Martin Scorsese:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual films


Books

Arnold, Frank
Martin Scorsese / mit beitrage von Frank Arnold ... [et al.]. Munchen: Carl Hanser Verlag, c1986. Series title: Reihe Film 37.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 S3482 1986

Biskind, Peter.
Easy riders, raging bulls : how the sex-drugs-and-rock'n'roll generation saved Hollywood / Peter Biskind. New York : Simon & Schuster, c1998.
Main Stack PN1998.2.B56 1998
Moffitt PN1998.2.B56 1998
See also: video based on this book

Biskind, Peter.
Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and-Rock 'n' Roll Generation Saved Hollywood
A documentary of Peter Biskind's controversial, best-selling book, which chronicles edgy, impressionistic pictures made by maverick, now-legendary directors such as Scorsese, Coppola, Lucas, Altman, Polanski and Peckinpah. Includes interviews with many directors, writers, actors, etc. Based on the book by Peter Biskind (Main Stack PN1998.2.B56 1998; Moffitt PN1998.2.B56 1998). 2004. 118 min. DVD 2763

Blake, Richard Aloysius.
Street smart : the New York of Lumet, Allen, Scorsese, and Lee Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N49 B63 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip059/2005007622.html

Bliss, Michael
Martin Scorsese and Michael Cimino / by Michael Bliss. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1985. Series title: Filmmakers series; no. 8.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 S34831 1985
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 S3483 1985

Bliss, Michael
The Word Made Flesh: Catholicism and Conflict in the Films of Martin Scorsese / by Michael Bliss. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, c1995. Series title: Filmmakers series; no. 46.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S39 B65 1995

Braudy, Leo
"The sacraments of genre: Coppola, DePalma, Scorsese." In: Film quarterly: forty years--a selection / edited by Brian Henderson and Ann Martin, with Lee Amazonas. p. 204-23. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1999.
Main Stack PN1994.F439135 1999
Morrison Rm PN1994.F439135 1999

Braudy, Leo
"The Sacraments of Genre: Coppola, DePalma, Scorsese." In: Native Informant: Essays on Film, Fiction, and Popular Culture / Leo Braudy. pp: 240-52. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.
Main Stack PN1995.B719 1991
Moffitt PN1995.B719 1991

Casillo, Robert.
Gangster priest: the Italian American cinema of Martin Scorsese Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2006.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
MAIN: PN1998.3.S39 C38 2006

Casillo, Robert.
"Moments in Italian-American Cinema: From Little Caesar to Coppola and Scorsese." In: From the Margin: Writings in Italian Americana / edited by Anthony Julian Tamburri, Paolo A. Giordano, Fred L. Gardaphe. pp: 374-96. West Lafayette, Ind.: Purdue University Press, c1991.
Main Stack PS508.I73.F76 1991
Moffitt PS508.I73.F76 1991

Cavallero, Jonathan J.
Italian/American filmmakers in American motion pictures: The films of Capra, Scorsese, Savoca, Coppola, and Tarantino (Disseration: Indiana University, 2007)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Connelly, Marie Katheryn.
Martin Scorsese: An Analysis of His Feature Films, with a Filmography of His Entire Directorial Career / by Marie Katheryn Connelly. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, c1993.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S39 C66 1993
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S39 C66 1993

Connelly, Marie Katheryn.
The films of Martin Scorsese: A critical study (Disseration: Case Western Reserve University, 1991)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

A Decade Under the Influence [videorecording]
The 1970s was an extraordinary time of rebellion as political activism, the sexual revolution, the women's movement and the music revolution contributed to social unrest. A new generation of filmmakers, galvanized by a new freedom of expression began targeting their films toward a new audience, with stories that reflected the reality of the era. Here a cast of pioneering writers, directors, producers and actors talk about the 70's, their films and their colleagues.
Media Center: DVD 2129

DeCurtis, Anthony
"What the streets mean: an interview with Martin Scorsese." In: Plays, movies, and critics / Jody McAuliffe, editor. Durham [N.C.] : Duke University Press, 1993.
Main Stack PN2020.P57 1993

DeCurtis, Anthony
"Martin Scorsese." In: In other words : artists talk about life and work Milwaukee, WI : H. Leonard, c2005.
MUSI: ML394 .D43 2005;
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip057/2005002298.html

Dillon, Steven.
"Situating American film in Godard, Jarmusch, and Scorsese." In: The Solaris effect: art & artifice in contemporary American film / Steven Dillon. 1st ed. Austin : University of Texas Press, 2006.
Full text available [UCB users only]
MAIN: PN1993.5.U6 D47 2006

Dougan, Andy.
Martin Scorsese / Andy Dougan. 1st Thunder's Mouth ed. New York: Thunder's Mouth Press, 1998. Series title: Close up (New York, N.Y.) UCB Main PN1998.3.S39 D68 1998

Easy riders, raging bulls how the sex-drugs-and-rock 'n' roll generation saved Hollywood [videorecording]
New York, NY : Sony Music Entertainment, Inc., 2004. A documentary of Peter Biskind's controversial, best-selling book, which chronicles edgy, impressionistic pictures made by maverick, now-legendary directors such as Scorsese, Coppola, Lucas, Altman, Polanski and Peckinpah. Includes interviews with many directors, writers, actors, etc. Based on the book of the same title by Peter Biskind
Media Center: DVD 2763

Ebert, Roger.
The Future of the Movies: Interviews with Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, and George Lucas / by Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel. Kansas City, Mo.: Andrews and McMeel, c1991.
UCB Moffitt PN1993.5.U6 E24 1991

Ebert, Roger.
Scorsese by Ebert / Roger Ebert ; foreword by Martin Scorsese. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.S39 E33 2008

Ehrenstein, David.
The Scorsese Picture: The Art and Life of Martin Scorsese / by David Ehrenstein. New York: Carol Pub. Group, c1992.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S39 E35 1992

Friedman, Lawrence S.
The Cinema of Martin Scorsese / Lawrence S. Friedman. New York: Continuum, c1997, 1998.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S39 F75 1998

Gilbey, Ryan.
"Martin Scorsese." In: It don't worry me : the revolutionary American films of the seventies / <2003> New York : Faber and Faber, c2003.
MAIN: PN1993.5.U65 G55 2003
MOFF: PN1993.5.U65 G55 2003
PFA : PN1993.5.U6 G55 2003;

Giles, Paul.
"Guilt and salvation: Alfred Hitchcock and Martin Scorsese." In: American Catholic arts and fictions: culture, ideology, aesthetics / Paul Giles. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992. Cambridge studies in American literature and culture.
Main Stack PS153.C3.G55 1992

Giles, Paul.
"The Intertextual Politics of Cultural Catholicism: Tiepolo, Madonna, and Scorsese." In: Catholic Lives, Contemporary America / Thomas J. Ferraro, editor. pp: 120-40. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1997.
Main Stack BX1406.2.C363 1997

Graham, David John
"Redeeming violence in the films of Martin Scorsese." In: Explorations in theology and film: movies and meaning / edited by Clive Marsh and Gaye Ortiz. Oxford, UK; Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1998.
Main Stack PN1995.5.E96 1998

Grist, Leighton.
The films of Martin Scorsese, 1963-77: authorship and context / Leighton Grist. Houndmills, Hampshire: Macmillan; New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S39 G75 2000

VIDEORECORDING
The Hollywood Style
Co-production of the New York Center for Visual History, KCET/Los Angeles, and the BBC. South Burlington, VT: Annenberg/CPB Collection, 1994. 1 videocassette (55 min.) VHS. Series title: American cinema; 1.
UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 3709

Hull, Stephanie; Viano, Maurizio-Sanzio
"The Image of Blacks in the Work of Coppola, De Palma, and Scorsese." In: Beyond the Margin: Readings in Italian Americana / edited by Paolo A. Giordano and Anthony Julian Tamburri. p. 169-97. Madison, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, c1998.
Main Stack PS153.I8.B495 1998

Iannucci, Matthew John.
Martin Scorsese's American antihero (Disseration: Union Institute and University, 2003)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Jacobs, Diane.
"Martin Scorsese." In: Hollywood Renaissance / Diane Jacobs. South Brunswick : A. S. Barnes, c1977.
Main Stack PN1998.A2.J28

Keller, James R.
Food, film and culture : a genre study Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2006.
MAIN: PN1995.9.F65 K45 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0615/2006018727.html

Kelly, Mary Pat.
Martin Scorsese: A Journey / Mary Pat Kelly; with forewords by Steven Spielberg and Michael Powell. New York: Thunder's Mouth Press, c1991.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S39 K45 1991
PFA : PN1998.3.S36 K44 2004

Kelly, Mary Pat.
Martin Scorsese, The First Decade / Mary Pat Kelly; [introduced by Francis Ford Coppola and Michael Powell]. Pleasantville, N.Y.: Redgrave Pub. Co., c1980.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .S3485
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 .S3485

Keyser, Lester J.
Martin Scorsese / Les Keyser. New York: Twayne; Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan; New York: Macmillan International, c1992. Series title: Twayne's filmmakers series.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S39 K49 1992
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S39 K49 1992

Kolker, Robert Phillip.
A cinema of loneliness: Penn, Stone, Kubrick, Scorsese, Spielberg, Altman / Robert Kolker. 3rd ed. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.
UCB Main PN1993.5.U6 K57 2000

Kruth, Patricia
"The color of New York: places and spaces in the films of Martin Scorsese and Woody Allen." In: Cinema & architecture: Melies, Mallet-Stevens, Multimedia / edited by Francois Penz and Maureen Thomas. London: British Film Institute, 1997.
Environ Dsgn PN1995.9.S4.C56 1997

Kruth, Patricia
Figures filmiques : les mondes new-yorkais de Martin Scorsese et Woody Allen / Patricia Kruth ; Villeneuve-d'Ascq, France : Presses universitaires du septentrion, [2002]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.S39 K78 2002

LoBrutto, Vincent.
Martin Scorsese : a biography Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.S39 L63 2008

Lourdeaux, Lee.
Italian and Irish Filmmakers in America: Ford, Capra, Coppola, and Scorsese / Lee Lourdeaux. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990.
UCB Main PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990

Macklin, F. Anthony
"Martin Scorsese." In: Voices from the set : the Film heritage interviews / interviews by Tony Macklin ; edited by Tony Macklin and Nick Pici.
PFA PN1993.5.U6.M214 2000

"Martin Scorsese." In: Directing: learn from the masters / [edited by] Tay Garnett Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 1996. Filmmakers series ; no. 48.
Main Stack PN1998.2.S52313 1996

Masood, Paula
"From Mean Streets to Gangs of New York: Ethnicity and Urban Space in the Films of Martin Scorsese." In: City that never sleeps : New York and the filmic imagination / edited by Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.N49 C58 2007

Meneghetti, Michael Anthony.
The future has passed, the past as style: Martin Scorsese's histories (Disseration: The University of Iowa, 2008)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Merkin, Daphne
"Clean Streets: Martin Scorsese Among the Gentry." In: Dreaming of Hitler: Passions & Provocations / Daphne Merkin. 1st Harvest ed. pp: 153-68. San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1999. (Series: A Harvest book)
Main Stack PS3563.E7412.D74 1999

Miliora, Maria T.
The Scorsese psyche on screen : roots of themes and characters in the films / Maria T. Miliora. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2004
Table of contents: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0413/2004001526.html
Main Stack PN1998.3.S39.M55 2004

Murri, Serafino
Martin Scorsese Milano: Editrice Il castoro, c2000.
MAIN: PN1998.3.S39 M87 2000

Nicholls, Mark Desmond.
Scorsese's men : melancholia and the mob / Mark Nicholls. North Melbourne, Vic. : Pluto Press, 2004.
Main Stack PN1998.3.S39.N53 2004

Nyce, Ben.
Scorsese up close : a study of the films / Ben Nyce. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2004. Filmmakers series ; no. 105
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip049/2003020840.html
Main Stack PN1998.3.S39.N93 2004

Odabashian, Barbara
"Double vision : Scorsese and Hitchcock." In: Social and political change in literature and film : selected papers from the Sixteenth Annual Florida State University Conference on Literature and Film / edited by Richard Chapple. Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c1994.
Main Stack PN51.F54 1991

The philosophy of Martin Scorsese
Edited by Mark T. Conard. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.S39 P55 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip079/2007003156.html

Potter, James.
Martin Scorsese and the poetics of post-classical authorship (Disseration: Northwestern University, 1998)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Rausch, Andrew J.
The films of Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro / Andrew J. Rausch. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2010.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.S39 R38 2010
Pacific Film Archive PN1998.3.S36 R38 2010

Raymond, Marc. Martin Scorsese and film culture: Radically contextualizing the contemporary auteur (Dissertation: Carleton University (Canada), 2009)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Sangster, Jim. Scorsese / Jim Sangster. London : Virgin, 2002. Virgin film.
Main Stack PN1998.3.S39.S26 2002

Scorsese : a journey through the American psyche / edited by Paul A. Woods. London : Plexus, 2005.
Pacific Film Archive PN1998.3.S36 S25 2005

Scorsese, Martin.
Martin Scorsese: interviews / edited by Peter Brunette. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, c1999. Conversations with filmmakers series
Main Stack PN1998.3.S39.A5 1999

Scorsese, Martin
A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies / Martin Scorsese and Michael Henry Wilson. 1st ed. New York: Hyperion, c1997.
UCB Main PN1993.5.U6 S36 1997

VIDEORECORDING
A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies / a BFI TV production for Channel 4 in association with Miramax Films. Santa Monica, CA: Voyager Company, 1995.
UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/D 175

Scorsese, Martin.
Scorsese on Scorsese / edited by David Thompson and Ian Christie. London; Boston: Faber and Faber, 1989.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S35 A3 1989
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.S35 A3 1989

Scorsese, Martin
Scorsese on Scorsese / edited by David Thompson and Ian Christie. Updated ed. London: Faber, 1996.
UCB Main PN1998.3.S35 A3 1996

Scorsese, Martin
"Men who knew too much." In: The best American movie writing, 1998 / edited by George Pimpton; Jason Shinder, series editor. New York : St. Martin's Griffin, c1998.
PFA PN1995.B47 1998

Stern, Lesley.
"Meditation on Violence." In: Kiss Me Deadly: Feminism and Cinema for the Moment / edited by Laleen Jayamanne. pp: 252-85. Sydney: Power Publications, c1995.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.K57 1995

Stern, Lesley.
The Scorsese Connection / Lesley Stern. Bloomington: Indiana University Press; London: British Film Institute, 1995. Series title: Perspectives (Bloomington, Ind.)
UCB Main PN1998.3.S39 S74 1995

Verdicchio, Pasquale
"Return voyages : Rossellini, Scorsese and the identity of national cinema." In: 'Merica : a conference on the culture and literature of Italians in North America / edited by Aldo Bove and Giuseppe Massara. Stony Brook, NY : Forum Italicum Publishing, 2006.
Main Stack E184.I8.M45 2006

Von Gunden, Kenneth.
Postmodern Auteurs: Coppola, Lucas, De Palma, Spielberg, and Scorsese / by Kenneth Von Gunden. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1991.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.2 .V66 1991

Weiss, Marion.
Martin Scorsese: A Guide to References and Resources / Marion Weiss. Boston, Mass.: G.K. Hall, c1987. Series title: A Reference publication in film.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 S348581 1987

Wernblad, Annette
The passion of Martin Scorsese : a critical study of the films / Annette Wernblad. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.S39 W47 2011
Contents: Something being done in front of the altar -- The mask and the mirror -- Down the rabbit hole -- Through the looking glass -- The passion and the pain -- To be without a home -- Paying out the shadow -- To beat the devil -- Filmography.

West, Rebecca.
"From Lapsed to Lost: Scorsese's Boy and Ferrara's Man." In: Beyond the margin : readings in Italian Americana / edited by Paolo A. Giordano and Anthony Julian Tamburri. pp: 198-222. Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c1998.
Main Stack PS153.I8.B495 1998

Journals

Attanasio, Paul.
"Film, faith & fire: director Martin Scorses, with darkness and hope." Washington Post v108 (Sun, Oct 27, 1985):C1, col 1, 75 col in.

Baecque, Antoine de
"Comme sur un lit d'hopital: portrait de Martin Scorsese en cineaste majeur."Cahiers du Cinema no500 Mar 1996. p. 64-8
"Part of a special section on film director Martin Scorsese. Various aspects of Scorsese and his work are discussed: the lasting effect of a depression that overcame him in 1978, the ups and downs of his career, and his style as one of the last old-time filmmakers whose films retain a primitive quality and display a desire to open up characters and wound and kill them in order to reveal their inner truth." [ArtAbstracts]

Baker, Kevin
"You have to give a sense of what people wanted": Martin Scorsese has drawn on his own youth and his feelings about the past -- and has rebuilt 1860s New York -- to make a movie about the fight for American democracy. Here he tells why it is both so hard and so necessary to get history on film. (Interview) American Heritage Nov-Dec 2001 v52 i8 p50(7)
UC users only

Begaudeau, Francois
"Scorsese, nouveau survol." Cahiers du Cinema no. 599 (March 2005) p. 80-2
Various hypotheses on the progressive acceleration of narrative and editing in the films of Martin Scorsese.

Blake, Richard A.
"Redeemed in Blood: The Sacramental Universe of Martin Scorsese."Journal of Popular Film and Television v24, n1 (Spring, 1996):2 (8 pages).
UC users only
Film director Martin Scorsese's films usually depict his religious convictions. The religious influences in his childhood have become deeply ingrained in his being that these mold the way he perceives the world. Such a world view is reflected in his works and their characteristic religiosity is shown in how he depicts the search of his characters for their redemption in different situations. His conviction that bloodshed is associated with redemption can be clearly seen in his movies. His religious works include the 1988 hit, The Last Temptation of Christ, and Mean Streets.

Braudy, Leo.
"The Sacraments of Genre: Coppola, DePalma, Scorsese."Film Quarterly 39:3 (1986:Spring) 17
UC users only

Burdeau, Emmanuel
"Entrees en scene et sorties de route."Cahiers du Cinema no545 Apr 2000. p. 35-7
Part of a special section on American film director Martin Scorsese. Scorsese's work can be divided into two categories: films that locate the hero at the margins of the action, and films where the hero is placed at the heart of a social or professional group, such as the Mafia. The writer traces the evolution of these two categories in Scorsese's work.

Castellitto, George P.
"Imagism and Martin Scorsese: Images Suspended and Extended."Literature-Film Quarterly v26, n1 (Jan, 1998):23 (7 pages).
UC users only
Martin Scorsese utilizes the technique of "freezing" scenes to create a moment between potential behavior and stasis. This cinematic approach visually conveys the importance and possible meaning of each object and functions as a thematic catalyst. Scorsese's consistent use of images to convey themes is reminiscent of the Imagist movement in American poetry.

Chanko, Kenneth M.
"Martin Scorsese."Films in Review v44, n11-12 (Nov-Dec, 1993):386 (7 pages).

Christie, Ian.
"Martin Scorsese's Testament." (interview with film director)(Interview)Sight and Sound v6, n1 (Jan, 1996):6 (6 pages).
Revered film director Martin Scorsese explains that he first got interested in doing the motion picture 'Casino' when its writer showed him a newspaper story on a domestic squabble in a Las Vegas yard. As he read the article, what unfolded was a story about mobsters running casinos. Scorsese admits that there are Biblical references in the movie. For instance, Las Vegas is an allusion to Sodom and Gomorrah while the main character is shown to be a man who is given Paradise on earth and eventually loses it because of greed and pride.

