John Ford: A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Libraries

John Ford:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual films
Movies by Director videography for works of Ford in MRC

Books

Anderson, Donald K.
John Ford, by Donald K. Anderson, Jr. New York, Twayne Publishers [1972]. Series title: Twayne's English authors series, TEAS 129.
MainUCB Moffitt PR2527 .A5
Main NRLF $B 243 623

Anderson, Lindsay
About John Ford / Lindsay Anderson. London: Plexus, c1981.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 F565 1981
MainUCB Main PN1998.A3 F565

Baxter, John
The Cinema of John Ford. London, A. Zwemmer; New York, A. S. Barnes [1971]. Series title: The International film guide series.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 F568 B3

Bhattacharyya, Jibesh
The Dramatic Art of John Ford/ Jibesh Bhattacharyya; with foreword by Visvanath Chatterjee. 1st ed. Calcutta: Maya Prakashan, 1984.
UCB Main PR2527 .B461 1984

Bogdanovich, Peter
John Ford. London, Studio Vista, 1967. Series title: Movie paperbacks.
UCB Main PN1998.A3.F568 .B6 1967

Bogdanovich, Peter
John Ford. [1st American ed. Berkeley] University of California Press [1968]. Series title: Movie editions.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 F568 B6; PN1998.A3 F568 1978
UCB Main PN1998.A3 F568 1978

Carey, Harry
Company of Heroes: My Life as an Actor in the John Ford Stock Company / Harry Carey, Jr. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1994. Series title: Filmmakers series; no. 42.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C367 A3 1994

Commolli, Jean-Lous
"Signposts on the Trail." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

Cowie, Peter.
John Ford and the American West / Peter Cowie. New York : H.N. Abrams, 2004.
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0418/2004013253.html
Main Stack PN1998.3.F65.C68 2004

Darby, William
John Ford's Westerns: A Thematic Analysis, with a Filmography
UCB Bancroft PN1998.3.F65 D37 1996
UCB Main PN1998.3.F65 D37 1996

Davis, Ronald L.
John Ford: Hollywood's Old Master / by Ronald L. Davis. Norman: University of Oklahoma, c1995. Series title: The Oklahoma western biographies: v. 10.
NRLF W 129 821 Request item at UCB Bancroft Library.

Dayan, Daniel
Western Graffiti: Jeux d'Images et Programmation du Spectateur dans La Chevauchee Fantastique de John Ford / Daniel Dayan. Paris: Clancier-Guenaud, c1983. Series title: Bibliotheque des signes.
UCB Main PN1997.S65733 D31 1983

Eyman, Scott
Print the legend: the life and times of John Ford / Scott Eyman. New York: Simon & Schuster, c1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.F65 E96 1999

Ford, Dan
Pappy: The Life of John Ford. / Dan Ford. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, c1979.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .F566

Gallagher, Tag
John Ford: The Man and His Films / Tag Gallagher. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1986.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 F5698 1986
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 F5698 1986

Giles, Paul.
"The Cinema of Catholicism: John Ford and Robert Altman." In: Unspeakable Images: Ethnicity and the American Cinema / edited by Lester D. Friedman. pp: 140-66. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, c1991.
Main Stack PN1995.9.M56.U57 1991
MainMoffitt PN1995.9.M56.U57 1991
MainNative Amer PN1995.9.M56.U57 1991

Girgus, Sam B.
Hollywood Renaissance: The Cinema of Democracy in the Era of Ford, Capra, and Kazan / Sam B. Girgus. Cambridge, UK; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.G497 1998

Hall, Sheldon.
"How the West Was Won: History, Spectacle and the American Mountains." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 255-61.. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996

Haudiquet, Philippe
John Ford, Presentation par Philippe Haudiquet Propos de John Ford ... Filmographie, bibliographie ... Paris, Seghers, 1966. Series title: Cinema d'aujourd'hui, 46.
UCB Main PN1993 .C4 v.46

John Ford in focus : essays on the filmmaker's life and work
Edited by Kevin L. Stoehr and Michael C. Connolly. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
MOFF: PN1998.3.F65 J645 2008
Contents: A tribute to John Ford / Peter Bogdanovich -- John Ford in the twenty-first century / Scott Eyman -- Ford and the romantic tradition / Charles Silver -- A bull is reared on Munjoy Hill / Michael C. Connolly -- John Ford / Maidhc P. O Conaola (Mike P. Connolly), translated by Kenneth E. Nilsen -- John Ford and the Feeney family of Galway and Portland / Matthew Jude Barker -- The John Ford tour / Margaret Feeney LaCombe -- John Ford's arrival in Hollywood / Dan Ford -- Reflections on the Battle of Midway : an interview with John Ford (August 17, 1943) -- We shot d-day on Omaha Beach / Peter Martin -- John Ford's use of Gaelic in The quiet man / Kenneth E. Nilsen -- "If you can call it an art--" / Tom Paulus -- Beyond the blessings of civilization / Robert C. Sickels -- John Ford's festive comedy / William C. Dowling -- The quiet man and the boxing film / Leger Grindon -- Ways of knowing / Tom Paulus -- Populist motifs in John Ford's films / Roy Grundmann -- Heroism, faith, and idealism in 7 women and other films by John Ford / Kevin L. Stoehr. "This collection of essays offers a comprehensive examination of his life and career. Part one provides an overview of Ford's importance in the early development of cinema. Part two focuses on Ford's personal life. Part three explores theories that explain why Ford's movies have sparked such interest, debate, and enjoyment among Hollywood film critics and the cinema community"--Provided by publisher.

