Medical Sciences and Technology/
Public Health












Addiction
Aging and the Aged (separate page)
Alternative Medicine
Biotechnology/Genetic and Reproductive Technologies
Stem Cell and Other Medical Research
Death and Dying
Disease/disease control
Disease/disease control: AIDS
Drugs / Pharmaceutical Industry
Food and Eating SEE Food: Production, Consumption, Politics videography
Health Care Conditions and Policy in the US
Health and the Developing World
Smoking/Tobacco Production and use
General & Miscellaneous Medicine and Health

Life Sciences for videos on Human Biology, Physiology and Genetics and Human Origins.
Women & Gender Studies - Reproductive Rights
Gay & Lesbian videography for videos on social and political aspects of AIDS.
Social, Political, and Economic Issue for videos on drug trafficking and use
Propaganda for vintage health, hygiene, and sex education films
Physical/Physiological disability
Mental disability (includes videos on addiction)
Psychology (includes videos on neurophysiology and brain dysfunctions)
Scientists and Medical Doctors in the Movies

Addiction

Propaganda (for anti-drug propaganda and educational films, 1930-1970)
Social, Political & Economic Issues: Drug Traffic and Use

The Addicted Brain.
Shows how the human brain manufactures and uses drugs. Explores the cutting edge of developments in the biochemistry of addiction and addictive behavior. c1987. 26 min. Video/C 1189

Addiction(The Mind; 4)
Explores addictive behavior, with emphasis on addiction to drugs. Discusses why some people are able to overcome their addictions while others cannot, what type of individual is most susceptible to addiction, and the factors of the mind and brain that influence recovery from addiction. Video/C 1301:4

The Alcohol Years
Alcohol years: A poetic retrieval of the years filmmaker Carol Morley spent in Manchester, where in the early 1980s, her life was lost in an alcoholic blur. In Morley's search for her lost self, conflicting memories and viewpoints weave in and out, revealing a portrait of the city, its pop culture, and the people who lived it. Everyday something: Based on the filmmaker's collection of newspaper cuttings the film presents private moments that give strange glimpses into everyday life. Stalin, my neighbour: To try and forget her own past Annie becomes ever more obsessed with local history. Filmed in East London. 2005. 79 min. DVD 4127

Altered States: A History of Drug Use in America
A documentary on the history of America's drug use and abuse, from practices by early American European settlers through Prohibition and up to today. The film encompasses the use of tobacco, alcohol, morphine, caffeine, opium, cocaine, LSD, marijuana and other substances. The program also documents the cultural, social and political movements that impacted or were impacted by the use of drugs and indicates that drug use is not a contemporary phenomenon and problem but has been a constant presence throughout the country's social history. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1995. 60 min. Video/C 8207

The Battle Over How to Fight the War on Drugs.
An analysis and debate on conflicting approaches to preventing drug abuse and trafficking. Should America shift its strategy in the war on drugs from prevention, interdiction, and prosecution to a policy of treatment, regulation, and control? Originally broadcast June 22, 1998 on the television program Nightline Dist.: Films Media Group. c1999. 22 min. Video/C 7166

Black Tar Heroin: The Dark End of the Street
A documentary filmed in San Francisco, California from December 1995 to January 1998 when black tar heroin use, particularly among young adults, surged to record levels in the city. Looks at two years in the lives of five young heroin addicts, ages 18 to 25, as they face the perils of hard core drug addiction -- crime, prostitution, rape, incarceration, AIDS, overdoses and death. A film by Steven Okazaki.1999. 75 min. Video/C 8727

Close To Home: Bill Moyers on AdditionDist.: Films Media Group.1998. each installment.

Portrait of Addiction. Bill Moyers explores the issues of drug and alcoholaddiction. Nine men and women, all recovering fromdrug and/or alcohol addiction, tell their stories.

The Hijacked Brain. Scientists are making dramatic discoveries about how addiction affects the brain. Bill Moyers goes into thelaboratory to follow researchers engaged in charting the effects of cocaine on a brain, who explain how brain scans reveal addiction as a chronic relapsing brain disease. Moyers also observes a genetic researcher as he monitors a variety of factorsthat may determine who is likely to developalcoholism. 57 min. Video/C 6506

Changing Lives. Bill Moyers focuses on the point that no singletreatment program will work for all addicts. He visitsthe Ridgeview Institute to interview recovering addicts and sit in on a group therapy session. The program also visits Project Safe, a treatment program that reaches out to disadvantaged mothers who are addicts and to their children who areat serious risk of becoming addicts. 57 min. 90 min. Video/C 6507

The Next Generation. Experts are increasingly focusing on prevention efforts based on community and family. This documentary looksat two of these efforts. One works with parents addicted to heroin by teaching them how to repair the damage to family wrought by drug abuse, and in spite of it, how to raise strong, resilient children. In a second program, vigilant counselors in Dade County schools watch for kids at risk of becoming drug addicts, and offer immediate counseling for thosewho are already involved with drugs. Nicotine addiction is addressed by a program that provides classes designed to prevent students from smoking, and another that helps them stop if they've already begun to smoke. School officials, counselors, and students are interviewed. 57 min. Video/C 6508

The Politics of Addiction. Bill Moyers looks at Arizona's recent struggle to find an alternative to current drug policies. Proposition 200 proposed a reassessment of the status of nonviolent drug addicts now serving time, and emphasized treatment over incarceration. On the Washington scene members of Congress, doctors, policy activists and recovering people have joined to push for new public policy. 57 min. Video/C 6508

Drunk or Sober
Explores alcoholism in the United States and efforts to treat the addiction and to discover its causes. Includes commentary by alcoholics, families of alcoholics, and members of Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) and support groups. 1988. 48 min. Video/C MM545

Foo-foo Dust
Explores the relationship between a crack-addicted prostitute and her 23-year old drug addicted son, both living in one room in San Francisco's Tenderloin District. A disturbing and intimate portrait of the destructive power of drug addiction, including a crack-induced fit and near-fatal heroin overdose, as well as a moving, poignant look at the intense love between a mother and her son living on the edge of society. Directors, Gina Levy and Eric Johnson. Dist.: New Day Films. 2003. 37 min. DVD 5560

It Can Happen to Anyone: Problems with Alcohol and Medication Among Older Adults
Alcohol is a part of our social fabric. For many older adults, prescribed medications are also a fact of life. At any stage of life, alcohol and drugs can pose a serious threat to health, happiness and longevity. In this video Ed Asner helps viewers take a candid look at the role alcohol plays in the lives of some older adults. 1996. 26 min. Video/C MM1037

The Red Road to Sobriety
Places the alcohol problems of Native Americans within the context of the historical destruction of indigenous peoples and culture and the stereotype of the drunken Indian. Documents a growing social movement which combines ancient spiritual traditions with modern medical approaches in substance abuse recovery. Directors, Chante Pierce and Gary Rhine. 2005. 90 min. DVD 4982

Rehab
This documentary follows five young addicts through Camp Recovery, in Santa Cruz, California, through a 30-day rehab program and tracks their progress, or lack thereof, in the months that follow. Directed by Steven Okazaki. c2005. 87 min. DVD X2549

Description from Berkeley Media catalog

The Meth Epidemic.
Speed. Meth. Glass. On the street, methamphetamine has many names. What started as a fad among motorcycle gangs in the 1970s has become a big business built on ephedrine -- the same chemical used to make over-the-counter cold remedies. Hundreds of illegal meth labs are now operating in the western United States, and the effects are sweeping the nation. From coast to coast, methamphetamine abuse is on the rise, but who's responsible? Is the government doing enough to crack down on this latest drug craze? Frontline investigates America's addiction to meth and exposes the inherent conflict between the illegal drug trade and the legitimate three-billion-dollar cold remedy business. Dist.: PBS. 2006. 60 min. DVD 5411

The Red Road to Sobriety
Places the alcohol problems of Native Americans within the context of the historical destruction of indigenous peoples and culture and the stereotype of the drunken Indian. Documents a growing social movement which combines ancient spiritual traditions with modern medical approaches in substance abuse recovery. Directors, Chante Pierce and Gary Rhine. 2005. 90 min. DVD 4982

Description from Berkeley Media catalog

Spin the Bottle: Sex, Lies and Alcohol.
By exploring the college party scene, this documentary shows the difficulties students have in navigating a cultural environment saturated with messages about gender and alcohol. The film steps beyond an analysis of "binge drinking" to focus on techniques that alcohol marketers use to link the product to the fragile gender identities of young men and women, encouraging students to recognized the presence of alcohol propaganda and take back control of their own lives from cynical manipulators. c2004. 45 min. Video/C MM82

Description from Media Education Foundation catalog

Substance Abuse Disorders.(World of Abnormal Psychology; 6)
Focuses on alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine addiction, considers the effects of substance abuse on the individual and society and examines causal factors and treatment approaches. 1992. 60 min. Video/C 4977

This program available for viewing online

Alternative Medicine

The Alternative Fix
Frontline examines the controversy over complementary and alternative medical treatments through interviews with staunch supporters, skeptical scientists and observers on both sides of the debate. These popular treatments are facing increased scrutiny as the first real studies of their effectiveness are published. Originally broadcast November 6, 2003 as a segment of the television program Frontline. Dist.: PBS. 60 min. DVD 3619

Alternative Medicine
Alternative, or complementary, health systems are gradually being integrated into American culture and can now be found in many American physicians' offices. This program provides an overview of Chinese medicine, ayurvedic, homeopathy, herbalism, naturopathy, osteopathy, massage, and chiropractic. Observes patients who are using one or more of these therapies in their health care and speaks with several experts. Originally broadcast in 1995 as a segment of: The Doctor Is In. Dist.: Films Media Group. 29 min. Video/C 6817

The Barefoot Doctors of Rural China
Examines the work of Chinese paramedics in rural areas of China. Shows how their work includes sanitation, reduction of pest problems, care for sick animals, and other duties relating to human birth control, dentistry, tonsil removal, and minor ailments requiring herbal remedies or acupuncture. 1975. 52 min. Video/C 6935

Bushman's Secret
When South African filmmaker Regad Desai travels to the Kalahari to investigate global interest in ancient Bushmen knowledge, he meets Jan van der Westhuizen, a fascinating Khomani San traditional healer. Jan's struggle to live close to nature is hampered by centuries of colonial exploitation of the San Bushmen and of their land. Unable to hunt and gather, the Khomani now live in a state of poverty that threatens to see the last of this community forever. "One plant make all the difference. Hoodia, a cactus used by Bushmen for centuries, has caught the attention of a giant pharmaceutical company. It now stands to decide the fate of the Khomani San. Director, Rehad Desai. Dist.: Documentary Educational Resources. 2006. 65 min.

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Chinese Healing
The Chinese look upon the body as an interactive energy system in which life energy -"chi"- flows along bodily meridians. In this program, the therapeutic value of acupuncture, massage, cupping, and chi kung is examined, along with preventive measures for replenishing chi, balancing yin and yang, and promoting harmony of body, mind, and spirit. Traditional Chinese Medicine is thousands of years old but its holistic approaches and almost mystical nature have left Western medical practitioners feeling skeptical, despite sometimes astonishing results. Fortunately, as the dialogue between East and West evolves, both are integrating the methods of the other for the overall improvement of health around the world. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1997. 45 min. Video/C 6815

Creature Cures (Taboo series)
Goes beyond conventional medicine to explore cures of the creepy-crawly kind, like bee-sting therapy in Taiwan to blood-sucking leeches in India. Originally broadcast on the National Georgaphic Channel in 2004. 48 min. DVD X1142

Eduardo the Healer
Presents the life and philosophy of Eduardo Calderon, a Peruvian folk healer. Includes his methods of diagnosis and a curing ceremony. 1978. 54 min. Video/C 7666

The Healer in the Indigenous Communities of the Highlands of Chiapas (El curandero en los pueblos indigenas de los altos de Chiapas)
A documentary of how a Mayan healer is called upon by people in the community to cure the sick. The healer reveals his Mayan healing practices--a combination of indigenous rituals and Christianity. c2000. 34 min. Video/C MM850

Healers (Taboo series)
The ability to heal others is prized in all cultures. But a healer's source of power can be mysterious and treatment often requires a big leap of faith. Meet three healers who claim their strength derives from unconventional sources. Originally broadcast on the National Georgaphic Channel in 2004. 48 min. DVD X1140

Healers of Ghana.
Explores the traditional medical practices of the Bono people of central Ghana and how their healers are accommodating the conflict between the arrival of Western medicine and their religious beliefs. Traditionally, Bono tribal priests undergo a painful spiritual possession, during which deities reveal to them the causes of illnesses, which plants to use to treat them, who is perpetrating witchcraft, and which villagers might be endangering society through improper behavior. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1993. 58 min. Video/C 5002

Healing and the Mind
5-part series hosted by Bill Moyers in which he investigates alternative medicine through visits with physicians, scientists, therapists and patients around the world, examining the healing connection between mind and body. Dist.: Ambrose Video. c1993. 58 min. each installment.

Vol 1: The Mystery of Chi. Moyers along with guide David Eisenberg of Harvard Medical School explores traditional Chinese medicine and its approach to healing through "Chi." Video/C 9713

Vol 2: The Mind Body Connection. Moyers talks with scientists and doctors who are on the frontier of mind-body research. Through careful research to understand how thoughts, emotions, and even personalities can effect physical health, they are gaining new insights into how the nervous and immune systems are linked and the role of emotions in health. Video/C 9714

Vol 3: Healing from Within. Examines two therapies that involve neither drugs nor surgery. One is a form of Buddhist meditation; the other, group psychotherapy. Both teach patients to use their minds to improve the healing capacities within their bodies. Video/C 9715

Vol 4: The Art of Healing. Looks at health care professionals who are employing models of medical care based on the idea that emotional states play an important role in people's vulnerability to disease and a patient's recovery. Also examines the importance of emotional and cultural issues in medical practice with Hispanic Americans. Video/C 9716

Vol 5: Wounded Healers. Highlights a visit to Commonweal, a retreat for people with cancer. The program follows a group of people over the course of a week as they learn to live with cancer. By listening, supporting, and encouraging each other, they recognize one another's unique experience of illness. Video/C 9717

The Jungle Pharmacy
Documents the development of certain pharmaceutical cures from natural compounds which are obtained from the trees of the tropical rainforests, and looks at the increasing ravaging of these forests and efforts to conserve them. Director, Jamie Hartzell. Dist: Cinema Guild. 1989. DVD 8243

The Jungle Pharmacy: Nature's Remedy
Do the world's rainforests contain a cure for cancer and AIDS? This intriguing program travels to Jakarta, Surabaya, and the jungles of Kalimantan to investigate the preparation and use of natural remedies to combat illnesses such as skin fungus, malaria and even AIDS. But logging continues unabated in Indonesia and other tropic zones. Will the jungle pharmacy disappear before it can be understood? Dist.: Films Media Group. Originally produced by Deutsch Welle TV Berlin in 1992. 26 min. Video/C 6816

Magic or Medicine?: Encounters of a Healing Kind
In this program, Dr. Robert Buckman discusses the differences between conventional medicine and representative forms of alternative medicine while pointing out the similarities behind all forms of medical treatment. A conventional medical doctor, a practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine, a homeopathic physician, a holistic general practitioner, a Rolfing specialist, an iridologist, a healer trained in the Hawaiian belief system of Huna, and a "bonesetter" in the Kalevalan folk tradition are filmed while consulting, diagnosing, and treating their patients. Navajo and curanderismo healing ceremonies are also presented. Dist.: Films Media Group. c2001. 52 min. Video/C 9773

Medicine in the Middle Kingdom
Looks at the variety and techniques of traditional medicine as developed in China including acupuncture and herbal medicine. Features archival film footage with commentary by authors and academics. Supplementary feature included on Adventures of young Indiana Jones; Volume one. c2007. 27 min. DVD X233

Medicine Made By God: The spiritual & Herbal Gealing Ministry of Brother Anatoli Wasswa
After twenty five years as an educator in Uganda, Brother Anatoli Wasswa began to devote himself to the study, research, and practice of using traditional medicine to lead Ugandans out of dependency on witchcraft and to accept natural cures for all kinds of illnesses and problems. He calls this "Medicine made by God." Wassawa is one of the leading authorities on herbal medicine on the African continent. Slowly through his radio programmes and his thirteen clinics, despite the opposition of witchdoctors, people have come to trust in the power of his spiritual and herbal healing now known all over Uganda, Africa, and Europe. 1996. 41 min. Video/C MM1122

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest.
Presentations from the workshop "Pharmacy from the Rain forest" held in Peru during October 1994.

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 1: ACEER Useful Plant Trail Guide. A tour of the Useful Plant Trail of the Amazon Center for Environmental Education and Research situated in the Peruvian rain forest. On average, nearly 300 species of woody plants per hectare have been found to grow here. Shaman Don Antonio Montero hosts the tour and describes the properties of 45 trees and plants, not only those useful to the people of Amazonia but some that provide chemicals or products used in countries around the world. Sponsored by the American Botanical Council, Texas Pharmacy Foundation, and International Expeditions. 28 min. Video/C 7872

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 2: Plant Drugs, Healing Herbs and Phytomedicals. Keynote address from the workshop "Pharmacy from the Rain forest" held in Peru during October 1994. Dr. Varro E. Tyler gives the opening presentation at this first ever conference to bring traditional medicinal plant healers and Western pharmaceutical professionals together to explore the uses of medicinal plants from the tropical rain forests of Peru. 1994. 34 min. Video/C 7873

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 3: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Application of Plant Drugs. A presentation from the workshop "Pharmacy from the Rain forest" held in Peru during October 1994. Dr. Varro E. Tyler explores five significant categories of plant drugs including antineoplastic agents, antiprotozoal drugs, cardiovascular drugs, chemotherapeutic drugs and possible immunostimulants. These and other natural products have served as prototypes for synthetic and semi-synthetic medicinals. 1994. 81 min. Video/C 7873

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 4: Nutrition and the Amazon Food Pharmacy. This program focuses on foods that are derived from tropical sources and the multiple health benefits they provide. Dr. James Duke traces the origins of introduced and native tropical "food farmaceuticals" that can be and have been utilized in preventitive pharmacy as well as an adjunct to therapeutic drug pharmacology. 1994. 47 min. Video/c 7875

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 5: Tropical Medicine in the Rainforest Dr. Linnea Smith of La Clinica Yanamono located on the banks of the Amazon River 50 miles from Iquitos, shares her experiences in providing healthcare in the Amazon where Western medicine is usually unavailable. She gives insights into how the cultural and religious needs of the people bring a new dimension to treatment and preventitive care. Adapative approaches of a medical practice in the Amazon as well as the problems, advantages and revelations of bringing Western-style medical care to this remote region are discussed. 1994. 25 min. Video/C 7876

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 6: Ethnomedical Field Research in the Amazon. Provides insights into the current methodology of ethnomedical field research as related to the success of programs associated with the search for new medicines from phytopharmaceuticals. Presents the challenges of drug discovery strategies as related to research among the Jivaro Amerindians of the western Amazon and gives some examples of uses of medicinal plants including obstetrical use by Amazonian Jivaro women, as well as the use of plant alkaloids in treating wounds. 1994. 57 min. Video/C 7877

Plant Wars
Dist.: Films Media Group. 2006. 52-53 min. each installment.

