 2005

Williams, Johnny E.
"Sustaining Power Through Reality TV Discourse." Critical Sociology, Volume 32, Numbers 2-3, 2006, pp. 541-555(15)
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Wood, Helen; Skeggs, Beverey
"Notes on Ethical Scenarios of Self on British Reality TV." Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 205-08, Summer 2004
"In a theoretical essay that explores the forms of selfhood privileged by reality, the authors provide the overarching frame within which the other essays are located. Through their examination of British shows, the authors argue that reality television encodes the shifting contours of contemporary cultural citizenship, a subjecthood that prioritizes intimate failures of self-control as a solution to the ethical dilemmas of modern life. The spectacular nature of the genre, the authors contend, permits only a limited number model of selfhood in which the televisual apparatus itself becomes a key cultural tool through which classed and gendered subjects produce new selves. The show What Not To Wear, for instance, is entirely focused on the displaying and performance of the "right" kind of femininity. When the ordinary woman has been made over, the camera follows her into her daily life to observe whether she can maintain her new way of being." [Communication Abstracts]

Zurbriggen, Eileen L., and Elizabeth M. Morgan.
"Who wants to marry a millionaire? Reality dating television programs, attitudes toward sex, and sexual behaviors.(study)." Sex Roles: A Journal of Research 54.1-2 (Jan 2006): 1(17).
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"Past research has revealed associations between television viewing and sexual attitudes and behaviors. We examined a burgeoning new television genre, reality dating programs (RDPs). Undergraduate students (ages 18-24) reported their overall television viewing, their RDP viewing, and their involvement with RDPs (watching in order to learn and watching in order to be entertained). They also completed measures of attitudes toward sex, dating, and relationships, and answered questions about sexual behavior. Most participants were occasional or frequent viewers of at least one RDP. Men reported using RDPs for learning more than did women; there was no gender difference in use of RDPs for entertainment. Total amount of RDP viewing was positively correlated, for both men and women, with adversarial sexual beliefs, endorsement of a sexual double standard, and the beliefs that men are sex-driven, that appearance is important in dating, and that dating is a game. In all cases, however, these relationships were partially or totally mediated through viewer involvement. Men and women who watched RDPs tended to be less sexually experienced; there were few other correlations with sexual behaviors." [Expanded Academic Index]

Individual Programs

American Idol

Cowell, Simon.
"All Together Now: Publics and Participation in American Idol." Invisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture Issue 6, 2003

Dann, Gabrielle
"American Idol: From the Selling of a Dream to the Selling of a Nation." Meditations: VOLUME 1, NUMBER 1
" From its beginning, the show American Idol has been a lesson in how to make money. Its spin-off merchandise and use of synergistic relationships is staggering. The show and its related products are under the ultimate control of 19 Management and FremantleMedia, two media conglomerates with expertise in television, music, film, merchandising, publishing, artist/writer and producer management, sponsorship, and promotions. Together, the two corporations have made millions of dollars from Idol, a product that is primarily used to sell other products, all under a single brand name. Originally conceived in England as Pop Idol by former Spice Girls manager Simon Fuller, the show has since been marketed worldwide, reaching its zenith in January 2004 at the internationally televised World Idol competition. This essay examines the political economy of media as it applies to American Idol and attempts to answer such questions as: Who wields the power? How vast is the control? What is media's involvement? Hopefully, this essay will demonstrate to the reader how a single product - the television show - can been engineered to be a “means with no end."

Lee, Jungmin
"American Idol: Evidence of Same-Race Preferences?" (February 2006). IZA Discussion Paper No. 1974
This study examines whether viewers of the popular television show, American Idol, are racially biased. I find strong evidence for same-race preferences, in particular among black viewers. Featuring more black contestants attracts more black households to tune in to watch the show. And, with more black viewers, a black contestant is less likely to be voted off.

