Prison Films:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UCB Library












These bibliographies:
Film Noir
Gangster Films
Lawyers and the Legal Process in the Movies
PrisonFlicks

Alber, Jan.
"Bodies Behind Bars: The Disciplining of the Prisoner's Body in British and American Prison Movies." In: In the grip of the law : trials, prisons, and the space between / edited by Monika Fludernik and Greta Olson. pp: 249-61. Frankfurt am main ; New York : P. Lang, c2004.
Main Stack PR408.L38.I5 2004

Alber, Jan.
"Cinematic Carcerality: Prison Metaphors in Film." Journal of Popular Culture, Apr2011, Vol. 44 Issue 2, p217-232, 16p
UC users only
The article presents film criticism on the use of prison and prisoners as a metaphor in motion picture plays. Several definitions of what constitutes a metaphor in a motion picture are offered. Motion pictures which depict prison and prisoners are discussed including "Birdman of Alcatraz," and "The Shawshank Redemption." Motion pictures which use prison as a metaphor for other social experiences are examined including "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner."

Ashkenazi, Ofer.
"Prisoners' fantasies in Weimar film The longing for a rational and just legal system." Journal of European Studies, Sep2009, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p290-304, 15p
UC users only

Bennett, Jamie
"The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: The Media in Prison Films." The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice Volume 45 Issue 2 Page 97 - May 2006
UCB users only
"Generally, people have low levels of exposure to prisons through personal experience and therefore the media plays an important role in informing beliefs and actions. In particular prison films are an important and extensive form of media depiction. However, media depiction of crime and imprisonment has been criticised on ethical, political and social grounds. This article explores how prison films have depicted the relationship between the media, crime and punishment. It argues that this is a significant and integrated part of the prison film genre. It also argues that these representations are important both as a narrative device and in making the media a focus of pressure for reform." [Blackwell Synergy]

Bennett, Jamie
"Reel life after prison: Repression and reform in films about release from prison." Probation Journal December 2008 vol. 55 no. 4 353-368
UCB users only

Berlatsky, Noah
"Men in Women-in-Prison: Masochism, Feminism, Fetish." Bright Lights Films Journal, August 2008 | Issue 61

Bernstein, Matthew
"Institutions and individuals: Riot in cell block 11." Velvet Light Trap nr 28 (Fall 1991); p 3-31
Auteurist reappraisal of "Riot in cell block 11", arguing whether the atypical approach to the genre of prison films can be attributed to director Donald Siegel or producer Walter Wanger.[FIAF]

Captured by the media : prison discourse in popular culture
Edited by Paul Mason. Cullompton, UK ; Portland, Or. : Willan, c2006.
Main Stack P96.C74.C37 2006

Caster, Peter
Prisons, race, and masculinity in twentieth-century U.S. literature and film / Peter Caster. Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2008.
Main Stack PS228.I66.C37 2008
Contents: Imprisonment in U.S. history and the cultural imagination -- Literary execution: race, crime, and punishment in three Faulkner novels -- Soul on ice, schizoanalysis, and the subject of imprisonment -- The executioner's song and the narration of history -- The contradictions of documentary realism in American history X -- "Based upon a true story": the hurricane and the problem of prison redemption -- The farm: "This is no dream or nothing made up, this is for real" -- Staging prisons and the performance of history.

Cecil, Dawn K.
"Looking Beyond Caged Heat." Feminist Criminology, Vol. 2, No. 4, 304-326 (2007)
UC users only
"Female prisoners are an invisible correctional population; thus, media images are critical in shaping people's understanding of this social issue. Although research has examined how Hollywood depicts female prisoners, it has not delved into images found in reality-based programs. This study examined documentaries, televised news magazines, and talk shows to determine how these programs portray this incarcerated population and to identify how the issue is framed. Findings indicate that although some of the critical issues facing incarcerated women are presented, these programs still highlight factors that excite viewers, including violence and sex, thereby creating a sensationalized and damaging image of women behind bars."