A Treasury of Plants. While acknowledging the achievements of the pharmaceutical industry, this program offers an alternative perspective on the production of medicines, emphasizing the use of plants and herbs instead of synthetic compounds. Beginning with a historical overview of plant remedies -- including evidence of sophisticated herbalism in ancient civilizations -- the film describes how pharmacology evolved out of traditional herbal medicine. It also explores new pharmaceutical research that has come full circle, returning to the use of natural plant extracts. The development of anti-cancer medicine derived from periwinkle is one of many examples. DVD 5733

The Shamans of the Future, or the New Alliance. This program identifies new ways for pharmaceutical companies to operate globally, promoting increased cooperation with local producers of traditional, plant-based medicines. Recognizing the worldwide demand for alternative medicine may create new producer countries, the program visits centers of herbology and other non-Western healing methods in China, Vietnam, Bhutan, Senegl, and Kenya. The documented ability of these facilities to fight AIDS and other diseases forms a powerful argument for the coexistence of both corporate and traditional industries. DVD 5734

Whose Plants Are They, Anyway? Surveying the vast biodiversity of the medicinal plant world, this program examines the challenges facing countries rich in such natural resources. Presents interviews with numerous alternative health experts, documenting their knowledge in a wide range of herbal and plant-based treatments. It also studies controversies surrounding the patenting of organisms with medicinal potential, such a Peru's maca root -- a clear demonstration that the interests of powerful pharmaceutical companies don't always suit those of indigenous peoples. DVD 5735

Pomo Shaman.
Shows Essie Parrish, the spiritual head of the Kashia Indian community and the only southwestern Pomo Indian sucking doctor who still practices this ancient form of doctoring. Follows his actions as he performs the essentials of the second and final night of a curing ceremony. Directed by William R. Heick, David Wayne Peri, Robert Walter Wharton. 1964. 20 min. DVD X5807; vhs Video/C 2428

Sastun
Sastun tells the story of American herbalist Rosita Arvigo, whose quest to explore the healing powers of plants led her to the rain forest of Belize where she befriended one of the last remaining Maya shamans, Don Elijio Panti. A film by Guido Verweyen. Presented at the International Latino Film Festival held in the San Francisco Bay Area. 2002. 20 min. Video/C MM1274

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Shamans of Siquijor: The Healers
Profiles three healers on Siquijor Island, Philippines, who cure illnesses using herbs, incantations, a magical prayer wheel, and other means. Is folk healing still valuable for the social and spiritual life of the community or just a dying relic of old traditions? c2004. 27 min. DVD 6672

Sucking Doctor
Presents, in its entirety, the second and final night of a curing ceremony held by the Kashia group of the Southwestern Pomo Indians. Shows how on the first night (May 31, 1963), while the Shaman was in a hypnotic trance, the patient's pain was located and the germs removed from his body. Directed by William R. Heick, David Wayne Peri, Robert Walter Wahrton. 1963. 50 min. Video/C 7868

Tiger's Apprentice
A Vietnamese American filmmaker journey's to her native Vietnam to observe and document her great-uncle's folk medicine practices. During her visit, Nguyen observes him treating many patients and making his medicines for tumors, leprosy, and infections. She also talks to his patients, to local doctors and herbalists, and battles Vietnamese government censors who are fearful her footage might make Vietnam appear backward to the Western world. Directed by M. Trinh Nguyen. 1998. 57 min. Video/C 6850

Western Medicine Meets the East
Examines the use of acupuncture and other traditional Eastern medical techniques as an anesthetic during surgery and as treatment for various ailments such as arthritis and back pain. Originally presented in 1988 as a segment on the television series Innovation. 26 min. Video/C 9774

Biotechnology/Reproductive Technologies

The Big If: Interferon.
Interferon is a body-produced substance that is a promising cancer drug. Previously expensive and in short supply, manufactured Interferon is shown being tested and administered to patients with advanced cancers. 3/4" UMATIC. (NRLF#: B 969 318) 50 min. Video/C 549

The Biological Revolution: 100 Years of Science at Cold Spring Harbor(1986).
Explores the origins of the biotechnology revolution through the perspective of the renowned Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on Long Island and gives an up-close look at how new techniques to manipulate the genetic code are being employed against cancer and world hunger. 60 min. Video/C 2387

Biotechnology in Society Lecture Series
Sponsored by Genetech, Inc., GTE Foundation, UC Systemwide Biotechnology Research and Education Program, 1993.

Human Genetics in American Popular Culture. Dorothy Nelkin discusses how current perceptions of genetics in American society influences policy making in response to technological change. Lecture held January 7, 1993 at University of California, San Francisco. 63 min. Video/C 2975

The Commercialization of Academic Biology. Charles Weiner Reviews the role genetic researchers and academics play in the development of new biotechnology industries. 50 min. Video/C 2976

From Eugenics to Human Genetics (and Back) Diane Paul Reviews the history and philosophies undergirding eugenics, human genetics and genetic engineering. 50 min. Video/C 2977

The Routinization of Medical Innovations: Bioscience and Bioethics in MSAFP Screening Nancy Press discusses the significance to society of the development of the MSAFP screening test used to identify abnormalities in the fetus. 52 min. Video/C 2978

Plants, Powers, and Profits: Social, Economic, and Ethical Consequences of the New Agricultural Biotechnologies Lawrence Busch discusses recent agricultural research and the development of new agricultural biotechnologies and the impact of their applications upon society. 50 min. Video/C 2979

Genetic Testing, the Social Milieu, and the Leap from Genes to Behavior Troy Duster discusses the social implications of the newly emerging "human geo-technologies". 63 min. Video/C 2980

Looking Back at Monoclonal Antibodies: An Ethnographic Account Alberto Cambrosio discusses the development of new biotechnologies and their applications which have resulted from the discovery of monoclonal antibodies. 63 min. Video/C 2981

Genomic Networks: A Sociology of the Human Genome Initiative Stephen Hilgartner discusses how knowledge concerning genomes is achieved and organized with a view to creating a viable infrastructure for the developing biotechnologies of the future. 63 min. Video/C 2982

New Wine in Old Bottles: A Comparative Review of Biotechnology Regulation Sheila Jasanoff discusses evolution of relations between science, technology and regulatory agencies. Film includes the current political situation and the regulation of new biotechnological innovations. Lecture held March 4, 1993 at University of California, San Francisco. 53 min. Video/C 2983

Rethinking the Meaning of Genetic Determinism Evelyn Fox Keller. Lecture held March 11, 1993 at University of California, San Francisco. 61 min. Video/C 2984

Biotechnology in the 21st Century Dist.: Films Media Group. 2009.

Biotechnology and Your Health
Scientists have come a long, long way since Alexander Fleming's discovery of penicillin, the wonder drug of the 20th century. This program explains the function of infection-fighting antibiotics; vaccinations and insulin, crucial to the prevention of diseases such as smallpox and the management of diabetes; recombinant drugs, treatments involving genetically engineered DNA; and stem cells, those chameleon-like building blocks of the body. Contents: Introduction -- Antibiotics -- Vaccination & Insulin -- Recombinant Drugs -- Stem Cells. Based on book Biotechnology and your health : pharmaceutical applications", by Bernice Schacter. 24 min. DVD X2947

The Ethics of Biotechnology
A group of experts discuss the ethical and moral implications of biotechnology in the twenty-first century. The program examines ethical and moral issues in relation to cloning, stem cell research, and animal testing. Based on book The ethics of biotechnology, by Jonathan Morris (Business & Economics TP248.23 .M67 2006). 24 min. DVD X2948

Biotechnology on the Farm and in the Factory
A group of experts discuss the issues and challenges concerning the use of biotechnology in agriculture and industry in the twenty-first century. Topics include genetic engineering to increase crop yields; animal agriculture; and industrial applications of biotech in the manufacturing of chemicals, textiles, beverages, and fuel. Based on the book "Biotechnology on the farm and in the factory: agricultural and industrial applications" by Brian Shmaefsky. 28 min. DVD X2949

Bloodlines: Technology Hits Home
Offering hope to infertile couples; curing disease by mixing human and animal cells; assessing risk with genetic testing. Over the past few decades the public has become increasingly comfortable with a growing menu of reproductive and genetic medical procedures. This documentary assesses how new life technologies are raising ethical, legal and social dilemmas as cutting-edge science intersects with the law. Written, produced and directed by Noel Schwerin. Premiere broadcast on PBS June 10th, 2003. 60 min. Video/C MM1162

Body Corporate: Who Owns Your Genes?
Right now across the globe there is a major legal and scientific battle raging over one simple question: should we allow individuals and corporations to patent genes? Some biotech companies say yes, claiming patents reward medical research and promote the investigation of life saving treatments. Others see it very differently, describing patenting as a biotech land-grab that's less about patients and more about greed. Reporter Andrew Fowler travels to the United States and around Australia to hear from both sides in this high-stakes battle. He talks to the researchers, patent lawyers and families who have been forced to pay significant amounts of money to find out if they have genes linked to potentially life-threatening conditions. Who is right? Can the very basis of life itself be patented and sold? Is it possible that a unique gene that makes us what we are could be patented by someone we don't know and then franchised out to a major corporation? Originally broadcast as a segment of Four Corners on ABC television on September 6, 2010. 45 min. DVD X6704

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Children by Design (Secret of Life; 7).
A couple has one child with cystic fibrosis. Determined that their next child will be free of the CF gene, they join in an experiment in which the fertilized eggis tested and possibly rejected. Other parents decide that their child will be the first to receive gene therapy. These are just a few of theextraordinary choices created by the current state of genetic engineering. 60 min. Video/C 3161

DNA and Dollars
Viewers are taken behind the scenes in clinics and laboratories to meet some of the major players in genetic research and into the homes of patients who have donated their DNA in the hope of finding treatments or cures for diseases. In the midst of this hope, nagging questions remain as to the ownership and patenting of human genetic materials. The biotech industry rightly claims that it takes a decade or more and millions of dollars to get a discovery from the lab bench to the drugstore shelf. But the public concerns about the manipulation and commercialization of human genes, cloning, genetic privacy seem to be lost as science marches onwards. Directed by David Maltby. Dist: National Film Board of Canada. 2002. 48 min. Video/C MM933

18 Ways to Make a Baby(NOVA)
Presents an in-depth look at scientific breakthroughs in reproductive science, including "cytoplasmic transfer, "in vitro fertilization, and the impact on human lives of revolutionary scientific breakthroughs in human reproduction presented by doctors and biologists on the leading edge. Also looks into a future where parents might one day be able to design their child for its sex and other traits. c2001. 56 min. Video/C MM35

Gene Blues: Dilemmas of DNA Testing
As geneticists unlock the DNA code, genetic engineering increasingly holds promise for alleviating human suffering, but what are the risks? This program looks at some problem areas: loss of privacy unless access to personal genetic information is protected; discrimination in employment and insurance based on genetic tests; and loss of respect for people with disabilities as the public comes to view inherited conditions as "avoidable" and some call for restricting reproductive rights. What are the ramifications of gene technology and to what extent should human beings intervene in the basic workings of nature? 31 min. 1997. Video/C 7269

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

The Gene Engineers (Nova).
Examines the social aspects of genetic engineering. 57 min. Video/C 16

The Genetic Gamble (Nova ).
Examines current research and prospects for the future of the controversial gene therapy. Medical scientists describe the need for gene therapy in treating patients suffering from various diseases caused by genetic disorders. Also explores the legal ramifications of genetic engineering. 58 min. Video/C 1026

Genetic Testing, the Social Milieu, and the Leap from Genes to Behavior. (Biotech lecture; 6).
Troy Duster discusses the social implications of the newly emerging "human geo-technologies". Symposium held Feb. 11, 1993, UC San Francisco; sponsored by Genentec, Inc. 63 min. Video/C 2980

Google Baby
This program journeys across three continents to meet the global network of egg donors, embryo brokers, doctors, surrogates and clients involved in the unregulated human reproduction industry. A host of moral and ethical questions are raised as the filmmakers follow the bold and scary global baby making trail. Directed & produced by Zippi Brand Frank. Originally broadcast on HBO2 in 2009. 76 min. DVD X6849

High-tech Babies (Nova).
This program discusses the triumphs, problems, and controversies surrounding the new technology of childbearing. 60 min. Video/C 1029

A History of Gene Therapy
Although somatic gene therapy is still in its infancy, its enormous potential is already visible. This program combines case studies involving AIDS, heart disease, ADA deficiency, and canavan disease and interviews with doctors and researchers from facilities such as the Universities of Southern California and Pennsylvania to outline the history of genetic science. But the ability to manipulate and alter the most basic building blocks of life brings ethical, legal, and social dilemmas as well. Genetic screening and profiling, germ-line gene therapy and eugenics are addressed. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2004. 46 min. DVD 5720

Life, Patent Pending (Nova ).
Presents breakthroughs in gene engineering, along with how scientists go about creating new forms of life, and how the impact of the gene bonanza affects industry, medicine, and the scientific community. 57 min. Video/C 911

Life Running Out of Control
A global journey exploring the effects of the ongoing experiments in the genetic manipulation of plants, animals and human beings, and unethical uses of genetic studies. A film by Bertram Verhaag and Gabriele Krober. 2004. Includes both the original 95-minute, and the short 60-minute versions of the film, and 77 minutes of additional interviews broken up into separate sections on plants, animals and humans. DVD 4676

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Life Running Out of Control: Designer Babies and Gene Robbery
Explores the possibility and other frightening implications of market-driven genetic engineering. Showing how the government-funded Human Genome Project has become highly lucrative for pharmaceutical companies, the film examines the cases of exploitative gene harvesting in Iceland and Peru. Interviews with prominent scientists and activists highlight the dangers of patenting genetic data and an absence of public discourse about artifical gene selection. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2004. 59 min. DVD 5037

Molecular Miracles: Human Gene Therapy and the Future of Modern Medicine
On September 14, 1990, a four year old girl who was suffering from a debilitating immune disease became the first human to receive gene therapy. Leading researchers describe the day and the consequences it has had for physicians using this new science to diagnose and treat many fatal genetic disorders. Dist.: Films Media Group. c1993. 47 min. Video/C MM1047

The Mouse that Laid the Golden Egg (Secret of Life ; 6).
What happens when science meets the marketplace, when life itself bceomes a commodity? Film examines the promises and dangers of industrial genetic manipulation, and the interaction of science with the marketplace. Dist.: Films Media Group. c1993. 60 min. Video/C 3160

On the Eighth Day: Perfecting Mother Nature.
A 2-part film about new reproductive and genetic technologies which poses disturbing questions about why these technologies are being developed and how they may affect the lives of women and society as a whole. Part 1 explores the origins and applications of in vitro fertilization. Part 2 is a critical examination of the application of genetic technology and the social and economic pressures which may influence the develoment and use of these procedures. Explores the social impact of the desire to produce perfect human beings on children, women, and the disabled. 102 min. Video/C 3365

Women Make Movies catalog description

Our Genes, Our Choices (Fred Friendly Seminars)
c2003.

Who Gets to Know? When it comes to genetic testing, how much should a patient be told? If the news is bad, who else should the patient inform? And could - or should - such privileged information be made available to employers, insurance companies, and others? This seminar moderated by Harvard Law School's Arthur Miller offers a compelling discourse on the far-reaching ethical, social, legal, and economic implications of genetic testing. 57 min. DVD 8857

Making Better Babies: Genetics and Reproduction How far should people be allowed to go in trying to have better babies? And whose definition of "better" should prevail? This seminar moderated by Dateline NBC correspondent John Hockenberry considers the ethical dilemmas facing individuals and society that grow out of prenatal testing and genetic options that may be available in the future -- such as cloning. 57 min. DVD 8858

Genes on Trial Genetics, Behavior, and the Law Could genetic research stigmatize people who carry a "bad" gene? Could the behavior actually be determined by that gene? If so, then just how free is free will? Moderated by Harvard Law School's Charles Ogletree, this seminar scrutinizes social, ethical, and legal issues involving genetic research into undesirable traits such as addiction to alcohol by exploring the relationship between the genetic basis for addiction and the limits of personal responsibility. 57 min. DVD 8859

A Question of Genes: Inherited Risks
Explores the ethical, moral and medical implications of the powerful new technology of genetic testing as it follows the personal journey of seven individuals and families who discover potential inherited genetic weaknesses. 116 mion. Video/C 6120

The Routinization of Medical Innovations: Bioscience and Bioethics in MSAFP Screening.
Biotech lecture; 4. Nancy Press discusses the significance to society of the development of the MSAFP screening test used to identify abnormalities in the fetus. Symposium held at UC San Francisco, Jan. 28, 1993; sponsored by Genentec, Inc. 52 min. Video/C 2978

Stem Cell and Other Medical Research

Life Sciences: Human Biology, Physiology and Genetics

Creation
Presents the latest advances in cloning, stem cell development, and genetic science. Includes an overview of the cloning research of Jose Cibelli, head of research at Advanced Cell Technology, which led to the first artificially cloned embryo are paralleled with the incredible feat of genetic replication as it occurs naturally in the womb. Commenting on how these innovations have already dramatically changed human life are Professor Lee Silver, molecular biologist at Princeton University, and Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist Sir Paul Nurse. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2002. 50 min. DVD 7981

Embryonic Stem Cell Tests
Susan Dentzer studies two new techniques for creating stem cells and the ethical and religious concerns surrounding them. Originally broadcast as segments of: The News Hour with Jim Lehrer. DVD 8860

Fetal Fix: Stem Cell Research and Moral Conflict
In the expanding world of biotechnology, cells taken from aborted fetuses are seen as a promising resource for developing a variety of medical cures, although their use has sparked intense controversy. This program examines stem cell and fetal tissue research programs in the United States, Japan, and China and highlights the ethical concerns that surround these projects. Explaining why stem cells cultivated from embryonic or fetal tissue are useful for transplant work and for developing treatments for Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries, and other medical problems, the program explores a new dimension in the battle over the sanctity, and value of human life. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2006. 53 min. DVD 7980

Rebuilding the Brain: Adult Brain Stem Cells
In this program Dr. Perry Bartlett of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research discusses the benefits of his pioneering research with adult brain stem cells. Dr. Bartlett gives detailed information on the different types of stem cells, the current research being conducted with them, and the future benefits they will have in rebuilding neural tissue in people with brain injuries and brain diseases. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2002. 21 min. DVD 7979

The Stem Cell Divide
Examines how Missouri became a central battleground in the embryonic stem cell controversy, beginning with contentious legislation introduced in the state senate and culminating with a ballot initiative campaign. The documentary explores both sides of the issue and challenges assumptions as it shows the passions and principles of patients, advocates, politicians, scientists and religious leaders. Directed by Sharon Harris Pollack, Jill Mirowitz Mogil, Barbara Langsam Shuman. Dist.: Filmakers Library. 2008. 60 min. DVD X4943

Terra Incognita: Mapping Stem Cell Research
Puts a human face on the stem cell debate by following the work of Dr. Kessler of Northwestern University, a renowned expert in the field of stem cell research, as he searches for a cure to spinal cord injuries, and the breakthrough that will allow his injured daughter to walk again. Director, Maria Finitzo. Dist. Cinema Guild.c2007. 90 min. DVD 8707

Tracked Down by Our Genes
Shows how the scientific breakthrough of the Human Genome Project has ushered in a new age of genetic awareness, with hundreds of companies offering tests to determine ancestry, paternity, and hereditary diseases. In addition to such benefits, however, there is increasing concern about the potential abuse of this scientific knowledge, such as the national databases of genetic information on millions of individuals being used in forensic investigations by police departments worldwide. Features interviews with leading geneticists, microbiologists, anthropologists, sociologists, civil-liberties lawyers and genetic rights activists. A film by Philippe Borrel & Gilbert Charles. c2007. 53 min. DVD X256

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Weighing the Decision: Ethics and Science of Stem Cell Research
On August 9, 2001, President George W. Bush announced his support for federal funding of limited embryonic stem cell research. This NewsHour program offers a revealing snapshot of that historic intersection between science and public policy. Bush's comments are followed by a panel discussion by ethicists and researchers expressing their views on the President's decisions--including University of Chicago professor Leon Kass, who soon became chair of the President's Council on Bioethics; Dr. Diane Krause, a stem cell researcher and Yale School of Medicine professor; Robin Alta Charo, a University of Wisconsin professor of law and bioethics; and Richard Doerflinger, Deputy Director of Pro-Life Activities for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. Originally broadcast on News hour with Jim Lehrer, August 9, 2001. Dist.: Films Media Group. 27 min. DVD 8887

Death and Dying

After Death
The television series Taboo presents an insider's view of closed worlds traditionally off-limits to outsiders with stunning stories of shocking and unusual rituals and traditions. Looks at how various cultures confront the untimate taboo: dealing with the dead.Originally broadcast on the National Georgaphic Channel in 2004. 48 min. DVD X1142

Angel on My Shoulder
Documentary about the death from cancer of Gwen Welles, who starred in such films as Nashville, New Years Day and Roger Vadim's "helle". Diagnosed with an cancerous tumor in 1992, Gwen chose not to go for conventional treatments, and the film documents her slow deterioration. Directed by Donna Deitch. 1997. 85 min. DVD X5244

Death: A Love Story
A thought provoking portrait of the greatest challenge we must all one day face. Married to Michelle LeBrun for only two years, actor Mel Howard was diagnosed with terminal liver cancer. Howard at first rejected traditional cancer treatments in favor of alternative therapy, and then embraced chemotherapy and liver transplants as last-ditch attempts to save his life. The film's ultimate focus is on Howard's spiritual progression as he adjusts to the notion of his passing. 1999. 63 min. DVD 3114

Death on Request.
This documentary records Cees de Joode as he, his wife Antoinette, and his doctor choose euthanasia to end his suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-- the incurable degenerative muscle disease also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. A film by Maarten Nederhorst 1994. 57 min. Video/C 6776