Christie, Ian.
"Scorsese: Faith Under Pressure."Sight & Sound v. ns16 no. 11 (November 2006) p. 14-17
UC users only
"An exploration of the career of director Martin Scorsese, focusing on his plans to make a film of Endo Shusaku's novel Silence. This novel, set in the 17th century, uses the story of the Jesuit missionaries who came to Japan and endured torture and martyrdom for their faith as a basis for examining the apparent conflict between traditional Japanese and western Christian values. Scorsese was deeply moved by Endo's portrayal of Christian faith being tested, and he arranged a deal to film the novel. Commitments to other films--including Cape Fear (1991), Casino (1995), Kundun (1997), and Bringing Out the Dead (1999)--delayed his work on Silence, which has remained on his agenda for more than 15 years. During the editing of The Departed (2006), however, he and his co-author Jay Cocks finally wrote a script that he views as workable. The novel allows Scorsese to pursue his concern with "what Jesus meant" in a dramatic form as challenging as Nikos Kazantzakis's The Last Temptation of Christ, which Scorsese made into a film in 1988." [Art Index]

Christie, Ian.
"The Scorsese Interview."Sight and Sound v4, n2 (Feb, 1994):10 (6 pages).

Clements, Marcelle.
"Martin Scorsese's Mortal Sins." (film director)Esquire v120, n5 (Nov, 1993):98 (6 pages).

Combs, Richard
"Hell up in the Bronx."Sight and Sound v 50 no2 Spring 1981. p. 128-32

Conn, Andrew Lewis.
"The Adolescents of Martin Scorsese: The Drama of the Gifted Child." (1998 Lincoln Center Honoree Martin Scorcese)(a fan's appreciation of Scorcese films)(Cover Story)Film Comment v34, n3 (May-June, 1998):24 (3 pages).
"Part of a special section on director Martin Scorsese. The generation of movie-lovers born between the late 1960s and early 1970s was naturally drawn toward Scorsese. For some of the members of this generation, Scorsese epitomized film--he was the director in whom they saw the great film traditions unite. His movies are, in the best, most generous sense of the word, adolescent, in that they contain the exuberant, yearning, restless quality that defines those years." [ArtAbstracts]

Cortés, Carlos E.
"Italian-Americans in Film: From Immigrants to Icons." MELUS, Vol. 14, No. 3/4, Italian-American Literature. (Autumn - Winter, 1987), pp. 107-126.
UC users only

DeCurtis, Anthony.
"Martin Scorsese." (The Rolling Stone Interview) (interview) Rolling Stone, n590 (Nov 1, 1990):58 (7 pages).

DeCurtis, Anthony.
"Martin Scorsese." (motion picture director) (The Rolling Stone Interview) (interview)Rolling Stone, n590 (Nov 1, 1990):58 (7 pages).

DeCurtis, Anthony.
"What the Streets Mean: An Interview with Martin Scorsese." (Interview)South Atlantic Quarterly v91, n2 (Spring, 1992):427 (30 pages).

De Stefano, George
"Italian-Americans: family lies." (Italians as mobsters in American films)Film Comment v 23 July/Aug 1987. p. 22-4+

Dickstein, Morris.
"Self-Tormentors." Partisan Review, vol. 61 no. 4. 1994 Fall. PAGES: 658-64.

Donato, Raffaele.
"Docufictions: an interview with Martin Scorsese on documentary film.(Interview)." Film History 19.2 (April 2007): 199(9).
UC users only

Durgnat, Raymond.
"Martin Scorcese: Between God and the Goodfellas."Sight and Sound v5, n6 (June, 1995):22 (4 pages).
Director Martin Scorcese compiled a list of the most influential films in his life which is documented in a television anthology titled 'A Personal Journey with Martin Scorcese Through the American Movies.' Scorcese classifies the films according to directorial effort, namely, illusionists, storytellers, iconoclasts and social critics. His choices range from the Western film 'Duel in the Sun' to the film noir 'Seventh Heaven.'.

Dutka, Elaine.
"'I Am the Movies I Make.'" (article on and interview with Martin Scorsese)(Interview) Los Angeles Times v116 (Sat, Feb 22, 1997):F1, col 2, 44 col in.

Everts, Desiree E.
"Martin Scorsese and His Young 'Girl': Female Objectification in Who's That Knocking at My Door?" Via: Voices in Italian Americana. 8(1):159-65. 1997 Spring

Farber, Stephen
"Five horsemen after the Apocalypse." (maverick filmmakers who participated in the studio system for a number of years but than opted out to pursue independent work Film Comment v 21 July/Aug 1985. p. 32-5

Fein, Esther B.
"Martin Scorsese: The Film Director as a Local Alien."New York Times v135, sec2 (Sun, Sept 29, 1985):H1(N), H1(L), col 5, 50 col in.

Giusti, Marco.
"Marco Giusti on Martin Scorsese's Betrayals." (film writer)(film director) (column)Artforum v29, n5 (Jan, 1991):20 (3 pages).

Goldstein, Patrick.
"After hours with a raging bull in Soho." (Martin Scorsese) Los Angeles Times v104, secC (Sun, Sept 29, 1985):22, col 1, 53 col in.

Guida, George
"Prospero's Muccs: The Meaning of Martin Scorsese's Italian American Dialect." Italian Americana, Winter2010, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p5-17, 13p
UC users only

Haenni, Sabine.
"Geographies of Desire: Postsocial Urban Space and Historical Revision in the Films of Martin Scorsese." Journal of Film & Video, Spring2010, Vol. 62 Issue 1/2, p67-85, 19p
UC users only

Henry, Michael
"Entretien avec Martin Scorsese: L'Orgueil précède la chute." Positif: Revue Mensuelle de Cinema, vol. 550, pp. 37-40, December 2006Henry, Michael

Hinson, Hal.
"Scorsese, Master of the Rage." (motion picture director Martin Scorsese)Washington Post v114 (Sun, Nov 24, 1991):G1, col 6, 35 col in.

Hodenfield, Chris.
"Martin Scorsese: 'You've Got to Love Something Enough to Kill It.'"American Film v14, n5 (March, 1989):46 (6 pages).

James, Caryn.
"Film makers' Youth: Outsiders Looking In." (autobiographies by directors Martin Scorsese, John Huston and Ingmar Bergman) (Living Arts Pages)New York Times v139 (Wed, Jan 3, 1990):B1(N), C13(L), col 4, 32 col in.

Kaplan, James.
"The Outsider." (film director Martin Scorsese)(Interview)New York v29, n9 (March 4, 1996):32 (9 pages).
Scorsese has won many awards and is considered by many critics as the greatest living American director. However, he still struggles with balancing his artistic vision against the budgetary restraints of the film industry. He discusses his life, career and aesthetics.

Krohn, Bill
"Histoires de gangsters, histoire d'Amerique." Cahiers du Cinema no452 Feb 1992. p. 76-80+

Molony, Sinéad
"'The Blood Stays on the Blade': An Analysis of Irish-American Masculinities in the Films of Martin Scorsese." Irish Feminist Review. Dec 2007. Vol. 3; p. 137 (13 pages)
UC users only

Mamber, Stephen.
"Parody, Intertextuality, Signature: Kubrick, DePalma, and Scorsese." (Stanley Kubrick, Brian DePalma, Martin Scorsese) (Film Parody)Quarterly Review of Film and Video v12, n1-2 (May, 1990):29 (7 pages).

Martin, Adrian.
"Call It Scorsese." UTS Review: Cultural Studies and New Writing, vol. 3 no. 1. 1997 May. pp: 216-23.

Mari, Christopher.
"Martin Scorsese, filmmaker.(Biography)." Current Biography 68.6 (June 2007): 60(12).

"Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen." (The Directors)(The Two Hollywoods: A Special Issue)(Cover Story)(Interview) New York Times Magazine (Sun, Nov 16, 1997):90, col 6, 137 col in.

Menand, Louis.
"Wise Guy: How Martin Scorsese Works the System." New Yorker v73, n38 (Dec 8, 1997):111 (5 pages).
Scorsese is known as perfectionist who has produced a number of memorable films in different genres including 'Taxi Driver,' 'Casino,' 'The Age of Innocence,' and 'The Last Temptation of Christ.' Details about his career and vision are given.

Murphy, Kathleen.
"Made Men." (1998 Lincoln Center Honoree Martin Scorcese)(excerpted from Sept/Oct 1990)(Cover Story) Film Comment v34, n3 (May-June, 1998):64 (3 pages).

Murphy, Kathleen; Smith, Gavin.
"Made Men." (interview) Film Comment v26, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1990):25 (7 pages).

Pizzello, Stephen
"Thelma Schoonmaker: assembling art with Marty."American Cinematographer v 74 Oct 1993. p. 45-6+

Rickey, Carrie
"Marty." American Film v 8 Nov 1982. p. 66-73

Rollet, Patrice; Saada, Nicolas; Toubiana, Serge
"Scorsese sur Scorsese." Cahiers du Cinema no436 Oct 1990. p. 80-9

Rosen, Marjorie
"Woman talk." Film Comment v 34 no3 May/June 1998. p. 29
Part of a special section on director Martin Scorsese. An excerpt from an article that appeared in the March/April 1975 issue. In an interview, Scorsese discusses such topics as Alice Doesn't Live Here Any More, women in films, and acting techniques.

Saada, Nicolas
"Entretien avec Martin Scorsese." Cahiers du Cinema no492 June 1995. p. 75-9+
Part of a special section on the 100th anniversary of the cinema. In an interview, film director Martin Scorsese discusses a range of topics relating to cinema, including Personal Journey, his contribution to cinema's centenary.

Schrader, Paul
"Interview with Martin Scorsese." Sight and Sound ns9 Apr 1999 supp. p. ix-xxii
An introduction to Paul Schrader's screenplay for Taxi Driver, directed by Martin Scorsese. In an interview conducted by Schrader in 1982 for Cahiers du Cinéma, Martin Scorsese discusses such topics as the films that he was attracted to as an adolescent, what American films have affected his life, how he works with the actor Robert De Niro, and his collaborations with Schrader.

Scorsese, Martin.
"Martin Scorsese's Guilty Pleasures." (1998 Lincoln Center Honoree Martin Scorcese)(includes related article)(excerpted from Sept/Oct 1978)(Cover Story) Film Comment v34, n3 (May-June, 1998):46 (4 pages).

Scorsese, Martin.
"Sans la musique, je serais perdu."Cahiers du Cinema numero special musiques 1995. p. 14-15+
"Part of a special issue on music in motion pictures. Music has played an important role in the films of Martin Scorsese throughout his career. Scorsese discusses his choice of music for several of his films, including Mean Streets, Raging Bull, Goodfellas, Casino, Taxi Driver, and The Last Temptation of Christ." [ArtAbstracts]

Sivapalan, Haran
"Khantzian's 'self-medication hypothesis' of drug addiction and films by Martin Scorsese." International Review of Psychiatry, Jun2009, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p285-288, 4p
UC users only

Smith, Gavin.
"Street Smart: Excerpts From Three Martin Scorsese Interviews." (Cover Story)(Interview)Film Comment v34, n3 (May-June, 1998):68 (6 pages).
The three interviews, excerpted from previous articles, highlight Scorsese's attitudes about making lasting impressions on celluloid. The works discussed include the films 'Goodfellas'(1990), 'The Age of Innocence'(1993) and 'Kundun'(1998).

Smith, Gavin.
"Martin Scorsese Interviewed." (director) (Interview) (Cover Story) Film Comment v29, n6 (Nov-Dec, 1993):15 (9 pages).

Smith, Gavin.
"Martin Scorsese Interviewed." Film Comment v 26 Sept/Oct 1990. p. 27-30+

"Sur Scorsese." (4 article special section)
Cahiers du Cinema no545 Apr 2000. p. 30-7
A special section on American film director Martin Scorsese. Articles discuss various topics relating to his work and examine a number of this films, including the recent Bringing out the Dead.

Taubin, Amy.
"Blood and Pasta." (motion picture director Martin Scorsese)New Statesman & Society v3, n126 (Nov 9, 1990):12 (3 pages).

Taubin, Amy.
"Dread and Desire."Sight and Sound, vol. 3 no. 12. 1993 Dec. pp: 6-9.

Taubin A, Scorsese M
"Everything is Form." (An interview with Martin Scorsese) Sight and Sound, 8: (2) 8-11 FEB 1998

Thompson, David
"Saint of cinema: the poetry of Scorsese's films lies in their style and texture." (Legends & Groundbreakers: Martin Scorsese). Variety Dec 9, 2002 v389 i4 pA8(1) (715 words)

Von Gunden, Kenneth
"Martin Scorsese." In: Postmodern auteurs: Coppola, Lucas, De Palma, Spielberg, and Scorsese / by Kenneth Von Gunden. pp: 136-62. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1991.
Moffitt PN1998.2.V66 1991

Walsh, Michael.
"Slipping into Darkness: Figures of Waking in Cinema."Wide Angle, vol. 5 no. 4. 1983. pp: 14-20.

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Saved by Film Noir." (director Martin Scorsese was influenced by film noir)(Column) New York Times v147 (Fri, Sept 26, 1997):B7(N), E7(L), col 2, 11 col in.

Wilmington, Michael
"The Wild Heart." (1998 Lincoln Center Honoree Martin Scorcese)(observations on selected films)(Cover Story)Film Comment v34, n3 (May-June, 1998):16 (6 pages).

Wood, Robin.
"The Radicalism of Scorsese"Canadian Forum 63:728 (1983:May) 39

Articles and Books on Individual Films

After Hours

Beach, Christopher.
"Yuppies and Other Strangers: Class Satire and Culture Clash in Contemporary Film Comedy." In: Class, language and American film comedy / Christopher Beach. Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.C55 B43 2002

Faber, Marion
"Kafka on the Screen: Martin Scorsese's "After Hours" Die Unterrichtspraxis / Teaching German, Vol. 19, No. 2. (Autumn, 1986), pp. 200-205.
UC users only

Geduld, Harry M.
"The Long Arm of Coincidence." Humanist; Jan/Feb86, Vol. 46 Issue 1, p39-40, 2p
UC users only

van Daalen, Bill
"After Hours" Film Quarterly, Vol. 41, No. 3. (Spring, 1988), pp. 31-34.
UC users only

Willett, Cynthia
"Baudrillard, "After Hours", and the Postmodern Suppression of Socio-Sexual Conflict." Cultural Critique, No. 34. (Autumn, 1996), pp. 143-161.
UC users only

Age of Innocence

"The Age of Innocence." (video recording reviews) American Heritage v45, n4 (July-August, 1994):105 (2 pages).

Alleva, Richard.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews)Commonweal v120, n19 (Nov 5, 1993):14 (4 pages).

Annan, Gabriele.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews)New York Review of Books v40, n18 (Nov 4, 1993):3 (2 pages).

Bromwich, David.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews)New Leader v76, n14 (Dec 13, 1993):20 (2 pages).

Bruzzi, Stella
"Desire and the Costume Film: Picnic at Hanging Rock, The Age of Innocence, The Piano." In: The film cultures reader / edited by Graeme Turner. London ; New York : Routledge, 2002.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1994 .F4384 2002 AVAILABLE
Pacific Film Archive PN1994 .F4384 2002

Cahir, Linda Costanza.
"The Perils of Politeness in a New Age: Edith Wharton, Martin Scorsese and The Age of Innocence."Edith Wharton Review, vol. 10 no. 2. 1993 Fall. pp: 12-14, 19.

Castellitto, George P.
"Imagism and Martin Scorsese: Images Suspended and Extended." Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 26 no. 1. 1998. pp: 23-29.
UC users only

Chanko, K.M. & Pawelczak, Andy
"Martin Scorsese / The Age of Innocence." (Interview+Review)."Films in Review" XLIV/11-12, Nov-Dec 93; p.386-392,411-413.
Scorsese discusses his career and his latest film "The Age of Innocence".

Christie, Ian, Kirkham, Pat & Cook, Pam
"The Scorsese Interview / Looking for the Simple Idea / The Age of Innocence." (Interviews+Synopsis+Review).Sight & Sound IV/2, Feb 94; p.10-20,45-46.
Martin Scorsese discusses in detail aspects of "The Age of Innocence", incl. adapting Edith Wharton's novel, editing, camera shots and titles, and explains the influences on it; plus comments from title sequence designers Saul and Elaine Bass relating to their work on this film and Scorsese's earlier "Cape Fear". Incl. a filmography of their work.

Cook, Pam.
"The age of innocence." In: Screening the past : memory and nostalgia in cinema London ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N67.C66 2005

Cook, Pam.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v4, n2 (Feb, 1994):45 (2 pages).
"Martin Scorsese's screen adaptation of Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence is a visual tour de force. Scorsese has successfully recreated the suffocating nature of 19th-century New York society. His obsession with authenticity, however, gives the film a lack of vitality that corresponds to the inertia of the character of Newland Archer. The performances are superb in this pessimistic view of male desire." [ArtAbstracts]

Corliss, Richard.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) Time v142, n12 (Sept 20, 1993):82 (2 pages).

Delbanco, Andrew.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) New Republic v209, n17 (Oct 25, 1993):31 (7 pages).

Denby, David.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews)New York v26, n38 (Sept 27, 1993):64 (2 pages).

Grenier, Richard.
"Society & Edith Wharton."Commentary, vol. 96 no. 6. 1993 Dec. pp: 48-52.
UC users only

Helmetag, Charles H.
"Re-creating Edith Wharton's New York in Martin Scorses's 'The Age of Innocence.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v26, n3 (July, 1998):162 (4 pages).
UC users only
Martin Scorsese's film version of Edith Wharton's 'The Age of Innocence' was a great departure from the types of movies with which he is most associated. Scorsese became fascinated with the rituals of 1870s society portrayed by Wharton's novel of New York. He hired many consultants in pursuit of the authenticity he recreated.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) New Republic v209, n16 (Oct 18, 1993):30 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) Nation v257, n10 (Oct 4, 1993):364 (3 pages).

Koch, Jim.
"Filming Edith Wharton's world: you were how you ate." New York Times, Sep 15 1993, Vol. 142, pCC3-CC3, 1p

Lane, Anthony.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) New Yorker v69, n29 (Sept 13, 1993):121 (3 pages).

McCarthy, Todd.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) Variety v352, n5 (Sept 13, 1993):31 (2 pages).

Morice, Jacques,
"Le temps de l'innocence." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no472 Oct 1993. p. 68-9

Murphy, Kathleen, Smith, Gavin & Lyons, Donald
"Artist of the Beautiful / Theaters of Cruelty." (Articles+Interview).Film Comment XXIX/6, Nov-Dec 93; p.10-23,26.
On the release of "The Age of Innocence", an appreciation of Martin Scorsese's adaptation and a discussion with him about his cinematic approach to the subject with reference to his earlier work; plus a comparison of this film with "The Heiress".

Nicholls, Mark.
"Male Melancholia and Martin Scorsese's The Age of Innocence." Film Quarterly. 58 (1): 25-35. 2004 Fall.
UC users only
"An analysis of Martin Scorses's The Age of Innocence, proposes a psychoanalytical based theory of male melancholia. Melancholia is revealed as an essential tool for reading Scorses's film for understanding representations of male desire in the cinema." [Expanded Academic Index]

Pawelczak, Andy
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) Films in Review v 44 Nov/Dec 1993. p. 411-13

Peucker, Brigitte.
"Rival Arts? Filming The Age of Innocence."Edith Wharton Review, vol. 13 no. 1. 1996 Fall. pp: 19-22.

Peucker, Brigitte.
"The Moment of Portraiture: Scorsese Reads Wharton." In: A companion to literature and film / edited by Robert Stam, Alessandra Raengo. Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell Pub., 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.3 .C65 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0421/2004017778.html

Pizzello, Stephen
" Cinematic Invention Heralds the Age of Innocence./ Thelma Schoonmaker: Assembling Art with Marty." (Interview). American Cinematographer LXXIV/10, Oct 93; p.34-46,48-50.
German-born cinematographer Michael Ballhaus discusses work on "The Age of Innocence" and compares Scorsese's working methods with those of an earlier collaborator, Fassbinder; Thelma Schoonmaker speaks of her long collaboration with Scorsese.