Meizel, Katherine.
"Making the Dream a Reality (Show): The Celebration of Failure in American Idol." Popular Music & Society, Oct2009, Vol. 32 Issue 4, p475-488, 14p
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America's Most Wanted

Cavender, Gray; Bond-Maupin, Lisa
"Fear and Loathing on Reality Television: An Analysis of "America's Most Wanted" and "Unsolved Mysteries" Sociological Inquiry Volume 63 Issue 3, 2007; Pages 305 - 317
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Big Brother

Dovey, Jon.
"Big Brother." In: The television genre book / edited by Glen Creeber. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1992.55.T45 2001)

Frau-Meigs, D.
"Big Brother and reality TV in Europe: Towards a theory of situated acculturation by the media."European Journal of Communication, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 33-56, 2006
UC users only
"This article examines the cross-border circulation of reality programming among European countries, taking Big Brother as a case in point. It tests the specificity of the media factor in the process of acculturation by considering the whole communication process, from production to reception, in a comparative manner. It deals with the dichotomy induced by contact between imported elements and traditional domestic core values and with the strategies related to adoption or adaptation. The media appear to apply the following three filters: the first filter, in production, makes a matrix of Anglo-American origin acceptable by editing out angst; the second filter, in broadcasting, acts as a transfer "airlock," aimed at making people accept the commercial audiovisual system; the third filter, in reception, shows a variety of strategies as co-present publics vie about the values that are being transmitted by reality programming. Assessing these acculturation filters brings the author to develop the notion of "situated" acculturation as it may reflect better the fundamental stakes at work in such cultural transfers-dissymmetric power relations-without precluding the possible strategies of resistance to hegemony that they entail and the cultural bypasses they produce." [Communication Abstracts]

Hartley, John.
"'Kiss Me Kat': Shakespeare, Big Brother, and Taming of the Self." In: Reality TV : remaking television culture / / edited by Susan Murray and Laurie Ouellette. New York : New York University Press, c2004.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 R45 2004)

Johnson-Woods, Toni.
Big bother : why did that reality-tv show become such a phenomenon? St. Lucia, Qld. : University of Queensland Press, 2002.
MAIN: PN1992.77.B49 J64 2002

Lavender, Andy.
"Pleasure, Performance and the Big Brother Experience." Contemporary Theatre Review: An International Journal, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 15-23, May 2003.

Starrs, D. Bruno
"Sara-Marie as Feminist Fairytale: From Big Brother to 'Big Sister'." Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 359-61, November 2004.

Thornborrow, J., and D. Morris.
"Gossip as strategy: The management of talk about others on reality TV show `Big Brother'." Journal of Sociolinguistics 8.2 (May 2004): 246(26).
UC users only
"In this paper, we examine the nature of gossip talk as an activity type in the context of the TV game show "Big Brother." Using a detailed analytic approach to the situated nature of gossip sequences, we show how participants in the show manage gossip talk strategically to establish social relationships within the house, as well as to present themselves in a positive way to the viewing (& voting) audience. We argue that there is a contextual double framing for talk in the Big Brother (BB) house which participants are orienting to, both as members of a social group, & as players in a TV game show. The paper thus contributes to existing work on the social function of gossip, as well as exploring its strategic function in this particular interactional context, calling into question the nature of "natural" discourse." [Sociological Abstracts]

Tincknell, Estella; Raghuram, Parvati.
"Big Brother: Reconfiguring the 'Active' Audience of Cultural Studies?" European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 199-215, May 2002.

Candid Camera

McCarthy, Anna.
"'Stanley Milgram, Allen Funt, and Me': Postwar Social Science and the 'First Wave' of Reality TV." In: Reality TV : remaking television culture / edited by Susan Murray and Laurie Ouellette. New York : New York University Press, c2004. (MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 R45 2004)

COPS

Consalvo, Mia.
"Hegemony, Domestic Violence and Cops." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 62-70, Summer 1998.