Dying
A personal, profound and poignant memoir of three people with terminal cancer and how they faced their deaths. One returns home to her elderly mother to die and they grow closer in their shared grief; the second is a husband with a wife and two children who is stoic about his death while his wife rages aginst his fate; the third is a preacher who accepts his fate and returns to the South, enjoying the time he has left with his family. Filmed over a two year period, the film highlights how each human being lives and dies as an individual, with deep personal needs and attitudes. Produced and directed by Michael Roemer. [1996?] 82 min. Video/C 9276

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Dying at Grace
A film about the experience of dying. Allan King captures the last few months of the lives of five terminally ill cancer patients at Toronto Grace Health Care Center. Watch as they laugh, cry, and contemplate the many issues that come with certain death. Directed by Allan King. 2003. 148 min. DVD X4594

The End
This profoundly moving chronicle examines terminal illness through the darkly fascinating lens of family dynamics. The loved ones of five different hospice patients in Los Angeles document their experiences, creating video diaries that are part case study, part family album. Director, Kirby Dick. 2003. 85 min. DVD 3706

End of Life Care: Ethical Dimensions
Provides nurses and other health care professionals with practical information concerning end-of-life issues that can be applied in daily medical practice. 34 min. Video/C 5985

Euthanasia, Murder or Mercy?
Presents the various ethical, legal, medical, and sociological aspects of active voluntary euthanasia for the terminally ill from a pro-euthanasia viewpoint. Videotaped at the Hemlock Society's Second National Voluntary Euthanasia Conference. c1985. 30 min. Video/C 9991

Flight From Death: The Quest for Immortality
Uncovers death anxiety as a possible root cause of many of our behaviors on a psychological, spiritual, and cultural level. Explores the ongoing research of a group of social psychologists which substantiates Ernest Becker's claim that death anxiety is a primary motivator of human behavior, specifically aggression and violence. Directed and edited by Patrick Shen 86 min. DVD X4420

Forever
Through a leisurely tour of the world-famous Père-Lachaise cemetery in Paris, the final resting place for legendary writers, composers, painters and other artists from around the world, this film provides an unusually poignant, emotionally powerful meditation on relations between the living and the dead, and the immortal power of art. Directed by Heddy Honigmann. c2006. 95 min. DVD 8638

The Hospice.
This film explores the work of a hospice in Zambia, a country on the front line in the world fight against HIV/AIDS. In Zambia, where one in five of the population are HIV-positive (most under 40 years old), all of the eleven million population has been touched by HIV/AIDS in some way. The Mother of Mercy Hospice on the edge of the capital, Lusaka, was the first of its kind in Zambia. It has just 22 beds and was founded by an inspiring woman of extraordinary courage, a Polish nun called Sister Leonia. The film follows the work of the staff and volunteers both at the hospice and in the local villages and communities. The courage of patients, the resilience and despair of the staff and the dignity of how they all deal with the almost daily ritual of death makes this film an extraordinary account of the human face of AIDS in modern Africa. Directed by Kasper Blagaard. c2004. 23 min. DVD 3977

Description from Bullfrog Films Catalog

How to Die in Oregon
In 1994, Oregon became the first state to legalize physician-assisted suicide. Since then, more than 500 Oregonians have taken their mortality into their own hands. Filmmaker Peter Richardson enters the lives of the terminally ill as they consider whether--and when--to end their lives by lethal overdose. Richardson examines both sides of the complex, emotionally charged issue. Directed, produced and photographed by Peter D. Richardson. 2010. 107 min. DVD X7081

[Kübler-Ross, Elisabeth]Elisabeth Kübler-Ross: Facing Death
Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross who has devoted her life to the study of death and dying, has done much to de-stigmatize dying and to draw attention to the treatment of the terminally ill. Now she lives in seclusion in the Arizona desert, on the verge of the transition she researched so passionately. Conversations with Elisabeth form the core of the film as she looks back on her life, describes her childhood and her work and explains how she herself faces aging and impending death. Includes interviews with family and colleagues, as well as extensive archival material. A film by Stefan Haupt. 2002. 57 min.) DVD X3422; Video/C 9718

Description from Icarus Films catalog

[Kubler-Ross, Elisabeth]To Live Until You Die: The Work of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross
An intimate portrait of Elizabeth Kübler-Ross working with the terminally ill in which she discusses her experiences in helping patients to face death without fear, and stresses the importance of communication which recognizes the patient's feelings. Originally broadcast on PBS as a segment of Nova. c1983. 57 min. Video/C 9928

Letting Go: A Hospice Journey
Shows how hospice can provide an opportunity to find comfort, companionship, and peace before death for terminally ill patients and their families. Follows the cases of three persons showing how hospice care helps them cope with fear and pain in the final stages of their lives, and prepares their loved ones for their imminent loss. The program also sheds light on the decision-making process of the doctors, nurses, chaplains, social workers, and volunteers involved in the hospice. Exec. producer, Sheila Nevins; editor, Deborah Dickson; camera, Albert Maysles. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1998. 90 min. DVD 3138

Near Death (1989)
An extensive 6 hour documentary filmed at the Intensive Care Unit of Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, examining how people and medical personnel face death. Presents the complex interrelationships between patients, families, doctors, nurses, hospital staff and religious advisors as they confront the personal, ethical, medical, psychological, religious and legal issues involved in making decisions about whether or not to give life-sustaining treatment to dying patients. A film by Fred Wiseman. 1989. 289 min. DVD X7239; Video/C 7066

On Our Own Terms
Host, Bill Moyers. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2000. 90 minutes each segment.

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

On Our Own Terms: Living with Dying. Death, which sooner or later comes to all, is treated as a strangely taboo subject in America. In this program, Bill Moyers describes the search for new ways of thinking--and talking--about dying. Forgoing the usual reluctance that most Americans show toward speaking about death, patients and medical professionals alike come forward to examine the end of life with honesty, courage, and even humor, demonstrating that dying can be an incredibly rich experience for both the terminally ill and their loved ones. 2000. 90 min. Video/C 8420

On Our Own Terms: A Different Kind of Care. At the end of life, what many Americans want is physical and spiritual comfort in a home setting. Bill Moyers presents the important strides being made in the area of palliative care at pioneering institutions such as New York's Mt. Sinai Hospital and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. These advances are bringing peace to those who fear that they will be a burden to loved ones, will suffer needlessly, or will be abandoned in their hour of greatest need. 2000. 90 min. Video/C 8421

On Our Own Terms: A Death of One's Own. More and more Americans are looking for opportunities to exert some measure of control over where and how they die. In this program, Bill Moyers unravels the complexities underlying the many choices at the end of life, including the bitter debate over physician-assisted suicide. Three patients, their families and their doctors discuss some of the hardest decisions, including how to pay for care, what constitutes humane treatment, and how to balance dying and dignity. In the end, do these patients die the way they wanted? Yes...and no. 2000. 90 min. Video/C 8422

On Our Own Terms: A Time to Change. Whether they want to or not, four out of five Americans will likely die in hospitals or nursing homes and the care they get will depend on who is footing the bill. Bill Moyers introduces crusading medical professionals--including staff members of the Balm of Gilead Project in Brimingham, Alabama--who have dedicated themselves to improving end-of-life care by changing America's overburdened health system. 2000. 90 min. Video/C 8423

Seeing the Difference: An Interdisciplinary Discussion of Death and Dying
Selected presentations and discussions from a two day institute with clinicians joined by artists and humanists in a discussion of what it means to die in American in the twenty-first century.

Seeing death and being seen / Jim Goldberg -- When death becomes plausible / Sandra Gilbert -- Acknowledging / Jodi Halpern, Patricia Benner, Elizabeth Davies, John Gillis, Thomas Cole -- When is death? / Guy Micco -- Altered states : conceptions of dying in a technological age: I. Expectations and reality in "triumph over nature" / Debu Tripathy. II. Accepting the natural / Lawrence Schneiderman -- Knowing / Frank Gonzalez-Crussi, Michael Whitmore -- Closing the door / Madelon Sprengnether, Sandra Gilbert. Held at the University of California, June 1-2, 2000. Berkeley, CA: Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, [1995]. 46 min. Video/C 8747

Seeing the Difference web site (Townsend Center)

The Self-made Man
Bob Stern, 77, discovers he is seriously ill, possibly dying. Thinking of an in-law on life-support, Bob decides to take his own life to avoid that end. His family tries to stop him. Bob sets up a video camera and tapes his arguments for suicide. Daughter Susan Stern tells the story of her father's interesting life and talks about difficult end-of-life choices. Filmed in 2004, PBS national broadcast, P.O.V. July 26, 2005. A film by Susan Stern. Dist.: New Day Films. 64 min. DVD 4509

The Suicide Tourist
Do we have the right to end our lives if life itself becomes unbearable, or we are terminally ill? With unique access to Dignitas, the Swiss non-profit that has helped over one thousand people die, filmmaker John Zaritsky offers a revealing look at two couples facing the most difficult decision of their lives, and lets us see as one Chicago native makes the trip to Switzerland for what will become the last day of his life. Directed by John Zaritsky. Originally broadcast on public television as an episode of Frontline, March 2, 2010. 60 min. DVD X5416

The Undertaking
Enters the world of Thomas Lynch, a writer, poet and undertaker whose family has cared for the dead -- and the living-- in a small Michigan town for three generations. For the first time, Lynch has allowed cameras inside Lynch & Sons, giving behind-the-scenes access -- from funeral arrangements to the embalming room. Tells the intimate stories of families coming to terms with grief, mortality and a funeral's rituals. Film includes excerpts from Lynch's book "The Undertaking: Life Studies from the Dismal Trade." Directed by Miri Navasky and Karen O'Connor. Originally aired nationwide on PBS stations Tuesday, October 30, 2007. 60 min. DVD 9556

The Vanishing Line
Film follows physician/filmmaker Maren Monsen and hospice social worker Jim Brigham as they visit some of his terminally ill clients. All are laying the groundwork for their imminent deaths, negotiating in advance whether or not they want to be resuscitated, what comfort measures will be taken, and whether to go to a hospital or die at home. Brigham shares the storyof his wife Cay's prolonged death from multiple sclerosis and explains how that experience affected the way he views the end of life. Physician Monsen explores how to meet the needs of the dying and their families and looks at the choices involved in treating what has no cure with the right balance of technology, compassion and care. 1997. 52 min. Video/C 5520

Description from Icarus Films catalog

The Way We Die: Listening to the Terminally Ill.
Through interviews with doctors, patients, and family members, and through filmed interactions between medical personnel and their terminally ill patients, this video addresses a pervasive problem in healthcare today: the excessive and restrictive focus on treating diseases, not people. It makes a case that physicians and nurses must be trained to treat the whole patient, and encourages health care professionals to work with their patients to devise treatment plans in accordance with their needs, values, and wishes. 25 min. Video/C 4570

Description from Fanlight catalog

To Live Until You Die: The Work of Elisabeth Kubler-Ross
An intimate portrait of Elizabeth Kubler-Ross working with the terminally ill in which she discusses her experiences in helping patients to face death without fear, and stresses the importance of communication which recognizes the patient's feelings. 1983. 57 min. Video/C 9928

Disease / Disease Control

AIDS

The Addicted Brain.
Shows how the human brain manufactures and uses drugs. Explores the cutting edge of developments in the biochemistry of addiction and addictive behavior. Dist.: Films Media Group. c1987. 26 min. Video/C 1189

The Brain-body Connection
Three segments in a television program of Exploring your brain, present the latest research on the link between depression and disease, the brain's role in athletic performance, and the treatment of chronic pain. Covers such topics as the relationship between depression and platelet clotting, how synapses are hardwired, and the development of a drug to block the encoding of pain memories. Contents: Depression and disease / Eileen Dzik (20 min.) -- Sports and the brain / Tracy Day (16 min.) -- Chronic pain / Noel Gunther (20 min.). Dist.: Films Media Group. 2000. 56 min. DVD 7141

Cancer in Two Voices.
This film provides a glimpse into the real lives of two lesbian women, Sandy and Barbara, especially into their coping with Barbara's breast cancer. Sandy and Barbara had almost three years together from the time Barbara's cancer was diagnosed until her death in 1988. The film is based on home videotapes made during that time. A film by Lucy Massie Phenix based on original videotapes by Ann Hershey. 1994. 43 min. Video/C 4002

Description from Women Make Movies catalog

Cell Wars (Secret of Life ; 5).
Describes the study on the molecular level of parasites and microbes that challenge the human immune system, and the possiblity of eventually preventing diseases like multiple sclerosis and AIDS. 60 min. Video/C 3159

Conquering Cancer (Secret of Life; 4).
As scientists are learning that cancer is a disease of the genes, they are beginning to formulate genetic cures. Film describes the discovery of genetic links to cancer, and new cancer therapies. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1993. 60 min. Video/C 3158

Defusing Cancer's Time Bombs
A documentary about the environment and cancer sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Public Broadcasting Co. 1978. 30 min. 3/4" UMATIC Video/C 214

A Healthy Baby Girl.
Presents the filmmaker's experience of coping with her own hysterectomy at twenty five for cancer caused by her mother's use of D.E.S., a synthetic hormone administered to prevent miscarriage. Producer and director, Judith Helfand. A film by Judith Helfand. 1996. 57 min. DVD X6687; Video/C 5015

Description from Women Make Movies catalog

Awards
Peabody Award

Aufderheide, Patricia. "Judith Helfand: Secret Stories, Video Diaries, and Toxic Comedy." In: Exile cinema : filmmakers at work beyond Hollywood / Michael Atkinson, editor. Albany : State University of New York Press, c2008. (Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.D44 E97 2008)
James, Caryn. "A Healthy Baby Girl." (television program reviews) New York Times v146 (Mon, June 16, 1997):B2(N), C14(L), col 3, 22 col in.

Heart Disease: Some New Thoughts About Prevention
(Meredith Morgan Symposium; UC Berkeley). Professor Syme discusses preventative maintenance for a healthy heart. Details are given on a large scale research project that involved studying 6500 men who were considered high-risk factors. Video/C 2265

Influenza, 1918
In the spring of 1918, an army private reported to a hospital in Kansas. He was diagnosed with the flu, an illness that doctors knew little about. As the flu spread people turned in desperation to folk remedies while frantic officials closed schools, factories and churches, and everyone was required to wear a mask. But the flu was unstoppable and by the end of WWI 675,000 people had died. Drawing on archival photographs, film footage and interviews with survivors and medical historians, tells the powerful story of America's worst health crisis. Originally broadcast as a segment on the television program American Experience in 1998. Dist.: PBS. 60 min. DVD 5578

A Lion in the House
Chronicles the lives of five American families who each have a child battling cancer, following them over the course of six years of treatment and uncertainty. Special features: Deleted scenes (12 min.) ; interview with filmmakers Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert (16 min.) ; Making A lion in the house (29 min.) ; Lions on the road (15 min.) ; filmmakers bios. Directed by Steven Bognar & Julia Reichert. 2006. 241 min. DVD X2920
Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

Orphans of Mathare
Explores the full cycle of Balinese death rituals that support and protect the soul's journey in its endless cycle of life, death, and rebirth. The specific ceremonies, which vary according to social and economic level, family tradition, and individual circumstance, are linked through Hindu-Buddhist tradition and the centrality of various Balinese forms of gamelan and vocal music that validate the rituals, protect the deceased, and guide the soul on its journey. Produced and directed by Randy Bell & Pacho Velez. 2003. 60 min. DVD X3290

Berkeley Media LLC catalog description

A Paralyzing Fear: The Story of Polio in America
A documentary tracing the full circle of the battle against polio from illness to epidemic to cure. The arrival of polio to American shores in 1916 marked the beginning of long "polio summers" that infected and crippled thousands of children each year. Finally, after a long, grassroots fight against the disease, Dr. Salk's vaccine brought the epidemic to a halt. Director/writer, Nina Gilden Seavey. Dist.: PBS. 1997. 89 min. DVD X5706; Video/C 6647

Hindley, Meredith. "Summers Past." Humanities, Sep/Oct97, Vol. 18 Issue 5, p14, 7p UC users only

Pandemic: An Influenza Scenario
Originally broadcast on the BBC television program Horizon. Dist.: Films Media Group.

Outbreak in Asia: How a Flu Pandemic is Born
An avian influenza epidemic will likely begin where poultry is slaughtered in poorly managed conditions. This semi-dramatized program starts in rural Cambodia, where a mutated H5N1 virus spreads from an infected chicken into the local population. Depicting the WHO containment strategy, the program also illustrates how a single wayward villager could render all such measures useless. 49 min. DVD X2547

Outbreak in America: When the Flu Hits Home
A California businessman returns home from a meeting with Chinese executives. This program presents the frightening consequences of his jouirney, which has transformed him into America's Patient Zero -- an unwitting carrier of the deadly H5N1 virus. Although his story is fictional, it represents a disturbingly probably scenario for which even the world's most powerful nation has no satisfactory contingency plan. 49 min. DVD X2548

Patient to Patient: Cancer Clinical Trials and You.
Patients who have participated in a clinical trial talk about their experiences and address many common concerns of patients considering a clinical trial, such as risks, benefits, eligibility, enrollment and costs. 15 min. {1999?). Stored at: NRLF #: $B 216 159 Video/C 6612

The Polio Crusade
This film interweaves the personal accounts of polio survivors with the story of an ardent crusader who tirelessly fought on their behalf. Features interviews with historians, scientists, polio survivors, and the only surviving scientist from the core research team that developed the Salk vaccine, Julius Youngner. Based in part on the book "Polio : an American story" by David Oshinsky. Written, produced and directed by Sarah Colt. Originally broadcast Feb. 2, 2009 as an episode of the television series American experience on PBS. 60 min. DVD X3319

Rachel's Daughters: Searching for the Causes of Breast Cancer
Directed and edited by Allie Light and Irving Saraf. Rachel's Daughters, the first feature length film to be made about the causes of breast cancer, is an investigative documentary with a difference. Eight women living with breast cancer act as detectives, traveling across the country interviewing scientists and researchers about the possible causes of the disease. These interviews are woven together with historical footage, short dramatizations and emotional visualizations, creating an engaging detective story. Directed and edited by Allie Light and Irving Saraf. 1997. 107 min. DVD X6686; Video/C 5384

Women Make Movies catalog description

Gross, Liza. "Rachel's Daughters: Searching for the Causes of Breast Cancer." (video recording reviews)Sierra v83, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1998):111 (2 pages).
Kolata, Gina. "Rachel's Daughters: Searching for the Causes of Breast Cancer." (television reviews) New York Times v147 (Wed, Oct 1, 1997):B5(N), E1(L), col 1, 12 col in.
Wilcox, Carolyn. "Rachel's Daughters: Searching for the Causes of Breast Cancer." (video recording reviews)Library Journal v123, n13 (August, 1998):150.

Rx for Survival
Dist.: PBS. c2005. 112 min. each installment DVD 4776

Disease warriors: Chronicles the groundbreaking work of early researchers, such as Louis Pasteur, who unmasked germs as the source of illness. Today, vaccines have made huge strides against epidemics, conquering smallpox and bringing global eradication of polio within reach. But the world still faces major challenges in getting basic vaccines to those who still need them, and in creating new ones to combat modern nemeses, like AIDS.

Rise of the Superbugs: Looks at the discovery of the first antibiotic, penicillin and the subsequent development of more "wonder drugs." Also looks at the growing threat posed by new strains of germs, such as tuberculosis and staph, that are resistant to our best antibiotics.

Delivering the Goods: At the dawn of the 21st century, we can prevent, treat or cure most of the deadliest diseases--and yet millions die needlessly every year because the benefits of modern medicine and public health fail to reach them. What are the obstacles to providing care to populations in need? This program profiles innovative health programs in Third World Countries, and the leaders who, against all odds, are "delivering the goods."

Deadly Messengers: Since the plague of the Middle Ages, vector-borne diseases -- those that rely on insects and animals to spread infectious agents -- have posed a serious threat to public health. Today, the most dangerous vector on earth is the mosquito. From malaria to yellow fever to West Nile virus, mosquito-borne diseases continue to threaten the health of millions around the world.

Back to the Basics: Nutrient-enriched products have reduced diseases caused by vitamin deficiency, but poorer countries also suffer from the twin problems of poor nutrition and unsafe water. This segment explores the connection between health and the essential requirements that so many people take for granted. It also examines how an overabundance of food -- in the form of over-consumption -- is causing an epidemic of obesity that is spreading across the globe.

How Safe Are We? Despite the rise in life expectancy in the past 100 years, in the last few decades, thirty new infectious diseases have emerged and one of them -- AIDS -- is becoming perhaps the most devastating epidemic in history. New diseases travel the globe with unprecedented rapidity. This segment examines the most critical threats we face today -- including avian flu -- and the pressing need to strengthen global public health systems.