Prose, Francine.
"In 'Age of Innocence,' Eternal Questions." New York Times v142, sec2 (Sun, Sept 12, 1993):H29(N), pH29(L), col 1, 32 col in.

Romney, Jonathan.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews)New Statesman & Society v7, n287 (Jan 28, 1994):33 (2 pages).

Salamon, Julie.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews)Wall Street Journal (Thu, Sept 16, 1993):A22(W), A18(E), col 1, 19 col in.

Savage King, Chris
"The Great Repression." (Review).Modern Review I/13, Feb-Mar 94; p.26-27.

Sawhill, Ray and Frost, Polly
"Loose Talk." (Discussion).Modern Review I/12, Dec-Jan 93-94; p.38. illus.
Of Scorsese's approach in adapting Edith Wharton's 'The Age of Innocence'.

Simon, John.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) National Review v45, n20 (Oct 18, 1993):69 (3 pages).

Smith, Gavin.
"Martin Scorsese Interviewed." (director) (Interview) (Cover Story) Film Comment v29, n6 (Nov-Dec, 1993):15 (9 pages).
Director Martin Scorsese created an impressionistic feel to 'The Age of Innocence' by using colored fade outs and by using fade outs to shorten scenes to create a reminiscence or dream atmosphere. Scorsese briefly discusses his other films.

Sterritt, David.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v85, n205 (Fri, Sept 17, 1993):11, col 1, 19 col in.

Taubin, Amy
"Dread and Desire." Sight & Sound III/12, Dec 93; p.6-9.
Martin Scorsese's film, 'The Age of Innocence,' based on Edith Wharton's novel of the same name, stars Daniel-Ray-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder. The film's theme, a new one for the director, is love triangle, and includes as much of the original text as possible. Day-Lewis is the focus of the story, while Pfeiffer's and Ryder's roles seem to be incomplete, although the characterizations are similar to those in the novel itself.

Thomas, Deborah
"The Age of Innocence: Martin Scorsese, 1993." CineAction, Summer 2003 i62 p22(12)

Updike, John.
"The Age of Innocence." (movie reviews) New Yorker v69, n32 (Oct 4, 1993):210 (3 pages).

Vidal, Belen.
"Labyrinths of loss: The letter as figure of desire and deferral in the literary film." Journal of European Studies 36.4 (Dec 2006): 418(19).
UC users only
"The visual implications of the letter in the film text to express the narratives of desire and deferral in two romantic period dramas, namely, The Age of Innocence (Martin Scorsese, 1993) and Onegin (Martha Fiennes, 1998) are analyzed. It was noted that the letter, depicts the motif of woman as the "unreachable/unreadable love object" from which the film derives its emotional impact." [Expanded Academic Index]

Villasur, Belén Vidal
"Classic adaptations, modern reinventions: reading the image in the contemporary literary film." Screen Vol XLIII nr 1 (Spring 2002); p 5-18
"Part of a special section on film adaptation. Period dramas require a critical approach that emphasizes their operations of rewriting rather than underplaying their singularity. This can be seen in the light of Martin Scorsese's and Terence Davies's respective adaptations of Edith Wharton's novels The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth. In their handling of literary realism, both movies are exemplary classic adaptations. By displaying various forms of tableaux vivants that work as a filmic trope, however, they generate a semiotic space that complicates narrative realism and closure while foregrounding the trace of the literary under the subjectivity inscribed in the movie image. As such, they serve as examples of the contemporary mode of the literary film, in which the Modernist symbol has given way to its images' self-conscious use. They show the appropriation of the feminine by masculine directors who explore the past as a suffocating system of signs where the feminine body is a ubiquitous object." [Art Index]

Alice Doesn't Live Here Any More

Davis, Russell E.
"Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore Under the comic frosting." Jump Cut, no. 7, 1975, pp. 3-4

Johnson, William
"Alice Doesn't Live Here Any More." Film Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 3. (Spring, 1975), pp. 55-59.
UC users only

Kay, Karyn and Peary, rald
"Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore: Waitressing for Warner's." Jump Cut, no. 7, 1975, pp. 5-7

Rosen, Marjorie
"Woman talk." Film Comment v 34 no3 May/June 1998. p. 29
Part of a special section on director Martin Scorsese. An excerpt from an article that appeared in the March/April 1975 issue. In an interview, Scorsese discusses such topics as Alice Doesn't Live Here Any More, women in films, and acting techniques.

Webb , Teena and Martens, Betsy
"Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore: A Hollywood liberation"Jump Cut, no. 7, 1975, pp. 4-5

The Aviator

Alleva, Richard.
"It's cold up there: 'The Aviator'.(Screen)(Movie Review)." Commonweal 132.3 (Feb 11, 2005): 19(2).
UC users only

Blake, Richard A.
"Flying Solo." America, 2/7/2005, Vol. 192 Issue 4, p32-34, 3p, 1c;
UC users only

Christie, Ian.
"Fly guy." Sight and Sound 15.1 (Jan 2005): 18(3).
UC users only
The writer discusses Martin Scorsese's new film The Aviator, a biopic about billionaire Howard Hughes, played by Leonardo DiCaprio. The writer focuses on the sheer scale of the set in Montreal and its recreation of the Los Angeles premiere of one of Howard Hughes's own films, Hell's Angels, at Grauman's Chinese Theatre.

Cohen, Paula Marantz.
"Citizen plane.(The Aviator)(Movie Review)." TLS. Times Literary Supplement 5309 (Jan 7, 2005): 17(1).

Courtwright, David T.
"The Aviator." Journal of American History, Dec 2005, Vol. 92 Issue 3, p1092-1094, 3p;
UC users only

Doherty, T.
"The Aviator." Cineaste v. 30 no. 2 (Spring 2005) p. 44-6
UC users only
"A review of The Aviator, a film directed by Martin Scorsese. Half the fun of this biopic of Howard Hughes is in watching film scholar Scorsese revel in his own "print-the legend" version of mythic Hollywood. The director channels the work of Hitchcock to peer into the tormented psyche of his subject: In two vertiginous bathroom scenes, the spectator is infused with the pathology of Hughes, who suffered from obsessive compulsion disorder. Tellingly, the film does not examine the Hollywood chapters of the postwar story of Hughes, when he, among other things, closed down RKO to hunt for communists in its employ. The film's historical revisionism is, fortunately, enlivened by a shattering and quite spectacular re-creation of Hughes's almost-fatal crash into the households of Beverly Hills in 1946. Scorsese has managed to remake the generic formula, marking the material with his own stamp." [Art Index]

Jackson, K.
"The Aviator." Sight & Sound v. ns15 no. 3 (March 2005) p. 42, 44
UC users only
"The life of Howard Hughes was filled with rich, even potentially magnificent material. Martin Scorsese is one of the few living American directors fit to do it justice, qualified both by expertise and emotional affinity, since he, like Hughes, has taken risk upon risk in the pursuit of his own views of perfection. Such a meeting of subject and director might well have resulted in a masterpiece; that the film falls far short of such exalted possibilities is less noteworthy than how very satisfying it is within its uninquisitive limitations, how engrossing, witty, elegant, and inventive it is as an entertainment." [Art Index]

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"On Films - Flying and Fighting.(The Aviator)(Million Dollar Baby)(Movie Review)." The New Republic (Jan 17, 2005): 20.
UC users only

Klawans, Stuart.
"Howard's End.(The Aviator)(Movie Review)."The Nation 280.1 (Jan 3, 2005): 40.
UC users only

Krohn, Bill; Hardy, Gregoire, tr
"Hughes, Bush, Hell's Angels et Hollywood."Cahiers du Cinema no. 597 (January 2005) p. 41
"Reflections on Martin Scorsese's film The Aviator. Topics discussed include the similarities and differences between Howard Hughes and George W. Bush, the fact that Peter Brown and Pat Broeske's book Howard Hughes: The Untold Story was the main source for the film's script, and Hell's Angels, Hughes's non-profit-making aviation film that nonetheless turned him into a Hollywood player." [Art Index]

O'Brien, Geoffrey
"Machine Dreams." Film Comment v. 41 no. 1 (January/February 2005) p. 22-5
"Martin Scorsese's The Aviator presents a 20th-century visionary who is driven forward but at the same time paralyzed by his own obsessions. One of the classic dilemmas of the biopic is its generally unsatisfactory alternation between large-scale scenes of triumph or defeat and the chambered interludes of domestic intimacy that purport to reveal the moods and motives behind the public spectacle. The Aviator reverses this dynamic, treating the action scenes as oases of calm and the "domestic" scenes as the genuine battle sequences. The more smoothly and logically the narrative advances, the more clear it becomes that Howard Hughes was out of step with his own life, down to the most minute details." [Art Index]

Pavlus, John
"High Life: Interview with Robert Richardson." American Cinematographer v. 86 no. 1 (January 2005) p. 38-42, 44, 46, 48, 50-3
UC users only
"In an interview, cinematographer Robert Richardson and visual-effects supervisor/second-unit director Rob Legato discuss the production and postproduction on Martin Scorsese's film The Aviator. The film focuses mainly on Howard Hughes's high-flying days in Hollywood. Topics discussed in the interview include attempts to mimic compositional conventions and lighting styles of the period; the use of dimming for psychological effect, notably the correlation between Hughes's mental breakup and the style of lighting; the difficulties of lighting the greenscreen flying scenes; the progression of the film's color palette from a two-color palette to a three-strip palette to approximate the technological advances of the film industry at that time and to mirror the characters' emotional evolution." [Art Index]

Bringing Out the Dead

Baecque, Antoine de
"Made in New York: l'art du grand ecart: Scorsese tourne a New York." Cahiers du Cinema no530 Dec 1998. p. 56-9
"A report on the filming of Martin Scorsese's 18th film, Bring out the Dead, in New York City. Marking a kind of return to Scorsese's roots, this film about the adventures of a New York ambulance driver is being filmed in the streets of the city almost exclusively at night. The writer describes a visit to the film set, noting that Scorsese is experimenting with a new silicon device that is placed over the camera lens to produce images that are almost hallucinogenic." [ArtAbstracts]

Cohen, Clelia
"Et si "Bringing out the dead" etait une serie?Cahiers du Cinema no545 Apr 2000. p. 34
Part of a special section on American film director Martin Scorsese. It is not too difficult to imagine Scorsese's latest film, Bringing out the Dead, as some sort of pilot to a new television series. With its choice of a paramedic as its central character, the film could even be a spin off of ER. The action takes place over three nights in the film, but it could easily continue with another night on the nightmarish streets of New York." [ArtAbstracts]

Coode, Judy.
"Bringing Out the Dead" (motion picture review)Sojourners v29, n1 (Jan, 2000):63.

Degli-Esposti Reinert, Cristina
"Martin Scorsese's Invisible City in "Bringing Out the Dead." Film-Philosophy Vol. 4 No. 12, May 2000

Hamilton, John R.
"Transcendental Style in Schrader: Bringing out the Dead." Literature/Film Quarterly. 32 (1): 26-29. 2004.
UC users only

Higuinen, Erwan
"Bringing Out the Dead" (motion picture review)Cahiers du Cinéma no545 Apr 2000. p. 32-4
"Part of a special section on American film director Martin Scorsese. A review of Scorsese's latest film, Bringing Out the Dead. The film resembles one of those war films that concentrates on the simple soldier: Nicolas Cage's character, Frank, is a paramedic on night shift in New York's Hell's Kitchen district who has to watch as dead bodies mount all around him, powerless to do anything. He is merely and always a spectator, a classic Scorsese character. The writer discusses the structure of the film, which could be seen as taking the form of three acts, and considers the film's religious dimension as it applies to Frank's search for peace in his life." [ArtAbstracts]

Horne, Philip
"Martin Scorsese and the film between the living and the dead." (Critical Essay) Raritan: A Quarterly Review, Summer 2001 v21 i1 p34(18)
UC users only
"The article explores the interrelationship between death and life in Martin Scorsese's film 'Bringing out the Dead.' Topics include the limit to what technology can change about living, but how only technology, including cinema, can offer a specific type of vision such as life after death." [Expanded Academic Index]

Jackson, Kevin.
"Bringing Out the Dead" (motion picture review) Sight and Sound v10, n1 (Jan, 2000):45 (2 pages).
"The team that gave audiences Taxi Driver, Martin Scorsese and Paul Schrader, have brought humor and authenticity to bear on this rich reworking of their original tragic material--without which it would have been a lot closer to Taxi Driver and also a lot weaker. Bringing Out The Dead follows the life of an ambulance driver who works the graveyard shift in New York City and is close to cracking up. The film appears to have been conceived more in sorrow than in anger, with its hero struggling toward health rather than toward an apocalyptic expression of his sickness." [ArtAbstracts]

Nathan, Jean.
"A film that raced from manuscript to a Scorcese set." (Martin Scorcese's new film 'Bringing Out the Dead')New York Times v148, sec2 (sun, Nov 1, 1998):AR17(L), col 1, 38 col in.

Pinkerton, James P.
"Nihilism-chic is no longer profitable." ('Bringing Out the Dead' is not doing well because things in New York City have gotten better)(Column) Los Angeles Times (Thu, Oct 28, 1999):B11, col 1, 15 col in.

Rudolph, Eric
"Urban gothic." American Cinematographer v 80 no11 Nov 1999. p. 30-4+
"Cinematographer Robert Richardson's work on Martin Scorsese's film Bringing Out the Dead is examined. Set in New York near the start of the 1990s, this gritty film documents a few harrowing days in the life of Frank Pierce, a spiritually shattered Emergency Medical Technician working in the after-hours insanity of Hell's Kitchen. In determining the look of the film, Scorsese was inspired to lead the audience into Frank's tortured mindset by "showing the things Frank might have thought he'd seen--the streaks, shadows and flashes of light" captured in his peripheral vision as he drove around at night. Shot in anamorphic format with Panavision E- and C-series lenses, the film has a monochromatic, desaturated look gained by skip-bleaching, a process used in printing that strips the color and makes blacks deeper. This process also creates extra contrast, however, and, to scale some of this down, Richardson used a one-eighth to one-quarter black ProMist filter through out the film. The writer also discusses Dante Ferretti's production design for the film." [ArtAbstracts]

"Sur Scorsese." (4 article special section)
Cahiers du Cinema no545 Apr 2000. p. 30-7
A special section on American film director Martin Scorsese. Articles discuss various topics relating to his work and examine a number of this films, including the recent Bringing out the Dead.

Tesson, Charles
"Scorsese, la tentation de l'oasis." Cahiers du Cinema no545 Apr 2000. p. 30-1
Part of a special section on American film director Martin Scorsese. In his new film Bringing out the Dead, Scorsese has discovered a new world of terror, never captured by his previous work. The film marks a return to the biblical allegory and Calvary, except in this case, the hero, a New York ambulance driver played by Nicolas Cage, is a witness to rather than a victim of the state of the world.

Thompson, David
"Death's cabbie."
Sight and Sound ns9 no12 Dec 1999. p. 12-14
"Martin Scorsese's new film Bringing Out the Dead flips between the high-adrenaline charge of three wild nights on duty for EMS paramedic Frank Pierce and the intervening two days when he spends quieter times with his girlfriend Mary. Neither Scorsese nor screenwriter Paul Schrader have lost their taste for seeking redemption in the New York night; Scorsese's mastery in drawing the audience into the state of mind of his protagonist ensures that even the movie's more reflective scenes encourage viewers to share Frank's need for escape. The film offers an abundance of black humor, with sharp dialogue and well-tuned performances, and there is a continuous thread of irony running through the scenes where Frank comes face to face with would-be suicides. Having left behind their preoccupation with Christian dogma, Scorsese and Schrader allow Frank's final redemption to have a human, rather than divine, touch." [ArtAbstracts]

Weinraub, Bernard.
"A paramedic with a pen." (Joe Connelly, whose autobiographical novel 'Bringing Out the Dead' has been turned into a motion picture)(Weekend)(Column) New York Times (Fri, Oct 22, 1999):B18(N), E17(L), col 1, 14 col in.

Cape Fear

Bowman, James.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews) American Spectator v25, n2 (Feb, 1992):51 (2 pages).

Canby, Vincent.
"Cape Fear." (Living Arts Pages) (movie reviews) New York Times v141 (Wed, Nov 13, 1991):B1(N), C17(L), col 1, 22 col in.

Castellitto, George P.
"Imagism and Martin Scorsese: Images Suspended and Extended." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 23-29, 1998
UC users only

Cauthen, Cramer R.
"The Gift Refused: The Southern Lawyer in To Kill a Mockingbird, The Client, and Cape Fear."Studies in Popular Culture, vol. 19 no. 2. 1996 Oct. pp: 257-75.

Cook, Pam.
"Scorsese's Masquerade." In: Screening the past : memory and nostalgia in cinema / London ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
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Cook, Pam
"Scorsese's Masquerade."Sight & Sound I/12, Apr 92; p.14-15.
Discusses the sexual politics in Martin Scorsese's "Cape Fear", esp. the ambiguous role of women in the film.

Corliss, Richard.
"Filming at Full Throttle." (Martin Scorsese) Time v138, n19 (Nov 11, 1991):84 (2 pages).
Director Martin Scorsese's films have always dealt with the seamier and violent aspects of life on the edge. His new movie, 'Cape Fear,' is a remake of the 1962 classic that has an ex-con terrorizing the family of the lawyer who sent him to prison.

Denby, David.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews) New York v24, n46 (Nov 25, 1991):88 (2 pages).

Diski, Jenny.
"The Shadow Within." (comparison of two versions of the movie 'Cape Fear')Sight and Sound v1, n10 (Feb, 1992):12 (2 pages).

Freed, John.
"Violence and southern films." (analysis of 'Cape Fear' and 'The Prince of Tides') Films in Review v43, n9-10 (Sept-Oct, 1992):307 (3 pages).
"Martin Scorsese's 'Cape Fear' and Barbra Streisand's 'The Prince of Tides' are both set in the south with violence being a common theme. The violence these films portray, however, is not isolated in the southern locales. What is made apparent by both films is the link between the violent psyche of Americans and the deep south existing in the collective unconscious of the film industry. The difference between Scorsese and Streisand is basically rooted in the male and female attitudes toward violence." [Magazine Index]

Garcia, Maria
" Cape Fear." (Review).Films in Review XLIII/1-2, Jan-Feb 92; p.43-44.

Hoberman, J. & Diski, Jenny
"Sacred and Profane / The Shadow Within."Sight & Sound I/10, Feb 92; p.8-13.
Discusses the directing merits of Martin Scorsese, particularly in the light of his latest film "Cape Fear". Incl. a filmography of Scorsese and a comparison of his remake with the original.

Jackson, K.
"Gothic Shadows." (Interview).Sight & Sound II/7, Nov 92; p.16-19.
Freddie Francis discusses his career as a director, and why Martin Scorsese chose him to be director of photography on "Cape Fear".

Jousse, Thierry
"Cape Fear." (motion picture review)Cahiers du Cinéma no453 Mar 1992. p. 60-2

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews) New Republic v205, n24 (Dec 9, 1991):28 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
" Cape Fear."(movie reviews) Nation v253, n22 (Dec 23, 1991):826 (3 pages).

Kolker, Robert Phillip
"Algebraic Figures: Recalculating the Hitchcock Formula In: Play it Again, Sam: Retakes on Remakes / edited by Andrew Horton and Stuart Y. McDougal; with an afterword by Leo Braudy. pp: 34-51. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1998.
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McRobbie, Angela
" Cape Fear." (Review).Sight & Sound I/11, Mar 92; p.39-40.