Crime Shows.[videorecording]
Critically examines television programs that re-enact crimes and encourage private citizens to become involved in the apprehension of criminals. Examines cases solved through citizen tips and includes interviews with innocent people falsely arrested, television producers and law enforcement officials. A segment from the television program: Nightline, with host Ted Koppel. c1998. 29 min. Media Resources Center Video/C 6871

Curry, Kathleen
"Mediating Cops: An Analysis of Viewer Reaction To Reality." Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture, 8(3) (2001) 169-185
UC users only "This study examines viewer reaction and response to the reality police program COPS. Survey data were collected from 117 undergraduate students enrolled in Justice Studies courses and additional focus group data were gathered from 35 of the respondents. A path model was constructed, positing that gender, race, and having been the victim of a property or a non-property crime would have significant effects upon two attitude scales constructed about policing and fear of crime. These measures of attitude were expected to affect how often respondents watched the program and how violent they perceived the program content to be. Watching frequency and perceived violence in turn were expected to affect how satisfied the respondents were with the COPS episode they viewed and the program overall. Using path analysis, the derived model conformed well to the reality of the data producing a chi-square that is small (23.71 with 20 degrees of freedom) and non-significant (p=0.26). Some focus group data also complemented the path analytic model stressing the relevance of the program's violent content and desensitizing effects." [JSTOR]

Doyle, Aaron.
Arresting images : crime and policing in front of the television camera / Aaron Doyle. Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, 2003.
Main (Gardner) Stacks HM1206 .D69 2003

Nadis, Fred
"Citizen Funt: Surveillance as Cold War Entertainment." Film & History; Sep2007, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p13-22, 10p, 1 bw
UC users only

Prosise, T. O.; Johnson, A.
"Law enforcement and crime on Cops and World's Wildest Police Videos: anecdotal form and the justification of racial profiling." Western Journal of Communication, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 72-91, Winter 2004
"For different reasons, reality TV programming has captured the attention of television executives, public audiences, and media scholars. Whereas much of the recent popular attention is directed at programs such as Survivor and The Bachelor, the crime-based genre of reality television programming became a staple for prime-time viewers in the 1990s and continues to be a mainstay of prime-time television viewing. The media's portrayal of law enforcement and crime tells public audiences about such things as good and evil, heroes and villains, and morality, and it suggests appropriate societal responses to crime and social problems. Crime-based reality television continues to be a mainstay of contemporary prime-time viewing. This crime-based reality programming offers audiences information about police, crime, and police-suspect interactions presented in dramatic form. This study considers the dramatic elements in two of these popular prime-time programs, Cops and World's Wildest Police Videos, focusing on the ways in which the reality-based programming represents police/suspect interaction through an examination of 81 anecdotes. Specifically, this rhetorical study identifies a representative anecdote form. The paper argues that the form of these programs serves to justify controversial police practices and, of particular significance, the programming implicitly justifies the practice of racial profiling. Such programming offers audiences "poor equipment" for living in a society that needs to continue confronting the problems of racism and discrimination." [Communication Abstracts]

Jeremiah, Milford A.
"The Language of COPS." Popular Culture Review, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 139-48, 2004.

The Osbournes

Kompare, Derek.
"Extraordinarily Ordinary: The Osbournes as "An American Family" In: Reality TV : remaking television culture / / edited by Susan Murray and Laurie Ouellette. New York : New York University Press, c2004. (MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 R45 2004)

Morreale, J.
"Revisiting The Osbournes: the hybrid reality-sitcom." Journal of Film and Video, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 3-15, Spring 2003
UC users only
"The Osbournes was one of the surprise hits of the 2001-2002 television season. As the highest-rated program on cable television and the most successful series in MTV's 21-year history, The Osbournes not only boosted the music channel's ratings, but also quickly became a national cultural phenomenon. The program's success was replicated when it moved to Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The first season consisted of 10 "documentary" episodes, each loosely structured as a situation comedy, based on the lives of the rock star Ozzy Osbourne, his wife, Sharon, and Jack and Kelly, two of their three teenage children. Soon after the show's premiere in the United States, the Osbournes were appearing in talk shows, gracing the covers of popular magazines, and becoming the subject of numerous articles in newspapers and magazines. This essay addresses several questions specific to The Osbournes. What is a reality-sitcom? How do multiple audiences make sense of it? How does it work in relation to the sitcom and to reality television? How does parody come into play with regard to its production and reception? The work of genre theorists Steve Neale, Rick Altman, and John Corner offers a starting point for addressing these questions." [Communication Abstracts]