John Ford made westerns: filming the legend in the sound era
Edited by Gaylyn Studlar and Matthew Bernstein Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c2001.
Main UCB Main PN1998.3.F65 J65 2001
Contents: "Shall we gather at the river?": the late films of John Ford / Robin Wood -- Sacred duties, poetic passions: John Ford and the issue of femininity in the western / Gaylyn Studlar -- The margin as center: the multicultural dynamics of John Ford's westerns / Charles Ramirez Berg -- Linear patterns and ethnic encounters in the Ford western / Joan Dagle -- How the West wasn't won: the repression of capitalism in John Ford's westerns / Peter Lehman -- Painting the legend: Frederic Remington and the western / Edward Buscombe -- "The sound of many voices": music in John Ford's westerns / Kathryn Kalinak -- John Ford and James Fenimore Cooper: two rode together / Barry Keith Grant -- From aesthete to pappy: the evolution of John Ford's public reputation / Charles J. Maland -- "John Ford: fighting Irish," New theater, April 1936 / Emanuel Eisenberg -- "Hollywood's favorite rebel," Saturday evening post, July 23, 1949 / Frank S. Nugent -- "John Wayne: my pal," Hollywood, no. 287 (March 17, 1951) / John Ford, translated from the Italian by Gloria Monti -- "The old wrangler rides again," Cosmopolitan, March 1964 / Bill Libby -- "About John Ford," Action 8.8 (Nov.-Dec. 1973).

Kalinak, Kathryn Marie
How the West was sung : music in the Westerns of John Ford Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.F65 K35 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip074/2006037036.html

Levy, Bill
John Ford: a bio-bibliography / Bill Levy. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1998. Bio-bibliographies in the performing arts; no. 78
Main Stack PN1998.3.F65.L48 1998

Lourdeaux, Lee.
Italian and Irish Filmmakers in America: Ford, Capra, Coppola, and Scorsese / Lee Lourdeaux. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990.
UCB Main PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990
MainUCB Moffitt PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990

Maland, Charles J.
American Visions, The Films of Chaplin, Ford, Capra, and Welles, 1936-1941 / Charles J. Maland. New York: Arno Press, 1977. Series title: Dissertations on film series. Series title: The Arno Press cinema program.
UCB Main PN1993.5.U6 M229 1977

Maltby, Richard.
"A Better Sense of History: John Ford and the Indians." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 34-49. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Bancroft PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996

Marcorelles, Louis
"Ford of the Movies." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

McBride, Joseph
John Ford / Joseph McBride and Michael Wilmington. London: Secker & Warburg, 1974. Series title: Cinema two.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 F591 1974

McBride, Joseph
Searching for John Ford: a life / Joseph McBride. New York: St. Martin's Press, c2001.
Main Stack PN1998.3.F65.M38 1999

Mitry, Jean
John Ford. Paris, Editions universitaires [1954]. Series title: Classiques du cinema, 1-2.
UCB Main PN1993 .C5 v.1-2 v.1-2 (1954)

Nolly, Ken.
"The Representation of Conquest" John Ford and the Hollywood Indian." In: Hollywood's Indian: The Portrayal of the Native American in Film / Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor, editors. pp: 73-90. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, c1998.
Main Stack PN1995.9.I48.H66 1998
MainMoffitt PN1995.9.I48.H66 1998
MainNative Amer PN1995.9.I48.H66 1998 Housed at Ethnic Studies

Place, Janey Ann
The Non-Western Films of John Ford / by J. A. Place. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, c1979.
MainUCB Main PN1998.A3 .F615

Place, Janey Ann
The Western Films of John Ford / by J. A. Place. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, [1974].
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 F62

Redding, Arthur F.
"Frontier mythographies : savagery and civilization in John Ford." In: Turncoats, traitors, and fellow travelers : culture and politics of the early Cold War / Arthur Redding. Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS228.C58 R43 2008

Sarris, Andrew
The John Ford Movie Mystery / Andrew Sarris. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c1975. Series title: Cinema one; 27.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3F625

Sarris, Andrew.
The John Ford Movie Mystery / Andrew Sarris. London: Secker and Warburg [for] the British Film Institute, 1976. Series title: Cinema one; 27.
UCB Main PN1993 .C45 v.27

Sinclair, Andrew
John Ford / Andrew Sinclair. New York: Dial Press/J. Wade, c1979.
UCB Main PN1998 .A3F6255

Spittles, Brian. John Ford Harlow ; New York : Longman, 2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.F65 S68 2002

Stowell, Peter
John Ford Peter Stowell. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1986. Series title: Twayne's filmmakers series.
MAIN: PN1998.A3 F62561 1986
MOFF: PN1998.A3 .F6256 1986
Native American Studies : PN1998.A3 .F6256 1986; Housed at Ethnic Studies Library.

Tasende, J. M.
Action! : memoirs of a spectator : the films of John Ford Barcelona : Ediciones Poligrafa, c2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.F65 T3 2007

Thomas, Deborah.
"John Wayne's Body." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 75-87. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
MainMoffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
MainBancroft PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996

VIDEORECORDING
The Western / co-production of the New York Center for Visual History, KCET/Los Angeles, and the BBC. South Burlington, VT: Annenberg/CPB Collection, 1994. 1 videocassette (55 min.): sd., col. and b&w; 1/2 in. VHS. Series title: American cinema; 4.
UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 3712

Wollen, Peter
"John Ford." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

Wood, Robin
"Shall We Gather at the River: The Late Films of John Ford." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

Journal Articles

Aleiss, Angela.
"A Race Divided: The Indian Westerns of John Ford." American Indian Culture and Research Journal v18, n3 (Summer, 1994):167 (20 pages).
"Examines the accusation that film director John Ford's westerns portrayed Indians as either savages or romantic nobles. Between The Iron Horse (1924) and Cheyenne Autumn (1964), Ford directed 12 movies that had Indian themes. An analysis of the films reveals that they stressed the need for Indian cultural and political autonomy, as well as the impossibility of their joining the dominant white culture because neither whites nor Native Americans wanted assimilation. Ford portrayed Indians stereotypically in his movies, but the idea of resisting assimilation into white society symbolizes contemporary Indian efforts to maintain autonomy." [America History and Life]

Beaver, Jim
"John Wayne." (with filmography) Films in Review v 28 May 1977. p. 265-84

Belton, John.
"Re-Imagining American Communities: Hollywood, Hawks, and Ford in 1939." MLN - Volume 122, Number 5, December 2007 (Comparative Literature Issue), pp. 1166-1179
UC users only

Bernstein, Matthew.
"Hollywood's 'Arty Cinema': John Ford's The Long Voyage Home." Wide Angle, vol. 10 no. 1. 1988. pp: 30-45.