MacCannell, Juliet Flower.
"Between the Two Fears." In: Lacan and contemporary film. Edited by Todd McGowan and Sheila Kunkle. New York : Other Press, c2004.
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Morgan, David
"A Remake That Can't Miss: Cape Fear." (Interview).American Cinematographer LXXII/10, Oct 91; p.34-38,40. illus.
Cinematographer Freddie Francis discusses his work on Martin Scorsese's remake of "Cape Fear".

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews) New Yorker v67, n41 (Dec 2, 1991):156A (4 pages).

Rapping, Elayne.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews) Progressive v56, n6 (June, 1992):34 (3 pages).

Rio Alvaro, Constanza del.
"Genre and Fantasy: Melodrama, Horror, and the Gothic in Martin Scorsese's Cape Fear." Atlantis: Revista de la Asociacion Espanola de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos. 26 (1): 61-71. 2004 June.
UC users only

Savage King, Chris
"Rape Fear." (Review).Modern Review I/3, Spring 92; p.30-31.

Simon, John.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews)National Review v43, n23 (Dec 16, 1991):56 (3 pages).

Solman, Gregory
"The Bs of Summer."Film Comment XXIX/4, July-Aug 93; p.10-17,19-22. illus.
Describes characteristics of B-movies of the 1940's-1960's and compares them to recent examples such as "Cape Fear".

Sterritt, David.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews)Christian Science Monitor v84, n4 (Fri, Nov 29, 1991):16, col 2, 17 col in.

Thain, Gerald J.
"Cape Fear - Two Versions and Two Visions Separated by Thirty Years." Journal of Law and Society Volume 28 Page 40 - March 2001
UC users only
"This essay examines the changes between 1962 and 1991 that occurred in the context within which the two very different versions of Cape Fear appeared. These two versions of the story of a threatened lawyer are emblematic of an altered perspective on law. The essay highlights the tension between art's role as a reflector of society and its values and its role shaping social views. The inference, from the different portrayals of Sam Bowden, that there has been a systematic decline in the lawyer's status and public esteem is not, however, borne out in the cinematic field. The situation has become one of moral ambiguity with the lawyer playing a more ambivalent role in society."

Travers, Peter.
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews)Rolling Stone, n618 (Nov 28, 1991):101 (2 pages).

White, Rob
"Cape Fear." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound, Jan 2002 v12 i1 p61(1)

Casino

Alexander, Victoria
"Casino." (Review).Films in Review XLVII/3-4, Mar-Apr 96; p.56-58.
"A review of Martin Scorsese's film Casino, starring Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci. The film focuses on the era when organized crime families of the Midwest came to Las Vegas in the 1970s and early 1980s. The movie has everything that Scorsese is known for: gangsters, the 1970s, and lots of violence. The difference this time is that the story has a woman as a central figure, and in her role as Ginger McKenna, a chip hustler and part-time hooker, Sharon Stone gives a fascinating performance." [ArtAbstracts]

Alleva, Richard.
"Casino." (movie reviews)Commonweal v123, n1 (Jan 12, 1996):18 (2 pages).

Alvarez, A.
"Casino." (movie reviews) New York Review of Books v43, n1 (Jan 11, 1996):15 (5 pages).

Blake, Richard A.
"Casino." (movie reviews)America v173, n19 (Dec 9, 1995):24 (2 pages).

Christie, Ian & Kirkham, Pat
"Martin Scorsese's Testament / Bright Lights Big City." (Interview). Sight & Sound VI/1, Jan 96; p.6-11. illus.
Martin Scorsese talks about his new film "Casino", his reasons for tackling another mafia subject after "Goodfellas", the characters, the structure, and the significance of the music in the film; plus a tribute to the effectiveness of the title sequence for "Casino" designed by Saul and Elaine Bass.

Denby, David.
"Casino." (movie reviews) New York v28, n47 (Nov 27, 1995):78 (2 pages).

Horne, Philip.
"Casino." (movie reviews)TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4850 (March 15, 1996):19.

Jaehne, Karen
"Casino." (Review).Film Quarterly XLIX/3, Spring 96; p.43-45.
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"Martin Scorsese's Casino, based on Nicholas Pileggi's book, Casino: Love and Honor in Las Vegas, is formally structured as a memoir of the rise and fall of bookie Sam "Ace" Rothstein, played by Robert DeNiro. Rothstein is sent to manage a mob property in Las Vegas, and, as his story unfolds, the strange world of gambling casinos is explored. Underlying the film is a puritanical suspicion of gaming and contempt of the nouveau-riche types it spawns. There are also long scenes of pointless violence. The sensationalism inherent in the film provides meager kicks to make up for a weak, illogical plot." [ArtAbstracts]

Jousse, Thierry; Saada, Nicolas
"Entretien avec Martin Scorsese."Cahiers du Cinema no500 Mar 1996. p. 8-15
"Part of a special section on film director Martin Scorsese. An interview with Scorsese who, with reference to his film Casino, discusses such topics as its location in Las Vegas, the actors and characters involved, the plot, and the genre to which the film belongs." [ArtAbstracts]

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Casino." (movie reviews) New Republic v213, n26 (Dec 25, 1995):26 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Casino." (movie reviews) Nation v261, n21 (Dec 18, 1995):803 (3 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Casino." (movie reviews) New York Times v145 (Wed, Nov 22, 1995):B1(N), C9(L), col 1, 21 col in.

Morgenstern, Joe.
"Casino." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Fri, Nov 24, 1995):A6(W), A6(E), col 1, 21 col in.

Pawelczak, Andy
"Casino." (Review).Films in Review XLVII/1-2, Jan-Feb 96; p.60-61.
"A review of Martin Scorsese's motion picture Casino. Based on Nicolas Pileggi's book, the film centers on the relationship between Ace (Robert De Niro), a mob-connected casino director, and Nicky (Joe Pesci), a mob enforcer; the two compete to see who will become king of Las Vegas. With a nervous and edgy rhythm, the movie is a visual and aural tour de force." [ArtAbstracts]

Pizzello,Stephen & Magid,Ron
"Ace in the Hole. Visualizing a Vintage Vegas." (Interview). American CinematographerLXXVI/11, Nov 95; p.34-44,46.
"The work of director Martin Scorsese and cinematographer Robert Richardson on the motion picture Casino is examined. This sprawling and ambitious Las Vegas crime epic set in the 1970s stars Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Sharon Stone. Shot in Super 35, the movie employs many of the techniques that were used to great effect in Scorsese's GoodFellas, including freeze-frames, flashbacks, extremely rapid dolly moves, and expansive voice-overs by various characters. Richardson used 5293 stock for almost all of the interior and exterior night scenes, with all of the day exteriors and most day interiors shot on 5248. He used both a Platinum and a Gold Panavision camera, working primarily with Primo lenses, particularly the 4:1 zoom." [ArtAbstracts]

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Casino." (movie reviews)New Yorker v71, n39 (Dec 4, 1995):118.

Rapping, Elayne.
"Casino." (movie reviews)Progressive v60, n3 (March, 1996):39 (2 pages).

Romney, Jonathan
"Casino." (Synopsis+Review).Sight & Sound VI/3, Mar 96; p.39-40.
"Casino is the flashiest, most superficial of Martin Scorsese's films--which is to say that it serves its theme brilliantly. It invites a proliferation of readings in terms of character, visual style, narrative construction, gaming theory, Scorsesean religious-ethical debate, and cinema itself." [ArtAbstracts]

Saada, Nicolas
"Casino." (movie reviews) Cahiers du Cinema no500 Mar 1996. p. 20-2
"Part of a special section on film director Martin Scorsese. A review of Scorsese's film Casino (1995). Although apparently set in the same world of American gangsters that featured in some of Scorsese's previous films such as Mean Streets and Goodfellas, Casino depicts a far more complex milieu comprising networks and movements that conjure up an infinite variety of characters and themes. Alternating between the documentary reality of a decadent world and the strange vision of its rulers, this film fully justifies its exceptional length. A unique work that cannot be classified, Casino is one of the best films made in a long time." [ArtAbstracts]

Schickel, Richard.
"Casino." (movie reviews)Time v146, n22 (Nov 27, 1995):93 (2 pages).

Schiff, Stephen.
"The Casino Cut." (Martin Scorsese's new film 'Casino')New Yorker v71, n38 (Nov 27, 1995):46 (5 pages).
Scorsese discusses his latest film 'Casino,' during the editing of the film. He notes the intricacies of editing the 3-hr drama, which contains many voice-overs. The film centers on a love triangle between a casino manager, his wife and a gangster during the end of the Mob days in Las Vegas.

Smith, Gavin
"Two Thousand Light Years From Home." (Review).Film Comment XXXII/1, Jan-Feb 96; p.59-61,63.
"Martin Scorsese's Casino depicts the acquisitive urge in all its savagery, neurotic compulsion, ruthless manipulation, and rush to destruction. Starring Robert De Niro and Sharon Stone, the film is Scorsese's blistering and haunting last word on the culture of American violence, criminal enterprise, and civic life that he has mined since Mean Streets. Like Mean Streets, Casino is a fundamentally introspective film that embroiders a classic tragic narrative of retribution and hubris with an episodic surfeit of incidentals, asides, and anecdotes. Here as ever, Scorsese's genius is his insistence on showing the interior emotional, spiritual, and psychological landscapes of his characters in startlingly heightened terms." [ArtAbstracts]

Toubiana, Serge
"Casino." (movie reviews) Cahiers du Cinema no500 Mar 1996. p. 22-3
"Part of a special section on film director Martin Scorsese. A review of Scorsese's film Casino. This film illustrates the power of the cinema to work almost as a scientific instrument to reveal, recount, and explain the otherwise invisible movements of money, more particularly, dirty money. A highly descriptive film, Casino deals above all with the demolition of the Mafia, who are portrayed from a calm, pedagogical viewpoint; it is a true masterpiece." [ArtAbstracts]

Color of Money

Bazar, K. and Ceplair, L.
"The Color of Money." (Review).Cineaste XV/3, 87; p.41-42.

Biskind, P.& Linfield,S.
"Chalk Talk." (Interview).American Film XII/2, Nov 86; p.30-33,69,71-72.
Screenwriter Richard Price and director Martin Scorsese discuss "The color of money".

Canby, Vincent.
"The Color of Money." (movie reviews) New York Times v136 (Fri, Oct 17, 1986):16(N), C12(L), col 1, 20 col in.

Combs, Richard
"Once a Contender." (Review).Sight & Sound LVI/1, Winter 86-87; p.68-69.

Forsberg, Myra.
"'The Color of Money': Three men and a sequel." (to 'The Hustler') New York Times v136, sec2 (Sun, Oct 19, 1986):H21(N), H21(L), col 1, 44 col in.

Jenkins, Steve
"Color of Money" (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin LIV/637, Feb 87; p.35-36.

Maslin, Janet.
"Color of Money" (movie reviews)New York Times v136, sec2 (Sun, Oct 26, 1986):H19(N), H19(L), col 1, 19 col in.

McDonough, J.
"Raging Balls." (Review).Film Comment XXIII/3, May-June 87; p.72,74.

Rafferty, Terrence
"High Stakes." (Production Report).Sight & Sound LV/4, Autumn 86; p.264-265. illus.

Salamon, Julie.
"The Color of Money." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, Oct 16, 1986):28(W), 30(E), col 1, 19 col in.

Turner, George
"Lighting for Drama: The Color of Money." (Interview).American Cinematographer LXVII/11, Nov 86; p.52-58. illus.
German-born cinematographer Michael Ballhaus discusses his lighting effects on "The color of money".

The Departed

Alleva, Richard.
"Boston massacre: 'The Departed'.(Movie review)." Commonweal 133.19 (Nov 3, 2006): 16(2).

Cohen, Paula Marantz.
"Underworld with an overbite: the corrupting effects of Martin Scorsese's late epic style.(The Departed)(Movie review)." TLS. Times Literary Supplement 5403 (Oct 20, 2006): 18(1).

Gorin, Jean-Pierre
"Dramatis Personae." Film Comment v. 42 no. 6 (November/December 2006) p. 30-3
"Martin Scorsese's The Departed is a great vehicle for impressive acting performances. The film unfolds within narrowly defined bands of activity and is carried by their vehemence: The material does not develop or uncover new dimensions, but the vehemence works viscerally. Permutations are constantly varied and the different facets of the basic condition of traumatic paralysis are highlighted. From that point, it is up to the actors' virtuosity to keep eliciting nuances from the situation and to keep the rhythm flexible. Much work, time, and attention has been spent on performance throughout, and Scorsese manages to get each member of the cast to perform at the same congruous level." [Art Index]

Heyer-Caput, Margherita
"Martin Scorsese's The departed, or the quest for a departed ethnic identity." In: Mafia movies : a reader / edited by Dana Renga. Toronto ; Buffalo [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
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James, Nick
"The Departed." Sight & Sound v. ns16 no. 12 (December 2006) p. 53
UC users only
"A review of Martin Scorsese's 2006 film The Departed. Applauded by many as Scorsese's return to the crime saga, this is a juicy and enjoyable gangster picture that also has generous humor, huge narrative drive, and an engagingly complex plot of multiple betrayal. It is not, however, a brilliant film. Despite its characteristic Scorsese flourishes and filmic references, The Departed ultimately seems to lose Scorsese in its nihilistic conclusion." [Art Index]

Kelly, David
"Model Citizens: The Irish Films of Martin Scorsese." Australasian Journal of American Studies, 2007, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p1-16, 16p
UC users only

Gangs of New York

Baker, Kevin
"A nation's wild start." (Martin Scorcese's film 'Gangs of New York' shows only a mild version of how violent America's beginnings were)(Column) The New York Times Dec 26, 2002 pA35(N) pA39(L) col 2 (20 col in)

Baker, Kevin
""You have to give a sense of what people wanted": Martin Scorsese has drawn on his own youth and his feelings about the past -- and has rebuilt 1860s New York -- to make a movie about the fight for American democracy. Here he tells why it is both so hard and so necessary to get history on film." (Interview) American Heritage Nov-Dec 2001 v52 i8 p50(7)
"Presents an interview with Martin Scorsese conducted in September 2001 about his movie Gangs of New York. In the film, Scorsese shows how New York City, especially the Five Points area, reacted to the dark days before and during the Civil War years. He probes into the inherent racism of the period, and he illustrates the strength of the anger of those who participated in the draft riots of 1863." [America History & Life]

Blake, Richard A.
"Melting pot." (Gangs of New York)(Movie Review) America Feb 3, 2003 v188 i3 p30
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Blouin, Patrice
"Gangs of New York."Cahiers du Cinema no. 575 (January 2003) p. 18-21
"A review of Gangs of New York, a film by Martin Scorsese. Set in the 1870s, the story centers on Amsterdam Vallon, who is determined to avenge the murder of his father by Bill the Butcher by infiltrating his enemy's gang. Despite the evident compromises made and the shortened running time, this is a beautiful film, an earth-colored epic on the origins of violence and the foundation of America. Among other things, it is the most meaningful example to date of a recent tendency in Scorsese's work not to center exclusively on a group of individuals but to integrate the group into a wider generational and civilizational process." [Art Index]

Bordewich, Fergus M.
"Manhattan Mayhem: Martin Scorsese's realistic portrayal of pre-civil war strife--gangs of New York--re-creates the brutal street warfare waged between immigrant groups." Smithsonian Dec 2002 v33 i9 p44
UC users only
"Based on a 1927 volume of the same name, Martin Scorsese's film Gangs of New York (2002) realistically portrays the "deadly subculture" of thugs and street gangs of 1846-63, the uphill survival of successive waves of immigrants, the anticonscription riots of the Civil War years, and the general maelstrom that characterized mid-19th-century Manhattan." [America History & Life]

Bosley, Rachael K.
"Native Sons." American Cinematographer v. 84 no. 1 (January 2003) p. 36-40, 42, 44-9
UC users only
"The work of cinematographer Michael Ballhaus for Gangs of New York, a film directed by Martin Scorsese, is discussed. Ballhaus opted to employ the Super 35mm (2.35:1) format for this film about the neighborhood of Five Points in New York from 1840 to 1863, an especially turbulent period in its history, when it was widely regarded as the world's worst slum. Throughout the film, which has a dark, warm look, Scorsese and Ballhaus employed a mobile camera and a variety of in-camera effects to visually underline the instability and excitement of the era. Using an Arriflex camera package that consisted of 535As, 535Bs, and 435s, he filmed most of the interior scenes on Kodak Vision 320T 5277, day exteriors on Eastman EXR 50D 5245, and most of the night scenes on Kodak Vision 500T 5279. Up to eight cameras were used on the film's battle scenes." [Art Index]

Calhoun, John
"Bad Boyos." Entertainment Design Jan 1, 2003 v37 i1 pNA (1436 words)
UC users only
"Dante Ferretti designed the mean streets of Martin Scorsese's latest, long-delayed, and highly touted movie, Gangs of New York. The pair first worked together on The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton's story of wealthy old New York, and went on to collaborate on Casino, Kundun, and Bringing out the Dead. For Gangs of New York, Ferretti returned to roughly the 19th-century time and place of The Age of Innocence, but the new film is set in a very different social landscape, with downtown streets filled with immigrants, criminals, and assorted lowlifes. The production took up the entire ten-acre backlot of Cinecitta, the vast studio complex in Rome, that is also Ferretti's home base. In conversation, Ferretti discusses his work on the movie." [Art Index]

Christie, Ian
"Manhattan asylum." Sight & Sound Vol XIII nr 1 (Jan 2003); p 20-23
Interview with Martin Scorsese who talks about the origins, techniques, and ambition of his epic film "Gangs of New York".
UC users only

Corliss, Richard .
"Director's Cut: He lost with Raging Bull and GoodFellas. Now MARTIN SCORSESE tries, one more time, for that elusive Best Director Oscar." (Movies)(director of 'Gangs of New York')(Interview)Time March 24, 2003 v161 i12 p60+

Czitrom, Daniel
"Gangs of New York." (Arts and Media)(Movie Review) . Labor History August 2003 v44 i3 p301(5)

DiGirolamo, Vincent.
"'Such, such were the B'hoys...'" (Movie Review) Radical History Review Fall 2004 i90 p123-141

Gallman, J. Matthew
"Gangs of New York." (Movie Review) Journal of American History Dec 2003 v90 i3 p1124(2)

Giles, Jeff
"Method Man: After a five-year absence, Daniel Day-Lewis is an Oscar contender again, thanks to a brilliant, brutal performance in 'Gangs of New York'." (Interview) Newsweek Jan 13, 2003 p56

Gilfoyle, Timothy J.
"Scorsese's Gangs Of New York: Why Myth Matters."Journal of Urban History 2003 29(5): 620-630.
"Reviews Martin Scorsese's 2002 film Gangs of New York, Scorsese's book of the same year, Gangs of New York: Making the Movie, and Herbert Asbury's The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld, originally published in 1928 but reprinted as recently as 2001. The reviewer takes issue with the historical inaccuracies in the film, the lack of historical research done in preparation for the film, and the unfortunate reliance on Asbury's 1928 text, the inaccuracies of which have since been refuted in many historiographic works." [America History & Life]

Goldman, William
"Crashing the party for poor Marty." (Screen Trade). (Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York) Variety Feb 3, 2003 v389 i11 p6(2)

Henkin, David
"Gangs of New York." (Movie Review) American Historical Review April 2003 v108 i2 p620-621
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Ignatiev, N.
"Gangs of New York." In: Re-imagining Ireland / edited by Andrew Higgins Wyndham. Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2006.
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Justice, Benjamin
"Historical fiction to histortical fact: Gangs of New York and the whitewashing of history." Social Education May-June 2003 v67 i4 p213(2)

Kelly, David
"Model Citizens: The Irish Films of Martin Scorsese." Australasian Journal of American Studies, 2007, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p1-16, 16p
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Kerr, Philip
"A load of raging bull: Philip Kerr on an epic disappointment from Martin Scoresese." (Movie Review) New Statesman (1996) Jan 20, 2003 v132 i4621 p42(1)
UC users only

Magid, Ron
"Mean Streets."American Cinematographer v. 84 no. 1 (January 2003) p. 50-2, 54, 56, 58-9
UC users only
"The work of production designer Dante Ferretti and visual-effects studio Industrial Light & Magic for Gangs of New York, a film directed by Martin Scorsese, is discussed. For this film about New York's tumultuous past, Ferretti re-created on the backlot of Cinecitta Studios in Rome a one-square-mile section of Five Points, a neighborhood that disappeared long ago. Rather than merely reproducing the city photorealistically, he designed a 19th-century New York that visually embodied the director's themes. Color (and its absence) was used to make essential distinctions about the class conflicts at the heart of the film. Led by visual-effects supervisor Michael Owens, ILM artists produced 45 computer-generated shots. They combined 2-D and 3-D matte paintings to digitally flesh out the crowded neighborhoods and to extend the sets as far as the minds of the filmmakers could see." [Art Index]

Mattie, Sean
"Blood, justice, and American citizenship: an interpretation of Gangs of New York." (Critical Essay) Perspectives on Political Science Fall 2003 v32 i4 p215(6)
UC users only

Molony, Sinéad.
"'The Blood Stays on the Blade': An Analysis of Irish-American Masculinities in the Films of Martin Scorsese." Irish Feminist Review. Dec 2007. Vol. 3; p. 137 (13 pages)

Morris, James McGrath
"Gangs of New York." (Letters)(Letter to the Editor) Social Education Sept 2003 v67 i5 p245(2)

Nathan, D. A., et. al.
" "The truth wrapped up in a package of lies": Hollywood, history, and Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York." In: Lights, camera, history : portraying the past in film / edited by Richard Francaviglia and Jerry Rodnitzky ; with an introduction by Peter C. Rollins ; contributions by Robert Rosenstone ... [et al.]. 1st ed. College Station : Published for the University of Texas at Arlington by Texas A&M University Press, c2007.
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Oestreicher, Richard
"How Should Historians Think about 'The Gangs of New York'?" History Workshop Journal, Volume 56, Number 1, 2003, pp. 210-216(7)
UC users only
"Although 'Gangs of New York' offers a gritty and remarkable spectacle of working-class life in New York City before the Civil War, it is likely to disappoint social historians. Even well-made historical dramas usually do. If historians want to understand why, they must go beyond critiques of the inaccuracies of particular films, and analyse how the relations of production in culture industries make such an outcome probable.