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy

See Gay/Lesbian representation bibliography

The Real World

Bell-Jordan, Katrina E.
"Black.White. and a Survivor of The Real World: Constructions of Race on Reality TV." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Oct2008, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p353-372, 20p
UC users only

Curnutt, Hugh.
""A Fan Crashing the Party": Exploring Reality-celebrity in MTV's Real World Franchise." Television & New Media, May2009, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p251-266, 16p
UC users only

Kachgal, Tara.
"'Look at The Real World. There's Always a Gay Teen on There': Sexual Citizenship and Youth-Targeted Reality Television." Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 361-64, November 2004.
"In this brief commentary, the author problematizes how The Real World constructs proper sexual citizenship, focusing on its politics of the closet. Using its 2002 Chicago season, where The Real World(for the first time) featured two sexual minority characters-a white gay man, Chris, and a biracial lesbian, Aneesa-the author examines how the program differentially, and problematically, constructs closetedness and coming/being out. The mechanisms for the revelation of sexual identity are evident in the first episode, which features an extended scene in the jacuzzi, where the characters discuss the unique qualities that resulted in their being chosen for the program. During a confessional moment, Chris admits that he is uncomfortable revealing his homosexuality to his cast mates. Upon further questioning back in the hot tub, Chris acknowledges that he is an artist and a recovering alcoholic. Chris's discomfort is contrasted with the openness of Aneesa, who has no qualms about disclosing her sexuality or much less anything else. Aneesa's nudity is meant to signify the transparency of her lesbianism-she is who she is-and also to counter the dishonesty of Chris and of everyone else. In highlighting tensions between assimilation and transgression, The Real Worldseems close to imagine dissident forms of queer citizenship. Yet, as the author shows, this is problematic." [Communication Abstracts]

Park, Ji Hoon.
"The Uncomfortable Encounter Between an Urban Black and a Rural White: The Ideological Implications of Racial Conflict on MTV's The Real World." Journal of Communication, Mar2009, Vol. 59 Issue 1, p152-171, 20p
UC users only

Stern, Danielle M.
"Consuming the Fractured Female: Lessons from MTV's The Real World." Communication Review, 2009, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p50-77, 28p
UC users only

Survivor

Metzl, Jonathan M.
"From Scopophilia to Survivor: A Brief History of Voyeurism." Textual Practice, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 415-34, Fall 2004.
UC users only
"This article traces the history of the term "voyeurism" from its psychoanalytic origins in the 1950s to contemporary uses in popular culture and post-Freudian, biological psychiatry. It begins with an overview of the psychoanalytic foundations of the term, paying particular attention to the ways Freudian theory helped shape clinical definitions of voyeurism in American psychiatry in the mid-twentieth century. Subsequently, it follows popular and psychiatric concepts of voyeurism through the 1970s and 1980s, leading to current TV programmes and internet sites, and definitions of voyeurism in present-day academic psychiatry. Reading against the assumption, common in social science literature, that there are distinct forms of 'pathological' and 'normal' voyeurism, I argue that medical and popular notions of voyeurism developed in relation to one another in ways that help explain their configuration in the present day. Such overlap is evident in many contemporary uses of 'voyeurism' in popular culture, as well as in the (relatively few) psychiatric research articles still concerned with 'voyeurism' as a mental illness. I conclude by arguing for a rethinking of the boundaries of voyeurism, and a rethinking of voyeurism itself, based on consideration of the ways voyeurism is a relational concept forged between medical and popular sensibilities." [Expanded Academic Index]

Podhoretz, John
"Survivor and the End of Television." Commentary, vol. 110, no. 4, pp. 50-52, November 2000.