Blake, Richard A., SJ.
"Going Home: The Films of John Ford." Thought, vol. 66 no. 261. 1991 June. pp: 179-95.
"Traces the theme of homecoming in the screen adaptations of film director John Ford (1895-1973). Analysis of The Informer (1935), The Long Voyage Home (1940), and The Grapes of Wrath (1940) shows that the films diverge in a consistent pattern from the literary works from which they were derived. Ford's Western films, especially Stagecoach (1939), My Darling Clementine (1946), The Searchers (1956), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence (1962), and his non-Western works such as The Quiet Man (1952) and The Wings of Eagles (1957), can be interpreted as explorations of the quest for a home." [America History and Life]

Bönke, Michael.
'Myth and Law in the Films of John Ford." Journal of Law & Society, Mar2001, Vol. 28 Issue 1
UC users only

Brauer, Ralph.
"The Fractured Eye: Myth And History In The Westerns Of John Ford And Sam Peckinpah." Film and History 1977 7(4): 73-84.
UC users only
Examines the films (1946-73) of John Ford and Sam Peckinpah in terms of their use of western mythos, evolution of consciousness, and historical myth.

Braun, Carlos Rodríguez
"Capitalism in Six Westerns by John Ford." Journal of Economic Education; 2011, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p181-194, 14p, 6 Charts
UC users only

Brinkley, Douglas.
"The color of war." (rare color film footage of the invasion of Normandy) New Yorker v74, n20 (July 20, 1998):34 (3 pages).
Noted film director John Ford led a camera unit for US forces when they landed on Normandy beach, June 6, 1944. Melvyn R. Paisley decided to search for the film of Operation Overlord. He found it in College Park, MD and turned it into a documentary. It is rare color film of World War II battles.

Budd, Michael.
"A Home in the Wilderness: Visual Imagery in John Ford's Westerns." Cinema Journal, Fall76, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p62-75, 14p
UC users only

Butters, Gerald R., Jr.
"How the West Was Sung: Music in the Westerns of John Ford." Journal of American History, Jun2008, Vol. 95 Issue 1, p270-272, 3p
UC users only

Carreras-Kuntz, María Elena de las
"The Catholic Vision in Hollywood: Ford, Capra, Borzage and Hitchcock." Film History 2002 14(2): 121-135.
UC users only
"Analyzes the influence of the Catholic faith on the films of directors John Ford, Frank Capra, Frank Borzage, and Alfred Hitchcock. The themes of communion, mediation, and sacramentality recur in their films, as do moral epiphanies, original sin, redemption, and gospel parables." [America History and Life]

Cassano, Graham.
"The Corporate Imaginary in John Ford's New Deal Cinema." Rethinking Marxism, Oct2009, Vol. 21 Issue 4, p480-497, 18p
UC users only

Combs, R
"At play in the fields of John Ford" (the case of 7 Women as Ford's last Western) Sight and Sound v 51 no2 Spring 1982. p. 124-9

Corkin, Stanley.
"Cowboys and Free Markets: Post-World War II Westerns and U.S. Hegemony." Cinema Journal, 2000 Spring, 39:3, 66-91.
UC users only
"The ideological significance of the post-World War II western films My Darling Clementine, directed by John Ford, and Red River, by Howard Hawks, is discussed. Recounting the triumph of quintessentially "American" heroes over various agents of chaos, these films generally emphasize the need for settlement and nationalism. Both films ask audiences to admire and relate to their heroic figures and the terms of American life they embody: physical courage, moral certainty, and the individual's power to alter circumstances according to a morally justified vision of the future. The writer argues that the western was well suited to convey significant ideological rationales for postwar American foreign policy, including the inevitability of American expansion." [ArtAbstracts]

Courtney, Susan.
"Looking for (Race and Gender) Trouble in Monument Valley." Qui Parle: Literature, Philosophy, Visual Arts, History, vol. 6 no. 2. 1993 Spring-Summer. pp: 97-130.

Davis, Ronald L.
"Paradise Among The Monuments: John Ford's Vision Of The American West." Montana 1995 45(3): 48-63.
"Reviews the life of movie director John Ford (1895-1973), especially his vision of the American West. He directed 54 Westerns over his career, including Stagecoach (1939), Fort Apache (1947), She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), and The Searchers (1956). The film My Darling Clementine (1946) was loosely based on the gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, and Wyatt Earp, who in his later years had known Ford. Considered a cinematic "old master" and pioneer, Ford created the Western genre as it is known in the 1990's." [America History and Life]

Demetrakopoulos, Stephanie.
"John Ford's Irish Drinking Ethos and Its Influence on Stereotypes of American Male Drunks." Midwest Quarterly v32, n2 (Wntr, 1991):224 (11 pages).

Dempsey, Michael
"John Ford: a reassessment." Film Quarterly v 28 no4 Summer 1975. p. 2-15
UC users only

Doherty, Thomas.
"Gunning for John Ford at the Auteur Corral." Chronicle of Higher Education v46, n40 (June 9, 2000):B9.

Douchet, Jean
"Le retour de John Ford." Cahiers du Cinema no424 Oct 1989. p. 33-5

Drabelle, Dennis
"Deep into a vale of inspiration." Preservation v 51 no3 May/June 1999. p. 90-5
"Monument Valley, located on the Navajo Reservation in northeast Arizona and southeast Utah, stirred the imagination of two geniuses of American popular culture: movie director John Ford and cartoonist George Herriman. Ford shot seven Westerns in the valley, which provided him with a vast, timeless background embodying the great sculpting forces of destiny. Herriman stocked his comic strip Krazy Kat with recognizable fixtures from Monument Valley, its grotesquely eroded monoliths and uncommon palette of colors seeming ideally suited for the strip's surreal, free-spirited world." [ArtAbstracts]

Ellis, Kirk.
"On the Warpath: John Ford and the Indians." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 8 no. 2. 1980. pp: 34-41.
On the surface, director John Ford's western films appear to associate Indians with evil, but a deeper assessment proves that Ford portrays Indians in a good light; cites many of his films from 1924 to 1964.