Sickle Cell Anemia.
Dr. Daniel Foster and guest Dr. Helen M. Ranney, head of the Dept. of Internal Medicine, U.C. San Diego, discuss various aspects of sickle cell anemia--a disease of the blood which afflicts only members of the black population. 3/4" UMATIC. (NRLF #: B 3 969 167) 29 min. Video/C 43

The Syphilis Enigma.
Scientists have generally believed that Columbus' expedition brought syphilis back to Europe with it. But now, the discovery in Europe of a pre-Columbian body with definite signs of syphilis has archeologist Charlotte Roberts convinced that syphilis existed in the Old World long before Columbus ever set sail. Originally presented as a segment on the television program Secrets of the dead. Dist.: PBS. c2001. 60 min. Video/C 8596

Trial and Error: The Rise and Fall of Gene Therapy.
It was the simplest idea but one with enormous potential. If a gene is defective in the human body, just replace it with one that works properly. Gene therapy would mean that genetic disorders would become a thing of the past. Cancer would be cured, as would cystic fibrosis and hundreds of other genetic illnesses. Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Human Gene Therapy and elsewhere were justifiably excited about the idea, but this enthusiasm would end up costing one young man his life. Originally broadcast as a segment of the television program Horizon. "A BBCW Production". Dist: Films Media Group. c2005. 50 min. DVD 5719

Tuberculosis in America: The People's Plague.
Chronicles a history that has shaped much of America's modern public health policy. Examines the battle against tuberculosis in the U.S. from the 1880s to the 1950s, a disease that is highly curable and almost entirely preventable and yet today, has returned to catch our country's health care system off guard. Told through the personal stories of TB survivors, and from the point of view of health care workers, researchers and TB victims of today. A film by Diane Garey and Lawrence R. Hott. Dist.: Direct Cinema. c1995. 114 min. Video/C MM1160

Viruses, the Mysterious Enemy.
Examines what is known about the tiny, mysterious, protein-covered nucleic acids called viruses and discusses their history, biochemistry, and life cycle. Tells how medical science is trying to eliminate this threat. 1985. 39 min. Video/C 2002

Disease/Diseases Control: AIDS

AIDS

Gay & Lesbian videography for videos on social and political aspects of AIDS.

+ve Living
In India over 2 million women are infected with HIV. For the majority of them, the only risk they were ever exposed to was marriage. This documentary follows 4 HIV infected women in rural Andhra Pradesh, who have battled with not just the virus but also the trauma, stigma and the ostracization that comes with it. 2007. 29 min. DVD 9669

The Age of AIDS
An extensive investigation of the history of the response to the AIDS crisis, produced on the 25th anniversary of the first diagnosed cases. Part one follows the trail of a medical mystery which began in 1981 when five gay men in Los Angeles were diagnosed with a deadly new disease. Traces the international response in the first years of the epidemic, contrasting moments of inspirational leadership with the tragedy of missed opportunities. Reveals the astounding spread of the infection to over 70 million infections in 2006. Part two explores the chasm that emerged between rich and poor following the development of the miraculous "triple cocktail" HIV treatment. While the discovery seemed to signal a new era in which AIDS was no longer a fatal disease, the high price of the drugs meant they were unaffordable to patients in developing nations. Also examines the next wave of the AIDS epidemic in some of the most populous and strategically important nations in the world, including Russia, India and China, and tracks the same pattern of official denial and political indifference that characterized the epidemic in so many other countries. Originally broadcast in two parts on May 30-31, 2006 as part of the Frontline television series. Dist.: PBS. c2006. 240 min. DVD 5793

AIDS, Blood and Politics (Frontline).
The ten-year history of AIDS and the blood supply is investigated, asking why the nation's guarantors of safe blood, including the American Red Cross and the FDA, failed to safeguard the blood supply from the deadly virus in the early 1980s, and why, still today, some of the nation's largest blood banks are not yet in full compliance with federal regulations on blood safety. 57 min. Video/C 3883

AIDS, Chapter One (Nova ).
Examines international efforts to uncover the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, focusing on research at the Center for Disease Control, the National Cancer Institute in the United States, and France's Pasteur Institute. 1985. 57 min. 3/4" UMATIC. Video/C 864

AIDS: Everything You and Your Family Need to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask.
Dr. C. Everett Koop, U.S. Surgeon General, answers frequently asked questions from a survey conducted by Home Box Office. c1987. 40 min. Video/C 1238

AIDS, HIV: Essentials of Professional Practice
Contents: 1. Infection control--2. Risk factor history taking-- 3. HIV testing and counseling. 1990? 22 min. Video/C 1787

AIDS in Africa
Describes the harsh reality of the AIDS epidemic in Zimbabwe, the hardest hit by the disease in Africa. Three successive reports address the hardships of a society composed of mostly the very old and the very young, and the grim future facing a nation deprived of its core adult population. Archbishop Desmond Tutu joins in the discussion of this monumental tragedy. Episodes from the television program, Nightline, originally airing Mar. 8-10, 2000. Reporter, Ted Koppel; correspondent, Dave Marash. 58 min. Dist.: Films Media Group. DVD 4904

AIDS: The Human Response
Health professionals discuss practical, emotional and spiritual responses to the AIDS crisis. 1989. Video/C 2233

Aids, Profile of an Epidemic: Update
An overview of AIDS, a disease which threatens to become a major epidemic of the century. Also covered are symptoms of the disease and what is being done to treat it. 1986. 58 min. Video/C 966

AIDS: The Global Challenge (CNN World Report; no. 59)
Reports from around the world about the fight against AIDS, who is most at risk, what is being done to protect them, latest research and treatment, education and prevention efforts. 1988. Video/C 1404:1-2

AIDS: Tracking the Mystery
The discovery of the HTLV3 virus now known to cause AIDS is documented through interviews and laboratory film footage. Emphasis is placed on progress in diagnosing, in developing reliable tests, and in allaying public fears that AIDS may be easily transmitted to the general population. 1984. 26 min. 3/4" UMATIC. Video/C 760

AIDS, What Everyone Needs to Know
A factual presentation on the current state of knowledge of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, with discussions by Doctors Michael Gottlieb and Peter Wolfe, and interviews with victims of the disease. 1986. 18 min. 3/4" UMATIC. Video/C 984

All of Us: Protecting Black Women Against AIDS
"The film follows a young female doctor, Mahret Mandefro, working in the south Bronx, as she gives medical and emotional support to her afflicted patients. Mahret is battling not only the virus, but the social conditions that leave these women so vulnerable. Focusing on two women, Chevelle and Tara, she explores their lives and how their early experience of abuse contributed to their inability to demand of their mates protected sex. She forms a support group where women patients confide in and comfort one another. As Chevelle and Tara strive for more power in their lives and relationships, Mehret expands her research to include women across boundaries of race, class and country. 2008. 82 min. DVD X6149

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

The Blood of Yingzhou District
Documentary on the AIDS epidemic in rural China focusing on one year in the life of a young boy with AIDS whose parents have died of the disease. Looks at how people living with the disease are ostracized. Shows how economic realities force many of the population into selling their blood to make ends meet, a practice that can expose them to unsafe medical practices that can expose them to the virus. Directed by Ruby Yang. Dist.: Cinema Guild. 2006. 40 min. DVD 8244

Awards
Academy Award: Best Documentary
Silverdocs: Docs Rx Global Documentary Award:

Blood Lines: A View Into the Souls of HIV+ Youth
A portrayal of young people living with HIV/AIDS, produced and written by HIV positive filmmakers Jennifer Jako and Rebecca Guberman, who were still in their teens when they became infected. A first person look at HIV positive youth who candidly share their grief, confusion, and hope. Directed and produced by Jennifer Jako and Rebecca Guberman. 2011. 24 min. DVD X6372

Brazil: Winning Against AIDS
HIV and AIDS patients in Brazil get the same treatment as similar patients in the United States and Europe. Since Brazil started to manufacture its own HIV and AIDS drugs in 1997, the national program has halved the death rate from AIDS, prevented thousands of new patients from being hospitalized, and helped stabilize the epidemic. This program examines whether Brazil's program can be replicated in other countries. Video/C 8944

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Can AIDS Be Stopped? (Nova ).
Discusses the disease, AIDS. Explains how the retrovirus HTLV III works to destroy the body's immunity. Discusses how the disease AIDS is transmitted, research regarding the disease, and ways to prevent it. 58 min. Video/C 1356

Changing face of AIDS
Joined by activists and health professionals from the U.S. and Africa, Ray Suarez moderates a roundtable on AIDS policy. Originally broadcast as segments of: The News Hour with Jim Lehrer. DVD 8860

Coping with AIDS: Some Personal Experiences of People with AIDS & HIV
Focuses on the physical, psychological, social and practical problems of people with AIDS. The aim of this program is to raise awareness of these difficulties among health care and social service providers. Presents a variety of people with AIDS and HIV infection who tell their own stories and share their experiences. 1988. 60 min. Video/C MM873

The Cost of Living. (Life, Part 14)
This program examines why AIDS drugs are unaffordable in developing countries, using as examples Thailand and South Africa, two countries who have applied to use compulsory licenses and parallel importing -- practices agreed under World Trade Organization guidelines -- to make their own generic versions of anti-retroviral drugs to halt the AIDS epidemic in their countries. It also asks why anti-retroviral drugs still aren't included in the WTO's essential drugs lists. (For other installments of series, see Global Issues and Events) c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7774

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Crisis Control: Stemming the Spread of HIV/AID
Two contrasting countries whose populations are affected by HIV/AIDS are examined, as are the roots of the problem and what is being done to alleviate it in each case. Ukraine has the fastest growing HIV epidemic in Europe, with most people infected through injecting drugs. Aid organizations and the government are working to encourage needle exchanges, peer education and self-help groups. In Zambia 1 in 5 of the population are infected. The film accompanies workers as they visit remote rural areas as well as the capital Lusaka and explores what is being done to stem the spread of AIDS and to treat those with the disease. 2004. 26 min. DVD 3964

Bullfrog Films catalog description

Dunia ni mbaya
This documentary examines why the AIDS epidemic is spreading rapidly in Kenya, the impact it has on society and the efforts being put in place to fight the scourge. Includes factors such as wife inheritance, promiscuity, and child rape. c2001. 27 min. DVD 9467

Everyone's Child.
Through the tragic story of one Zimbabwean family devastated by AIDS, the film makes an eloquent call for action on behalf of Africa's millions of orphaned children. The film was produced in direct response to the prediction that by the year 2000 there will be over 10 million AIDS orphans on the African continent. At the same time, the film focuses attention on millions of other children left homeless by civil wars or abandoned because their parents could not support them. 1996. 83 min. Video/C 5253

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Fisher, Alexander. "Funding, ideology and the aesthetics of the development film in postcolonial Zimbabwe." Journal of African Cinemas, 2010, Vol. 2 Issue 2, p111-120, 10p UC users only

The Fight Against Infectious Disease: From Yellow Fever to AIDS. (The Health Century; 1).
Explores the dynamic processes of medical discoveries by probing current work in the nation's laboratories and research institutes. 1987. Video/C 1586

The Gift.
Documents the phenomenon of deliberate HIV infection. The film follows the stories of two "bug chasers" who sought out "the gift" of HIV infection. Also interviewed are AIDS activist and author, Walt Odets, and HIV+ and HIV- men. The film explores the normalization and glamorization of HIV/AIDS and discusses the isolation and division caused by HIV status in the gay community. Bonus feature: Does anyone die of AIDS anymore? (26 min., 2002). Produced and directed by Louise Hogarth. 2002. 62 min. DVD 5027

HIV/AIDS: A Challenge To Us All. 1: Educating Our Children: How To Speak with Young Children About HIV/AIDS
A film demonstrating how parents can answer children's questions about HIV/AIDS. 199? 30 min. Video/C 5681

HIV/AIDS: A Challenge To Us All. 2: A Parent Meeting: Discussing HIV/AIDS in Our Community
A video accompanied by a written guide designed to help any adult set up a parent meeting about HIV/AIDS. 199? 30 min. Video/C 5682

HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials: Knowing Your Options
Includes narration and interviews with people who have participated in HIV/AIDS clinical trials and medical research staff. AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service; [sponsored by] National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases ... [et al.]. 1996. 19 min. Video/C 4594

The Hospice.(Life; 4)
This film explores the work of a hospice in Zambia, a country on the front line in the world fight against HIV/AIDS. In Zambia, where one in five of the population are HIV-positive (most under 40 years old), all of the eleven million population has been touched by HIV/AIDS in some way. The Mother of Mercy Hospice on the edge of the capital, Lusaka, was the first of its kind in Zambia. It has just 22 beds and was founded by an inspiring woman of extraordinary courage, a Polish nun called Sister Leonia. The film follows the work of the staff and volunteers both at the hospice and in the local villages and communities. The courage of patients, the resilience and despair of the staff and the dignity of how they all deal with the almost daily ritual of death makes this film an extraordinary account of the human face of AIDS in modern Africa. Directed by Kasper Blagaard. 2005. 23 min. DVD 3977

Bullfrog Films catalog description

How Safe Are We?(Rx for Survival)
Despite the rise in life expectancy in the past 100 years, in the last few decades, thirty new infectious diseases have emerged and one of them -- AIDS -- is becoming perhaps the most devastating epidemic in history. New diseases travel the globe with unprecedented rapidity. This segment examines the most critical threats we face today -- including avian flu -- and the pressing need to strengthen global public health systems. 2005. 112 min. DVD 4776

It's My Life
Zackie Achmat is an AIDS activist who refuses to take anti-retrovirals until they are available in public hospitals and clinics. He leads the court battle against the multi-national drug companies and takes on the South African government for it's confusing policies around HIV/AIDS. As a leader in the campaign for affordable treatment, Zackie's provocative position is not one all his friends and colleagues support. A film by Brian Tilley. 2001. 73 min. Video/C MM1015

Icarus Films catalog description

It's Too Late! Just Give Me a Chance to Live
Tuvumiliane Choir, made up of eighteen young men and women, all HIV positive, sing on the dangers of contracting AIDS to the uninfected youth of Oyugis in western Kenya. The songs emphasize chastity and abstinence before marriage. The choir is part of the Oyugis Integrated Project run under the direction of the Brothers of Our Lady, Mother of Mercy, developed to give AIDS victims the opportunity to develop spiritually and offer them hope and a desire to live with respect and dignity. 2000. 29 min. Video/C MM983

Kosodo: The Village of Grandmothers.
A documentary looking at the activities of the Help Orphan Project, a community based program that helps AIDS orphans who are left under the care of their grandparents in the Kosodo Village of Rongo Division, Kenya. It depicts the sufferings of the children who have lost both parents to AIDS and the struggles of those who work with meager resources to rehabilitate the orphans in their natural environment. 2001. 21 min. PAL format. Video/C MM385

Living Positive: Women and AIDS
This video examines the lives of five HIV/AIDS diagnosed women from different ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. Through their stories we come to understand how they have grown from a place of fear to a place where they appreciate the beauty of life and strive to live each day fully. By the end, we learn how to prevent being infected with the HIV virus, what to do if one learns that he or she is infected, and how to live well in spite of it. Director/writer, Karen Robinson Hunte. c1999. 45 min. DVD X6148

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Living Proof: HIV and the Pursuit of Happiness.
Presents narratives by persons who have AIDS or are HIV positive. Kermit Cole discovered a diverse community, straight and gay, female and male, young and old, filed with active and vibrant people who live contrarily to every dismal and oppressive image of the typical AIDS victim presented by the media. 1993. 72 min. Video/C 3304

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Living with AIDS.
This program profiles several people with the HIV virus over the course of two years and examines the issues they face--issues of medication, handling the emotional ups and downs, dealing with famiy members, paying for medical care and dealing with guilt. Interviewed are a drug abuser and her infected baby, a composer and victim of sexual abuse and a steer-wrestler. In addition to exploring traditional medical care, this program also examines alternative therapies and social support systems. Originally shown on the television program The Doctor is In. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1995. 28 min. Video/C 5414

Not My Child: AIDS in South Africa
Presents segments from the 13th Annual International Conference on AIDS in Durban and accounts by people of South Africa with HIV/AIDS and the role of traditional healers. 1998. 7 min. Video/C 7880

The Odds Against Us-- But There's Hope
People in Kenya are responding to the AIDS pandemic and one such person is pediatrician Dr. Margaret Ogola, the administrator and co-ordinator of Catholic health services throughout the country. She says that the church offers about 40% of all health care in Kenya and ministers to the poorest of the poor AIDS patients. Since 1994 she has served as medical director of Cottolengo, a hospice for children with AIDS. Through her extensive experience with the AIDS pandemic and her eight years of clinical practice with AIDS orphans, she is a recognized authority on this subject. In this video, Dr. Ogola gives the most thorough and comprehensive explanation of AIDS in Africa. c2002. 34 min. Video/C MM1145

The Origins of AIDS
An exploration of a theory of how AIDS was introduced to the human population. Illustrates the thesis presented in Edward Hooper's book The river : journey to the source of HIV and AIDS, and expands on it with new reporting. Many believe the answer lies in the research undertaken by scientist Hilary Koprowski, who between 1957 and 1960, injected his experimental polio vaccine into almost one million people in the former Belgian Congo. The film interviews scientists and journalists, as well as Africans who worked in the labs where the alleged vaccines were made, and also documents the ongoing battle between journalists and scientists in proving the theory's viability. 2003. 92 min. Video/C MM970

Out of Control: AIDS in Black America
According to ABC News AIDS is responsible for the deaths of over 200,000 African Americans as of the year 2004 and is the leading cause of death among African American women between the ages of 25 and 44. This program utilizes on location footage, commentary, and interviews to explore issues of sex, race, neglect, and denial as they relate to the disproportionate incidence of AIDS among African Americans. One of its segments, a group discussion with Jesse Jackson, Calvin Butts and T.D. Jakes and several African-American women, is hosted by the late television journalist, Peter Jennings. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2006. 41 min. DVD 7129

Pandemic: Facing AIDS
This theatrical version of the 5-part HBO series takes us around the globe to reveal stories of people who have been touched by AIDS: James (Uganda), a seven-year-old orphan who is taking care of his little sister Jessica; Sergei and Lena (Russia), young parents whose previous drug use has left them HIV-positive; Nagaraj and Bhanu (India), a young family facing life with AIDS in a small village, Alex (Brazil), a 27-year-old gay man who is trying to rebuild his health and get back to living a full and productive life; and Lek (Thailand), a former sex worker. Directed by Rory Kennedy. c2003. 113 min. DVD 5435

Patient Abuse: TAC's Struggle for Treatment Access
Presents the early missteps by the South African government health officials concerning AIDS through archival footage and reprints from the newspaper AIDS Times. Film follows the controversial statements made by current President Thabo Mbeki which advance doubts that HIV is the cause of AIDS. It also looks at the work of the organizations South Africa United Against AIDS and the Treatment Action Campaign which challenges pharmaceutical companies for charging high prices for AIDS drugs. 2001. 59 min. Video/C 8726

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Paying the Price.
This program examines the history of AIDS treatment in Africa. It details Uganda's success with a UN-sponsored program of price reduction and medical education, and South Africa's refusal to begin a national AIDS treatment program. It also looks at the success of smaller local programs that are bringing hope for the future to many infected Africans. 2001. 30 min. Video/C 8949

Bullfrog Films catalog description

Pills, Profits, Protest Chronicle of the Global AIDS Movement.
A documentary about the global activist movement to expand access to AIDS treatment for millions of people with HIV/AIDS. Examines the national and international grassroots responses from Durban to Delhi, from Botswana to Bahia, from Philadelphia to Port-Au-Prince, depicting activists' successes in bringing affordable treatment to the poor. Dist.: Outcast Films. 2005. 60 min. DVD 5308

Sangoma.
In South Africa, traditional healers have always been regarded with suspicion by practitioners of Western medicine. New efforts to integrate traditional healers into primary health care, nutritional education, and AIDS work holds some promise for a public health system under siege. 1996. 54 min. Video/C 4635

Sowing Seeds of Hunger. (Life; 41)
Part of a series examining the issue of glabalization and its effect on ordinary people around the world. This segment looks at the AIDS epidemic in Zambia and other sub-Saharan African nations which has crippled the agricultural community, forcing children to undertake the responsibilities of farming. 2003. 27 min. Video/C 9850 (for other installments of series, SEE Global Issues and Events)

Taking the Pulse(Way We Live: Introduction to Sociology ; 19)
Health care in the United States has reached a crisis point, despite advances in medicine and technology. Yet this is not necessarily the case in other parts of the world. This lesson looks at health and society, and explores such issues as inequities in health care coverage, the economics of providing care, alternative medical treatments and ethical questions including right-to-die. Particular emphasis is placed on one of the most serious sexually transmitted diseases -- HIV/AIDS." 2005. 27 min. DVD 4814