Because cultural products demand novelty and originality, directors, screenwriters, set designers and other cultural workers have some leverage with the corporate executives who ultimately control the production process. Struggles over the production process are often fought on an ideological terrain of art versus money. Cultural workers thus see their assertion of superior artistic and aesthetic vision as a weapon in the politics of production. They do not value the analytical and factual concerns of historians because to do so potentially undermines their aesthetic claims to control the product." [Ingenta]

Palmer B.D.
"The Hands That Built America: A Class-Politics Appreciation of Martin Scorsese's The Gangs of New York." Historical Materialism, Volume 11, Number 4, 2003, pp. 317-345(29)
UC users only

Parker, James
"Scorsese's low score: gangs of New York is mere filmmaking, not mythmaking." (Martin Scorsese) The American Prospect Feb 2003 v14 i2 p42(2)
UC users only

Plakhova, Yelena
"City of Butchers." (Gangs of New York)(Movie Review) Moscow News April 2, 2003 v4067 i12 p11(1)

Reckner P.
"Remembering Gotham: Urban Legends, Public History, and Representations of Poverty, Crime, and Race in New York City." International Journal of Historical Archaeology, Volume 6, Number 2, June 2002, pp. 95-112(18)
UC users only
"The 'past' is never truly past, nor are historians/archaeologists privileged stewards of a city's memory. The moment ground was broken at Five Points, researchers encountered a public avidly interested in the history of New York's legendary nineteenth-century "slum." From the 1840s this Manhattan neighborhood provided journalists with grist for lurid tabloid tales, creating a grim literary legacy that lingers in popular historical memory into the twenty-first century and also continues to shape public perceptions of poverty and antipoverty policies. New York's press remains steeped in memories of a crime-infested Five Points. Even as researchers uncovered nineteenth-century accounts of gangs, prostitution, and sweat-shop labor at the Five Points, our own newspapers arrived with blaring headlines drawing on nineteenth-century stereotypes of poverty, race, and place. The struggle to create alternative accounts of life in Five Points based on archaeological evidence clashed with these tenacious narratives and the class interests informing them."

Scott, A. O.
"To feel a city seethe." (Gangs of New York)(Movie Review) The New York Times Dec 20, 2002 pB1(N) pE1(L) col 1 (35 col in)

Taubin, Amy
"Founding Fathers."Film Comment v. 39 no. 1 (January/February 2003) p. 24-7
UC users only
"Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York is a spectacular, brilliant, but punishing movie--essentially one long brawl framed between what must be the two bloodiest battle scenes ever filmed. Scorsese and screenwriter Jay Cocks loosely based their script on Herbert Asbury's 1928 The Gangs of New York, an anecdotal account of the street gangs that wrestled for control of poor immigrant neighborhoods from the early 1800s to the early 1900s. The primary focus is the conflict between the Nativists--Protestant descendants of the original Anglo-Dutch settlers--and the newly arrived Irish Catholic immigrants, who, at the apex of the Irish potato famine, were streaming into New York at the rate of 15,000 per week. Gangs of New York could be the last costume picture made wholly in a studio by a prodigiously creative director in conjunction with master craftspeople, but the the heavy economic and aesthetic burdens of films on this scale mean that this is not necessarily a bad thing." [Art Index]

Tayler,Christopher
"Old knives tale." (Gangs of New York)(Movie Review) TLS. Times Literary Supplement Jan 24, 2003 i5208 p19(1)

Tesson, Charles
"Lames de fond." Cahiers du Cinema no. 575 (January 2003) p. 21
"The writer discusses the influences on Gangs of New York, a film by Martin Scorsese. The film centers on the young Amsterdam Vallon (played by Leonardo DiCaprio), who dreams of reliving the primitive scene in which his father is killed during a battle between two generations of immigrants to New York. The backbone of the film is for the most part taken directly from Samuel Fuller's book of the same name, but references to the history of American cinema are scattered throughout the film. Moreover, if the intrigue is Fullerian, the hero as played by DiCaprio is a character straight from the films of Kurosawa." [Art Index]

Thompson, David
"Gangs of New York." (Movie Review) Sight and Sound Feb 2003 v13 i2 p44(2)
UC users only
"Scorsese's movie promises grand passion between its young leads against the backdrop of 19th-century gang warfare in New York. The director is clearly in his element depicting the ferocious aura of the gangs and their ritualistic behavior, along with the cultural clashes and political corruption. However, the tension between his clarity of vision and the sentimental demands of the movie is not resolved satisfactorily." [Art Index]

Travers, Peter
"Blood on the streets: a brutal, brilliant epic takes on the violence that is hard-wired into the American character." (Gangs of New York) (Movie Review) Rolling Stone Jan 23, 2003 i914 p75(1)

Walkowitz, Daniel J.
"'The Gangs of New York': the Mean Streets in History." History Workshop Journal, Volume 56, Number 1, 2003, pp. 204-209(6)
UC users only
"In 'Gangs of New York' Martin Scorcese reimposes his familiar vision of gritty New York on the nineteenth century. The director documents vividly the nativist prejudices that divided the city, even as he exaggerates in melodramatic form the violence of the era which culminated in the New York draft riot. Drawing on events from a forty-year period, the film condenses time and eliminates any sense of the changes that convulsed New York's industrializing society. In reducing working people to caricatures of unthinking mobs, the film is a missed opportunity to dramatize the political struggles and class fragility of the era, as well as the divisions that animated racism." [Ingenta]

Williams, Alex
"Passion play." (Martin Scorsese directs 'Gangs of New York') New York Dec 16, 2002 v35 i44 p28(7)

Winchell, Mark Royden
"Copperhead cinema : Ang Lee's Ride with the devil (1999) and Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York (2002)." In: God, man, and Hollywood : politically incorrect cinema from "The birth of a nation" to "The Passion of the Christ" / Mark Royden Winchell. Wilmington, Del. : ISI Books, c2008.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S6.W53 2008
PFA PN1995.9.S6.W53 2008

Winkler, Irwin .
"Wearing 'Gangs' colors." (Guest Column).Variety Feb 17, 2003 v390 i1 p10(1)

Goodfellas

Alleva, Richard.
"Goodfellas."Commonweal v117, n21 (Dec 7, 1990):720 (3 pages).

Anker, Roy.
"Badfellas: the rash of mob movies cannot but prod viewers to contemplate the specter of evil and its proximity to their own dark places."Christianity Today v34, n3 (March 11, 1991):45 (3 pages).

Ansen, David.
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews)Newsweek v116, n12 (Sept 17, 1990):54 (3 pages).

Blake, Richard A.
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews)America v163, n16 (Nov 24, 1990):407 (2 pages).

Bradley, Scott C.
"Film as Literature: Two Screenplays." Literature-Film Quarterly v23, n1 (Jan, 1995):79 (2 pages.
UC users only
Reviews the scripts of Paul Shrader's `Taxi Driver,' and Martin Scorsese and Nicholas Pileggi's `GoodFellas.'

Canby, Vincent.
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v140 (Wed, Sept 19, 1990):B1(N), C11(L), col 3, 26 col in.

Colley, Iain.
Goodfellas : director, Martin Scorsese / note by Iain Colley. [Harlow, U.K.] : Longman ; London : York Press, 2001.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.G596 C65 2001

Condren, Robert
Abstract for 'let it bleed,' the music in Goodfellas." Popular Music and Society, Volume 15, Issue 3 Autumn 1991 , pages 131 - 136

Corliss, Richard.
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews)Time v136, n13 (Sept 24, 1990):83 (2 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"Married to the Mob; in some spiffy new films, Hollywood hooks up with gangsters." Time v136, n13 (Sept 24, 1990):83 (2 pages).

Denby, David; Pener, John Degen.
"Movies: Brutally Realistic, "GoodFellas" is Scorsese and Pileggi's Dark Mob Comedy." (Martin Scorsese, Nicholas Pileggi; includes list of upcoming fall movies) (Fall Preview) New York v23, n35 (Sept 10, 1990):32 (6 pages).

Donatelli, Cindy. Alward, Sharon.
"'I Dread You'? Married to the Mob in The Godfather, GoodFellas and The Sopranos." In: This thing of ours : investigating The Sopranos / edited by David Lavery. New York : Columbia University Press ; London : Wallflower, 2002.
MAIN: PN1992.77.S66 T49 2002
MOFF: PN1992.77.S66 T49 2002

Ebert, Roger.
"Goodfellas." In: The great movies II / Roger Ebert ; photo stills selected by Mary Corliss. New York : Broadway Books, 2005
Pacific Film Archive PN1994 .E232 2005

Ferrante, Leonard A.
Redemption in the narrative films of Martin Scorsese: Related critical essays, with emphasis on "Mean Streets", "Raging Bull", and "Goodfellas" (Disseration: The Union Institute, 1994)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Freedman, Carl.
"Hobbes After Marx, Scorsese after Coppola: on GoodFellas." Film International, Mar2011, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p42-62, 21p
UCB users only

Giusti, Marco.
"Marco Giusti on Martin Scorsese's Betrayals." Artforum v29, n5 (Jan, 1991):20 (3 pages).

Hoberman, J.
"J. Hoberman on Gangster Flicks." Artforum v29, n5 (Jan, 1991):19 (2 pages).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews)Maclean's v103, n40 (Oct 1, 1990):55 (2 pages).

Jousse, Thierry
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews)Cahiers du Cinema no435 Sept 1990. p. 16-17

Kael, Pauline
"Goodfellas." (Review).Modern Review I/1, Autumn 91; p.29.
Originally publ. in 'The New Yorker', 24 Sept 90.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews) New Republic v203, n17 (Oct 22, 1990):28 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Goodfellas." (movie reviews)Nation v251, n15 (Nov 5, 1990):537 (2 pages).

Krauthamer, Ky; Spence, Timothy
"Our Take: Goodfellas." Transitions Online, issue: 09/12 / 2007

Linfield, Susan.
"'Goodfellas' looks at the banality of mob life."New York Times v139, sec2 (Sun, Sept 16, 1990):H19(N), H19(L), col 4, 40 col in.

Milne, Tom
"Goodfellas." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin LVII/683, Dec 90; p.355-357.

Murphy, Kathleen
"Made Men." (Interview).Film Comment XXVI/5, Sept-Oct 90; p.25-30,69. illus.
Part of a special section on director Martin Scorsese. A reprint of an article that appeared in the September/October 1990 issue. The writer discusses Martin Scorsese's GoodFellas, which is so unerring and so full of convincing action, color, character, and risk that it takes the audience's breath away.

Orsitto, Fulvio
"Martin Scorsese's GoodFellas : hybrid storytelling between realism and formalism ." In: Mafia movies : a reader / edited by Dana Renga. Toronto ; Buffalo [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.M23 M34 2011

Quart, Leonard
"Goodfellas." (Review).Cineaste XVIII/2, 91; p.43-45.

Rapping, Elayne.
"Goodfellas." (Review). Progressive v55, n3 (March, 1991):37 (2 pages).

Rollet, P.; Saada, Nicolas; Toubiana, Serge
"Scorsese sur Scorsese." Cahiers du Cinéma; nr.436 (Oct 1990); p.80-89
M.S. discusses the violence in "Goodfellas", and cites several influences from earlier US gangster films.

Shipman, David.
"GoodFellas." (Review). Contemporary Review v258, n1503 (April, 1991):213.

Simon, John.
"GoodFellas." (movie reviews)National Review v43, n1 (Jan 28, 1991):63 (3 pages).

Smith, Gavin
"Street smart." Film Comment; Vol.XXXIV nr.3 (May-June 1998); p.68-69,71-72,74,77
Reprints three interviews with Martin Scorsese published on the release of his films "Goodfellas" (Sept-Oct 1990 issue), "The age of innocence" (Nov-Dec 1993) and "Kundun" (Jan-Feb 1998).

Sterritt, David.
"Gangster movies close in; the resurgence of an old format poses new questions of on-screen violence." Christian Science Monitor v82, n208 (Fri, Sept 21, 1990):12, col 2, 29 col in.

Taubin, Amy.
"Blood and Pasta." (motion picture director Martin Scorsese) New Statesman & Society v3, n126 (Nov 9, 1990):12 (3 pages).

Verevis, Constantine
"Way of Life: Goodfellas and Casino." In: The gangster film reader / edited by Alain Silver and James Ursini.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.G3 G36 2007
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.G3 G29 2007
Contents via Google books

Viano, Maurizio
"GoodFellas." (Review).Film Quarterly XLIV/3, Spring 91; p.43-50.
UC users only

Willens, Michele.
"Pileggi, the fella behind 'Goodfellas.'" (author Nicholas Pileggi)Los Angeles Times v110 (Fri, March 22, 1991):F10, col 1, 37 col in.

Hugo

Christie, Ian.
"Clash of the Wonderlands." Sight and Sound, vol. 21, no. 11, pp. 36-38, 2011 Nov
UC users only

Christie, Ian.
"The Illusionist." Sight & Sound, Jan2012, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p36-39, 4p;
UC users only

Keller, Susan Marie.
"Hugo: The Invention Of Thelma Schoonmaker, A.C.E." CinemaEditor, 2011 4th Quarter, Vol. 61 Issue 4, p54-56, 3p
UC users only
The article features the collaboration between director Martin Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker on the creation of the motion picture "Hugo." Schoonmaker says that Scorsese has always been a big fan of 3-dimension (3D) and they reviewed a number of 3-D movies before the "Hugo" project started. It states how Schoonmaker and Scorsese met during a course they took in New York University.

Lally, Kevin.
"Hugo." Film Journal International, Jan2012, Vol. 115 Issue 1, p54-55, 2p
UC users only

Marriner, Katy.
"Mechanical Magic: A Hugo Study Guide." Screen Education, Autumn2012, Issue 65, p18-29, 12p
UC users only

Osmond, Andrew.
"Hugo." Sight & Sound, Feb2012, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p66-6
UC users only

King Of Comedy

Arnold, Gary.
"The King of Comedy." (moving-picture reviews) Washington Post v106 (Fri, April 15, 1983):C1, col 2, 26 col in.

Buckley, Michael
"The King of Comedy." (Review).Films in Review XXXIV/5, May 83; p.301.

Canby, Vincent.
"The King of Comedy." (moving-picture reviews) New York Times v132 (Fri, Feb 18, 1983):21(N), C10(L), col 1, 17 col in.

Conroy, Mark.
"Crashing the Party in Scorsese's The King of Comedy."New Orleans Review, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992 Spring. pp: 72-80.

Jenkins, Steve
"The King of Comedy." (Review) Monthly Film Bulletin L/593, June 83; p.150-151. illus., cred.

Kakutani, Michiko.
"Scorsese's Past Colors His New Film." (Martin Scorsese and The King of Comedy)New York Times v132, sec2 (Sun, Feb 13, 1983):H1(N), H1(L), col 3, 52 col in.

Killgore, Matthew.
"Kierkegaard's Either/Or via Via Scorsese's Neither/Nor: Taxi Driver and King Of Comedy. Heythrop Journal, Nov2011, Vol. 52 Issue 6, p1009-1020, 12p
UC users only

Librach, Ronald S.
"Class-consciousness and Self-improvement in The King of Comedy."Film Criticism XV/2, Winter 91; p.47-62.
UC users only
Briefly analyses "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore" and then examines the themes of transcendence and redemption in "The King of Comedy".

Mamber, Stephen
"In Search of radical Metacinema." In: Comedy/Cinema/Theory / edited by Andrew Horton. pp: 79-90. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1991.
Main Stack PN1995.9.C55.C65 1991
Moffitt PN1995.9.C55.C65 1991

Mamber, Stephen
"Parody, Intertextuality, Signature: Kubrick, DePalma, and Scorsese."Quarterly Review of Film and Video XII/1-2, May 90; p.29-35.
Draws on three publications studying postmodernist metafiction - 'Parody/meta-fiction' (Margaret Rose), 'Metafiction' (Patricia Waugh) and 'A theory of parody' (Linda Hutcheon) - to underline the theme of parody running through Kubrick's "The Shining", De Palma's "Body Double" and Scorsese's "The King of Comedy".

Maslin, Janet.
"The King of Comedy." (moving-picture reviews)New York Times v132, sec2 (Sun, Feb 20, 1983):H19(N), H19(L), col 1, 24 col in.

Miller, William Ian.
"'I Can Take a Hint': Social Ineptitude, Embarrassment, and The King of Comedy." In: The Movies: Texts, Receptions, Exposures / edited by Laurence Goldstein and Ira Konigsberg. pp: 76-97. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, c1996.
Main Stack PN1994.M78 1996
Moffitt PN1994.M78 1996

Mortimer, Barbara.
"Portraits of the Postmodern Person in "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull," and "The King of Comedy."" Journal of Film and Video v49, n1-2 (Spring-Summer, 1997):28 (11 pages).
Robert De Niro starred in such Martin Scorsese's films as the 'Taxi Driver,' 'Raging Bull' and 'The King of Comedy' which used an artistically revolutionary approach to show that the character of a person was acquired and developed through imitation. The characters portrayed by De Niro in the films were all products of 'impersonation,' which was a postmodern theory of identity that states that a person is influenced by external forces in understanding, realizing and discovering his true nature. Such concept in identity acquisition is considered outmoded in recent times because of cultural changes.