Cheatwood, Derral.
"Prison movies: films about adult, male, civilian prisons: 1929-1995." In: Popular culture, crime, and justice / Frankie Y. Bailey, Donna C. Hale. Belmont: Wadsworth Pub. Co., c1998. Contemporary issues in crime and justice series.
Main Stack HV6789.B25 1998

Ciasullo, Ann.
"Containing "Deviant" Desire: Lesbianism, Heterosexuality, and the Women-in-Prison Narrative." Journal of Popular Culture. Apr 2008. Vol. 41, Iss. 2; p. 195 (29 pages)
UC users only

Clowers, M.
"Dykes, gangs, and danger: Debunking popular myths about maximum-security life." Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture, vol. 9, no. 1, pp.
"Although the number of incarcerated females is rapidly increasing, few of us will have actual contact with women in a correctional setting. For the most part, our ideas about female inmates and the prisons they are housed in come from filmic images--images that, though highly accessible to the public, depict inaccurate accounts of prison life. From the use of unlikely characters and their corresponding improbable behavior to the maintenance of insecure facilities and impossible happenings, the four films reviewed for this article propagate common, negative stereotypes of inmates. After providing numerous filmic images of inaccurate depictions, the author provides counterexamples based on her own work in a maximum-security prison as an educator of female inmates. More than being wrong, celluloid portrayals of female prisoners inspire additional marginalization of a group who, though convicted of serious crimes, will eventually be released into society." [Communication Abstracts]

Combs, Richard
"Less is more: Don Siegel from the block to the rock." Sight & Sound Vol XLIX nr 2 (Spring 1980); p 117-121
A study of Siegel's career, and his two most notable prison films, 'Riot in cell block 11' and 'Escape from Alcatraz'.

Crowther, Bruce.
" Captured on film: the prison movie London: B.T. Batsford, 1989.
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.C36 C76 1989

Cull, Nicholas J.
"Great Escapes: 'Englishness' and the Prisoner of War Genre." Film History: An International Journal, vol. 14, no. 3-4, pp. 282-95, 2002.

Dow, David R.
""Fictional documentaries and truthful fictions: the death penalty in recent American film." Constitutional Commentary Winter 2000 v17 i3 p511 (18048 words)
UC users only

Eigenberg, Helen; Baro, Agnes
"If You Drop the Soap in the Shower You Are on Your Own: Images of Male Rape in Selected Prison Movies." Sexuality & Culture, 2003, 7, 4, fall, 56-89
UCB users only
"Analyzes 15 movies to explore whether films about prison life include male rape & whether this is an accurate reflection of the existing literature. Each film is analyzed to determine if male rape is presented as a common occurrence, is an essential part of the plot of the movie, & if the victims & perpetrators fit the stereotypical profiles of those believed to be victims & offenders in the prison culture. It was found that 50% of the films included an attempted or completed rape & nearly 75% mentioned rape & treated it as a common prison event. Consensual homosexual behavior & prostitution were not represented. Physical force was usually involved, & the victim displayed fear, but resisted physically. Prison officials were portrayed as passively accepting the practice of male rape. The results stand in contrast to studies that have found male rape in prison to be a relatively rare event. The sensationalization of male rape in prison may contribute to its acceptance as a deterrent of crime & may discourage the moral outrage that such vulnerability should receive." [Sociological Abstracts]

Gonthier, David.
American prison film since 1930 : from The big house to The Shawshank redemption Lewiston, N.Y. : Edwin Mellen Press, c2006.
MAIN: PN1995.9.P68 G66 2006

Gutterman, Melvin
"Abuse, Racism, Torture, Savagery: Hollywood Pictures the Dark Side of American Prisons." Humanist; Sep/Oct2005, Vol. 65 Issue 5, p24-30, 7p
UC users only

Gutterman, Melvin
"Failure to Communicate - The Reel Prison Experience." Southern Methodist University Law Review. 1515 (2002)
UC users only

Herman, D.
"Bad Girls Changed My Life": Homonormativity in a Women's Prison Drama." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 20, No. 2, June 2003, pp. 141-159
UCB users only

In the grip of the law : trials, prisons, and the space between
Edited by Monika Fludernik and Greta Olson. Frankfurt am main ; New York : P. Lang, c2004.
Main Stack PR408.L38.I5 2004

Jarvis, Brian.
"Inside the American prison film." In: Cruel and unusual : punishment and US culture London ; Sterling, Va. : Pluto Press, 2004.
MAIN: HV9466 .J37 2004;