Turning Grief into Courage
With an estimated 6.4 million Asians now infected with AIDS, Asia is projected to be the next epicenter of the global AIDS pandemic. This is the story of a teenage girl who lost her father to AIDS, and her mother is HIV positive. With the help of her rural community in San Pa Tong, Thailand, she is turning grief into courage to make something of her life. c2001. 13 min. Video/C 9143

United in Anger: A History of ACT UP
Combines startling archival footage and insightful interviews to explore ACT UP (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) from a grassroots perspective. The film takes the viewer through the planning and execution of a half dozen exhilarating major actions, including Seize Control of the FDA, Stop the Church, and Day of Desperation, with a timeline of many of the other zaps and actions that forced the U.S. government and mainstream media to deal with the AIDS crisis, revealing the group's complex culture. Meetings, affinity groups, and approaches to civil disobedience mingle with profound grief, sexiness, and the incredible energy of ACT UP. 93 min. 2011. DVD X9314

The Value of Life AIDS in Africa Revisited.
30 million Africans have HIV/AIDS. In the summer of 2003, two years after the release of his documentary "Race against time," United Nations' HIV/AIDS envoy Stephen Lewis returns to Africa, comparing the status of AIDS-afflicted people in 2001 and 2003. There is hope that the epidemic can be helped with new generic antiretroviral drugs on which Canada is expected to pass legislation. 2004. 52 min. DVD 4956

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Drugs / Pharmaceutical Industry

Battles in the War on Cancer: A Wonder Drug on Trial
(Nova). Nova reports on the painstaking trials to determine the value of Interleukin 2 (IL-2), looking into the lives of patients and into the laboratories of scientists who have pinned their hopes on this latest treatment. 58 min. Video/C 1193

Big Bucks, Big Pharma: Marketing Disease & Pushing Drugs
Pulls back the curtain on the multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical industry to expose the insidious ways that illness is used, manipulated, and in some instances created, for capital gain. Focusing on the industry's marketing practices, media scholars and health professionals help viewers understand the ways in which direct-to-consumer (DTC) pharmaceutical advertising glamorizes and normalizes the use of prescription medication, and works in tandem with promotion to doctors. Combined, these industry practices shape how both patients and doctors understand and relate to disease and treatment. Ultimately, Big Bucks, Big Pharma challenges us to ask important questions about the consequences of relying on a for-profit industry for our health and well-being. Dist.: Media Education Foundation. 2006. 46 min. DVD 6439

Rees, S. "Big Bucks, Big Pharma: Marketing Disease & Pushing Drugs." Video Librarian; Jan/Feb2007, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p63-63, 1p UC users only

Birth of Perception: the American Story on RU-486
Explores the heated controversy in America surrounding the struggle to get the French abortion pill RU-486 (mifepristone) approved for use in the United States. Directed & written by Kristine Clark. c1997. 45 min. Video/C MM830

Branding Illness
Documentary about how big drug companies create diseases and then supply the medications that can cure them. It's a reversal of the traditional approach - trying to discover a drug that cures an illness - and one that relies far more heavily on marketing than on research. The film offers case after startling case of how big pharma creates the conversation around new diseases and then offers up the solutions. Directed by Anne Georget. 2010. DVD X6774

Description from Icarus Films catalog

The Cost of Living. (Life, Part 14)
This program examines why AIDS drugs are unaffordable in developing countries, using as examples Thailand and South Africa, two countries who have applied to use compulsory licenses and parallel importing -- practices agreed under World Trade Organization guidelines -- to make their own generic versions of anti-retroviral drugs to halt the AIDS epidemic in their countries. It also asks why anti-retroviral drugs still aren't included in the WTO's essential drugs lists. (For other installments of series, see Global Issues and Events) c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7774

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Generation Rx
Examines a culture of medicine and corruption, documenting how an entire era of children has been caught in the middle of an unprecedented change in western culture: that of drugging children with psychiatric medications earlier-and more often- than ever before. Reveals an "astronomical spike in teen deaths and suicides and countless numbers of horrid but predictable side effects." Written and directed by Kevin P. Miller. 2008. 81 min. DVD X2347

Health for Sale
Are the world's largest drug companies, paradoxically, major obstacles to making a healthier world? This film focuses on Big Pharma, the ten largest pharmaceutical makers, who account for 500 billion dollars of world health spending a year. Officials from all sides debate the impact of drug companies' patenting, "intellectual property," pricing and new product development strategies on global public health. These policies, according to Nobel Prize winning economist and former World Bank Chief Economist, Joseph Stiglitz "are condemning billions of the world's poorest citizens to death." Contents: Pharmaceutical industry and its regulatory regime -- Patented vs. generic drugs: the role of TRIPS -- Compulsory licensing: access to generics in developing countries -- India and generic drug production -- HIV in Africa -- Mantaining monopoly: extending patent life -- Profit vs need: the development of new drugs -- Infrastructure and distribution -- Creating profitable health conditions. Directed by Michele Mellara and Alessandro Rossi. 2007. 53 min. DVD 9533

Description from California Newsreel catalog

A History of Antibiotics
In this program, experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and elsewhere use case studies and research findings to discuss key issues in the war against infectious diseases such as pneumococcal meningitis, toxic shock syndrome, and ulcers. Decades of overuse and misuse of antibiotics are targeted as key factors in the birth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the reemergence of TB, bubonic plague, and other deadly organisms. Factors contributing to the spread of diseases, including crowded daycare facilities and international travel, are also examined, along with the development of the new drug Zyvox. Dist.: Films Media Group. 999. 45 min. Video/C 8157

Hofmann's Potion
Discovered in 1943 by Albert Hofmann, LSD was hailed as a powerful tool to treat alcoholism and drug addiction and to provide a window into schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. Aldous Huxley and others promoted the drug as a powerful tool for mental exploration and self-understanding. This film chronicles the drug's early days, and features interviews with many LSD pioneers. c2002. 57 min. Video/C 9744

How Weed Won the West
With California and the rest of the country going bankrupt, one business is booming. Takes a journey through the world of the growing medical marijuana industry, focusing on Los Angeles with over 700 legal dispensaries doling out the buds. Following the story of Organica, a southland dispensary which was raided by state and federal agencies in August of 2009, this film shows that although much has changed with Obama in office, the drug war is nowhere nearly over. Directed by Kevin Booth. c2010. 102 min. DVD X4647

The Human Experiment (Ethics in America; 9).
Columbia University Seminars on Media & Society. Moderator, Lewis Kaden; series host, Fred W. Friendly. A panel of prominent representatives from the fields of medicine, government service, the judiciary, journalism, religion, and academe discuss the ethical ramifications of human experimentation in medical research. A hypothetical medical test of a new drug for the treatment of AIDS serves as the focus for the examination of such issues as the propriety of risking the life of one patient in order to save millions in the future and the use of placebos on victims of serious diseases. 58 min. Video/C 1661

The Jungle Pharmacy
Documents the development of certain pharmaceutical cures from natural compounds which are obtained from the trees of the tropical rainforests, and looks at the increasing ravaging of these forests and efforts to conserve them. Dist.: Cinema Guild. 1989. 53 min. DVD 8243

The Jungle Pharmacy
Do the world's rainforests contain a cure for cancer and AIDS? This intriguing program travels to Jakarta, Surabaya, and the jungles of Kalimantan to investigate the preparation and use of natural remedies to combat illnesses such as skin fungus, malaria and even AIDS. But logging continues unabated in Indonesia and other tropic zones. Will the jungle pharmacy disappear before it can be understood? Dist.: Films Media Group. 1992. 26 min. Video/C 6816

The Keys of Paradise (Nova ).
Describes the recently discovered, powerful and complex painkilling drugs, endorphins, manufactured by the human brain. 3/4" UMATIC. 57 min. Video/C 147

Kill or Cure?(Life; 5)
Travels to India, whose pharmaceutical industry has been a leader in producing low cost drugs for the developing world for over a decade. Now, India's $4.5 billion pharmaceutical industry is at a crossroads following a new law introduced there in January 2005. TRIPS (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) is an agreement drawn up by the World Trade Organization between 1986 and 1994 to ensure intellectual property rights are respected within international trade. The government says that despite the new law, they are committed to supplying drugs at an affordable price. But those actually working in the health system have doubts. Directed by Reena Mohan. 2005. 26 min. DVD 8392

Bullfrog Films catalog description

Marijuana as Medicine
Traces the history of the medicinal use of marijuana in the United States, and cites the benefits of using the drug for treatments of specific diseases, such as glaucoma. Includes personal accounts by the first five patients in the United States who have been granted legal access to marijuana to treat their medical conditions. c1992. 18 min. Video/C MM88

Matters of Life and Death
From the late 1800's through the present day this film investigates the remarkable breakthroughs in surgery, vaccines, drugs and medical technology; medicine's new ethical questions; and assumptions about life and death. Topics investigated include fighting disease, the discovery of penicillin and insulin, and the history of surgery and organ transplants. 120 min. Video/C 5998

The Medicated Child
Ten years ago, stimulants like Ritalin and Adderall were the drugs of choice to treat behavioral issues in children. Today, children as young as four years old, are being prescribed more powerful anti-psychotic medications that are much less understood. The drugs can cause serious side effects and virtually nothing is known about their long-term impact. The increase in the use of anti-psychotics is directly tied to the rising incidence of one particular diagnosis, bipolar disorder. Experts estimate that the number of kids with the diagnosis is now over a million and rising. Written, produced and directed by Marcela Gaviria. Originally presented as a segment on the television program Frontline in 2008. 60 min. DVD 9534

Money Talks: Profits Before Patient Safety
An in-depth, academic perspective on the questionable marketing tactics of the pharmaceutical industry, featuring the commentary by investigative journalists and medical professionals. Written and directed by Kathleen Slattery-Moschkau. 2006. 50 min. DVD 9106

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest.
Presentations from the workshop "Pharmacy from the Rain forest" held in Peru during October 1994.

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 1: ACEER Useful Plant Trail Guide. A tour of the Useful Plant Trail of the Amazon Center for Environmental Education and Research situated in the Peruvian rain forest. On average, nearly 300 species of woody plants per hectare have been found to grow here. Shaman Don Antonio Montero hosts the tour and describes the properties of 45 trees and plants, not only those useful to the people of Amazonia but some that provide chemicals or products used in countries around the world. Sponsored by the American Botanical Council, Texas Pharmacy Foundation, and International Expeditions. 28 min. Video/C 7872

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 2: Plant Drugs, Healing Herbs and Phytomedicals. Keynote address from the workshop "Pharmacy from the Rain forest" held in Peru during October 1994. Dr. Varro E. Tyler gives the opening presentation at this first ever conference to bring traditional medicinal plant healers and Western pharmaceutical professionals together to explore the uses of medicinal plants from the tropical rain forests of Peru. 1994. 34 min. Video/C 7873

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 3: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Application of Plant Drugs. A presentation from the workshop "Pharmacy from the Rain forest" held in Peru during October 1994. Dr. Varro E. Tyler explores five significant categories of plant drugs including antineoplastic agents, antiprotozoal drugs, cardiovascular drugs, chemotherapeutic drugs and possible immunostimulants. These and other natural products have served as prototypes for synthetic and semi-synthetic medicinals. 1994. 81 min. Video/C 7873

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 4: Nutrition and the Amazon Food Pharmacy. This program focuses on foods that are derived from tropical sources and the multiple health benefits they provide. Dr. James Duke traces the origins of introduced and native tropical "food farmaceuticals" that can be and have been utilized in preventitive pharmacy as well as an adjunct to therapeutic drug pharmacology. 1994. 47 min. Video/c 7875

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 5: Tropical Medicine in the Rainforest Dr. Linnea Smith of La Clinica Yanamono located on the banks of the Amazon River 50 miles from Iquitos, shares her experiences in providing healthcare in the Amazon where Western medicine is usually unavailable. She gives insights into how the cultural and religious needs of the people bring a new dimension to treatment and preventitive care. Adapative approaches of a medical practice in the Amazon as well as the problems, advantages and revelations of bringing Western-style medical care to this remote region are discussed. 1994. 25 min. Video/C 7876

Pharmacy from the Rain Forest, Part 6: Ethnomedical Field Research in the Amazon. Provides insights into the current methodology of ethnomedical field research as related to the success of programs associated with the search for new medicines from phytopharmaceuticals. Presents the challenges of drug discovery strategies as related to research among the Jivaro Amerindians of the western Amazon and gives some examples of uses of medicinal plants including obstetrical use by Amazonian Jivaro women, as well as the use of plant alkaloids in treating wounds. 1994. 57 min. Video/C 7877

Patents and Patients. (Life; 39)
In India the drug company Cipla produces generic copies of anti-retroviral drugs whose patents officially belong to pharmaceutical giants like Bristol Myers Squibb. But without a proper health infrastructure to ensure that the drugs are properly administered to patients, India faces the risk of a drug-resistant HIV explosion. c2002. 23 min. Video/C 9848

The Pill
Examines the work of contraceptive pioneers Margaret Sanger, Katherine McCormick, Gregory Pincus and John Rock, and features personal accounts from the first generation of women to have access to the Pill. Shows how harnessing female hormones into a little pill unleashed a social revolution that allowed women to pursue careers as never before, fueled the feminist and consumer health movements, and encourged more open attitudes towards sex. Originally broadcast on PBS as a segment of The American Experience. Dist.: PBS. 2003. 60 min. Video/C 9599

The Pill
Chronicles little known chapters in the history of the development of the birth control pill and examines how far the pharmaceutical industry was willing to risk women's health. For its inquiry the film draws on archival footage, interviews with women from from Puerto Rico who became unsuspecting test subjects for the early pill, insights from women health activists who questioned the high-dose version's safety, and testimony from scientists who developed the pill. A film by Erna Buffie and Elise Swerhone. 1999. 46 min. Video/C 7975

Description from Women Make Movies catalog

Pricing Drugs
Ray Suarez focuses on efforts by states to make prescription drugs more affordable. His guests are Marjorie Powell of PHARMA and Kevin Concannon, director of the Iowa Department of Human Services. Originally broadcast as segments of: The News Hour with Jim Lehrer. DVD 8860

Selling Sickness.
Documentary examines the pharmaceutical industry's marketing of antidepressants with particular emphasis on the firm GlaxoSmithKline. It explores the unhealthy relationships between society, medical science and the pharmaceutical industry as they promote miracle cures - selling not just drugs but also the latest diseases that go with them. It also looks at the growing controversy around SSRI antidepressants (especially as they affect adolescents) and follows British psychiatrist David Healy and patients' accusations that aggressive drug marketing is blurring the boundaries between medical conditions and ordinary life. Director, Catherine Scott. 2004. 52 min. DVD 3994

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Shannon, J. "Selling Sickness." Video Librarian; Sep/Oct2005, Vol. 20 Issue 5, p68-68, 1p UC users only

Untangling the Mind: The Legacy of Dr. Heinz Lehmann
This documentary shows the transformation that has occurred in psychiatric care through the work of Dr. Heinz Lehmann. His greatest legacy came with a single pill, largactil, the first anti-psychotic drug used in North America. By successfully treating patients with this drug, Lehmann introduced the idea that biology plays a role in mental illness. Also includes rare archival footage of doctors performing electric shock therapy and lobotomies to demonstrate how far psychiatric medicine has come and concludes with a visit to a leading brain research center where Lehmann's work is being taken to the next level. 1999. 54 min. Video/C 7655

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Wellness and Psychoactive Drugs: Legal and Otherwise (Meredith Morgan Symposium; UC Berkeley ).
Professor Frederick Meyers discusses the basis for our vulnerability to drugs, which he states is anxiety. Video/C 2268

Health Care Conditions and Policy in the US

Critical Condition
Investigates the worsening health care crisis in America by following a diverse group of uninsured individuals as they battle critical illnesses without proper care. It is through their eyes and words that we are taken through the gaping holes in the health care system, where care is often delayed or denied. A few sobering statistics reinforce these disturbing personal stories --the most compelling, perhaps, are those that illustrate the enormous cost in dollars and human suffering that we pay by denying sick patients access to routine primary care. Special features: Filmmaker interview with Roger Weisberg, filmmaker biography, two short films: "Uncovered" and "Your money or your life." Produced and directed by Roger Weisberg. 83 min. 2008. DVD X1011

Health Care Address by Carol Moseley Braun (Senator, Illinois), 2004. DVD 3132

Malady of Health Care (Nova ).
Focuses on the problems of delivering and paying for good health care by contrasting British and American health care systems and pointing out the advantages and problems of each. The program also explores other health optionsin the United States such as pre-paid health care and questions how much we can spend on health care as it becomes more and more expensive. 3/4" UMATIC. 58 min. Video/C 387

Money-driven Medicine
Reveals why comprehensive healthcare reform remains the challenge of the years ahead and points to paths for the future. Doctors and health researchers show how the movement for patient-centered, accountable care can be carried into classrooms, hospitals, doctors' offices and community forums across the country. Based on the book Money-driven medicine : the real reason healthcare costs so much by Maggie Mahar. (Business & Economics RA410 .M34 2006) Contents: Costs up, access down -- Doctors say U.S. healthcare far from best in the world -- A shortage of primary care physicians -- Commercialization undermines the doctor-patient relationship -- Supply-driven overtreatment : "we over-build and then we over-use" -- One-third of healthcare dollars wasted on unnecessary treatments -- Insurers pass on the cost of unneeded treatments, premiums skyrocket -- When patients aren't told the risks -- Shared decision making : informed patient choice -- To compete hospitals invest in redundant technology -- In a busy hospital, patients need an advocate -- The medical-industrial complex -- Cascading complications, "They're generating revenue" -- Aggressive care becomes barbaric -- Doctors and patients : managing the condition together -- A system focused on cure not care -- Becoming a patient advocate -- Will only the elite be able to afford healthcare? -- Obstacles to reform : who profits from spiraling costs? Complete film (86 min.) -- Educator's version (50 min.) -- Practitioner's version (38 min.) -- Advocacy version (18 min.) -- Trailer (2 min.) DVD X2732

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Ginsburg, Paul. "Money-Driven Medicine." Health Affairs, Jan/Feb2007, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p287-288, 2p UC users only
Palmer, Steve. "Money-Driven Medicine." AMWA Journal: American Medical Writers Association Journal, 2010, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p34-37, 2pUC users only

Sicko
Michael Moore interviews Americans who have been denied treatment by the United States health care insurance companies -- companies who sacrifice essential health services in order to maximize profits. Sheds light on the how complicated it can become for communities and individuals, and the sacrifices they have made when they are denied health care coverage. Special features (ca. 80 min.): written and directed by Michael Moore: Sicko goes to Washington, This country beats France, Uniquely American, what if you worked for G.E. in France?, Sister Mary Fidel, Who would Jesus deny, more with Mike & Tony Benn, a different kind of Hollywood premiere, "Alone without you," music video performed by the Nightwatchman, interview gallery, theatrical trailer. 2007. 123 min. DVD 8750

Awards
Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards - Best Documentary

Sick Around America
In the United States, more than 2.5 million people lost their jobs in 2008. Along with losing their livelihood, they lost their health insurance. As the economy continues to spiral downward, the new administration promises to deliver comprehensive health care reform. Investigates the failures and future of the private insurance industry, examing the best and worst of U.S. healthcare by telling the gripping and sometimes tragic stories of ordinary Americans. As the national debate intensifies, the program lays bare the flaws in the system and examines the critical choices Americans face in changing a system that all sides agree needs a fundamental overhaul. Originally broadcast on Frontline, Mar. 31, 2009. 60 min. DVD X2610

Sick Around the World
Four in five Americans say the U.S. health-care system needs 'fundamental' change. Can the U.S. learn anything from the rest of the world about how to run a health-care system, or are these nations so culturally different from us that their solutions would simply not be acceptable to Americans? FRONTLINE correspondent T.R. Reid examines first-hand how other advanced capitalist democracies - the United Kingdom, Japan, Germany, Taiwan and Switzerland - deliver healthcare, and what the United States might learn from their successes and failures. Contents: 1. Great Britain: a leader in preventive medicine -- 2. Japan: universal coverage, no gatekeepers -- 3. Germany: a popular largely market-based system -- 4. Taiwan: a new system they copied from others -- 5. Switzerland: its former system resembled ours. Produced and directed by Jon Palfreman. Originally broadcast as a segment of the television program Frontline on April 15, 2008. 56 min. DVD X518

Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?
Sounds the alarm about the extent of our alarming socio-economic and racial inequities in health--and searches for their root causes. But those causes are not what we might expect ... It turns out there's much more to our health than bad habits, health care or unlucky genes. The social conditions in which we are born, live and work profoundly affect our well-being and longevity. Program notes including contents of episodes ([8] p. : ill.) in container. Introduction -- In sickness and in wealth (56 min.) -- When the bough breaks (29 min.) -- Becoming American (29 min.) -- Bad sugar (29 min.) -- Place matters (29 min.) -- Collateral damage (29 min.) -- Not just a paycheck (30 min.). Series executive producer, Larry Adelman. c2008. 236 min. DVD 9457

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

View this video online
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Description from California Newsreel catalog

Rine, Christine M. "Unnatural Causes." Health & Social Work, Aug2010, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p229-231, 3p UC users only

Health and the Developing World

See Also: AIDS

A-OK? (Life, Part 26)
In underdeveloped countries children with Vitamin A deficiency run the risk of dying from common childhood illnesses. The cost of ensuring all children receive enough Vitamin A is small, but improves children's chances of survival by 25%. This episode looks at Vitamin A distribution programs in Ghana, Uganda, India and Guatemala. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7786

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

An Act of Faith: The Phelophepa Health Train. (Life, Part 4)
A group of health professionals spends nine months or each year touring the poorest and most remote areas of South Africa by rail. With a full contingent of volunteer doctors, dentists, optometrists and health educators on board, the "good clean health train" delivers quality health care to deprived rural communities. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7764

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

All Our Futures
Shows the worldwide efforts of UNICEF to provide children and mothers with nutritious food and an adequate diet, pure water, disease control and basic health education. Focuses on projects in Asia, Africa and Latin America. 1989. 28 min. Video/C MM563

Choices for the New Century
Illustrates how the UN Development Program (UNDP) emphasizes projects related to health, education, nutrition and quality of life in developing countries. Produced by the UN Development Programme ; producers Ashali Varma, Mayuri Chawla. 1992. 28 min. Video/C MM591

Conducting Drug Research in India
Fred de Sam Lazaro visits India, exploring the controversial decision by many pharmaceutical companies to conduct clinical trials there. Originally broadcast as segments of: The News Hour with Jim Lehrer. 55 min. DVD 8860

Dead Mums Don't Cry
This documentary follows Grace Kodindo, an obstetrician in Chad, as she tries to stop mothers from dying during pregnancy. Women in Chad have a 1 in 11 chance of dying in pregnancy or during childbirth. But a few countries have succeeded in saving mother's lives. The film then moves on to Honduras which has cut maternal mortality far faster than some wealthier neighbors. Directed by by Tristan Quinn. 2005. 50 min. DVD X1760

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Doctors of Nigeria.
Demonstrates the interrelation of traditional herbal medicine and orthodox Western medicine in Nigeria. 1981. 57 min. Video/C 308

The Doctor's Story. (Life; 40)
Nepal has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. This episode explores the plight of Nepal's local health services, and links the situation to the prohibition by the U.S. government against funding any non-governmental organization that supports abortion. c2003. 23 min. Video/C 9849

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Donka: X-Ray of an African Hospital (Radioscope d'un hopital Africain)
This film follows daily life in the largest public hospital in the Republic of Guinea, Donka Hospital in Conakry. Donka hospital typifies the financial crisis affecting the entire African health sector. Today, without assistance from governmental or international relief agencies and compelled to develop its financial autonomy, the hospital practices a paying health care policy designed to cover running costs. The financial strategy is applied at a high social and human cost, as access to treatment diminishes for many Guineans, compromising the very notion of public health services. 1996. 59 min. Video/C 6812

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Femmes Aux Yeux Ouverts = Women with Open Eyes (Library of African Cinema).
Profiles contemporary African women in four West African countries: Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal and Benin. We meet a woman active in the movement against female genital mutilation, a health care worker educating women about sexually transmitted diseases, and businesswomen who describe how they have set up an association to share expertise and provide mutual assistance. 1994. 52 min. Video/C 3728

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Fire Eyes
Explores the socio-economic, psychological and medical consequences of the ancient custom of female circumcision which is routed in deep cultural mores and performed on more than 80 million women worldwide. In this film, several women who have experienced this "rite of passage" voice varying points of view on perpetuating the practice. Testimony from doctors detail the various forms of female circumcision and the horrendous ob/gyn problems that result. 1994. 60 min. Video/C MM113

Filmakers Library catalog description

For a Few Pennies More.
Across the world there are two billion people at risk from iodine deficiency. Apart from the classic symptoms of goiters and cretinism, it also leads to still births, underweight babies and lowered IQ. This film examines the health problems resulting from iodine deficiency in Indonesia and steps taken to solve the problem. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7780

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

From Docklands to Dhaka. (Life; 3)
Physician Sam Everington serves the poor in London where 40% of his patients are from Bangladesh. Believing that community health involves not only treating illness, but working with local people on jobs, housing and education, Dr. Everington travels to Bangladesh to test his theories in an effort to improve community health. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7763

The Great Health Service Swindle.(Life; 5)
Explores why Ghanaian nurses have been leaving their country to work abroad, and what this "brain drain" means for the Ghanaian health care system. One widely quoted source says almost two thousand nurses left the country between 1995 and 2002. The exodus is set to continue as nurses opt to leave a crumbling health system to earn more abroad. In the UK, some nurses can earn more in a day than they could in a month back home. Spending on health in Ghana has gone up but its value has declined because of inflation. While most of that money goes to wages, patients have to pay because the health service operates on a "user pays" principle, the so-called "cash and carry" system. The stresses of this system is one reason health workers leave. Filmed & directed by Kim Hopkins. 2005. 26 min. DVD 8389

Bullfrog Films catalog description

Guinea Worm: The Fiery Serpent
Describes the history, epidemiology, and prevention and control of the parasitic Guinea worm which afflicts some 20 million people worldwide, mostly in Africa. Focus is on the importance of clean water to prevent the spread of the worm. c1988. 20 min. Video/C 9901

Healers of Ghana.
Explores the traditional medical practices of the Bono people of central Ghana and how their healers are accommodating the conflict between the arrival of Western medicine and their religious beliefs. Traditionally, Bono tribal priests undergo a painful spiritual possession, during which deities reveal to them the causes of illnesses, which plants to use to treat them, who is perpetrating witchcraft, and which villagers might be endangering society through improper behavior. 1993. 58 min. Video/C 5002

The Health Protestors.
Frustrated doctors, health professionals, and civil rights activists from around the world met in Dhaka in December 2000 at the People's Health Assembly to draw up their demands for health care in a new People's Health Charter. This program follows the process, from a 50,000-person rally in Calcutta, to late-night drafting sessions, to the final publication of the charter on the last day of the Assembly. Video/C 8931

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Holy Smoke.
Developing countries like Cambodia bear the brunt of aggressive marketing techniques by huge multinational tobacco companies. There are no health warnings on tobacco products in Cambodia and no bans on sales to minors. However, since the fall of the Khmer Rouge regime, previously suppressed religion has asserted itself as an instrument of change. Buddhist monks are now spearheading the campaign to persuade Cambodians to give up tobacco. 2001. 30 min. Video/C 8950

Bullfrog Films catalog description

India Inhales. (Life, Part 12)
Every day in India, another 55,000 children start smoking. This film explores the cynicism of the major global tobacco companies' campaigns in India with particular reference to the largest firm in India, ITC Limited. It also looks at the work of activists who have pledged to try to stop them -- and to halt the soaring increase in cancer cases in India that result from smoking. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7772

Bullfrog Films catalog description

It Takes a Village.
In 1991 a cyclone struck Bangladesh. What was needed was a real experiment in community participation, one in which the villagers could decide what kind of health services were necessary and then take it upon themselves to facilitate those services. This segment looks at the construction of an experimental community health care center in Chakaria. 2005. 23 min. Video/C 9845

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Kill or Cure?(Life; 5)
Travels to India, whose pharmaceutical industry has been a leader in producing low cost drugs for the developing world for over a decade. Now, India's $4.5 billion pharmaceutical industry is at a crossroads following a new law introduced there in January 2005. TRIPS (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) is an agreement drawn up by the World Trade Organization between 1986 and 1994 to ensure intellectual property rights are respected within international trade. The government says that despite the new law, they are committed to supplying drugs at an affordable price. But those actually working in the health system have doubts. Directed by Reena Mohan. 2005. 26 min. DVD 8392

Bullfrog Films catalog description

Lost Generations. (Life; 24)
Maternal poverty and malnutrition have increased dramatically in India since the early '90's. Low birth weight babies from malnourished mothers grow up to become malnourished themselves and in turn give birth to more low birth weight babies. This film explores what can be done to break the cycle of poverty and ill-health that condemns whole populations to sub-standard lives. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7784

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Malaria: Killer Number One
Malaria claims three million lives every year worldwide, most of them in the countries south of the Sahara. Among the places hardest hit is Ethiopia. Here malaria can wipe out the lives of hundreds of thousands of villagers, mainly women and children, in a single epidemic. 2005. 19 min. DVD 9947

Missing Out.(City Life; 17)
Niger is one of the poorest countries in the world, and less than a third of the population has access to any health care. Malnutrition remains the main cause of maternal and infant mortality, and over half of all pregnant women suffer from iron deficiency anemia. In Tanzania, malaria is blamed for the increase in anemia. UNICEF believes that the solution is providing micromultinutrient pills which contain iron folate and other vitamins. This program follows two traditional birth attendants as they try to persuade women to take iron folate supplements and visit hospitals. It also looks at what could happen when donors pull out of distribution programs. Directed by Di Tatham. 2001. 30 min. Video/C 8945

Bullfrog Films catalog description

Motherland Afghanistan
Afghanistan today has the second highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the world. Filmmaker Sedika Mojadidi reveals the extent of this tragedy by documenting the 2003 return to Afghanistan of her father, an OB/GYN who emigrated to the U.S. in 1972, as he attempts to rehabilitate Kabul's Rabia Balkhi Hospital and to curb the rising maternal mortality rate despite limited supplies, unsanitary facilities, and an untrained staff. Originally broadcast on television in 2007 as an episode of Independent lens. 74 min. DVD X1931

Orphans of Mathare
Documents the lives of former street children, many orphaned by HIV/AIDS, now living at the Good Samaritan Children's Home, an orphanage and school run by Mercy Thuo in the Mathare Slum of Nairobi, Kenya. By following the lives of several orphans, the film lays bare the complicated relationship between poverty, violence, disease, Christianity, tradition and the orphan crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa. Reveals that global AIDS is not simply a medical crisis but a socio-cultural one as well that threatens to create a generation of children without parents. Produced and directed by Randy Bell & Pacho Velez. 2003. 60 min. DVD X3290

Berkeley Media LLC catalog description

Patents and Patients. (Life; 39)
In India the drug company Cipla produces generic copies of anti-retroviral drugs whose patents officially belong to pharmaceutical giants like Bristol Myers Squibb. But without a proper health infrastructure to ensure that the drugs are properly administered to patients, India faces the risk of a drug-resistant HIV explosion. c2002. 23 min. Video/C 9848

The Role of Health Care in Building a Lasting Peace in Timor Leste
Dr. Chris Fenton, managing director of the Hospital of Hope in East Timor addresses the role of health care in establishing a lasting peace through equal access to adequate nutrition, sanitation, housing and availability of health care to all, especially the poor. The lecture is preceeded by the introduction of recent publications on East Timor authored by human rights activists. 2006 Andrew McNaughtan memorial lecture; Andrew McNaughtan memorial lecture, 2006.; Third annual Dr. Andrew McNaughtan memorial lecture. 110 min. DVD 8898

Roots of Health
Using incisive case studies from around the world, it explores how a person's health and well-being is primarily determined by where they live, their educational, social, and economic status, and the degree of control they have over their lives. The film illustrates that these are the true roots of health -- though generally overlooked in the contentious national debate over health care -- and these conditions can be improved for whole communities through social and political action. Produced by Linda Harrar. 2010. 57 min. DVD X3253

Berkeley Media LLC catalog description

Salud!
A timely examination of human values and the health issues that affect us all, ˇSalud!looks at the curious case of Cuba, a cash-strapped country with what the BBC calls 'one of the world's best health systems.' From the shores of Africa to the Americas, !Salud!hits the road with some of the 28,000 Cuban health professionals serving in 68 countries, and explores the hearts and minds of international medical students in Cuba -- now numbering 30,000, including nearly 100 from the USA. Their stories plus testimony from experts around the world bring home the competing agendas that mark the battle for global health—and the complex realities confronting the movement to make healthcare everyone's birth right. Directed by Connie Field. c2006. 93 min. DVD 9329

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

Sangoma.
In South Africa, traditional healers have always been regarded with suspicion by practitioners of Western medicine. New efforts to integrate traditional healers into primary health care, nutritional education, and AIDS work holds some promise for a public health system under siege. 1996. 54 min. Video/C 4635

Seeing is Believing.
Health experts have long known that a lack of Vitamin A can lead to serious diseases during childhood, as well as increasing the risk of child and maternal mortality. This segment looks at the country of Zambia as it begins a nationwide program to deliver Vitamin A to its population through sugar fortification as just one part of a multi-pronged strategy. 2002. 23 min. Video/C 9846

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

The Silent Crisis (Life; 5)
Explores the economic and social crises facing the Central African Republic by examining the country's ill-equipped health system. A landlocked former French colony of just under four million people, the Central African Republic is one of the least developed countries in the world but appeals for aid have fallen largely on deaf ears. Only a handful of aid agencies continue to work there, and the amount of aid it gets is pitiful compared to other sub-Saharan countries. In 2003, it received just $12.9 USD per person. President Francois Bozize confirms that health is the country's top priority. Bozize has pledged to restore the country's national unity and security, but foreign governments have been slow to respond to his repeated requests for assistance and support. DVD. Directed by Amanda Feldon. 26 min. DVD 8393

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Staying Alive! (Life; 4)
Poverty combined with lack of education and health services affect maternal mortality rates in Bangladesh, where 50 women die during pregnancy or in childbirth every day. In the Millennium development goals, 189 countries have made committments to reduce maternal mortality by 75% by 2015. Will Bangladesh be able to deliver on its promises? Directed & produced by Subina Shrestha, Alex Gabbay. 2005. 23 min. DVD 3957

Bullfrog Films catalog description

Transplant Tourism.
Looks at the multi-million dollar international trade in human kidneys. Poor people in Turkey, Pakistan, India, Iraq, Russia, China and the Philippines undergo invasive surgery, risking on-going health problems for a one-off payment which might improve their lives. Includes interviews with transplant patients, kidney sellers and brokers, doctors, and bio-ethicists. Directed by David Paperny. 1999. 52 min. DVD 8436

Uganda: Out of the Wild
Health officials in Uganda are looking to a new approach to preventing diseases like Ebola and Marburg virus, which can spread from gorillas and other animals to humans. Originally broadcast on PBS (Frontline) on May 11, 2010. DVD X4434

A Walk to Beautiful
A look at the lives of three Ethiopian women, rejected by their husbands and ostracized by their communities, who leave home in search of seeking treatment for obstetric fistula. The program follows them walking for hours on their journey to transportation to a special hospital in Addis Ababa where they find solace for the first time in years, and stays with them as their lives begin to change. Directed by Mary Olive Smith and Amy Bucher. Originally broadcast in 2008 as a segment on the television program Nova. 56 min. DVD X2647

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

Warrior Marks.
A poetic and political film about female genital mutilation. Includes interviews with women from Senegal, Burkina Faso, Gambia, the United States, and England. A film by Alice Walker and Pratibha Parmar. 1993. 54 min. Video/C 3348

Walker, Alice. Warrior Marks: Female Genital Mutilation and the Sexual Blinding of Women / Alice Walker and Pratibha Parmar. 1st ed. New York: Harcourt Brace, c1993. (UCB Bancroft GN484 .W35 1993; UCB Grad Svcs XMAC.W18.W37 Modern Authors Collection; UCB Main GN484 .W35 1993; UCB Moffitt GN484 .W35 1993)

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Hamilton, Amy. "Warrior Marks." (includes related articles) off our backs v23, n11 (Dec, 1993):2 (5 pages).
Minor, Diane. "Warrior Marks: Joyous Resistance at Walker Film Debut." (documentary film by Alice Walker) National N O W Times v26, n2 (Jan, 1994):7.
Simonds, Cylena. "Missing the Mark." (female mutilation in movie 'Warrior Marks') Afterimage v21, n8 (March, 1994):3.

Smoking/Tobacco Production and Use

Death in the West: The Marlboro Story.
A powerful expose of the most successful cigarette advertising campaign, The Marlboro Man. Juxtapositions television footage from Marlboro television commercials, interviews of physicians, researchers and tobacco industry executives with personal narratives of present day cowboys dying from smoking related lung diseases. 1976. 32 min. Video/C 9902

Holy Smoke.
Developing countries like Cambodia bear the brunt of aggressive marketing techniques by huge multinational tobacco companies. There are no health warnings on tobacco products in Cambodia and no bans on sales to minors. However, since the fall of the Khmer Rouge regime, previously suppressed religion has asserted itself as an instrument of change. Buddhist monks are now spearheading the campaign to persuade Cambodians to give up tobacco. 2001. 30 min. Video/C 8950

Bullfrog Films catalog description

India Inhales. (Life, Part 12)
Every day in India, another 55,000 children start smoking. This film explores the cynicism of the major global tobacco companies' campaigns in India with particular reference to the largest firm in India, ITC Limited. It also looks at the work of activists who have pledged to try to stop them -- and to halt the soaring increase in cancer cases in India that result from smoking. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7772

Bullfrog Films catalog description

The Last Cigarette
A look at the smoking culture in America, beginning with the pro-cigarette ads of the '20s, '30s, and '40s to the anti-smoking movement of the '90s. A compilation of Hollywood clips, vintage cigarette commercials, anti-smoking scare-films, Congressional battle-footage, smoking esoterica and much more examines how we got to this point in the smoking battle. Casts a satirical eye on the notably uncivilized tactic employed by both sides in today's smoking wars. Directed by Kevin Rafferty & Frank Keraudren. 1999. 82 min. DVD 8590

The Next Generation
Experts are increasingly focusing on prevention efforts based on community and family. This documentary looksat two of these efforts. One works with parents addicted to heroin by teaching them how to repair the damage to family wrought by drug abuse, and in spite of it, how to raise strong, resilient children. In a second program, vigilant counselors in Dade County schools watch for kids at risk of becoming drug addicts, and offer immediate counseling for thosewho are already involved with drugs. Nicotine addiction is addressed by a program that provides classes designed to prevent students from smoking, and another that helps them stop if they've already begun to smoke. School officials, counselors, and students are interviewed. 57 min. Video/C 6508

Secondhand Smoke
Focuses on the dangers of passive smoking by combining hard-hitting information with humor. Shows an evil chemist who tries to conjure up the deadliest poison he can and discovers that the most lethal substance he can find turns out to be cigarette smoke. Encourages nonsmokers to stand up for their right to breathe unpolluted air armed with facts about the dangers of tobacco smoke. 1985. 16min. Video/C 9927

Smoking Cessation: Community Interventions for Latinos.
Presents conclusions and recommendations for future actions from an extensive research project focusing on smoking prevention programs for the three major Latino subgroups in California: Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans. 1991. 47 min. Video/C 8689

General/Miscellaneous Medicine and Health

Actress-playwright Anna Deavere Smith
While politicians and the media war over aspects of health care reform, Anna Deavere Smith gives voice to questions of life and death, sickness and medical treatment, through her one-woman play Let Me Down Easy. In this edition of the Journal, Bill Moyers speaks with Smith about her acclaimed play, which spotlights the real-life personal stories of people facing illness and their mortality. Clips from the play are included. Afterward, the Journal profiles New York City's Poets House, a national poetry library and literary center that invites poets and the public alike to step into the living tradition of poetry. Broadcast date: 11/13/2009. 57 min. DVD X4954

The Artificial Heart
This program looks at the risks, costs and controversies surrounding the development of the artificial heart. Includes interviews with Dr. William C. DeVries, surgeon and Barney Clark, artificial heart patient. 1983. 56 min. Video/C MM896

The Barefoot Doctors of Rural China
Examines the work of Chinese paramedics in rural areas of China. Shows how their work includes sanitation, reduction of pest problems, care for sick animals, and other duties relating to human birth control, dentistry, tonsil removal, and minor ailments requiring herbal remedies or acupuncture. 1975. 52 min. Video/C 6935

Behind the Mask
Three years in the filming, this documentary was created by animal rights lawyer, Shannon Keith who owns Uncaged Films and ARME (Animal Rescue, Media & Education) and was produced in response to a perceived bias in the mainstream media against the animal rights movement. The film explores the history and current activities of the Animal Liberation Front, and associated illegal animal liberation activities. Includes interviews with animal rights activists discussing why they believe that breaking the law is the best way to challenge corporations that harm animals. c2006. 71 min. DVD 6880