Everson, William K.
"In search of John Ford." American Film v 4 May 1979. p. 70-3

"Eyewitnesses to War: A documentary focuses on the bravery of the servicemen who shot film instead of bullets." (The Arts/Show Business)(Brief Article) Time v155, n24 (June 12, 2000):80.

"Ford and Kennedy on the western."
Films in Review v 20 Jan 1969. p. 29-33

Franklin, Richard
"John Ford." Senses of Cinema (Great Directors: A Critical Database)

Freedman, Carl.
"Post-Hetero Sexuality: John Wayne and the construction of American." Film International, 2007, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p16-31, 16p
UC users only

Gallagher, Tag.
"John Ford's Indians." (Native Americans in John Ford's Western films) Film Comment v29, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1993):68 (4 pages).
"In the films of John Ford, Indians are presented as mythic figures rather than as characters based on scholarly knowledge. In a film such as The Searchers, Indians are depicted as icons of savage beauty, even projections of white fantasy. His treatment of Indians is confessional rather than racist because he was conscious of the fact that his films were myths based on myths." [ArtAbstracts]

Gronstad, Asbjorn.
"Gathering At The River: Ford, Peckinpah and the Failure of the Communal." American Studies in Scandinavia 2003 35(1): 51-67 17p

Heffernan, Jeanne.
""Poised between Savagery and Civilization": Forging Political Communities in Ford's Westerns." Perspectives on Political Science v28, n3 (Summer, 1999):147.
UC users only

Ingrassia, Catherine.
"I'm not kicking, I'm talking": discursive economies in the Western." (Special Issue: The Western) Film Criticism v20, n3 (Spring, 1996):4 (11 pages).
UC users only
The apparent dominance of actions over words in Western films does not appear to diminish the need for Western legends and heros to be validated by a film's textual constructions. In John Ford's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence" and Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven", the tension between actions and words in Western films is explored. The films align themselves with the Western film tradition even as they attempt to use text to move beyond it.

"Jean Ford v John Renoir." (100 years of film-making)
Economist v332, n7880 (Sept 10, 1994):105 (2 pages).

Kinder, Marsha.
"The Subversive Potential of the Pseudo-Iterative." Film Quarterly, vol. 43 no. 2. 1989-1990 Winter. pp: 3-16.

Lassally, Walter.
"Ford fever." (the recollections of a John Ford fan) Sight and Sound v2, n7 (Nov, 1992):8 (1 page).
Cinematographer Walter Lassally pays tribute to director John Ford, and recalls his own early obsession with Ford's films. Before movies were available on video Lassally and friends borrowed prints of Ford movies and transferred pre-selected sections of the soundtrack onto tape. The tapes were then transferred onto discs, some of which Lassally still owns. During the filming of 'The Ballad of the Sad Cafe' Lassally created some images that recalled Ford's work.

Magny, Joel
"Ford et Walsh, deux cavaliers solitaires." Cahiers du Cinema no531 Jan 1999. p. 8-9
"The writer discusses the films of John Ford and Raoul Walsh in relation to each other. Although the work of Ford, to whom French television channel Cinetoile is devoting a series of 12 films in January 1999, seems now almost totally under the spotlight, Walsh's work, which can only be placed under the very general umbrella of adventure films, has still largely escaped critical discourse. The writer compares and contrasts a range of films by the two filmmakers in terms of their aesthetics and their approach to their subject." [ArtAbstracts]

Matheson, Sue.
"The West–Hardboiled: Adaptations of Film Noir Elements, Existentialism, and Ethics in John Wayne's Westerns." Journal of Popular Culture, Aug2005, Vol. 38 Issue 5, p888-910, 23p
UC users only

McBride, Joseph
"Drums along the Mekong: I love America, I am apolitical." Sight and Sound v 41 no4 Autumn 1972. p. 213-16

McBride, Joseph; Wilmington, Michael
"Prisoner of the desert." Sight and Sound v 40 no4 Autumn 1971. p. 210-14

McGillis, Roderick.
"Westering of the Spirit: Wordsworth Out West." Journal of Popular Culture, vol. 18 no. 2. 1984 Fall. pp: 85-95.

Morgan, Jack
"The Irish in John Ford's Seventh Cavalry Trilogy - Victor McLaglen's Stooge-Irish Character." MELUS v22, n2 (Summer, 1997):33 (12 pages).
UC users only
Victor McLaglen's portrayal of Irish characters in John Ford's trilogy of Seventh Cavalry films reinforced the stereotypical views of the time of Irish as essentially interested in combat, singing, dancing and drinking. Ford was Irish-American and often promoted Ireland in many of his films, but Ford's willingness to incorporate a simplistic view of his culture is one of his shortcomings.

Movshovitz, Howard.
"The Still Point: Women In The Westerns Of John Ford." Frontiers 1984 7(3): 68-72.
UC users only
In Stagecoach (1939) and The Searchers (1956), director John Ford presents women as living in a world fundamentally different from that of men; the outward manifestation of the difference is the stillness (not necessarily passivity) of the women and the contrasting activity of the men.

Mukherjee, Tutun.
"Women in the Patriarchal Unconscious: Western Films of John Ford and Howard Hawks." Indian Journal of American Studies [India] 1996 26(1): 99-107.
The various marginalizing stereotypes of women in Hollywood's "western" movies are a result of patriarchal male domination of that genre. The author focuses on the films of John Ford and Howard Hawks during the 1930's-70's.

Nogueira, Rui
"Fonda on Ford." Sight and Sound v 42 no2 Spring 1973. p. 85-6

Nolley, Ken.
"John Ford And The Hollywood Indian." Film & History 1993 23(1-4): 44-56.
UC users only
Director John Ford's Western films of 1939-64 display increasing sensitivity in their portrayal of American Indians while retaining certain Hollywood stereotypes.