Mason, Paul.
"The Prison In Cinema." Senses of Cinema

Mason, Paul.
"Prison decayed: Cinematic Penal Discourse and Populism 1995-2005." Social Semiotics Volume 16, Number 4/December 2006
UCB users only
"The increased populist and punitive turn in criminal justice policy in the United Kingdom over recent years has led to punishment becoming politicised, harsher and more ostentatious. The role of media and popular culture discourses of prison is rarely examined in this account. Adopting a Foucauldian discourse analysis of prison films released over the past 10 years, this article explores the prison film as one important element of the discursive regime. It seeks to investigate what representational practices are at work, how they limit the meaning of prison and prisoners, and how this may contribute to debates about the nature and aim of prison in contemporary society. It argues that several discursive practices exist in cinematic representations of the incarceration that strengthen support for the use of prison. The explicit and recurring depiction of violence in most prison films over the past 10 years, while appearing to offer evidence for prison reform, does the opposite. This paper suggests that discourses around the futility and inhumanity of incarceration are scant, replaced by scenes of prison violence; rape and death appear, which appear to exist purely for the pleasure of the spectator: a generic feature of the prison film. Secondly, prisoners are largely constructed as an inhuman other: a danger to society and deserving of harsh punishment. Consequently, the discursive regime of prison in cinema over the past decade constructs prison as not only necessary, but as the only process for crime control and reduction." [Taylor and Francis]

Mason, Paul.
"The Screen Machine: Cinematic Representation of Prisons." In: Criminal visions : media representations of crime and justice / edited by Paul Mason. Cullompton, Devon ; Portland, Ore. : Willan, 2003.
Main Stack P96.C74.C78 2003

Mayne, Judith.
""Caged and framed: the women-in-prison film." In: Framed: lesbians, feminists, and media culture / Judith Mayne. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, c2000.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.M359 2000

Morey, Anne.
""'The Judge Called Me an Accessory': Women's Prison Films, 1950-1962." Journal of Popular Film & Television. 23(2):80-87. 1995 Summer.
UCB users only
Theoretical analysis of four women's prison films: "Caged", "Women's prison", "Girls in prison" and "House of women."

O'Sullivan, Sean
"Representations of Prison in Nineties Hollywood Cinema: From Con Air to The Shawshank Redemption." Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, 2001, 40, 4, Nov, 317-334
UCB users only
"The 1990s saw a steady growth in the world prison population with the US contributing significantly to the upward trend. But, while it has been suggested that media-led panics & the propagation of "prison myths" have legitimated prison growth, there has been little work done on the significance of representations of prison in popular cinema for social & cultural understandings of imprisonment. The current article attempts to redress this neglect. After a brief review of some of the existing literature, an analysis of four significant "prison films" of the 1990s is presented. It is concluded that, with respect to film, the notion of challenging media misrepresentations of prisons & prisoners is problematic. 24 References." [Sociological Abstracts]

Parish, James Robert.
" Prison pictures from Hollywood: plots, critiques, casts, and credits for 293 theatrical and made-for-television releases / by James Robert Parish. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1991.
UCB Main PN1995.9.P68 P37 1991
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.P68 P37 1991)

Querry, R.B.
" "Prison movies: an annotated filmography 1921-present." Journal of Popular Film and Television; Vol.II nr.2 (Spring 1973); p.181-197 UC users only

Rafter, Nicole Hahn
"Prison and Execution Films." In: Shots in the mirror: crime films and society Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 R34 2000
Moffitt: PN1995.9.G3 R34 2000
Contents via Google Books

Schauer, Terrie
"Masculinity Incarcerated: Insurrectionary Speech and Masculinities in Prison Fiction." Journal for Crime, Conflict and the Media 1 (3) 28-42
"Existing research on prison film--where it addresses gender--has largely focused on the relationship between represented incarceration and hegemonic masculinities (Jarvis, 2004; Mason, 2003; O'Sullivan, 2001). Although arguments are far more complex, the general consensus appears to be that prison film as a whole symbolically confirms, rather than challenges the existing hierarchical organization of masculinities. This article questions the preceding proposition. The debate begins at a theoretical level, with a brief overview of some elements of masculinity studies theory that are relevant to analysis of prison film. Next, I introduce Butler's concept of 'insurrectionary speech'. Through textual analysis, 'insurrectionary speech' (Butler, 1997) becomes a vehicle for reading certain fictional representations of prison as renegotiations of conventional hegemonic masculinity is present-day North America. In light of a number of recent productions, the article considers the insurrectionary potential of prison film as a genre."