The Body Parts Business.
Follows Covenant House worker, Bruce Harris, as he visits Argentina and Central America to investigate the murder of homeless children and patients in mental health facilities as sources of body parts for the black market. 62 min. Video/C 4375

Breast Implants on Trial
Covers a class action suit and individual liability suits on the issue of breast implants, FDA and medical findings, and issues of medicine and science in the courtroom. Includes interviews with physicians, lawyers, the CEO of Dow Corning Corporation, and individuals with illnesses they feel are linked to their use of silicone breast implants. Originally shown on the television program Frontline on February 27, 1996. 87 min. Video/C 5799

The Business of Being Born
Inspired by their own unique birth experiences, producer Ricki Lake and director Abby Epstein team up to provide a nation of mothers-to-be with insight into the process of childbirth and the various options available when preparing for this special event. From pregnancy to the miraculous moment of birth, an informative celebration of the road to motherhood. 2007. 84 min. DVD X834

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

Coma (Nova)
Racing to New York Hospital, a doctor relays urgent instructions to the ER where a child, hit by a car, lies unconscious. In this real-life drama, the documentary follows neurosurgeon Jam Ghajar as he struggles to save a young boy with massive head trauma, using simple but crucial techniques that are dangerously absent from most hospitals across the country. Inspired by Conquering the coma by Malcolm Gladwell in The New Yorker. c1997. 60 min. Video/C 8773

Critical Condition: America's Obesity Crisis
In the United States, people with low incomes tend to weigh more than the affluent. This news program focuses on an economically struggling Detroit community to investigate the causal link between poverty and obesity. In this community where fast food is prevalent and grocery stores are scarce, the film gathers the experiences of neighborhood residents and healthcare professionals in a powerful study of the correlation between being poor and obesity. Originally broadcast on Nightline on June 2, 2004. Host, Ted Koppel. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2005. 22 min. DVD 4656

Critical Thinking in Nursing: Lessons from Tuskegee
Explores the theory and practice of critical thinking in the professional life of a nurse. Focuses attention on the role that nurse Eunice River played in the ethically murky Tuskegee Syphilis Study and how her participation may be interpreted today in the context of critical thinking. Dist.: Insight Media. 1993. 44 min. DVD 5711

Dramatization of the Tuskegee Experiment
Miss Evers' Boys (TV, 1997) DVD X5597

The Culture of Emotions: A Cultural Competence and Diversity Training Program
Explores the variety of ways the diverse cultures of America understand mind and body, and the disorders to which mind and body are subject. Designed to introduce cultural competence and diversity skills to mental/behavior health professionals the film features didactic interviews and skill building exercises with distinguished researchers and clinicians from ethnic and culturally diverse populations. Also introduces a diagnostic system for assessment and treatment of psychiatric disorders across cultural boundaries, the DSM-IV outline for cultural formation (OCF). 58 min. Video/C 9776

Description from Fanlight Productions catalog

Dax's Case
This gripping documentary poses the ultimate bioethical problem. Does a patient have the right to refuse treatment? Uses interviews and original video footage to examine the case of Donald (Dax) Cowart and his desire to die following severe burns over 65% of his body and the loss of his vision and hands. Considers a patient's right to refuse treatment and to die. Directed by Donald Pasquella. 1984. 58 min. DVD 6973

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

The Deadly Deception.
Investigates one of the most notorious medical experiments in American history; the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male. African American men in Macon County, Alabama believed they were receiving free treatment for syphilis; they were instead given medicines that were worthless against the disease. It also discusses the lingering mistrust of the white medical establishment created by this study. Writer, producer and director, Denisce Diianni. 60 min. DVD X524 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3151

Dramatization of the Tuskegee Experiment
Miss Evers' Boys (TV, 1997) DVD X5597

De motu cordis
Looks at the life and influence of William Harvey and his pioneering work in fostering the understanding of the cardiovascular system, how the heart functions and its relation to the circulation of the blood. Footage from a current day heart operation is interspersed with commentary by physicians, archival footage and extracts from Harvey's seminal work "De motu cordis." Directed by Mariana Ochoa. Presented at the International Latino Film Festival held in the San Francisco Bay Area. 2007. 33 min. DVD X5939

Dietary Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens
(Meredith Morgan Symposium; UC Berkeley). Professor Bruce Ame's lecture discusses cancer, aging, DNA damage, carcinogens and anticarcinogens and some of the causes of cancer. Video/C 2267

Does Doctor Know Best? (Ethics in America ; 4).
Columbia University Seminars on Media & Society. Moderator, Arthur Miller; series host, Fred W. Friendly. A panel of physicians and others from the medical profession, journalists, and jurists explore the ethical conflicts between a doctor's paternalism and a patient's autonomy. 58 min. Video/C 1656

Dolor crónico
For years, Rosario has been suffering a chronic disease that causes unbearable physical pain and alters every aspect of her life and relationships with those around her. In the Clinic for Pain and Palliative Care of the General Hospital of Mexico, surrounded by intimidating machines and understanding doctors (across halls and operating rooms but also at home), this patient becomes the center of an atypical documentary. Centered on a person's struggle to defeat the obstacles enforced by life, this documentary could have become a cold clinical study on a medical case, turns into a story of survival by being narrated in the first person by its protagonist. In Spanish without English subtitles. Written, produced and directed by Santiago Esteinou. 70 min. DVD X7005

Don't Get Sick After June: American Indian Healthcare
Declared wards of the state, Native Americans negotiated housing, education and healthcare in numerous treaties with the U.S. Government. Like so many other federal promises, these too have not been met. The budget shortfall to the Indian Health Service continues. Add to this the generational trauma of subjugation, reservations, boarding schools and alienation, their health and their healthcare is in a critical state. This is the story of the program's inception under the Department of War through the latest promise -- renewed recognition of our government's obligation to America's first people. Director, Chip Richie. c2010. 57 min. DVD X5467

Fighting for Life
A documentary portrait of American military medicine interweaving three stories: Military doctors, nurses and medics, working with skill, compassion and dedication amidst the vortex of the Iraq War; wounded soldiers and marines reacting with courage, dignity and determination to survive and to heal; and students at USU, the "West Point" of military medicine, on their journey toward becoming career military physicians. The filmmakers had extraordinary access to combat support hospitals in Iraq, medevac flights with wounded soldiers, and military hospitals in Germany and the United States. Written by Terry Sanders and Christine Wiser. c2007. 89 min. DVD X6320

[Eakin, Richard] Hans Spemann and Embryonic Development
Dr. Richard Eakin, professor emeritus of zoology presents Hans Spemann speaking about his investigations in embryonic development. c1973. 42 min. DVD 7305; vhs Video/C MM757

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[Eakin, Richard] Louis Pasteur
Recreation of Louis Pasteur by Professor Richard Eakin of the Dept. of Zoology, University of California, Berkeley. 1974. DVD 7334; vhs Video/C 2023

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[Eakin, Richard] William Beaumont and Alexis' Stomach.
Recreation of the scientist William Beaumont by Professor Richard Eakin, Zoology Dept., UC Berkeley. DVD 7333; vhs Video/C 2025

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[Eakin, Richard]William Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood.
Recreation of William Professor Richard M. Eakin, Dept. of Zoology, University of California, Berkeley. DVD 7306 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 2024

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The English Surgeon
What is it like to have God-like surgical powers, yet to struggle against your own humanity? This documentary offers a glimpse into the life of an English neurosurgeon (Henry Marsh) situated in Ukraine as we are exposed to the overwhelming dilemmas he has to face and the burden he has to carry throughout his profession. Produced and directed by Geoffrey Smith. 2008. 90 min. DVD X2926

Awards
Silverdocs: Sterling Award for a World Feature

Finding a Voice (Nova).
This program explores the speech disabilities of Dick Boydell. Dick was born with cerebral palsy and unable to say no more than yes or no for thirty years. This program explores the technology that has provided Dick with a "voice". 57 min. Video/C 403<p>

For a Few Pennies More. (Life, Part 20)
Across the world there are two billion people at risk from iodine deficiency. Apart from the classic symptoms of goiters and cretinism, it also leads to still births, underweight babies and lowered IQ. This film examines the health problems resulting from iodine deficiency in Indonesia and steps taken to solve the problem. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7780

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Forgotten Ellis Island: The Extraordinary Story of America's Immigrant Hospital
In the era before antibiotics, tens of thousands of immigrant patients were separated from family, detained in the hospital on Ellis Island, and healed from illness before becoming citizens. Those deemed too feeble of mind or body were deported. 350 babies were born in the hospital but ten times that many immigrants died on Ellis Island and were buried in pauper's graves around New York City. Written & directed by Lorie Conway. 2008. 57 min. DVD X1380

From Docklands to Dhaka. (Life, Part 3)
Physician Sam Everington serves the poor in London where 40% of his patients are from Bangladesh. Believing that community health involves not only treating illness, but working with local people on jobs, housing and education, Dr. Everington travels to Bangladesh to test his theories in an effort to improve community health. c2000. 24 min. Video/C 7763

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Full Signal
Since 1997 and the onset of GSM telephony, more and more cellular antennas have been popping up in neighborhoods, near children's schools and on neighbor's rooftops all around the world to support an ever-growing number of cell phone users and people are feeling the effects ...The filmmaker talks to a number of leading scientists that have been studying the effects of cellular technology on human beings for years; sheds light on the triumphs and tribulations of lawmakers, lawyers and activists fighting to regulate antenna placement; and hears from those who have suffered and lost due to cellular technology. Directed by Talal Jabari 2009. 62 min. DVD X7078

The Goat Gland Doctor.
Documents the rise and fall of Dr. John R. Brinkley, who combined a dubious medical practice with radio broadcasting, creating one of the largest and most powerful radio stations of the 1920s and 30s. Brinkley used his radio stations to promote his special surgical operations, most famous of which was his goat gland transplant designed to restore a man's sexual vitality. Traces his rise to wealth and fame and recounts his problems with the American Medical Association and the Federal Radio Commission, which chased him to Mexico and later ruined him. c1986. 58 min. Video/C 9897

Gray's Anatomy
This diary of a compulsive homeopathic ex-christian scientist takes a comical look at Spalding Gray's middle-age problems including a rare and mysterious eye condition, and his pursuits into alternative healing, including a Native American sweat ceremony, a debilitating raw vegetable diet, and a trip to the Philippines to try out the "Elvis Presley of psychic surgeons." Directed by Steven Soderbergh; written and performed by Spalding Gray. 1997. 80 min. DVD 5774
Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

The Health Century
c1989. 60 min. each installment.

The Fight Against Infectious Disease (The Health Century; 1).
Explores the dynamic processes of medical discoveries by probing current work in the nation's laboratories and research institutes. 1987. Video/C 1586

Damage Control: Advances in Cardiovascular Medicine, Brain Disease and Diabetes (Health Century, 2).
Highlights discoveries involving molecular repectors and genetics that hold great promise for the diagnosis and treatments of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, diabetes and brain disorders. Documents the progress of heart surgery and organ transplants. Video/C 1587

From Chance to Choice: The Revolution in Molecular Medicine (Health Century, 4).
Traces developments in molecular biology and genetics through profiles with the principal researches and expert witnesses involved in this biotechnological revolution. Video/C 1588

Extending the Warranty: Organ Replacement, Progress Against Cancer and Alzheimer's Disease (The Health Century; 3).
Centers on the most common diseases of the elderly and reveals current efforts to understand and solve them. Video/C 1589

Health & Human Rights
First segment: An interview with Dr. Jonathan Mann, Harvard professor and architect of the World Health Organization's program on AIDS, in which he explores the connection between health and human rights. Second segment: An Interview with Harlan Dalton of Yale Law School and Karen Porter, who teaches law and medicine at Washington University on their views of public health as a human rights issue. Segment from the television program Rights & wrongs broadcast June 14, 1995. Video/C 6726

Homo Sapiens 1900.
Examines the history of eugenics, racial hygiene and the ideas of the "new man," as developed in the early 20th century in Germany and the Soviet Union. In Germany, race hygiene focused on the body, on corporal beauty and the ideal form, while in the Soviet Union, eugenic interest focused on the brain and intellect. a film by Peter Cohen. 1998. 88 min. DVD X5717; Video/C 6552

Hospital (1969)
Shows the daily activity of the Metropolitan Hospital Center, New York City, with emphasis on the emergency ward and outpatient clinics. Reveals social problems of the city and illustrates how medical expertise, availability of resources, organizational considerations, and the nature of communication among the staff and patients affect the delivery of appropriate health care. A film by Frederick Wiseman. 86 min. DVD X7233; Video/C 4133

The Human Experiment (Ethics in America; 9).
Columbia University Seminars on Media & Society. Moderator, Lewis Kaden; series host, Fred W. Friendly. A panel of prominent representatives from the fields of medicine, government service, the judiciary, journalism, religion, and academe discuss the ethical ramifications of human experimentation in medical research. A hypothetical medical test of a new drug for the treatment of AIDS serves as the focus for the examination of such issues as the propriety of risking the life of one patient in order to save millions in the future and the use of placebos on victims of serious diseases. 58 min. Video/C 1661

Jonas Salk (World of Ideas with Bill Moyers).
Bill Moyers talks with Jonas Salk, the developer of the polio vaccine, about AIDS, people as guardians of nature, and evolution. Video/C 1572

The Last to Know.
A documentary about four women of different backgrounds who are similarly dependent upon alcohol or prescribed drugs. Describes the nature of their addiction and how it is possibly perpetuated by the medical establishment and other societal forces. 1983. 3/4" UMATIC. 45 min. Video/C 541

Lethal Medicine.
"For the last fifty years, an unprecedented effort has been made to convince millions of people that animal research saves human lives. The objective of this documentary is to debunk this most destructive myth."-- Opening frame. 1997. 57 min. Video/C 5733

Light of the 21st Century (Nova ).
Traces the development of lasers and discusses their applications in the fields of medicine, dentistry, construction, and communications. 57 min. Video/C 211

Linus Pauling: Crusading Scientist
A biography of Linus Pauling, the Nobel prize winning chemist, peace activist and political activist. 1989. 58 min. Video/C 4090

The Lobotomist
Lobotomy was hailed by The New York Times as a groundbreaking medical procedure that promised hope to the most distressed mentally ill patients and their families. But what began as an operation of last resort was soon being performed at some fifty state asylums, often with devastating results. Little more than a decade after his rise to fame, Walter Freeman, the neurologist who championed the procedure, was decried as a moral monster, and lobotomy one of the most barbaric mistakes of modern medicine. Through interviews with Dr. Freeman's former patients and their families, his students, and medical historians, this program offers an unprecendented look at one of the darkest chapters in psychiatric history. Produced and directed by Barak Goodman and John Maggio. c2008. 60 min. DVD 9480

Made Over in America
A thought-provoking picture of how the desire for a better self-image operates within consumer culture, and how this desire is fed by the media, the medical makeover industry and society at large. Features interviews with producers and contestants of The Swan and Dr. 90210 makeover television programs, surgeons and their patients, clinical psychologists, media theorists, and youth who are coming of age in a culture where bodies seem to be customizable. Produced and directed by Bernadette Wegenstein and Geoffrey Alan Rhodes. 2007. 65 min. DVD 9926

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Manganese: Aberrant/Violent Behavior.
Five television programs present a variety of views on possible physiological causes of violent behavior with individuals postulating that elevated levels of manganese or other chemical imbalances could be the causal factor in violent crimes and behaviors which could be successfully treated with vitamin, mineral and enzyme therapies. Includes discussions of research with testing and treatment of prisoners by vitamin therapy. ABC TV Day One (25 min.) -- Willie Brown TV program / KCRA-TV (18 min.) -- NBC TV "Leeza show" #1 (26 min.) -- NBC TV "Leeza show" #2 (10 min.) -- Pfeiffer Treatment Center (12 min.). 91 min. Video/C 8696

Man's Best Friends.
A documentary about the ethical questions and public controversy surrounding the use of animals for experimental research. Animal rights advocates and scientists both present their views. 1985. 60 min. Video/C 867

Marathon Challenge
Follows thirteen sedentary individuals through a nine-month training program designed to prepare them for running the grueling Boston Marathon. Filled with personal drama, the film also takes viewers on a scientific adventure inside the human body. What happens to muscles and hearts when couch potatoes become endurance runners? And what are the hidden risks? This behind-the-scenes portrait of the trials, tribulations, and joys of marathon training reaches a climax at the 2007 Boston Marathon. Originally produced as an episode of the television series: Nova. 2008. 54 min. DVD X867

Mary Ann Glendon (World of Ideas with Bill Moyers ).
Mary Ann Glendon, a professor of law, discusses abortion in the U.S. and Europe, and explains how she believes "Roe vs. Wade" gave rise to misinterpretation of the abortion issues in the U.S. 29 min. Video/C 1884

Matters of Life and Death
From the late 1800's through the present day this film investigates the remarkable breakthroughs in surgery, vaccines, drugs and medical technology; medicine's new ethical questions; and assumptions about life and death. Topics investigated include fighting disease, the discovery of penicillin and insulin, and the history of surgery and organ transplants. 120 min. Video/C 5998

Medical Ethics & Issues
Originally broadcast as segments of: The News Hour with Jim Lehrer.

Nurses denied training: Why are thousands of would-be nurses denied affordable training at community colleges while America's healthcare providers, facing a shortage, import nurses from abroad? John Merrow investigates. Caregivers struggle with Alzheimer's: Susan Dentzer looks at the growing number of patients stricken with Alzheimer's disease and the emotional, physical, and financial burdens placed on their loved ones. Restructuring the ER: Studies show that more than half the nation's emergency rooms are so overcrowded that they frequently turn patients away. Susan Dentzer sheds light on this critical situation. Risk of hospital infections: Ray Suarez interviews Dr. Richard Shannon of the University of Pennsylvania about an alarming statistic: approximately 100,000 Americans die each year from infections acquired in hospitals. Changing face of AIDS: Joined by activists and health professionals from the U.S. and Africa, Ray Suarez moderates a roundtable on AIDS policy. Conducting drug research in India: Fred de Sam Lazaro visits India, exploring the controversial decision by many pharmaceutical companies to conduct clinical trials there. 55 min. DVD 8860

Rising healthcare costs: Susan Dentzer explains a 2007 U.S. healthcare spending report projecting a dramatic rise over the next decade, from $2 trillion to over $4 trillion by 2016. Uninsured Americans: Susan Dentzer analyzes a 2006 U.S. Census Bureau report on the number of uninsured Americans, which has increased by 1.3 million--including 400,000 more children--since 1999. Longevity and income: Highlighting medical research that links certain health risks with low social status, Paul Solman reports on the connection between what we earn and how long we live. A plan to insure everyone: Susan Dentzer clarifies groundbreaking Massachusetts legislation which would allow 99 percent of individuals in the state to obtain health insurance. Foreign country doctors: Fred de Sam Lazaro studies the increase in doctors from overseas working in the U.S. healthcare system--and how American hospitals often can't manage without them. Medical mistakes: Up to 98,000 deaths annually can be attributed to errors in U.S. hospitals. Susan Dentzer interviews Drs. Donald Berwich and Glenn Bingle and reports on the 100,000 Lives campaign which aims to prevent those tragedies. 54 min. DVD 8860

Debating drug company gifts: Gwen Ifill and two experts discuss a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Big Pharma marketing tactics--and their effects on patients. Drug safety: Margaret Warner interviews FDA Commissioner Dr. Andrew Von Eschenbach about administrative changes designed to improve oversight of prescription drugs. Mandatory cervical cancer vaccine debate: After a background report from Susan Dentzer on the human papillomavirus, two guests debate mandatory HPV vaccinations for school-age girls. Pricing drugs: Ray Suarez focuses on efforts by states to make prescription drugs more affordable. His guests are Marjorie Powell of PHARMA and Kevin Concannon, director of the Iowa Department of Human Services. Assisted suicide: a case study: Lee Hochberg guides viewers through the U.S. Supreme Court case concerning Oregon's assisted suicide law; Margaret Warner interviews doctors and activists regarding the controversy. Embryonic stem cell tests: Susan Dentzer studies two new techniques for creating stem cells and the ethical and religious concerns surrounding them. 70 min. DVD 8860

Medicine in the Middle Kingdom
Looks at the variety and techniques of traditional medicine as developed in China including acupuncture and herbal medicine. Features archival film footage with commentary by authors and academics. Supplementary feature included on Adventures of young Indiana Jones; Volume one. c2007. 27 min. DVD X233