Nolley, Ken.
"Printing the Legend in the Age of MX: Reconsidering Ford's Military Trilogy." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 2. 1986. pp: 82-88.
UC users only

Parrish, Robert.
"Directors at War: John Ford." American Film v. 10 (July/Aug. '85) p. 22+.

Parrish, Robert.
"Fact Meets Fiction In A World War II Celluloid Face-Off." Smithsonian 1986 16(12): 164-168.
Discusses the work of noted filmmaker John Ford as a propagandist for the US Office of Strategic Services during World War II, as told by Ford's assistant, Robert Parrish, who himself has become a successful film editor.

Peek, Wendy Chapman
"The romance of competence: rethinking masculinity in the Western." Journal of Popular Film and Television Wntr 2003 v30 i4 p206(13)
UC users only
"Discussions of masculinity in the Western regularly characterize it as in a state of crisis, pointing to heroes hamstrung between ideologically opposed models of manhood, one endorsing commitment to community and family, the other advocating freedom from them. Yet, the metaphor of crisis, with its suggestion of irresolution and immobility, fails to account for the competence of heroes who display behavior from both models. Such heroes realize their goals precisely because they combine behaviors from both models as their strategies for success. The heroes of postwar Westerns thus redefine masculinity as they transgress the limitations of the two models to create a new ideal of masculinity that incorporates all manner of behaviors, provided that they lead to male success." [Expanded Academic Index]

Redding, Arthur.
"Frontier Mythographies: Savagery and Civilization in Frederick Jackson Turner and John Ford." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2007. Vol. 35, Iss. 4; p. 313 (10 pages)
UC users only

Roth, Lane.
"Folk Song Lyrics As Communication In John Ford's Films." Southern Speech Communication Journal 1981 46(4): 390-396.
"Discusses Hollywood film director John Ford's use of folk songs, focusing on Judge Priest, The Grapes of Wrath, The Long Voyage Home, Tobacco Road, How Green Was My Valley, Rio Grande, The Searchers, and The Last Hurrah, released between 1934-58, and how folk songs in these movies helped develop characters, communicated ideas about "the affirmation of community and nature," and provided a means for audience identification and interaction." [America History and Life]

Roth, Lane.
"Ritual Brawls in John Ford's Films." Film Criticism; Spring83, Vol. 7 Issue 3, p38-46, 9p
UC users only

Sinclair, A.
"Ford's war." Sight and Sound v 48 no2 Spring 1979. p. 98-104

Skerry, Philip J.
"The Western Film: A Sense of an Ending." New Orleans Review, vol. 17 no. 3. 1990 Fall. pp: 13-17.

Stowell, H. Peter
"John Ford's Literary Sources: From Realism to Romance." Literature/Film Quarterly 5:2 (1977:Spring) 164

Stowell, H. Peter
"John Ford's Literary Sources: From Realism to Romance." Literature Film Quarterly; Spring77, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p164, 10p
UC users only

Tavernier, Bertrand.
"Notes of a Press Attache: John Ford in Paris, 1966." (film director; includes related comments by the interviewer) (Interview) Film Comment v30, n4 (July-August, 1994):66 (9 pages).
"An article excerpted from Amis americains. Everything about film director John Ford commands respect. Although his personality has a conquering, irresistible warmth, this warmth is often hidden behind aggressiveness and a quick, unpredictable humor, which he employs with diabolical deftness. Ford has never tried to please audiences by following the fashion or stacking the deck. Ford's views of his own work are discussed, and excerpts from a series of interviews with him in 1966 are provided." [ArtAbstracts]

Telotte, J. P.
"The Human Landscape of John Ford's South." The Southern Quarterly, vol. 19 no. 3-4. 1981 Spring-Summer. pp: 117-133.
"John Ford is known for his Western films. However, he did make a number of Southern films. The author reviews Ford's Southern films, especially Judge Priest and Steamboat 'Round the Bend to determine Ford's depiction of the South. Ford shows the strength of the individual Southern man and his human nature. Ford is sympathetic to the Southern man who can stand up and cling to his ideals when the world around him is changing.' [America History and Life]

Thoene, Bodie and Stuck, Rona.
"Navajo Nation Meets Hollywood." American West 1983 20(5): 38-44.
From Stagecoach in 1939 to Cheyenne Autumn in 1965, John Ford produced his classic westerns in Monument Valley, Utah. Whether the script called for Apache, Comanche, or Cheyenne, the faces were the local Navajo Indians, and the language and the centuries old songs and chants used in the movies were always Navajo.

Vanoye, Francis
"Façonner son image, raconter son histoire. Le narcissique et l'autobiographique." Positif nr.478 (Dec 2000); p.58-61
"Discusses the narcicism and autobiography inherent in filmmaking using examples from the work of Clint Eastwood, Philippe Garrel and John Ford." [FIAF Index to Film Periodicals]

Yawn, Mike; Beatty, Bob.
"John Ford's vision of the closing West: from optimism to cynicism." Film & History (26:1/4) 1996, 6-19.
UC users only
As two cinematic depictions of the American frontier, My Darling Clementine (1946) and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) reflect director John Ford's transition from optimism to pessimism about the country's civilizing mission.

Books and Articles on Individual Films

Cheyenne Autumn

"Cheyenne Autumn." (review)America v. 112 (January 16 1965) p. 85

"Cheyenne Autumn." (review) Life v. 57 (November 27 1964) p. 19

"Cheyenne Autumn." (review) The New Republic v. 152 (January 23 1965) p. 36-7

"Cheyenne Autumn." (review) The New Yorker v. 40 (January 2 1965) p. 65

"Cheyenne Autumn." (review) Newsweek v. 65 (January 11 1965) p. 79

"Cheyenne Autumn." (review) Saturday Review v. 48 (January 16 1965) p. 36

"Cheyenne Autumn." (review) Time v. 85 (January 8 1965) p. 54

Cook, Page.
"The Soundtrack" Films in Review XXXV/3, Mar 84; p.184-186. illus.
Discusses the tracks of two recently issued cassettes, "Lili" and "Cheyenne Autumn".