Schuster, Heather
"Prison/Labor/Film: A Montage." Studies in Law, Politics, and Society, 2002, 24, 1, 103-131
"Most contemporary American prison films represent the relationship between the inside & the outside of the prison through the prison escape. Paradoxically, the prison break both produces & undermines the distinction between inside & outside, which doesn't allow us to know very much about the prison itself. The audience is able to walk out of the theater without much thought regarding how prison structures our everyday lives. But the prison montage that opens Sam Peckinpah's 1972 film The Getaway expresses how the prison functions as a microcosm of social totality at the same time it is the locus of the most radical exclusion from the social. In this way, prison actually fragments or destroys the fascistic fantasy of tantalization, which is based on an omnipotent vision of the whole. And cinematic montage becomes a mighty means through which to express this new understanding of totality." [Sociological Abstracts]

Sutton, David L.; Winn, J. Emmett
"'Do We Get to Win This Time?': POW/MIA Rescue Films and the American Monomyth." Journal of American & Comparative Cultures, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 25-30, Spring 2001. [Journal Information]

Walters, Suzanna Danuta.
"Caged Heat: The (R)Evolution of Women-in-Prison." In: Reel knockouts: violent women in the movies / edited by Martha McCaughey and Neal King. 1st ed. pp: 106-23. ustin: University of Texas Press, 2001.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.R454 2001

Wilkins, Mike.
"Jail Birds." Film Comment. Jul 1986. Vol. 22, Iss. 4; pg. 63
The girls-in-gangs adult film genre is examined. Women-in-prison films are highlighted. Pornographic girls-in-gangs films enjoyed peak publicity during the 1960s.

Williams, Melanie.
"Women in Prison and Women in Dressing Gowns: Rediscovering the 1950s Films of J. Lee Thompson." Journal of Gender Studies. 11(1):5-15. 2002 Mar
UC users only
"British cinema of the 1950s has recently been the subject of substantial reappraisal which has sought to rescue it from its former image as dull and reactionary. However, one thing that has stayed the same is the notion of this period of British cinema as male-dominated, particularly through the critical focus on the war film genre. An analysis of director J. Lee Thompson's career in the 1950s provides an interesting corrective to this. Thompson's films focus predominantly on women, particularly those who do not or cannot fit in with accepted modes of female behaviour. These include two films about women in prison, The Weak and The Wicked (1953) and Yield To The Night (1956), and one about an unhappy housewife, Woman in a Dressing Gown (1957). This article also discusses Thompson's contribution to the war film, Ice Cold In Alex (1958), which interestingly, is one of the few examples of the genre to give a central role to a female character. Although the personnel behind these films are mainly men, including Thompson himself, these films powerfully expose the contradictions and problems in constructions of femininity at the time, and merit more critical attention than they have previously received." [Taylor & Francis]

Wilson, David.
Images of incarceration : representations of prison in film and television drama Winchester, U.K. : Waterside Press, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.P68 W559 2004
Contents via Google books

Wilson, David.
"Inside observations." Screen; Vol.XXXIV nr.1 (Spring 1993); p.76-79
Discusses the use of cliched or 'mythical' images of prisons in US films. "Notes that British cinema of the 1950s has been the subject of substantial reappraisal which has sought to rescue it from its former image as dull and reactionary. However, one thing that has stayed the same is the notion of this period of British cinema as male-dominated, particularly through the critical focus on the war film genre. An analysis of director J. L. Thompson's career in the 1950s provides an interesting corrective to this. Thompson's films focus predominantly on women, particularly those who do not or cannot fit in with accepted modes of female behavior. These include 2 films about women in prison, The Weak and The Wicked (1953) and Yield To The Night (1956), and 1 about an unhappy housewife, Woman in a Dressing Gown (1957). This article also discusses Thompson's contribution to the war film, Ice Cold In Alex (1958), which is 1 of the few examples of the genre to give a central role to a female character. Although the personnel behind these films are mainly men, including Thompson himself, these films expose the contradictions and problems in constructions of femininity at the time, and merit more critical attention than they have previously received." [PsycINFO]

Wilson, David; O'Sullivan, Sean. .
"Re-theorizing the penal reform functions of the prison film." Theoretical Criminology, Nov2005, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p471-491, 21p 21p
UC users only

Young, Charles S.
"Missing Action: POW Films, Brainwashing, and the Korean War, 1954-1968." Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 49-74, March 1998.

Dead Man Walking

Alleva, Richard.
"Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Commonweal v123, n4 (Feb 23, 1996):17 (2 pages).

Ansen, David.
" "Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Newsweek v127, n2 (Jan 8, 1996):69.