Survivor lessons : essays on communication and reality television
Edited by Matthew J. Smith and Andrew F. Wood. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Company, Inc., c2003.
MAIN: PN1992.8.R43 S87 2003
Includes bibliographical references and index. I. Lessons about reality ; 1. Individual and cultural identity in the world of reality television / Terri Toles Patkin ; 2. Contrived television reality: Survivor as a pseudo-event / April L. Roth ; 3. Who owns your personality: reality television and publicity rights / Debora Halbert ; 4. From Dragnet to Survivor: historical and cultural perspectives on reality television / Sean Baker -- II. Lessons about playing social games ; 5. Reel life: the social geometry of reality shows / Ellis Godard ; 6. The nonverbal communication of trustworthiness: a necessary Survivor skill / R. Thomas Boone ; 7. Metaphors of survival: a textual analysis of the decision-making strategies of the Survivor contestants / Kathleen M. Propp ; 8. Survivor, social choice, and the impediments to political rationality: reality TV as social science experiment / Ed Wingenbach -- III. Lessons beyond the lens ; 9. Mutual metaphors of Survivor and office politics: images of work in popular Survivor criticism / Jennifer Thackaberry ; 10. Self-help for savages: the "other" Survivor, primitivism, and the construction of American identity / Steven S. Vrooman ; 11. The communication ethics of Survivor / Marilyn Fuss-Reineck ; 12. Traveling the terrain of screened realities: our reality, our television / Marcy R. Chvasta and Deanna L. Fassett.

Thompson, Robert.
"Reality and the future of television." Television Quarterly 31.4 (Wntr 2001): 20(6).
The popularity of so-called "reality" television shows such as 'Survivor' is partly due to the close relation between voyeurism and television. Reality programs also fit the multi-channel environment and the possibilities provided by emerging technologies.

Waggoner, C. E.
"Disciplining female sexuality in Survivor." Feminist Media Studies, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 217-220, 2004
"In Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault (1979) argues that seemingly optimistic literary practices associated with modern institutions are accompanied by a more insidious power focused on the body. Through disciplinary techniques such as constant surveillance modeled in the Panoptican and carried over into other modern institutions (e.g., schools, hospital, military), "docile" or subjugated bodies are produced in support of the dominant order. Sandra Lee Bartky (1988) extends Foucault's work to include a consideration of the gendered dimensions of these disciplinary practices, noting in particular those that produce a decidedly feminine body through discursive regulations. While Foucault points to specific institutions as the source of the disciplinary practices, Bartky argues that power that inscribes femininity is not centralized, but is instead anonymous, ubiquitous, and evasive--everywhere and nowhere all at once--and she notes the influence of media in perpetuating this inscription. It is the author's contention that the reality television show Survivor serves as such a site of inscription for disciplined female sexuality. In this prime-time version of Lord of the Flies meets Gilligan's Island, in which 16 "marooned" contestants compete in a contrived survival-of-the-fittest game, a particular construction of gendered reality is advanced, one that naturalizes female sexuality as commodity." [Communication Abstracts]

Wright, Christopher J.
"Welcome to the jungle of the real: Simulation, commoditization, and Survivor.(Critical essay)." Journal of American Culture 29.2 (June 2006): 170(13).
"The way in which the reality television program 'Survivor' has undergone commoditization since its debut in May 2000 is examined. Reasons are outlined as to why the show is not real but rather a contrived construction and the program's development as a commodity through both official and unofficial, viewer-driven means is detailed." [Expanded Academic Index}

Wright, Christopher J.
Tribal warfare : survivor and the political unconscious of reality television Lanham : Lexington Books, c2006.
MAIN: PN1992.77.S865 W75 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0610/2006009149.html

The Swan

Jerslev, Anne.
Cosmetic surgery and mediated body theatre: the designable body in the makeover programme The Swan." New Review of Film & Television Studies, Dec2008, Vol. 6 Issue 3, p323-341, 19p;
UC users only

Wife Swap

Gies, Lieve.
"Reality TV and the jurisprudence of wife swap." In: Law and the media : the future of an uneasy relationship / Lieve Gies. Abingdon [England] ; New York : Routledge-Cavendish, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks KJC3655 .G54 2008

Lyle, Samantha.
"(Mis)recognition and the middle-class/bourgeois gaze: A case study of Wife Swap." Critical Discourse Studies, Oct2008, Vol. 5 Issue 4, p319-330, 12p
UC users only

Piper, Helen
"Reality tv, Wife swap and the drama of banality."Screen Vol XLV nr 4 (Winter 2004); p 272-286
Taking the Channel 4 series "Wife swap" as an example of the growing popularity of the reality tv genre, explores the relation between documentary and the infiltration of real life narrative.





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