The Mystery of Sleep
Featuring some of the leading figures in sleep research, this documentary explores the science of sleep using computer-generated images to illustrate dream cycles as well as the state of "active paralysis" in which we usually sleep. Also examines the nature and frequency of dreams and nightmares, and sleep disorders such as insomnia, apnea and narcolepsy that affect millions of Americans. Directed, written, and produced by Mel Stuart. c2010. 47 min. DVD X233

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Nicotine War (Frontline).
This program tells the story of Food and Drug Administration chief David Kessler's attempt to regulate tobacco, an industry which has defied regulation for more than thirty years. 57 min. Video/C 3892

Not for Sale
This documentary explores some little-known aspects of global trade agreements. Patents and other intellectual property rights are expanding what corporations can own and control -- from machines to knowledge and even living creatures. What does this mean for the environment, the food supply and human rights? This film looks at farmers, indigenous people, and global justice activists who oppose patents on life and advocate for a world where life is not a commodity but something to be treasured. c2002. 32 min. Video/C 8871

Bullfrog Films catalog description

The Number of My Days.
Follows the progress of four organ transplant surgeries through interviews with the patients, their families, and the doctors. A serious shortage of donated organs plaques medical professionals, who must make the agonizing decisions of who will and will not receive a life-prolonging transplant. The criteria used to determine an individual's chance of becoming a recipient, such as the likelihood of success, often create ethical conflict. Transplant patients must also be prepared to cope with emotional toll, uncertainty, and loss of control. As an additional burden, follow-up therapy is life-long and in most cases even more financially devastating that the initial surgery. Produced and directed by Robert Thurber. 1987. 57 min. Video/C 9932

The Odds of Recovery.
The filmmaker documents her personal journey through illnesses, surgeries and problems she encounters with the medical establishment. She strongly feels that these problems also affected the sexual relationship with her lesbian companion. Alternative treatments to solve her medical problems included tai chi and acupuncture, gardening and embroidery. A film by Su Friedrich. 2005. 65 min. DVD 4700

Patient Abuse: TAC's Struggle for Treatment Access
Presents the early missteps by the South African government health officials concerning AIDS through archival footage and reprints from the newspaper AIDS Times. Film follows the controversial statements made by current President Thabo Mbeki which advance doubts that HIV is the cause of AIDS. It also looks at the work of the organizations South Africa United Against AIDS and the Treatment Action Campaign which challenges pharmaceutical companies for charging high prices for AIDS drugs. 2001. 59 min. Video/C 8726

Description from California Newsreel catalog

A Plastic Story: A History of Plastic Surgery
Through archival documents and photographs, and incorporating interviews with experts in history and medicine, this documentary reveals the international origins of plastic surgery. Beginning with the development of skin grafts circa 800 B.C., to the work of Ambroise Pare who developed the art of suture, to WWI and WWII, when doctors were confronted with the seriously mutilated faces of soldiers, and through striking failures which resulted in lawsuits that motivated practitioners to create professional societies and standards, the film tells the history of the development of a now accepted medical field. Directed by Antoine Hurtado and Julien Glicenstein. c2003. 52 min. DVD X3439; Video/C MM66

Description from Icarus Films catalog

The Politics of Nature and Direct Action
Features an interview with Dr. Steven Best, along with clips from a speech given at the Action for Animals Symposium in Tampa, Florida in 2003. Dr. Best discusses animal welfare activism in the climate of the Patriot Act. 38 min. DVD 7522

Pregnancy and Substance Abuse
Follows several couples through pregnancy and prenatal care, examining the risks of smoking and fetal alcohol syndrome. Originally shown on the television program The Doctor is in. 1991. 28 min. Video/C 2506

Remaking American Medicine
Series examining critical health care issues facing America today, that follows pioneering individuals struggling to fix our broken health care system. Written and directed by Matthew Eisen. 2006. 60 min. each installment. DVD 9557

Program 1, Silent Killer. Silent Killer shows how families and health care professinals are working together to stop needless loss of life in American hospitals due to "medical errors," preventable mistakes that are occurring at an alarming rate in hospitals around this country. In fact, as many as 98,000 people die each year in American hospitals due to medical errors, more than auto accicents, breast cancer or HIV/AIDS combined.

Program 2, First Do No Harm. First do no harm focuses on two major health care challenges -- hospital-acquired infections and the devastating impact of medication errors. Featured in this program are physicians and hospitals working together through the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative to conquer infection and the commitment Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey has made to introducing technology as a way of reducing medical errors.

Program 3, The Stealth Epidemic. The stealth epidemic looks at groundbreaking efforts to create effective chronic disease management programs by transforming fundamentally the physician-patient relationship. Treatment for two chronic diseases: diabetes and congestive heart failure which consume nearly 70 percent of all health care resources are threatening the viability of the entire health care system.

Program 4, Hand in Hand. Hand in hand depicts how families are helping to change and improve health care. Viewers are introduced to one of the nation's most innovative approaches to patient-centered care in the unique partnerships between patients, families and health care providers at the Medical College of Georgia Health System In Augusta.

Right to Decide.
Program deals with the debate about medical service for handicapped newborns. It examines the question who has the right to decide whether such infants should be treated or allowed to die. The history of the controversy is outlined through narration and interviews. 22 min. 1984. 3/4" UMATIC Video/C 847

Roots of Health
Using incisive case studies from around the world, it explores how a person's health and well-being is primarily determined by where they live, their educational, social, and economic status, and the degree of control they have over their lives. The film illustrates that these are the true roots of health -- though generally overlooked in the contentious national debate over health care -- and these conditions can be improved for whole communities through social and political action. Produced by Linda Harrar. 2010. 57 min. DVD X3253

Berkeley Media LLC catalog description

Rothstein's First Assignment: A Story About Documentary Truth
Reviews the work of FSA photographer Arthur Rothstein, retracing his steps by interviewing descendants of the mountain people he photographed during the depression, weaving them together with a 1964 audio interview of Rothstein, archival newsreel footage, and clips from the documentary "Hollow Folk." During the course of his research, Robinson discovered evidence that Rothstein's images were not pure documentation. Instead, they were often staged for the camera. Digging beneath the official story, the film unearths an unsettling link between propaganda and documentary, and raises troubling questions about the photographer's complicity in the displacement of thousands of people for "progress." The most chilling discovery, though, is the forced institutionalization and sterilization of mountain residents as part of a eugenics program where over 8,000 individuals were sterilized. This fascinating film challenges the viewer to consider the complexity behind images that are viewed as historical truth. Written and directed by Richard Knox Robinson. Dist.: The Cinema Guild. 2010. 72 min. DVD X6649

Rx for Survival
Dist.: PBS. c2005. 112 min. each installment DVD 4776

Disease warriors: Chronicles the groundbreaking work of early researchers, such as Louis Pasteur, who unmasked germs as the source of illness. Today, vaccines have made huge strides against epidemics, conquering smallpox and bringing global eradication of polio within reach. But the world still faces major challenges in getting basic vaccines to those who still need them, and in creating new ones to combat modern nemeses, like AIDS.

Rise of the Superbugs: Looks at the discovery of the first antibiotic, penicillin and the subsequent development of more "wonder drugs." Also looks at the growing threat posed by new strains of germs, such as tuberculosis and staph, that are resistant to our best antibiotics.

Delivering the Goods: At the dawn of the 21st century, we can prevent, treat or cure most of the deadliest diseases--and yet millions die needlessly every year because the benefits of modern medicine and public health fail to reach them. What are the obstacles to providing care to populations in need? This program profiles innovative health programs in Third World Countries, and the leaders who, against all odds, are "delivering the goods."

Deadly Messengers: Since the plague of the Middle Ages, vector-borne diseases -- those that rely on insects and animals to spread infectious agents -- have posed a serious threat to public health. Today, the most dangerous vector on earth is the mosquito. From malaria to yellow fever to West Nile virus, mosquito-borne diseases continue to threaten the health of millions around the world.

Back to the Basics: Nutrient-enriched products have reduced diseases caused by vitamin deficiency, but poorer countries also suffer from the twin problems of poor nutrition and unsafe water. This segment explores the connection between health and the essential requirements that so many people take for granted. It also examines how an overabundance of food -- in the form of over-consumption -- is causing an epidemic of obesity that is spreading across the globe.

How Safe Are We? Despite the rise in life expectancy in the past 100 years, in the last few decades, thirty new infectious diseases have emerged and one of them -- AIDS -- is becoming perhaps the most devastating epidemic in history. New diseases travel the globe with unprecedented rapidity. This segment examines the most critical threats we face today -- including avian flu -- and the pressing need to strengthen global public health systems.

Sowing Seeds of Hunger.
This segment looks at the AIDS epidemic in Zambia and other sub-Saharan African nations which has crippled the agricultural community, forcing children to undertake the responsibilities of farming. Video/C 9850

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Sex and Other Matters of Life and Death.
Chronicles a year in the life of STAR Theater, a teenage theater company which performs for adolescents throughout New York City, trying to raise awareness about the risks young people face growing up in the age of AIDS. The documentary combines intimate profiles of the young actors with scenes from their performances. 56 min. Video/C 4568

Sick Around the World
Four in five Americans say the U.S. health-care system needs 'fundamental' change. Can the U.S. learn anything from the rest of the world about how to run a health-care system, or are these nations so culturally different from us that their solutions would simply not be acceptable to Americans? FRONTLINE correspondent T.R. Reid examines first-hand how other advanced capitalist democracies - the United Kingdom, Japan, Germany, Taiwan and Switzerland - deliver healthcare, and what the United States might learn from their successes and failures. Contents: 1. Great Britain: a leader in preventive medicine -- 2. Japan: universal coverage, no gatekeepers -- 3. Germany: a popular largely market-based system -- 4. Taiwan: a new system they copied from others -- 5. Switzerland: its former system resembled ours. Produced and directed by Jon Palfreman. Originally broadcast as a segment of the television program Frontline on April 15, 2008. 56 min. DVD X518

Smoking Cessation: Community Interventions for Latinos.
Presents conclusions and recommendations for future actions from an extensive research project focusing on smoking prevention programs for the three major Latino subgroups in California: Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans. 1991. 47 min. Video/C 8689

Spin the Bottle: Sex, Lies and Alcohol.
By exploring the college party scene, this documentary shows the difficulties students have in navigating a cultural environment saturated with messages about gender and alcohol. The film steps beyond an analysis of "binge drinking" to focus on techniques that alcohol marketers use to link the product to the fragile gender identities of young men and women, encouraging students to recognized the presence of alcohol propaganda and take back control of their own lives from cynical manipulators. c2004. 45 min. Video/C MM82

Description from Media Education Foundation catalog

Stress: Portrait of a Killer
Stanford University neurobiologist, Robert Sapolsky, has been advancing our understanding of stress - how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. Research reveals that the impact of stress can be found deep within us, shrinking our brains, adding fat to our bellies, even unraveling our chromosomes. Yet understanding how stress works can help us figure out a ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. Narrator, Marcus Lovett ; features interviews with Dr. Robert Sapolsky, Dr. Carol Shively, Sir Michael Marmot, Dr. Tessa Roseboom, Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn, Dr. Elissa Epel. Producer/director/writer, John Heminway. 2008. 56 min. DVD X4246

Susceptible to Kindness: Miss Evers' Boys and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study
Examines the ethical issues raised by the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male (1932-1972). Includes excerpts from David Feldshuh's play Miss Evers boys and comments by nurses; physicians; government officials; James Jones, the author of Bad blood; and others on the issues raised by the play. Includes scenes from Illusion Theater's production of Miss Evers boys at Cornell University's Center for the Theatre Arts, August 22-31, 1991; directors, D. Scott Glasser, Michael Robbins. 1993. 45 min. Video/C MM1008

Dramatization of the Tuskegee Experiment
Miss Evers' Boys (TV, 1997) DVD X5597

Taking Control of Your Health: the Pap Test and Cervical Cancer.
Teaches Native American women of all ages about the pap test and cervical cancer, what the pap test is, how to get one, and ways women may be able to protect themselves from getting cervical cancer. 1999. 9 min. [VIDEO/C 6684] Stored at: NRLF #: $B 216 155

Taking the Pulse.(Way We Live: Introduction to Sociology; 19)
Health care in the United States has reached a crisis point, despite advances in medicine and technology. Yet this is not necessarily the case in other parts of the world. This lesson looks at health and society, and explores such issues as inequities in health care coverage, the economics of providing care, alternative medical treatments and ethical questions including right-to-die. Particular emphasis is placed on one of the most serious sexually transmitted diseases -- HIV/AIDS. 2005. 27 min. DVD 4813

To the People of the United States
This film stresses the intensity of the problem of syphilis by numbers of cases and cost in dollars and heartaches. Shown are the importance and relative ease of detection and cure, and a comparison to Denmark's syphilis program. Film also includes exterior shots of the Public Health Service building in Washington, D.C.; Oregon State Hospital; Arizona Hospital for Mental Diseases; and the National Soldiers Home. In addition, it shows the following scenes: the Flying Fortress taking off, women working at machines in a factory, and a young Robert Mitchum in a dramatized sequence in the role of a soldier. Originally produced in 1944. 21 min. DVD 9722

Toxic Bust
A healthy woman finds a lump in her breast which launches this documentary that uncovers mounting evidence that links cancer to chemical exposure. Most breast cancer funding and research has gone toward treatment, and finding the elusive cure. Far less emphasis has been given to prevention and discovering the causes of breast cancer. This film focuses on three cancer "hotspots" (Cape Cod MA, SF Bay Area, and hi-tech manufacturing workers) to more fully explore the connection between breast cancer and chemical exposure in the home, community and workplace. Produced and directed by Megan Siler. 2006. 41 min. DVD 9236

Description from Bullfrog Films catalog

Transplant Tourism.
Looks at the multi-million dollar international trade in human kidneys. Poor people in Turkey, Pakistan, India, Iraq, Russia, China and the Philippines undergo invasive surgery, risking on-going health problems for a one-off payment which might improve their lives. Includes interviews with transplant patients, kidney sellers and brokers, doctors, and bio-ethicists. Directed by David Paperny. 1999. 52 min. DVD 8436

Victims at Birth
A medical documentary examines why infant mortality and birth defects are on the increase in the United States. Three main issues are explored: 1) denial of prenatal care to the poor, 2) substance abuse in pregnancy, and 3) teenage pregnancies. 1989. 57 min. Video/C MM897

Wellness Lecture Series.
1991/92. Wellness lecture series sponsored by the California Wellness Foundation, the University of California and Health Net. Videotaped at the University of California, San Diego by the Office of Learning Resources-Television.

Achieving Wellness for All Californians: The General Health Policy Model. By Robert M. Kaplan. Despite an ever increasing proportion of the GNP devoted to health care, the system is inequitable, denying access to millions who have no insurance. Also little is known about the relationship between expenditures on health care and health outcomes. In order to analyze these problems, this discussion proposes a general health policy model which would allow comparisons between health care services which may have different specific objectives. 51 min. Video/C 8688

Ancient Genomes, Wise Bodies, Unhealthy People: Limits of a Genetic Paradigm in Biology and Medicine. By Richard C. Strohman. In the early part of this century, the focus of medicine was on infectious diseases; the causes were bacteria and viruses treated with vaccines and later antibiotics. By 1990, however the genetic basis of disease was reaffirmed with the establishment of the Human Genome Project. This discussion suggests that the genetic hypothesis be replaced by an adaptational or evolutionary hypothesis as the major paradigm governing medical research in particular and disease-aging control in general. 64 min. DVD X1231 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 8691

The Causes and Prevention of Degenerative Diseases Associated with Aging. Scientists are rapidly gaining an understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of aging and the degenerative diseases associated with aging, such as cancer, heart disease, and brain deterioration. Many degenerative diseases appear to be caused in large part by accumulative damage to DNA, the genetic material in cells. This lecture looks at DNA research and its potential to delay or prevent many degenerative diseases. 56 min. Video/C 8686

Creating and Maintaining Healthy Environments: Toward a Social Ecology of Health Promotion. In an era fraught with technological hazards, degraded natural resources and threats of global conflict the signal challenge of our time is to establish and maintain healthy environments. This discussion offers a social ecological analysis of heath promotive environments, emphasizing the transactions between individual and collective behaviors and the health resources and constraints that exist within specific environmental settings. 56 min. Video/C 8685

Injuries: Personal and Policy Options for Prevention. By Garen J. Wintemute. Trauma and non-traumatic injury have grown to be the leading cause of death in the United States from age 8 months through age 44, nearly two-thirds of our life span. This presentation reviews the development of current knowledge regarding injury prevention, with particular reference to injuries from firearms. 56 min. Video/C 8690

A Model for Health Promotion in Ethnic Minority Families. It has been suggested that higher rates of illness and death in low income, ethnic minority groups are primarily due to involvement in unhealthy behaviors. This lecture looks at differences in health behaviors and disparities in health outcomes among minority groups in the United States, identifying barriers to good health behaviors in these populations and at the development of programs to address these barriers. 55 min. Video/C 8687

Prescription for Prevention: First Aid for What's Killing our Kids. Hosts: Ken Kizer, Gary Yates ; panel moderator: Nancy Snyderman ; Panelists: Geno Tellez, Louis Caldera, Lois Salisbury, Rev. Romie Lilly, George Rodriguez, Wesley Mitchell, Bong Hwan Kim. Commentary: Arturo Venegas, Garen Wintemute, Joan Claybrook Vincent DeMarco, Stephen Teret, Lynn Woolsey, Maxine Waters, Dan Lungren, Barbara Boxer, Donna Shalala, Bill Bradley, Lucille Royball-Allard. Professionals from a variety of backgrounds gather in a video teleconference discussing policies related to hand guns and youth in America, attempting to set the stage for a dialogue that ultimately will result in a reduction of deaths and tragedies related to handguns in American society. Presented on February 22, 1995. 90 min. Video/C 8695

Physical Inactivity: The Neglected Coronary Disease Risk Factor. By David Cosca. Coronary heart disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Physical inactivity has been determined to be a major, independent risk factor. This program looks at the potential of physical exercise to act as a cost-effective, widely applicable intervention in lowering CHD incidence. 48 min. Video/C 8692

Policymaker's Forum on Wellness. Brief remarks introducing the UC Wellness lecture series excerpted from a round table forum on health promotion and health care reform. 7 min. Video/C 8684

Smoking Cessation: Community Interventions for Latinos. By Eliseo J. Perez-Stable. Presents conclusions and recommendations for future actions from an extensive research project focusing on smoking prevention programs for the three major Latino subgroups in California: Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans. 47 min. Video/C 8689

Sustaining Community Living Among the Oldest Old: Health and Service Issues. By Colleen L. Johnson. Presents conclusions and recommendations for future actions from an extensive research project focusing on smoking prevention programs for the three major Latino subgroups in California: Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans. 40 min. Video/C 8694

University-community Partnerships to Promote Wellness in Children, Youth and Families. By Philip R. Nader. Preventitive medicine efforts to benefit children and youth require new partnerships and collaborations among a broad range of public, private and community organizations that interact with youth and families on a routine basis. This lecture proposes that the university, specifically the medical school, become a leading force in forging the necessary collaborations and partnerships required to promote wellness. 63 min. Video/C 8693

Who Needs Sleep?
Unsettled by the preventable death of a coworker, filmmaker Haskell Wexler learns that sleep deprivation and long work hours are a deadly combination. Interweaving medical findings with personal accounts, his camera reveals how a 24/7 work culture affects all Americans. Wexler does a magnificent job of persuading his audience to wake up and smell the very real dangers of overworking and the pricey toll it's taking on our health and our lives. c2006. 78 min. DVD 6948

Who Plays God?: Medicine, Money, and Ethics in American Health Care
Explores a variety of life and death situations to illustrate the spectrum of highly controversial ethical decisions made daily in modern American medicine. The program looks at the decisions that underlie the use of health-care dollars. When is life support provided and stopped? Who gets the transplants, the best technology and treatment? Who lives longer and who does not? The program features five segments that portray choices concerning prolonged life support, the painful struggle of extremely premature babies, the allocation of organ transplants, the crises that accompany the inaccessiblity of health insurance, and the often thwarted desire to die with dignity. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1996. 120 min. DVD 2379

With a Vengeance: The Fight for Reproductive Freedom.
Political aspects of Abortion and the Pro-choice movement in the United States. A film by Lori Hiris. 1989. 40 min. Video/C 1777

Description from Women Make Movies catalog

Working Safely with HIV in the Research Laboratory.
Depicts biosafety practices and procedures, including work in safety cabinets, disposal of waste, selection of protective equipment, and planning for emergencies. 3/4 " UMATIC. 19 min. Video/C 1560

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