Nankov, Nikita.
"Sublime Rupert and Beautiful Lenny: Aesthetics and Temporality in Scorsese's The King of Comedy and Fosse's Lenny." Comparatist: Journal of the Southern Comparative Literature Association. 28: 77-95. 2004 May.
UC users only

"Paul Zimmerman: Screen-writing is Like the Priesthood." (Interview).
American Film VIII/2, Nov 82; p.72.
Zimmerman discusses his script for "The King of Comedy" and how it came to be made.

Pulleine, T.
"King of Domedy." (motion picture review)Films and Filming no346 July 1983. p. 33-4

Rafferty, Terrence
"Martin Scorsese's Still Life." Sight & Sound LII/3, Summer 83; p.186-192.
Analysis of "The King of Comedy" in relation to his earlier films.

Rickey, C.
"Marty."American Film VIII/2, Nov 82; p.66-72. illus.
On the making of "The King of Comedy" and Scorsese's attitude to his work and to the cinema.

Schruers, Fred.
"Scorese's Strange Realm; the director on 'The King of Comedy' & other temptations." Washington Post v106 (Sun, May 8, 1983):H1, col 1, 54 col in.

Sikov, Ed
"The King of Comedy." (Review)Film Quarterly XXXVI/4, Summer 83; p.17-21.
UC users only

Wood, Robin
"Two Films by Martin Scorsese." [King of Comedy, Ragin Bull] In: Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan / Robin Wood.pp: 245-69. New York: Columbia University Press, 1986.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.W641 1986

Kundun

Abramson, Marc
"Mountains, monks, and mandalas: Kundun and Seven years in TibetCineaste v 23 no3 1998. p. 8-12
"The films Seven Years in Tibet, directed by Jean Jacques Annaud, and Kundun, directed by Martin Scorsese, are discussed. The former tells the true story of Heinrich Harrer and Peter Aufschnaiter, climbers on a German expedition in the Himalayas who escape to Tibet after being interned in India at the start of World War II, and becomes a tale of Harrer's individual redemption through his relationship with Aufschnaiter and the young Dalai Lama. Kundun, a vastly different film, is narratively unconventional by current Hollywood standards, following events from the autobiography of the Dalai Lama and avoiding the simplistic portrayal of Tibet and the pandering toward Western audience tastes and expectations that characterize Seven Years. However, both Seven Years, because it is only partially about Tibet, and Kundun, because it transcends the subject to become a cinematic meditation of memory and transcendence, fail to render Tibet as a real place with its own history, thus perpetuating the mystery and romance that surrounds it." [ArtAbstracts]

Alleva, Richard.
"A risk worth taking: Scorsese'a 'Kundun'." (filmmaker Martin Scorsese)Commonweal v125, n4 (Feb 27, 1998):21 (2 pages).
Filmmaker Martin Scorsese's latest work 'Kundun' reflects his tempers and cinematic styles commonly found in his former projects. The film which is expected to become another hit, features scenes and artists that viewers will not expect to see in ordinary movies.

Blake, Richard A.
"Kundun." (movie reviews) America v178, n12 (April 11, 1998):20 (2 pages)

Burdeau, Emmanuel
"Kundun." (motion picture review)Cahiers du Cinema no525 June 1998. p. 70-2
"A review of Kundun, Martin Scorsese's latest film. The film basically recounts the sequence of events that led to the exile of the 14th Dalai Lama in India, but rather than being a biography, it is a presentation of his "visions." This is not a film about Buddhism, but a film "with" Buddhism, and the tragedy of both the character and the film is that they are doomed to be neither totally Buddhist nor totally historical. Kundun is not a bad film, merely a film made by a director who does not know whether to be crazy or well behaved, an artist or an academician, an experimental filmmaker or a conservative spectator." [ArtAbstracts]

Freedland, Jonathan.
"Kundun." (movie reviews) New Statesman (1996) v127, n4379 (April 3, 1998):64 (2 pages).

Holden, Stephen.
"Kundun." (movie reviews)New York Times v147 (Wed, Dec 24, 1997):B1(N), E1(L), col 2, 22 col in.

Insdorf, Annette.
"Kundun." (movie reviews) Whole Earth, n93 (Summer, 1998):96 (1 page).

Moynihan, Maura.
"Genocide in Tibet." (recent films, 'Kundun' and 'Seven Years in Tibet,'help educate people about Tibet and its occupation by Communist China)(Column) Washington Post (Sun, Jan 25, 1998):C7, col 6, 20 col in.

Kaufman, Debra
"Tracing a filmmakers's footsteps." American Cinematographer v 80 no1 Jan 1999. p. 68-70+
"Michael Henry Wilson's documentary In Search of Kundun With Martin Scorsese is discussed. The film tracks Scorsese and his production team during selected portions of the production process involved in the creation of Kundun, a sweeping biopic on the life of the Dalai Lama. Wilson chose video--namely, PAL Digital Betacam--for various reasons, including its flexibility and the quality of the image. As a backup, he also brought a Sony DVX-1000 DV-format camera, which proved quite useful for the film's intimate scenes in very tight interior sets. As the budget did not allow the documentary crew to stay in Morocco for the duration of the Kundun shoot, Wilson had to choose his moments with care, zeroing in on key points in the story, in particular scenes with the Dalai Lama as a two-year-old, a six-year-old, and a young adult. The emotional core of the documentary, however, was formed by the stories of the Tibetans involved in Kundun, which Wilson captured in a series of interviews." [ArtAbstracts]

Lopez Jr., Donald S.
"Kundun." Rethinking History, Jul99, Vol. 3 Issue 2, p227, 4p
UC users only

O'Hehir, Andrew
"Kundun." (motion picture review) Sight and Sound ns8 no4 Apr 1998. p. 41-2
"Filmed on four continents at enormous expense, this biographical epic about the Dalai Lama is a movie only somebody of Scorsese stature and ambition could have made. More than a grand spectacle full of breathtakingly beautiful images, it is a film that uses its visual and aural palette to create something almost indescribable, revelatory, and profoundly moving." [ArtAbstracts]

Pizzello, Stephen
"Kundun: a kinder, gentler Scorsese film." American Cinematographer v 79 Feb 1998. p. 58-60+
"An interview with Martin Scorsese on his new motion picture, Kundun. Scorsese discusses a range of topics, including his interest in the story of the Dalai Lama, the inspiration of the images of Andrew Marton's film Storm over Tibet for the movie, his use of sketches or storyboards, his work with cinematographer Roger Deakins, their choice to shoot in Super 35 and their use of Steadicam, his choice of Morocco for the film's location, and his use of nonprofessional actors." [ArtAbstracts]

Pizzello, Stephen
"Raising Tibet in the desert." American Cinematographer v 79 Feb 1998. p. 38-42+
"The work of cinematographer Roger Deakins in Martin Scorsese's new film, Kundun, is discussed. The movie traces the life of the Dalai Lama from infancy to adulthood. Cast with native Tibetans to give it resonance, the film was shot in Ouarzazate, Morocco, as it was denied permission to shoot in India. Working in rough conditions, Scorsese and Deakins planned each scene in great detail. They used the Super 35 format for wide-screen compositions, with Zeiss Superspeed and standard-speed lenses. Deakins also used Eastman Kodak's Vision 500T 5279 stock for all of his interior and exterior night work, EXR 5293 for day interiors or dusky exteriors, and EXR 5248 for day exteriors. For stage work, the complete lighting package included some 58 Maxi-Brutes, 32 blondes, 24 10Ks, and 2 20ks." [ArtAbstracts]

Rosenthal, A.M.
"From Scorcese to Tibet." (Martin Scorcese's film, "Kundun")(Column) New York Times v147 (Fri, Dec 12, 1997):A23(N), A35(L), col 5, 18 col in.

Simon, John.
"Kundun." (movie reviews) National Review v50, n1 (Jan 26, 1998):52 (2 pages).

Smith, Gavin
"The art of vision: Martin Scorsese's Kundun." Film Comment v 34 Jan/Feb 1998. p. 22-31
"Martin Scorsese's latest film, Kundun, is a historical epic about the spiritual awakening and escape into exile of the young Dalai Lama following the invasion of feudal Tibet by Communist China. A uniquely metaphysical spectacle, the movie systematically operates through a string of plays on vision and viewpoint that in some ways can be seen as the culmination of the director's formal inquiries. If all Scorsese's films are ultimately, inescapably interiorized, Kundun is the first to locate the art of vision in a realm where the exterior and interior landscape combine in an epic of the psyche and the spirit. In an interview, among the topics Scorsese discusses are his reasons for becoming involved in Kundun, his meetings with the Dalai Lama, and his thoughts on the similarities and differences between his latest movie and The Last Temptation of Christ." [ArtAbstracts]

Taubin, Amy
"The road not taken." Sight and Sound ns8 Feb 1998. p. 6-11
"A discussion of the new Martin Scorsese film, Kundun, followed by an interview with Scorsese himself. The film broadly traces the Dalai Lama's autobiography, My Land and My People, starting in 1937 when he is just two, and finishing in 1959 when he flees Tibet for what may become permanent exile in India. In the interview, Scorsese talks about, among other things, his commitment to the Dalai Lama, meditation, the cast of the film and their inexperience, editing, the response from the Tibetans to the film, and the response from critics and audiences in the West." [ArtAbstracts]

Taves, Brian.
"Kundun." (movie reviews)American Historical Review v103, n2 (April, 1998):636 (2 pages).

"Tibet film may derail Disney's efforts to expand in China." (Chinese officials unhappy with Walt Disney Co.'s involvement with Martin Scorsese's new film about Tibet, "Kundun")
Los Angeles Times v115 (Sat, Nov 23, 1996):D1, col 2, 14 col in.

Vineberg, Steve
"Kundun: Martin Scorsese's Fairy Tale." The Threepenny Review, No. 73 (Spring, 1998), pp. 26-27
UC users only

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Disney will defy China on its Dalai Lama film." (Walt Disney Co. plans to release 'Kundun,' film about the life of the exiled Tibetan leader, despite threats by Chinese government) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v146 (Wed, Nov 27, 1996):B1(N), C9(L), col 4, 18 col in.

Last Temptation of Christ

Anonymous
"(Re)Presenting Mary Magdalene: A Feminist Reading of The Last Temptation of Christ ; God doesn't like this movie." Journal of Religion and Popular Culture 9 (Spring 2005)
UC users only

Ansen, David.
"Wrestling with 'Temptation'; to blunt a storm of protest, Universal moves up the release of Scorsese's controversial new film." (Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ") Newsweek v112, n7 (Aug 15, 1988):56 (2 pages).

Baugh, Lloyd.
Imaging the divine : Jesus and Christ-figures in film / Lloyd Baugh. Kansas City, MO : Sheed & Ward, c1997.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.J4 B38 1997

Baugh, Lloyd
"Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ: A Critical Reassessment of Its Sources, Its Theological Problems, and Its Impact on the Public." In: Scandalizing Jesus? : Kazantzakis's The last temptation of Christ fifty years on / edited by Darren J.N. Middleton ; featuring essays by Martin Scorsese, Peter Bien & Peter T. Chattaway. New York : Continuum, c2005.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PA5610.K39 T4325 2005

Blake, Richard A.
"The Universal Christ." ('The Last Temptation Of Christ') (editorial) America v159, n5 (Aug 20, 1988):99 (4 pages).

Brown, Stephen J.
"Celluloid Jesus." Sight & Sound v. ns14 no. 4 (April 2004) p. 18
UC users only
"A brief review of films that have depicted the Passion of Christ, including Cecil B. DeMille's The King of Kings, Paolo Pasolini's The Gospel According to St. Matthew, and Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ."

Chanko, K.M.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (Review)Films in Review XXXIX/11, Nov 88; p.550-552.

Chattaway, Peter T.
"Battling the Flesh: Sexuality and Spirituality in The Last Temptation of Christ." In: Scandalizing Jesus? : Kazantzakis's The last temptation of Christ fifty years on / edited by Darren J.N. Middleton ; featuring essays by Martin Scorsese, Peter Bien & Peter T. Chattaway. New York : Continuum, c2005.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PA5610.K39 T4325 2005

Cook, Pam
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin LV/657, Oct 88; p.287-288.

Cook, Pam.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." In: Screening the past : memory and nostalgia in cinema / London ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
MAIN: PN1995.9.N67 C66 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0416/2004006798.html

Corliss, Richard.
"Body ..." (Martin Scorsese's "Last Temptation of Christ")Film Comment v24, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1988):34 (3 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
" ... And Blood." (Martin Scorsese, director of "The Last Temptation of Christ") (interview)Film Comment v24, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1988):36.

Corliss,Richard, Jacobson,H. & Singer,Michael
"For Christ's Sake." (Special Section).Film Comment XXIV/5, Sept-Oct 88; p.31-34,36-39,40-49.
On the screen image of Jesus Christ occasioned by the release of "The Last Temptation of Christ", features reviews, a discussion of the film's production with director Martin Scorsese and a survey of other screen treatments.

Denby, David.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews) New York v21, n34 (Aug 29, 1988):50 (2 pages).

"La Derniere Tentation du Christ de Martin Scorsese." (6 article special section) Cahiers du Cinema no412 Oct 1988. p. 3-15, 18-21

DiCaprio, L.
"Spirit and Flesh." (Review).Jump Cut /35, Apr 90; p.108-109.

"For Christ's sake." (Scorsese's Last Temptation of Christ; 4 article special section)
Film Comment v 24 Sept/Oct 1988. p. 31-9+

Fauteux, Kevin
"The final portrait of Christ." Journal of Religion and Health Issue: Volume 28, Number 3 September 1989 Pages: 195 - 206
UC users only
"Artistic presentations of Jesus are as numerous and varied as the artists who created them. Whether on canvas or in music, Jesus has been portrayed as a redeemer, revolutionary, teacher, and clown. While some people are inspired by a particular presentation of Jesus, others are angered and incensed at what they perceive to be blasphemous. An example of the latter is Martin Scorsese''s film, ldquoThe Last Temptation of Christ.rdquo This article examines why people responded so negatively to this and other artistic presentations of Jesus. It suggests they have failed to recognize how the portrayal reflects a personal experience of the artist and is not meant to be a final portrait of Christ. And on a more unconscious level, these works of art evoke feelings within people which they fear to acknowledge and which they escape by condemning the work." [Springer]

Flowers, Elizabeth H.; Middleton, Darren J. N.
"Satan and the Curious: Texas Evangelicals Read The Last Temptation of Christ" In: Scandalizing Jesus? : Kazantzakis's The last temptation of Christ fifty years on / edited by Darren New York : Continuum, c2005.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PA5610.K39 T4325 2005

Fraser, Peter
"The biblical spectacular." In: Images of the passion: the sacramental mode in film / Peter Fraser. p. 163-82. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1998.
Main Stack PN1995.9.R4.F73 1998

Geduld, Harry M.
The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews) Humanist v48, n6 (Nov-Dec, 1988):41 (2 pages).

Grogan, David.
In the name of Jesus; filmmaker Martin Scorsese's daring vision of a tempted and vulnerable Christ enrages conservatice Christians." ('The Last Temptation of Christ') People Weekly v30, n6 (Aug 8, 1988):40 (4 pages).

Haberman, Clyde.
"'Last Temptation' creates furor at Venice festival." (Last Temptation of Christ, Venice International Film Festival)New York Times v137 (Thu, Sept 8, 1988):19(N), C17(L), col 1, 22 col in.

Harmetz, Aljean.
"'The Last Temptation of Christ' opens to protests but good sales." New York Times v137 (Sat, Aug 13, 1988):12(N), 11(L), col 1, 25 col in.

Holderness, Graham
"Half God, half man": Kazantzakis, Scorsese, and The Last Temptation. Harvard Theological Review (2007) volume: 100 issue: 1 page: 65
UC users only

Humphries-Brooks, Stephenson.
"The last temptation of Christ: the psychological problem of God in a body." In: Cinematic savior : Hollywood's making of the American Christ / Stephenson Humphries-Brooks. Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2006.
Main Stack PN1995.9.J4.H86 2006

Jacobson, Harlan.
The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews)Film Comment v24, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1988):32 (2 pages).

James, Caryn.
"An Obsession Became 'Temptation'." (Martin Scorsese directs "The Last Temptation of Christ)New York Times v137 (Mon, Aug 8, 1988):15(N), C11(L), col 6, 30 col in.

Jenkins, Steve
"From the Pit of Hell." Monthly Film Bulletin LV/659, Dec 88; p.352-353. illus.
Account of the troubled background to the making of "The Last Temptation of Christ", with quotes from Martin Scorsese taken from interviews for 'The South Bank Show'.

Johnson, Brian D.
"The Stormy Debate Over Jesus and Sex." (The Last Temptation of Christ) Maclean's v101, n34 (Aug 15, 1988):53 (2 pages).

Jordan, Randolph
"The Dual Substance of Cinema: What Kazantzakis's Christ Can Teach Us about Sound/Image Relationship in Film." In: Scandalizing Jesus? : Kazantzakis's The last temptation of Christ fifty years on / edited by Darren J.N. Middleton ; featuring essays by Martin Scorsese, Peter Bien & Peter T. Chattaway. New York : Continuum, c2005.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PA5610.K39 T4325 2005

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews)New Republic v199, n11-12 (Sept 12, 1988):28 (2 pages).

Kelly, Mary Pat.
"Jesus Gets the Beat: An Interview with Martin Scorsese." (interview)Commonweal v115, n15 (Sept 9, 1988):467 (4 pages).

Kennedy, Tammie
"(Re)Presenting Mary Magdalene: A Feminist Reading of The Last Temptation of Christ." Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, Volume IX: Spring 2005
UC users only

Klawans, Stuart.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews) Nation v247, n6 (Sept 19, 1988):210 (3 pages).

Knowles, Melody D.; Whitney, Allison
"Teaching the Temptation: Seminarians Viewing The Last Temptation of Christ." In: Scandalizing Jesus? : Kazantzakis's The last temptation of Christ fifty years on / edited by Darren J.N. Middleton ; featuring essays by Martin Scorsese, Peter Bien & Peter T. Chattaway. New York : Continuum, c2005.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PA5610.K39 T4325 2005

Koseluk, C.
"Christ Comes Home - Quietly."American Film XIV/9, July-Aug 89; p.12.
Brief report on the video release of the film, MCA's lack of promotion and several outlets' refusal to stock it.

Kraemer, Christine Hoff
"Wrestling with Flesh, Wrestling with Spirit: The Painful Consequences of Dualism in The Last Temptation of Christ." Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, vol VIII, Fall, 1985
UC users only
Martin Scorsese's film adaptation of Nikos Kazantzakis' The Last Temptation of Christ presents an unorthodox, nonhierarchical dualism. This dualism has often been negatively interpreted by critics, leading them to condemn the film for misogyny, among other sins. Following Scorsese's intentions for the film, this essay offers an alternative interpretation of Last Temptation's conflict as one between competing virtues. In addition, it also positively evaluates the creators' attempt to lift the story of Jesus out of traditional Christianity in order to offer it to a wider audience.

Leo, John; Corliss, Richard.
"A holy furor: boycotts and belligerence greet a startling new film about Jesus." (The Last Temptation of Christ; includes related article) Time v132, n7 (Aug 15, 1988):34 (3 pages).