December 7/Battle of Midway

Baxter, John
"December 7th." (a documentary on Pearl Harbour) Sight and Sound v 42 no1 Winter 1972/1973. p. 24-5

Garrett, Greg
"It's everybody's war: racism and the World War Two documentary." Journal of Popular Film and Television v 22 Summer 1994. p. 70-8
"The writer examines racism in World War II documentaries. By studying the treatment accorded people of color in wartime documentaries, he asserts, we may establish the true states of democracy, racism, and tolerance in America during the struggle against a foreign tyranny. He finds that only three of the best-known wartime documentary films include racial diversity: Frank Capra's War Comes to America, John Ford and Gregg Toland's December 7, and John Huston's Let There Be Light. He argues that in comparison with the nonexistent Native Americans and the reviled Japanese Americans, on those rare occasions when black Americans do appear in wartime documentaries, they seize center stage. He suggests that unlike their typical depictions in popular culture, the blacks in these films are intelligent, competent, and brave." [ArtAbstracts]

Murphy, William T.
"The United States Government and the Use of Motion Pictures during World War II." In: The Japan/America film wars: World War II propaganda and its cultural contexts / edited by Abe Mark Nornes and Fukushima Yukio. pp: 59-67. Chur, Switzerland; Langhorne, Pa., USA: Harwood Academic Publishers, c1994. Series title: Studies in film and video v. 1.
UCB Main D743.23 .J36 1994

Murphy, William T.
"John Ford And The Wartime Documentary." Film and History 1976 6(1): 1-8.
UC users only
John Ford, Hollywood filmmaker, collaborated with the federal government ca. 1941-42 in making two World War II documentary films, Battle of Midway and December 7, which turned out to be cinematic flops because they were strictly propaganda.

Parrish, Robert.
"Directors at War: John Ford." American Film v. 10 (July/Aug. '85) p. 22+.

Parrish, Robert.
"Fact Meets Fiction In A World War II Celluloid Face-Off." Smithsonian 1986 16(12): 164-168.
Discusses the work of noted filmmaker John Ford as a propagandist for the US Office of Strategic Services during World War II, as told by Ford's assistant, Robert Parrish, who himself has become a successful film editor.

Sinclair, A.
"Ford's war." Sight and Sound v 48 no2 Spring 1979. p. 98-104

White, Geoffrey M., and Jane Yi.
"December 7th: Race and Nation in Wartime Documentary." In: Classic Hollywood, classic whiteness / Daniel Bernardi, editor. pp: 301-38. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2001.
UCB Main PN1995.9.M56 C59 2001

Drums Along the Mohawk

Countryman, Edward.
"John Ford's Drums Along the Mohawk: The Making of an American Myth." Radical History Review 1980 (24): 92-112.
John Ford's film Drums along the Mohawk (1939), based on the 1936 novel by Walter D. Edmonds, mythologized the experiences of Gil and Lana Martin, a young couple living on the New York frontier during the American Revolution who withstood two Indian raids.

"Drums Along the Mohawk." (review)The New Republic v. 101 (November 22 1939) p. 142

"Drums Along the Mohawk." (review) Time v. 34 (November 20 1939) p. 80

Wood, Robin.
"Drums Along the Mohawk." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 174-80. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Bancroft PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996

Fort Apache

Campbell, Russell.
"Fort Apache." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Aug71 Issue 2, p8-12, 5p

Corkin, Stanley
"Melodrama and Feminine Means to Empire: Duel in the Sun, Pursued, and Fort Apache." In: Cowboys as cold warriors : the Western and U.S. history / Stanley Corkin. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2004.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C65 2004
Bancroft PN1995.9.W4 C65 2004

Coyne, Michael.
"'The Lonely Crowd': Catholicism and Consensus on the Prairie: Red River, Fort Apache, and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon." In: The crowded prairie : American national identity in the Hollywood western / Michael Coyne. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; [New York : distributed by St. Martin's Press], 1997.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C69 1997

Dunne, Michael.
"Cold War Ideology in John Ford's Fort Apache." Popular Culture Review, vol. 8 no. 1. 1997 Feb. pp: 83-95.

Hoberman, J.
"Fort Apache, Our Home." In: An army of phantoms : American movies and the making of the Cold War / J. Hoberman. New York : The New Press : Distributed by Perseus Distribution, 2011.
Moffitt PN1995.9.P6 H62 2011 AVAILABLE
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.P6 H62 2011

Hutton, Paul Andrew.
"'Correct in Every Detail': General Custer in Hollywood." Montana: The Magazine of Western History, Vol. 41, No. 1 (Winter, 1991), pp. 28-57
UC users only

McDonough, Kathleen
"Wee Willie Winkie Goes West: The Influence of the British Empire Genre on John Ford's Cavalry Trilogy." In: Hollywood's West : the American frontier in film, television, and history / edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 H58 2005

Morgan, Jack
"The Irish in John Ford's Seventh Cavalry Trilogy - Victor McLaglen's Stooge-Irish Character." MELUS v22, n2 (Summer, 1997):33 (12 pages).
UC users only
Victor McLaglen's portrayal of Irish characters in John Ford's trilogy of Seventh Cavalry films reinforced the stereotypical views of the time of Irish as essentially interested in combat, singing, dancing and drinking. Ford was Irish-American and often promoted Ireland in many of his films, but Ford's willingness to incorporate a simplistic view of his culture is one of his shortcomings.

Neale, Steve.
"'The Story of Custer in Everything But Name?': Colonel Thursday and Fort Apache." Journal of Film and Video, XLVII/1-3, Spring-Fall 95; p.26-32. Calls into question the common view that the Colonel Thursday character in "Fort Apache" is based on General Custer.

Nolley, Ken.
"Printing the Legend in the Age of MX: Reconsidering Ford's Military Trilogy." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 2. 1986. pp: 82-88.