Bruno, Marc. .
" 'We Both Live With the Poor.' (Sister Helen Prejean's influence on the film 'Dead Man Walking')(includes related article on death penalty opponents and advocates) America v174, n5 (Feb 17, 1996):31 (3 pages)

Denby, David. .
" "Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) New York v29, n1 (Jan 8, 1996):46 (2 pages).

Francke, Lizzie. .
""Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v9, n395 (March 22, 1996):33.

Friedman, Leon. .
""Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Films in Review v47, n3-4 (March-April, 1996):58 (2 pages).

Goldberg, Stephanie B. .
" "Walking the last mile, on film. (film about capital punishment," 'Dead Man Walking,' starring Sean Penn and Susan Sarandon) New York Times v145, sec2 (Sun, Dec 24, 1995):H9(N), H9(L), col 3, 44 col in.

Johnson, Brian D. .
" "Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Maclean's v109, n4 (Jan 22, 1996):62 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley. .
""Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) New Republic v214, n6 (Feb 5, 1996):26 (2 pages).

Kemp, Philip. .
""Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v6, n4 (April, 1996):43 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart. .
" "Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Nation v262, n5 (Feb 5, 1996):35 (2 pages).

Levy, Emanuel. .
""Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Variety v361, n7 (Dec 18, 1995):66 (2 pages).

Musbach, Tom. .
""Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Commonweal v123, n6 (March 22, 1996):31.

Rebeck, Victoria A. .
" "Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Christian Century v113, n13 (April 17, 1996):431 (2 pages).

Rodgers, Christy. .
"Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Cineaste v22, n2 (Spring, 1996):42 (2 pages).

Sarat, Austin.
"State killing in popular culture : responsibility and representation in Dead man walking, Last dance, and The green mile." In: When the state kills : capital punishment and the American condition / by Austin Sarat. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2001 [2002]
Moffitt HV8699.U5 S27 2002

Schickel, Richard.
"Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Time v147, n2 (Jan 8, 1996):69.

Simon, John.
"Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) National Review v48, n3 (Feb 26, 1996):64 (2 pages).

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) New Yorker v71, n43 (Jan 8, 1996):68 (4 pages).

Span, Paula.
"Tim Robbins, walking tall; the filmmaker, winning plaudits for 'Dead Man,' a tough take on capital punishment." Washington Post v119 (Sun, Jan 14, 1996):G1, col 2, 54 col in.

Sterritt, David.
"Dead Man Walking." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v88, n25 (Fri, Dec 29, 1995):13, col 1, 27 col in.

The Green Mile

Boyd, Stacy C.
"Messianic masculinity: killing black male bodies in Uncle Tom's Cabin and The Green Mile." In: Black men worshipping : intersecting anxieties of race, gender, and Christian embodiment / Stacy C. Boyd. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books BR563.N4 B6695 2011

Dow, David R.
"Fictional documentaries and truthful fictions: the death penalty in recent American film." Constitutional Commentary Winter 2000 v17 i3 p511

Glenn, Cerise L.; Cunningham, Landra J.
"The Power of Black Magic: The Magical Negro and White Salvation in Film." Journal of Black Studies, Nov2009, Vol. 40 Issue 2, p135-152, 18p
UC users only

Hester-Williams, Kim D.
"NeoSlaves." Genders; 2004, Issue 40, p5-5, 1p
UC users only

Hicks, Heather J.
"Hoodoo Economics: White Men's Work and Black Men's Magic in Contemporary American Film." Camera Obscura, Aug2003, Vol. 18 Issue 53, p25-55, 30p
UC users only

Hughey, Matthew W.
"Cinethetic Racism: White Redemption and Black Stereotypes in "Magical Negro" Films." Social Problems, aug2009, Vol. 56 Issue 3, p543-577, 35p
UCB users only

Kent, Brian
"Christian martyr or grateful slave? The magical negro as Uncle Tom in Frank Darabont's The green mile." In: The films of Stephen King : from Carrie to Secret window / edited by Tony Magistrale. New York ; Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008
Pacific Film Archive PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008

Kehr, Dave
"The Green Mile" (movie review) Film Comment Jan 2000 v36 i1 p77

Kellman, Steven G.
"It's a wonderful life on death row." Southern Quarterly, 2000, Vol. 38 Issue 2, p167-168, 2p

Magistrale, Tony.
"Defining heroic codes of survival : The Dead Zone, The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile." In: Hollywood's Stephen King / Tony Magistrale. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Full-text available online [UCB users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3561.I483 Z758 2003