Lindlof, Thomas R.
Hollywood under siege : Martin Scorsese, the religious right, and the culture wars Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2008.
MOFF: PN1997.L3443 L56 2008

Lopate, Phillip
"Fourteen koans by a Levite on Scorsese's The last temptation of Christ." In: Totally, tenderly, tragically: essays and criticism from a lifelong love affair with the movies /... 1st Anchor Books ed. New York: Anchor Books/Doubleday, 1998.
Main Stack PN1995.L627 1998 p. 123-37.

Maslin, Janet.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews)New York Times v137 (Fri, Aug 12, 1988):13(N), C1(L), col 2, 19 col in.

Medhurst, Martin J
"Temptation as Taboo: A Psychorhetorical Reading of The Last Temptation of Christ." In: The terministic screen : rhetorical perspectives on film / edited by David Blakesley. Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2003.
Main Stack PN1994.T47 2003

Meredith, Lawrence; Forshey, Gerald.
"The Gospel According to Kazantzakis: How Close did Scorsese Come?" (Nikos Kazantzakis; 'The Last Temptation of Christ'; Martin Scorsese; includes related article on Jesus on film)Christian Century v105, n26 (Sept 14, 1988):799 (4 pages).

Miles, Margaret R.
""Were you there when they crucified my Lord?" : The Last temptation of Christ; Jesus of Montreal." In: Seeing and believing : religion and values in the movies / Margaret R. Miles. Boston : Beacon Press, c1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.R4.M56 1996
Contents via Google books

Mitchell, Elvis.
"Jesus Christ Movie Star." (The Last Temptation of Christ) Rolling Stone, n535 (Sept 22, 1988):42.

Morris, Michael
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (motion picture review) American Film v 14 Oct 1988. p. 44-9

Morgan, Robert C.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (motion picture review)Arts Magazine v 63 Dec 1988. p. 103

Morris, Meaghan
"Of God and Man."American Film XIV/1, Oct 88; p.44-49.
Theological analysis of the presentation of Jesus Christ in "The Last Temptation of Christ".

Neff, David.
"Scorsese's Christ: The Last Temptation Ironically Fails in Its Central Purpose - To Affirm the Humanity of Jesus." (editorial)Christianity Today v32, n14 (Oct 7, 1988):12 (2 pages).

O'Brien, Tom.
"Jesus as Hamlet: 'The Last Temptation.'" (The Last Temptation of Christ)Commonweal v115, n15 (Sept 9, 1988):470 (2 pages).

Papanikolaou, Eftychia
"Identity and Ethnicity in Peter Gabriel's Sound Track for "The Last Temptation of Christ"." In: Scandalizing Jesus? : Kazantzakis's The last temptation of Christ fifty years on / edited by Darren J.N. Middleton ; featuring essays by Martin Scorsese, Peter Bien & Peter T. Chattaway. New York : Continuum, c2005.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PA5610.K39 T4325 2005

Rafferty, Terrence.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews)New Yorker v64, n29 (Sept 5, 1988):78 (2 pages).

Reinhartz, A.
"History and pseudo-history in the Jesus film genre." In: The Bible in film-- the Bible and film / edited by J. Cheryl Exum. Leiden ; Boston : Brill, c2006.
Full text available [UCB users only]

Riley, Robin
Film, faith, and cultural conflict : the case of Martin Scorsese's The last temptation of Christ Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2003.
MAIN: PN1997.L3443 R55 2003;

Riley, Robin
Religion, popular film and cultural conflict: The case of Martin Scorsese's "Last Temptation of Christ" (Disseration: The University of Utah, 1998)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Rosenbaum, Jonathan
"Raging Messiah." (Review).Sight & Sound LVII/4, Autumn 88; p.281-282.

Salamon, Julie.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews)Wall Street Journal (Thu, Aug 11, 1988):20(W), 24(E), col 1, 25 col in.

Scandalizing Jesus? : Kazantzakis's The last temptation of Christ fifty years on
Edited by Darren J.N. Middleton ; featuring essays by Martin Scorsese, Peter Bien & Peter T. Chattaway.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PA5610.K39 T4325 2005

Sharrett, Christopher
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (Review).Cineaste XVII/1, 89; p.28-29.

Shilling, Kaile.
"Servant of the Story: Judas as Tragic Hero in Film." Journal of Religion and Film. 8 (2): [no pagination]. 2004 Oct.

Simon, John.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews) National Review v40, n18 (Sept 16, 1988):54 (2 pages).

Sitney, P. Adams.
"Cinematic Election and Theological Vanity." (Martin Scorsese's 'The Last Temptation of Christ' and Woody Allen's 'Crimes and Misdemeanors') Raritan: A Quarterly Review v11, n2 (Fall, 1991):48 (18 pages).
Two impressive films from the 1980s, Martin Scorsese's 'The Last Temptation of Christ' and Woody Allen's 'Crimes and Misdemeanors', dealt with theological themes. Scorsese's controversial film depicted Jesus as given to self-doubt, sexual fantasies, and occasional fanaticism. In 'Temptation' Scorsese carried on his delineation of the pain caused by choice of vocation. Allen's film explored how people resolve the moral choices that confront them. In 'Crimes' Allen satirizes the influence of Hollywood movies.

Snee, Brian J.
"The Spirit and the Flesh: The Rhetorical Nature of The Last Temptation of Christ." Journal of Media and Religion 2005, Vol. 4, No. 1, Pages 45-61
"In this article I examine the rhetoric of Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ. Using Kenneth Burke's (1962) concept of "consubstantiality," I argue that the film exceeds traditional notions of character-viewer identification by constructing a spectatorial dilemma that resembles the character's dilemma in limited but consequential ways. I then suggest that this dynamic may be why so many Christian viewers were drawn to a character they understood to be in conflict with the biblical Jesus." [Author's abstract]

Sobran, Joseph.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews) National Review v40, n18 (Sept 16, 1988):30 (3 pages).

Taubeneck, Steven
"The existential turn : refiguring Christ from Kazantzakis to Scorsese." In: Jesus in twentieth-century literature, art, and movies / edited by Paul C. Burns. New York : Continuum, 2007.
Main Stack PN57.J47.J47 2007

Thompson, David
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (Review).Films & Filming /409, Oct 88; p.37-38.

Wills, Garry.
"The Last Temptation of Christ." (movie reviews)New York Review of Books v35, n15 (Oct 13, 1988):8 (3 pages).

The Last Waltz

Bartholomew, David
"The Last Waltz." Film Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 2. (Winter, 1979-1980), pp. 56-60.
UC users only

Combs, Richard
"The Last Waltz." (Review).Sight & Sound XLVII/2, Spring 78; p.125.

Gallo, Phil
"The Last Waltz." (Review). Variety April 22, 2002 v386 i10 p29(2) (871 words)

Garbowski, Christopher
"The Catholic Imagination in Martin Scorsese's The Last Waltz."Journal of Religion and Film Vol. 5, No. 2 October 2001

Milne, Tom
"The Last Waltz." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin XLV/534, July 78; p.136-37.

Minturn, Neil.
The last waltz of The Band. Hillsdale, N.Y. : Pendragon Press, c2005.
MUSI: ML421.B32 M55 2005

Mitchell, Elvis.
"A cinematic seduction still working its charm." (The Last Waltz) The New York Times April 7, 2002 pAR32(N) pAR32(L) col 1 (20 col in)

Piegay, Baptiste
"Scorsese rock." Cahiers du Cinema no. 570 (July/August 2002) p. 40
"Martin Scorsese's The Last Waltz, which has been reissued on DVD, is a documentary film about the final concert of the group known as The Band. In this film, Scorsese unweaves the tapestry that is the life of the group, from the tiring tours and attractive female companions, to the band's money problems. Without distancing himself from the documentary structure of the film, Scorsese treats the musicians as characters, both primary (the core members) and secondary (the invited guests). His real achievement is being able to tackle rock n' roll in the same way as he does fiction, intermingling defiance and fascination with a sense of muddled-up narrative and flamboyance, while realizing the full potential of a single shot." [Art Index]

Plasketes, George M.
"Rock on reel: The rise and fall of the rock culture in America reflected in a decade of rockumentaries." Qualitative Sociology Volume 12, Number 1 March 1989, 55 - 71
UC users only
This article analyzes the filmic representation of the rise and demise of the American rock/youth culture of the 1960s through several popular rockumentaries. This article explores the ways in which popular film and music both reflect and define political and cultural movements in advanced industrial societies by comparing and contrasting the plots and narrative techniques of films such as Monterey Pop (1968),Woodstock (1970),Gimme Shelter (1971) andThe Last Waltz (1978).

Sarchett, B.W.
" 'Rockumentary' as Metadocumentary: Martin Scorsese's The Last Waltz.".Literature/Film Quarterly XXII/1, Jan 94; p.28-35.
UC users only
Rock music documentaries are shown as self-reflexive examples of the form, closer to the theories of Dziga Vertov than John Grierson; considers Scorsese's "The Last Waltz".

Severn, Stephen E.
"Robbie Robertson's Big Break." Film Quarterly v. 56 no. 2 (Winter 2002/2003) p. 25-31
UC users only
"The writer discusses Martin Scorsese's The Last Waltz: Ostensibly, The Last Waltz is a souvenir of the final performance by The Band on Thanksgiving Day, 1976, but ultimately it stands as much more than a straightforward documentary. The Last Waltz has been neglected by critics, but it has also suffered from general misinterpretation: The film's true subject is not The Band as a group but lead singer and guitarist Robbie Robertson. It clearly seeks to elevate Robertson above the other members of the group. In doing so, the movie begins a thematic obsession with the connection between risk and image that continues through three of Martin Scorsese's next major projects: Casino, The Color of Money, and The King of Comedy." [Art Index]

Telotte, J. P.
"Scorsese's "The Last Waltz" and the Concert Genre." Film Criticism, Winter79, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p9-20, 12p
UC users only

Travers, Peter
"The best rock movie ever made." (The Band's "The Last Waltz") Rolling Stone May 9, 2002 i895 p26(2)
"The Last Waltz," a documentary by Martin Scorsese about the final concert performance of the Band is 25 years old this year. To celebrate the anniversary of its release a box set and DVD are being issued. Scorsese shot it on 35mm film and used seven cameras.

Mean Streets

Atlantic, v 232 Dec. 1973, pp 132-4

Baecque,-Antoine-de
"De qui s'mook-t-on?"Cahiers du Cinéma no435 Sept 1990. p. 38-9

D'Acierno, Pellegrino
"Nihilism and Mafiositá in Martin Scorsese's Mean streets." In: Mafia movies : a reader / edited by Dana Renga. Toronto ; Buffalo [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.M23 M34 2011

DeCurtis, Anthony.
"What the Streets Mean: An Interview with Martin Scorsese." South Atlantic Quarterly v91, n2 (Spring, 1992):427 (30 pages).

Denby, David
"Mean streets: the sweetness of hell."Sight and Sound v 43 no1 Winter 1973/1974. p. 48-50

Ferrante, Leonard A.
Redemption in the narrative films of Martin Scorsese: Related critical essays, with emphasis on "Mean Streets", "Raging Bull", and "Goodfellas" (Disseration: The Union Institute, 1994)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Hampton, Howard
"Scorpio Descending. In Search of Rock Cinema." Film Comment XXXIII/2, Mar-Apr 97; p.36-42.
On the troubled relationship of rock music and the cinema; discusses the use of rock films such as "Mean Streets", "Easy Rider", "A Hard Day's Night" and other musical and non-musical films.

Hosney, Jim; Wollman, Jacqueline; Engdahl, Jesse Ward.
"The Passion of St. Charles: Martin Scorsese's 'Mean Streets.'"South Atlantic Quarterly v91, n2 (Spring, 1992):409 (10 pages).
Reprinted in: Plays, Movies, and Critics / Jody McAuliffe, editor. pp: 179-96. Durham [N.C.: Duke University Press, 1993.
Main Stack PN2020.P57 1993

Leonard and Rabinow, Paul.
"The Ethos Of Mean Streets." Film and History 1975 5(2): 11-15.

Librach, Ronald S.
"The Last Temptation in 'Mean Streets' and 'Raging Bull.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n1 (Jan, 1992):14 (11 pages).
UC users only

Lourdeaux, Lee.
Italian and Irish Filmmakers in America: Ford, Capra, Coppola, and Scorsese. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990.
UCB Main PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990)

Magill's Survey of Cinema: English Language Films, Second Series. v 4, p. 1554 (Main Lib. I

Maxfield, James F.
"'The Worst Part': Martin Scorsese's 'Mean Streets.'"Literature-Film Quarterly v23, n4 (Oct, 1995):279 (8 pages).
UC users only
The tragedy in Martin Scoreses's 'Mean Streets' is not in Charlie's inability to achieve his ambition and the destruction and loss of his friend but rather in the loss of his spiritual goal. The loss of the goal itself, the self-imposed penance of taking care of his friend, Johnny, is inevitable: subconsciously, he tried to get rid of his friend as well of his lover, Teresa, in order to achieve his ambition.

New York Times, (Oct. 14, 1973), Sect II, p. 1

New York Times, (Oct. 21, 1973), Sect II, p. 1

New York Times, (Dec. 30, 1973), Sect II, p. 11

New York Times, (Jan. 30, 1973), Sect II, p. 1

New Yorker, v 49 (Oct. 8, 1973), pp. 157-62

Penman, Ian and McGreal,Jill
"Juke Box and Johnny Boy / Mean streets." (Article+Synopsis+Review). Sight & Sound III/4, Apr 93; p.10-11,64. illus., cred.
On the significance of the music soundtrack in "Mean streets".

Raymond, Marc.
"The Municipality of Generic Discourses and the Meaning and Pleasure of Mean Streets." Canadian Journal of Film Studies, Fall2006, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p62-80, 19p
UC users only

Restivo, Angelo.
"Mean Streets and Absence." Spectator: The University of Southern California Journal of Film & Television, Spring93, Vol. 13 Issue 2, p82-89, 8p
The article investigates the function of castration in the film "Mean Streets," directed by Martin Scorsese on the level of both character and narrative. The film was compared by critics to the film "The Godfather." A world of sons cut off from the father is depicted in the film "Mean Streets." The refusal of the male characters of "Mean Streets" to acknowledge castration accounts for their aimlessness, their irresponsibility, and their self-indulgence. The film's various sequences are examined.

Scorsese, Martin; DeCurtis, Anthony, interviewer.
"What The Streets Mean: An Interview With Martin Scorsese." South Atlantic Quarterly 1992 91(2): 427-458.

Social Policy, v 4 (Jan.-Feb. 1974), pp. 59-60.

Walsh, M.
"Slipping into Darkness."Wide Angle V/4, 83; p.14-20. illus., bibliogr.
Makes an analogy between the film spectator and the dreamer and reflects on a number of films dwelling on characters sleeping and waking, esp."Mean Streets".

New York New York

Almendros, Nestor
"Life lessons: une lecon de cinema (a propos de New York Stories)." Cahiers du Cinema no419/420 May 1989. p. iv-v

Cooke, L.
"Looking at De Niro."Movie /31-32, Winter 86; p.101-107.
Discussion of De Niro's role and performance in the film "New York, New York".

Friedman, Lawrence S.
"Vision and Revision in Scorsese's New York, New York and Sorrentino's The Moon in Its Flight." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 9 no. 2. 1981. pp: 103-109.
UC users only

Heuring, David; Lee, Nora
"This is the city: New York stories." (interviews with Sven Nykvist, Vittorio Storaro, and Nestor Almendros) American Cinematographer v 70 Mar 1989. p. 54-62

Lippe, Richard
"New York, New York and the Hollywood Musical."Movie /31-32, Winter 86; p.95-100.
Definition of the film in relation to the tradition of the American musical.

Page, Ken
"Going solo : performance and identity in New York, New York, and Taxi driver." In: You Tarzan : masculinity, movies, and men / edited by Pat Kirkham and Janet Thumim. New York : St. Martin's Press, 1993.
Main Stack PN1995.9.M46.Y68 1993
Moffitt PN1995.9.M46.Y68 1993)

Quart, Leonard and Quart, Barbara
"New York, New York." (Review).Cineaste VIII/2, Fall 77; p.44-45.

New York Stories (Life Lessons)

Blake, Richard A.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews)America v160, n14 (April 15, 1989):353.

Canby, Vincent.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) New York Times v138, sec2 (Sun, March 12, 1989):H13(N), H13(L), col 5, 26 col in.

Combs, Richard.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v58, n4 (Autumn, 1989):279.

Denby, David.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) New York v22, n11 (March 13, 1989):63 (2 pages).

Grant, Edmond
"New York Stories." (movie reviews)Films in Review v 40 June/July 1989. p. 362-3

Heuring, David and Lee, Nora
"This is the City: New York Stories."American Cinematographer LXX/3, Mar 89; p.54-62. illus.
Lighting techniques used in "New York stories" discussed by its cinematographers Sven Nykvist, Vittorio Storaro and Nestor Almendros. NEW YORK STORIES (US, Martin Scorsese & Francis Ford Coppola & Woody Allen, 1989)

Hislop, Andrew.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) Times Literary Supplement, n4520 (Nov 17, 1989):1270.

Jousse, Thierry
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) Cahiers du Cinema no419/420 May 1989. p. 72-4

Kael, Pauline.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) New Yorker v65, n5 (March 20, 1989):93 (4 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) New Republic v200, n13 (March 27, 1989):24 (3 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) Nation v248, n12 (March 27, 1989):426 (2 pages).

Librach, Ronald S.
"A Nice little Irony: Life Lessons. (Article).Literature/Film Quarterly XXIV/2, Apr 96; p.128-144. illus., bibliogr.
UC users only
Views 'Life Lessons', the Martin Scorsese contribution to "New York stories", as an unofficial adaptation of Dostoevskij's 'The Gambler' and 'Polina Suslova's Diary'.

Maslin, Janet.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) (Living Arts Pages) (column) New York Times v138 (Wed, March 1, 1989):B1(N), C17(L), col 3, 20 col in.

Moore, Suzanne.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews)New Statesman & Society v2, n76 (Nov 17, 1989):44 (2 pages).

O'Brien, Tom.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews) Commonweal v116, n7 (April 7, 1989):212 (2 pages).

Salamon, Julie.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews)Wall Street Journal (Tue, Feb 28, 1989):A16(W), A20(E), col 1, 22 col in.

Sragow, Michael.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews)American Film v14, n7 (May, 1989):65.

Simon, John.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews)National Review v41, n11 (June 16, 1989):45 (3 pages).

Sterritt, David.
"New York Stories." (movie reviews)Christian Science Monitor v81, n70 (Wed, March 8, 1989):10, col 2, 34 col in.

Sweet, Louise
"New York Stories." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin LVI/670, Nov 89; p.339-341.

No Direction Home

"Another kind of river." Studies in Documentary Film v. 1 no. 1 (2007) p. 53-8
UC users only
"The relatively conventional form of Martin Scorsese's epic documentary No Direction Home is compared with the artistic expression of its subject: Bob Dylan. Further speculations are offered as to Dylan's relation to several innovative works and projects in cinema history." [Art Index]

Coleman, Lindsay.
"No Direction Home." Film & History , Sep2007, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p91-92, 2p
UC users only

Corliss, Richard.
"When He Was on His Own: Martin Scorsese makes a film about Bob Dylan's early freewheelin' years.(Arts/Music)(Review)(No Direction Home: Bob Dylan)(Movie Review)." Time 166.12 (Sept 19, 2005): 71.