Poague, Leland.
"'All I Can See is the Flags': Fort Apache and the Visibility of History." Cinema Journal,(USA), XXVII/2, Winter 88; p.8-26.
UC users only
Critical study emphasizes a rereading of the film's ending.

Pye, Douglas.
"Genre and History: Fort Apache and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 111-22. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996

Turner, George
"Dust and Danger at Fort Apache." American Cinematographer v. 77 (June '96) p. 106-10.
"The making of John Ford's 1948 Western Fort Apache is discussed. With an expensive cast that included John Wayne, Henry Fonda, and former child star Shirley Temple, the movie was one of the few pictures of its time to take a sympathetic view of the plight of the Apache in post-Civil War America. It also remains a landmark of pictorial imagery due to the efforts of veteran cinematographer Archie J. Stout. Stout lent the picture a distinctive visual style, shooting the exteriors on black-and-white infrared film. The most impressive aspect of the movie, which was a big audience favorite on its release, was not the story itself but the depiction of life at Fort Apache, where the soldiers and their families had to make the best of a hard life away from civilization. Also well executed were the action sequences and the acting itself." [ArtAbstracts]

Westbrook, Max.
"The Night John Wayne Danced with Shirley Temple." Western American Literature, vol. 25 no. 2. 1990 Aug. pp: 157-169.

Wetta, Frank J.; Novelli, Martin A.
"'Romantic, isn’t it, Miss Dandridge?': Sources and Meanings of John Ford’s Cavalry Trilogy." American Nineteenth Century History, Jun2006, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p299-321, 23p
UC users only

The Grapes of Wrath

Bednarek, Janet R. Daly.
"An Historian's View of The Grapes of Wrath." University of Dayton Review, vol. 23 no. 3. 1995-1996 Winter. pp: 83-88.

Blake, Richard A., SJ.
"Going Home: The Films of John Ford." Thought, vol. 66 no. 261. 1991 June. pp: 179-95.
"Traces the theme of homecoming in the screen adaptations of film director John Ford (1895-1973). Analysis of The Informer (1935), The Long Voyage Home (1940), and The Grapes of Wrath (1940) shows that the films diverge in a consistent pattern from the literary works from which they were derived. Ford's Western films, especially Stagecoach (1939), My Darling Clementine (1946), The Searchers (1956), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence (1962), and his non-Western works such as The Quiet Man (1952) and The Wings of Eagles (1957), can be interpreted as explorations of the quest for a home." [America History and Life]

Campbell, R.
"The Ideology of the Social Consciousness Movie: Three Films of Darryl F. Zanuck."Quarterly Review of Film Studies III/1, Winter 78; p.49-71.
Examines the function of ideology and the social consciousness film in Hollywood, with special reference to "The Grapes of Wrath", "Gentleman's Agreement", and "Pinky" - all produced by Zanuck.

Cassano, Graham.
"Radical Critique and Progressive Traditionalism in John Ford's The Grapes of Wrath" Critical Sociology, 2008, Vol. 34 Issue 1, p99-116, 18p
UC users only

Fender, Stephen.
"The Dust Bowl on film," In: Nature, class, and New Deal literature : the country poor in the Great Depression / Stephen Fender. New York : Routledge, 2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS173.R87 F46 2012

Freedman, Carl.
"Versions of the American Imperium in Three Westerns by John Ford." Film International (, 2005, Vol. 3 Issue 18, p14-25, 12p
UC users only

Gladstein, Mimi Reisel.
"From Heroine to Supporting Player: The Diminution of Ma Joad." In: Critical Essays on Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath / [edited by] John Ditsky. pp: 124-137. Boston, Mass.: G.K. Hall, c1989. Critical essays on American literature.
Main Stack PS3537.T3234.G847 1989
MainMoffitt PS3537.T3234.G847 1989

Gossage, Leslie.
"The Artful Propaganda of Ford's The Grapes of Wrath." In: New Essays on The Grapes of Wrath / edited by David Wyatt. pp: 101-25. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990. American novel.
Main Stack PS3537.T3234.G857 1990
MainMoffitt PS3537.T3234.G857 1990

"The Grapes of Wrath: The Values of John Ford."
University of Dayton Review, vol. 23 no. 3. 1995-1996 Winter. pp: 99-103.

"The Grapes of Wrath." (review)Commonweal v. 31 (February 9 1940) p. 348

"The Grapes of Wrath." (review) Life v. 8 (January 22 1940) p. 29-31

"The Grapes of Wrath." (review) The Nation v. 150 (February 3 1940) p. 137-8

"The Grapes of Wrath." (review)The New Republic v. 102 (February 12 1940) p. 212

"The Grapes of Wrath." (review)Newsweek v. 15 (February 12 1940) p. 37-8

"The Grapes of Wrath." (review) Saturday Review of Literature v. 21 (February 10 1940) p. 16

"The Grapes of Wrath." (review) Time v. 35 (February 12 1940) p. 70+

Hearle, Kevin.
"Sturges and The Grapes of Wrath: Sullivan's Travels as Documentary Comedy." Steinbeck Newsletter, vol. 7 no. 2. 1994 Summer. pp: 5-7.

Lucius, Ramona.
"Let There Be Darkness: Reversed Symbols of Light and Dark in The Grapes of Wrath." Pleiades, vol. 12 no. 1. 1991 Fall-Winter. pp: 50-58.

Macklin, Tony.
"The Grapes of Wrath: the values of John Ford and John Steinbeck." University of Dayton Review (23:3) 1996, 99-103.

Menides, L.J.
"John Huston's Wise Blood and the Myth of the Sacred Quest." Literature/Film Quarterly IX/4, 81; p.207-212.
Explores the film's parallels to elements in "The Grapes of Wrath" and their common theme of the hero's mythic journey.

Pulliam, Rebecca.
"The Grapes of Wrath." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Aug71 Issue 2, p3-7, 5p

Rule, Philip C.
"The Grapes of Wrath: The Poor You Always Have with You." In: Image and Likeness: Religious Visions in American Film Classics / edited by John R. May. pp: 21-30. New York: Paulist Press, c1992. Isaac Hecker studies in religion and American culture.
Main Stack PN1995.5.I46 1992

Sanderson, Jim.
"American Romanticism in John Ford's 'The Grapes of Wrath': Horizontalness, Darkness, Christ, and F.D.R." Literature-Film Quarterly v17, n4 (Oct, 1989):231 (14 pages).