Maslin, Janet
"The walk on death row can seem very long." (movie review) The New York Times Dec 10, 1999 pB25(N) pE17(L) col 3 (18 col in)

Nilsen, Sarah an
"White soul: the "magical negro" in the films of Stephen King." In: The films of Stephen King : from Carrie to Secret window / edited by Tony Magistrale. New York ; Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008
Pacific Film Archive PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008

Sarat, Austin.
"State killing in popular culture : responsibility and representation in Dead man walking, Last dance, and The green mile." In: When the state kills : capital punishment and the American condition / by Austin Sarat. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2001 [2002]
Moffitt HV8699.U5 S27 2002

Williams, Linda.
"Melodrama in Black and White: Uncle Tom and The Green Mile." Film Quarterly. 55(2):14-21. 2001-2002 Winter
UC users only

The Shawshank Redemption

Alber, Jan.
"Cinematic Carcerality: Prison Metaphors in Film." Journal of Popular Culture, Apr2011, Vol. 44 Issue 2, p217-232, 16p
UC users only

Alleva, Richard.
"Adjusting to hell." Commonweal. Nov 4, 1994. Vol. 121, Iss. 19; p. 16 (3 pages)

Armstrong, Richard.
"The Shawshank Redemption." Australian Screen Education, Winter2004, Issue 35, p79-83, 5p

Browning, Mark.
"The Great Escape: Prison Drama." In: Stephen King on the big screen / Mark Browning. Bristol, UK ; Chicago, USA : Intellect, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3561.I483 Z56 2009

Deacy, Christopher.
"Redemption Revisited: Doing Theology at Shawshank." Journal of Contemporary Religion, May2006, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p149-162, 14p
UC users only

Ding Xu; Luo Jian-bo.
"Song of praise to faith and hope: On the faith and hope in The Shawshank redemption." US-China Foreign Language, Oct2007, Vol. 5 Issue 10, p45-48, 4p
UC users only

Fiddler, Michael
"Projecting the prison: The depiction of the uncanny in The Shawshank Redemption." Crime, Media, Culture, Vol. 3, No. 2, 192-206 (2007)
UC users only

Gonthier, David.
American prison film since 1930 : from The big house to The Shawshank redemption Lewiston, N.Y. : Edwin Mellen Press, c2006.
MAIN: PN1995.9.P68 G66 2006

Gutterman, Mel.
"Abuse, Racism, Torture, Savagery: Hollywood Pictures the Dark Side of American Prisons." Humanist, Sep/Oct2005, Vol. 65 Issue 5, p24-30, 7p
UC users only

Magistrale, Tony.
"Redemption through the feminine in The Shawshank redemption; or, Why Rita Hayworth's name belongs in the title." In: The films of Stephen King : from Carrie to Secret window
Edited by Tony Magistrale. New York ; Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, c2008.
MAIN: PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008; PFA : PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008

Magistrale, Tony.
"Defining heroic codes of survival : The Dead Zone, The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile." In: Hollywood's Stephen King / Tony Magistrale. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Full-text available online [UCB users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3561.I483 Z758 2003)

O'Sullivan, Sean.
"Representations of prisons in nineties Hollywood cinema: From Con Air to The Shawshank Redemption." The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice. Nov 2001. Vol. 40, Iss. 4; p. 317
UCB users only

Peterson, Erik
"The Shawshank Redemption: The Outsider on the Inside." In: The image of the outsider in literature, media, and society : selected papers / edited by Will Wright and Steven Kaplan. Pueblo, Colo. : Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery, [2002]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN56.5.O95 S63 2002

Reinhartz, Adele
"Shawshank redemption and the salvation that lies within (I Corinthians)." In: Scripture on the silver screen / Adele Reinhartz. Louisville, Ky. : Westminster John Knox Press, c2003.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.5 .R45 2003

Sánchez-Escalonilla, Antonio
"The Hero as a Visitor in Hell: The Descent into Death in Film Structure." Journal of Popular Film and Television Volume 32, Number 4 / Winter 2005
UCB users only
During the last six millennia, the hero's journey to the underworld of the dead has been a main part of epic storylines. It is also a literary tradition adopted by cinema in the last century. The author analyzes this journey as a rescue, an experience of death, and purification.

Young, William
"The Shawshank redemption and the hope for escape." In: Movies and the meaning of life : philosophers take on Hollywood / [edited by] Kimberly A. Blessing and Paul J. Tudico. Chicago : Open Court, c2005.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .M665 2005


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