Dolan, Jon
"Voice Choices: Film: DVD: New Scorsese Documentary Only a Pawn in Dylan's Game." The Village Voice 50:40 [5 October 2005-11 October 2005] p. C69
UC users only

Donato, Raffaele.
"Docufictions: an interview with Martin Scorsese on documentary film.(Interview)." Film History 19.2 (April 2007): 199(9).
UC users only

Doyle, P.
"Citizen Dylan." Studies in Documentary Film v. 1 no. 1 (2007) p. 67-75
UC users only
"Martin Scorsese's documentary on Bob Dylan, No Direction Home may be seen as part of a series of Scorsese works, in particular A Personal journey through American Cinema and II Mio Viaggio in Italia (aka My Voyage in Italy). The latter two films are threaded together by Scorsese's curatorial voice over With the Dylan documentary, however the narrating voice and visual presence of Dylan supplants Scorsese and provides the thread. But as director, Scorsese treats the Dylan interview as though it were an artefact, roughly akin to the clips he shows in his film documentaries. He structures the film's archive footage and interviews around Dylan's narration. The direction here provides a kind of filmic equivalent of musical obbligato. Dylan puts himself in a similar relation to the artefact in his recent XM radio programs, in which he sets up afictive world and then acts as curator of and accompanist to the recordings he spins. And as in Scorsese's documentaries on film, the curatorial relationship to the material allows Dylan to very deliberately but subtlely play with effects of intimacy and remove." [Art Index]

"Dylanology.(No Direction Home: Bob Dylan)(Video Recording Review)(Brief Article)." Rolling Stone 983 (Sept 22, 2005): 118(1).

Enright, R.
"The Siege of Dylangrad: Martin Scorsese's "No Direction Home"." Border Crossings v. 24 no. 4 (November 2005) p. 18-19
UC users only
"A review of No Direction Home, a documentary film directed by Martin Scorsese. This documentary on singer Bob Dylan may be not only the finest film ever created about a popular musician, but also one of the best films ever made by Scorsese, ending with a brilliant chronicle of how Dylan reached a state of retaliatory fatigue during the England leg of his infamous 1966 tour. He combines interviews with a cluster of musicians, producers, Dylan's lovers, and friends, with a treasure trove of archival material, performance tapes, and hours of interviews with Dylan himself." [Art Index]

Gallo, Phil.
"Love song to Dylan.(No Direction Home: Bob Dylan)(Movie Review)." Variety 400.4 (Sept 12, 2005): 59(2).

Goldman, Michael
"Clips: Documentary: Dylan's Pipeline." Millimeter - The Magazine of Motion Picture and Television Production 33:12 [December 2005] p. 6-7
UC users only

Hiatt, Brian
"Rock & Roll: Dylan Looks Back - Inside the Making of "No Direction Home," Martin Scorsese's Epic New Bob Dylan Documentary." Rolling Stone 984 [6 October 2005] p. 36
UC users only

Herdt, Jascha Paul.
Bringing it all back home: Bob Dylan's identity construction, performance, and representation through a documentary film, and early albums (Disseration: University of Wyoming, 2011)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Kidel, Mark.
"Life at the crossroads.(No Direction Home)(Movie Review)." TLS. Times Literary Supplement 5349 (Oct 7, 2005): 20(1).

King, Noel
"'The entire panorama of what America is to me': Dylan and the American idiom." Studies in Documentary Film v. 1 no. 1 (2007) p. 35-47
UC users only
"This article discusses the 'Americanness' of Dylan's 'American idiom' in the context of Dylan's profoundly international cultural influence. Dylan is placed in a recognisable US tradition of the American artist who is interested in 'self-invention' and 'self-architecturing' almost as strongly as he is in distinctive reworkings of received cultural traditions. Dylan's interest in the American vernacular, in moving across art forms (from poetry to cinema to music to writing), his ongoing acts of self-invention and pioneer-like reinvention (Emerson, Gatsby) are explored in relation to Scorsese's documentary and the interpretations of that film (and Dylan's stature) offered by Greil Marcus and Don DeLillo. The article connects Dylan to a range of US and international (French, Australian) literary texts (prose, poems) in order to explore the resonances of Dylan's Americanist thematics beyond the US so that throughout the globe, Dylan's invocations of modes of reinvention strike chords everywhere." [Art Index]

Marcus, Greil
"The World Premier of "No Direction Home." Studies in Documentary Film v. 1 no. 1 (2007) p. 49-52
UC users only
Greil Marcus discusses the sneak preview world premier of Bob Dylan: No Direction Home and how it was received at the 34th Telluride Film Festival in September 2005.

Richardson, Ken
"Random play: Scorsese on Dylan." Sound & Vision 70:7 [September 2005] p. 26

Taubin, Amy.
"From there to here: No Direction Home, Scorsese's time-bending Dylan documentary, is the year's best release that wasn't." Film Comment 41.6 (Nov-Dec 2005): 30.
UC users only "Three mysteries are posed by No Direction Home, Martin Scorsese's Bob Dylan documentary: The first is the mystery of artistic genius, the second is the mystery of the 1960s, and the third, which encompasses the audience as well as Dylan, is the mystery of how America got from there to here. Collaborating with editor David Tedeschi, Scorsese drew on approximately ten hours of interviews with Dylan shot after 2000 and had access to a vast amount of photographs, film footage, and sound recordings covering the first 25 years of Dylan's life. The post-2000 Dylan essentially becomes the documentary's narrating voice, sharing his thoughts on a past that seems in many ways just as mysterious and incomprehensible to him as it does to those watching." [Art Index]

White, Rob.
"Long and grinding road.(No Direction Home: Bob Dylan)(Video Recording Review)." Sight and Sound 15.11 (Nov 2005): 92(1).
UC users only
"The writer reviews Martin Scorsese's sublime documentary about the early years of Bob Dylan's life and career, No Direction Home: Bob Dylan. Beginning and ending with Dylan's epochal tour of Britain in 1966 and his definitive break from the folk movement that had lionized him, the documentary shows Dylan's defiance of the mob, his far-fixed eyes discovering new intensities of performance, a new freedom, and a new place in which to make a stand." [Art Index]

Raging Bull

Borden, L.
"Blood and Redemption."Sight & Sound V/2, Feb 95; p.61. illus.
"The writer comments on Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull. This film is the third in a trilogy along with Mean Streets and Taxi Driver, in each of which Scorsese presents an alienated misfit protagonist who can only express his rage and frustration through violence. Moving between Jake La Motta's frustrated emotions outside the ring and their operatic expression inside, Raging Bull explores Jake's violence from the perspective of those on the receiving end. During the boxing matches, however, viewers are made to identify with the loneliness, triumph, horror, and eloquence of this kind of violence." [ArtAbstracts]

Cook, Pam.
"Masculinity in crisis? tragedy and identification in Raging bull." In: Screening the past : memory and nostalgia in cinema London ; New York : Routledge, 2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N67.C66 2005

"Dialogue on Film: Robert De Niro." (Interview).
American Film VI/5, Mar 81; p.39-48.
De Niro discusses his performance in "Raging bull", how he prepares for a role, and his collaboration with directors.

Edelman, R.
"Raging Bull." (Review)Films in Review XXXII/1, Jan 81; p.54-55.

Ferrante, Leonard A.
Redemption in the narrative films of Martin Scorsese: Related critical essays, with emphasis on "Mean Streets", "Raging Bull", and "Goodfellas" (Disseration: The Union Institute, 1994)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Georgakas, Dan
"Raging Bull." (Review).Cineaste XI/1, Winter 80-81; p.28-30.

Grist, Leighton.
"Masculinity, violence, resistance: a new psychoanalytic reading of Raging Bull." (motion picture)(Critical essay). Atlantis, revista de la Asociación Española de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos 29.1 (June 2007): p11(17). (8811 words)
UC users only

Hemmeter, Gail Carnicelli.
"The Word Made Flesh: Language in Raging Bull." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 2. 1986. pp: 101-105.
UC users only
In "Raging Bull", Martin Scorsese asks us to respond to what we see, not what we are told.

Jenkins, Steve
"Raging Bull." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin XLVIII/565, Feb 81; p.32-34.

Librach, Ronald S.
"The Last Temptation in 'Mean Streets' and 'Raging Bull.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n1 (Jan, 1992):14 (11 pages).
UC users only

LoBrutto, Vincent.
"Subtext in personal expression: Raging bull." In: Becoming film literate : the art and craft of motion pictures Westport, Conn. : Praeger, c2005.
MAIN: PN1994 .L595 2005
MOFF: PN1994 .L595 2005
PFA : PN1994 .L595 2005

Martin Scorsese's Raging bull
Edited by Kevin J. Hayes. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
MAIN: PN1997.R2253 M37 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/cam051/2004048597.html

Mortimer, Barbara.
"Portraits of the Postmodern Person in "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull," and "The King of Comedy."" Journal of Film and Video v49, n1-2 (Spring-Summer, 1997):28 (11 pages).
Robert De Niro starred in such Martin Scorsese's films as the 'Taxi Driver,' 'Raging Bull' and 'The King of Comedy' which used an artistically revolutionary approach to show that the character of a person was acquired and developed through imitation. The characters portrayed by De Niro in the films were all products of 'impersonation,' which was a postmodern theory of identity that states that a person is influenced by external forces in understanding, realizing and discovering his true nature. Such concept in identity acquisition is considered outmoded in recent times because of cultural changes.

Recchia, Edward J.
"Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull: In Violence Veritas?"Aethlon: The Journal of Sport Literature, vol. 7 no. 2. 1990 Spring. pp: 21-31.

Thomson, D.
"The Director as Raging Bull - Why Can't a Woman Be More Like a Photograph." (Martin Scorsese's 'Raging Bull' is as bleak as Beckett, as funny-sad as Chekhov) Film Comment 34: (3) 52-+ MAY-JUN 1998
UC users only
The works of leading American directors and their portrayal of women in film are criticized. The examples given are from several movies including 'Raging Bull' and 'The Searchers'. The conclusions are that women are treated with indifference and are often presented through voyeuristic adoration.

Thomson, David
"The Director as Raging Bull: Why Can't a Woman Be More Like a Photograph?" Film Comment XVII/1, Jan-Feb 81; p.9-15. illus.
Discusses voyeurism and women in recent US films, esp. in "Raging bull".

Thomson, David
"Raging Bull." (motion picture review) Film Comment v 34 no3 May/June 1998. p. 52+
Part of a special section on director Martin Scorsese. A reprint of an article that appeared in the January/February 1981 issue. The writer discusses Scorsese's Raging Bull..

Wiener, T.
"Raging Bull's Secret Punch."American Film VI/2, Nov 80; p.33.
Actress Cathy Moriarty discusses her role in "Raging bull".

Wiener, T.
"Martin Scorsese Fights Back." American Film VI/2, Nov 80; p.30-34,75.
Discusses the making of "Raging bull".

Wood, Robin
"Two Films by Martin Scorsese." [King of Comedy, Ragin Bull] In: Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan / Robin Wood.pp: 245-69. New York: Columbia University Press, 1986.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.W641 1986

Wood, Robin
"Raging Bull: The Homosexual Subtext."Movie /31-32, Winter 86; p.108-114. illus.
Consideration of classical narrative's concern with the heterosexual couple, with examples of films which subvert this view, concentrating on "Raging Bull".

Shutter Island

Fuller, Graham.
"Island of Lost Souls." Sight & Sound, Apr2010, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p16-20, 5p
UC users only

Gold, Steven N.
"A fictional tale about actual horrors." PsycCRITIQUES, Vol 55(24), 2010.
UC users only

Lally, Kevin.
"Shutter Island." Film Journal International, Apr2010, Vol. 113 Issue 4, p131-132, 2p
UC users only

Lane, Anthony
"The Critics: The Current Cinema: Behind Bars." The New Yorker 86:2 (1 March 2010) p. 82-83
UC users only

Romney, Jonathan.
"Shutter Island." Sight & Sound, Apr2010, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p74-75, 2p
UC users only

"Script to Screen: Shutter Island." Script Sep/Oct2009, Vol. 15 Issue 5, p40-44, 5p
UC users only

Taxi Driver

Bernardoni, James
"The Hitchcockian Fallacy" In: The New Hollywood: What the Movies Did with the New Freedoms of the Seventies / by James Bernardoni. pp: 84-116. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1991.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.B39 1991

Bliss, Michael.
"Affliction and forgiveness: an interview with Paul Schrader." Film Quarterly; Fall 2000, Vol. 54 Issue 1, p2-9, 8p
UC users only

Bradley, Scott C.
"Film as Literature: Two Screenplays." Literature-Film Quarterly v23, n1 (Jan, 1995):79 (2 pages.
UC users only
Reviews the scripts of Paul Shrader's `Taxi Driver,' and Martin Scorsese and Nicholas Pileggi's `GoodFellas.'

Dempsey, Michael
"Taxi Driver." (review)Film Quarterly v 29 no4 Summer 1976. p. 37-41
UC users only

Fuchs, Cynthia
"All Animals Come Out at Night: Vietnam meets Noir in Taxi Driver." In: Inventing Vietnam : the war in film and television / edited by Michael Anderegg. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 1991.
Main (Gardner) Stacks DS557.73 .A5 1991
Moffitt DS557.73 .A5 1991

Kael, Pauline.
When the Lights Go Down / Pauline Kael. pp: 131-35 1st ed. New York: Holt,Rinehart and Winston, c1980.
UCB Main PN1995 .K254

Kouvaros, George.
Paul Schrader / George Kouvaros. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.S358 K68 2008

Mortimer, Barbara.
"Portraits of the Postmodern Person in "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull," and "The King of Comedy."" Journal of Film and Video v49, n1-2 (Spring-Summer, 1997):28 (11 pages).
UC users only
Robert De Niro starred in such Martin Scorsese's films as the 'Taxi Driver,' 'Raging Bull' and 'The King of Comedy' which used an artistically revolutionary approach to show that the character of a person was acquired and developed through imitation. The characters portrayed by De Niro in the films were all products of 'impersonation,' which was a postmodern theory of identity that states that a person is influenced by external forces in understanding, realizing and discovering his true nature. Such concept in identity acquisition is considered outmoded in recent times because of cultural changes.

Page, Ken
"Going solo : performance and identity in New York, New York, and Taxi driver." In: You Tarzan : masculinity, movies, and men / edited by Pat Kirkham and Janet Thumim. New York : St. Martin's Press, 1993.
Main Stack PN1995.9.M46.Y68 1993
Moffitt PN1995.9.M46.Y68 1993)

Patterson, Patricia; Farber, Manny.
"The Power and the Glory." (1998 Lincoln Center Honoree Martin Scorcese)(an analysis of 'Taxi Driver' taken from the May-June 1976 issue)(Cover Story)Film Comment v34, n3 (May-June, 1998):30 (7 pages).
UC users only
The techniques which Martin Scorsese applies to 'Taxi Driver' are analyzed with special emphasis on visual elements and character development. The analysis is presented through the dissection of the film's dialog and camera angles and offers an interpretation of the director's message for his audience.

Quart, Leonard
"A Slice of Delirium: Scorsese's Taxi Driver Revisited."Film Criticism XIX/3, Spring 95; p.67-71.
UC users only
"The writer examines Martin Scorsese's view of New York in the motion picture Taxi Driver. The movie focuses on both a paranoid, solipsistic, strangely innocent, and conventional cab driver, Travis Bickle (Robert DeNiro), and the city through which he drives. Travis has no church, family, or male friends to relieve his alienation, and the city he confronts is a nightmare New York of such elements as police sirens, prostitutes, and madmen. The movie displays a genuine passion for a city that many people either recoil from or, with some residue of social concern, wish to make more equitable and just. Nonetheless, Scorsese shows no shock or revulsion with what he sees, nor does he have any interest in setting an agenda for social reform." [ArtAbstracts]

Quart, Leonard
"These are very uncertain times: an interview with Paul Schrader." Cineaste; 1998, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p12-14, 3pQuart, Leonard
UC users only

Rice, Julian C.
"Transcendental Pornography and Taxi Driver." Journal of Popular Film & Television 5:2 (1976) p. 109
UC users only

Rosenbaum, Jonathan.
"Hell on wheels: Taxi driver." In: Essential cinema : on the necessity of film canons / Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.
MAIN: PN1994 .R5684 2004
MOFF: PN1994 .R5684 2004
PFA : PN1994 .R63 2004;

Schrader, Paul.
"Paul Schrader on Martin Scorsese." (their collaboration on 'Taxi Driver')(Collaborations) New Yorker v70, n5 (March 21, 1994):124.

Schrader on Schrader
Edited by Kevin Jackson. London ; Boston : Faber and Faber, 1990.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.S33 A5 1990

Sharrett, Christopher
"The American Apocalypse: Scorsese's Taxi Driver."Persistence of Vision /1, Summer 84; p.56-64.
Analyses the apocalyptic discourse in the film.

Swensen, Andrew J.
"The Anguish of God's Lonely Men: Dostoevsky's Underground Man and Scorsese's Travis Bickle." Renascence, Summer2001, Vol. 53 Issue 4, p267, 20p
UC users only

Taubin, Amy
"God's lonely man."Sight and Sound ns9 no4 Apr 1999. p. 16-19
"Taxi Driver is a film steeped in failure: the American failure in Vietnam, the failure of the 1960s counterculture, and the failure of masculinity itself. The story of an alienated ex-Marine who drifts to New York at the end of the Vietnam War and takes a job as a cab driver, the film was partly inspired by Arthur Bremer, an undereducated, lower-middle-class Midwestern psychopath who talked to himself in his diary. It is suggested that one of the reasons why this film evokes an empathic response across culture, nationality, class, race, and to a certain degree gender has to do with the fact that the protagonist, Travis Bickle, is largely a cipher that each viewer decodes with his or her own desire. Also, many viewers may not in fact be responding to Bickle's alienation per se, but to director Scorsese's own sense of being an outsider in a glamorous city." [ArtAbstracts]

"Taxi Driver" (review) America, v134, Mar. 6, 1976, p. 182

"Taxi Driver" (review) Cineaste, v7:3, 1976, pp: 34-35

"Taxi Driver" (review) Film Comment, v12, Mar.-April 1976, pp: 4-5

"Taxi Driver" (review) Film Comment, v12, May-June 1976, pp: 26-30

"Taxi Driver" (review) Film Comment, v12, July-Aug. 1976, pp: 2-3

"Taxi Driver" (review) Film Quarterly, v29, Summer 1976, pp: 37-41

"Taxi Driver" (review) Films and Filming, v22, Sept. 1976, pp: 30-31

"Taxi Driver" (review) Films and Filming, v22, Aug. 1976, pp: 42-3

"Taxi Driver" (review) The Nation, v222, Feb. 28, 1976, pp: 253-4

"Taxi Driver" (review) The National Review, v25, May 14, 1976, pp: 511-12

"Taxi Driver" (review) The New York Times, Feb. 15, 1976, Sect. III, p. 1

"Taxi Driver" (review) The New York Times, Feb. 9, 1976, Sect. III, p. 1

"Taxi Driver" (review) The New Yorker, v51, Feb. 9, 1976, p. 82

"Taxi Driver" (review) The Village Voice, April 5, 1976, pp: 69-71

"Taxi Driver" (review) The Village Voice, Feb. 16, 1976, pp: 145-6

Westerbeck, Colin L., Jr.
"Beauties and the beast; Seven beauties/Taxi Driver." Sight and Sound v 45 no3 Summer 1976. p. 134-9

Whited, William Scott.
"Travis Bickle: Personal Terrorist as 'Hero' in Scorsese's Taxi Driver." In:

Wood, Robin
"The Incoherent Text: Narrative in the '70s."Movie /27-28, Winter-Spring 80-81; p.24-42. illus.
Analyses the function of narrative in films of the 1970's, illustrated by "Taxi Driver", "Looking for Mr. Goodbar" and "Cruising".






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