UC users only

Smith, John R.
"Making the Cut: Documentary Work in John Ford's The Grapes of Wrath." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2007. Vol. 35, Iss. 4; p. 323 (7 pages)
UC users only

Sobchack, Vivian C.
"The Grapes Of Wrath (1940): Thematic Emphasis Through Visual Style." American Quarterly 1979 31(5): 596-615.
"Discusses the visual style of John Ford's cinematic adaptation of John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath. Usually the movie is examined in terms of its literary roots or its social protest. But the imagery of the film reveals the important theme of the Joad family's coherence. The movie shows the family in closeups, cramped in small spaces on a cluttered screen, isolated from the land and their surroundings. Dim lighting helps abstract the Joad family from the reality of Dust Bowl migrants. The film's emotional and aesthetic power comes from its generalized quality attained through this visual style." [America History and Life]

How Green Was My Valley

Freedman, Carl.
"Versions of the American Imperium in Three Westerns by John Ford." Film International (, 2005, Vol. 3 Issue 18, p14-25, 12p
UC users only

"How Green Was My Valley." Commonweal v. 35 (November 7 1941) p. 72

"How Green Was My Valley." Life v. 11 (November 10 1941) p. 64-6+

"How Green Was My Valley." The Nation v. 153 (November 15 1941) p. 491

"How Green Was My Valley." The New Republic v. 105 (December 1 1941) p. 733

"How Green Was My Valley." Newsweek v. 18 (November 3 1941) p. 59-60

"How Green Was My Valley." The New Yorker v. 17 (November 1 1941) p. 72

"How Green Was My Valley." Theatre Arts v. 25 (December 1941) p. 884+

"How Green Was My Valley." Time v. 38 (November 24 1941) p. 100+

Mate, Ken.
"How Green was your Valley Then, John Ford." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Spring73 Issue 8, p23-28, 6p

Mitchell, George J., 1918-1994.
"How Green Was My Valley: A Verdant Classic." American Cinematographer v. 72 (Sept. '91) p. 34-40.

The Hurricane

Cassano, Graham
""The Last of the World's Afflicted Race of Humans Who Believe in Freedom" : Race, Colonial Whiteness and Imperialism in John Ford and Dudley Nichols's The Hurricane (1937)." Journal of American Studies, Feb2010, Vol. 44 Issue 1, p117-136, 20p
UC users only

Fitzsimmons, Lorna.
"Contra colonialism: Turning the edge in Ford's The Hurricane." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2003. Vol. 31, Iss. 1; p. 57
UC users only

The Informer

Blake, Richard A., SJ.
"Going Home: The Films of John Ford." Thought, vol. 66 no. 261. 1991 June. pp: 179-95.
"Traces the theme of homecoming in the screen adaptations of film director John Ford (1895-1973). Analysis of The Informer (1935), The Long Voyage Home (1940), and The Grapes of Wrath (1940) shows that the films diverge in a consistent pattern from the literary works from which they were derived. Ford's Western films, especially Stagecoach (1939), My Darling Clementine (1946), The Searchers (1956), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence (1962), and his non-Western works such as The Quiet Man (1952) and The Wings of Eagles (1957), can be interpreted as explorations of the quest for a home." [America History and Life]

Kalinak, L.
"The Fallen Woman and the Virtuous Wife: Musical Stereotypes in The Informer, Gone with the Wind, and Laura." Film Reader /5, 82; p.76-82.
Points out the use of the musical score to stereotype female characters in Hollywood films; examples taken from "The Informer", "Gone with the wind" and "Laura".

Sheeran, Patrick F.
The informer Cork : Cork University Press in association with the Film Institute of Ireland, 2002.
MAIN: PN1997.I514 S4 2002

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Corkin, Stanley
"Modernization Theory, Political Discord, and Intervention: Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, The Magnificent Seven, and The Alamo." In: Cowboys as cold warriors : the Western and U.S. history / Stanley Corkin. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2004.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C65 2004
Bancroft PN1995.9.W4 C65 2004

Coursen, D.F.
"John Ford's Wilderness - The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." Sight & Sound XLVII/4, Autumn 78; p.237-41. illus.
Examination of Ford's methods in the film to express his ambivalence towards the West and its past, the anarchy personified by Valance, and the transformation brought about through Ranse.

Darby, William.
"Musical links in Young Mr Lincoln, My Darling Clementine, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." Cinema Journal v. 31 (Fall '91) p. 22-36.
UC users only

Ingrassia, Catherine.
"I'm not kicking, I'm talking": discursive economies in the Western." (Special Issue: The Western) Film Criticism v20, n3 (Spring, 1996):4 (11 pages).
UC users only
The apparent dominance of actions over words in Western films does not appear to diminish the need for Western legends and heros to be validated by a film's textual constructions. In John Ford's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence" and Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven", the tension between actions and words in Western films is explored. The films align themselves with the Western film tradition even as they attempt to use text to move beyond it.

Koch, Gertrud.
"A law's tale John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance."Philosophy & Social Criticism, Jul2008, Vol. 34 Issue 6, p685-692, 8p
UC users only

Langford, Barry.
"Revisiting the "Revisionist" Western." Film & History , Sep2003, Vol. 33 Issue 2, p26-35, 10p
UC users only

Livingstone, David W.
"Spiritedness, Reason, and the Founding of Law and Order: John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." Perspectives on Political Science, Fall2009, Vol. 38 Issue 4, p217-227, 11p
UC users only

Lubet, Steven. UCLA Law Review, Dec2000, Vol. 48 Issue 2, p353, 21p
"The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence: Truth or Justice in the Old West." UCLA Law Review, Dec2000, Vol. 48 Issue 2, p353, 21p
UC users only

O'Neill, Timothy P.
"Two Concepts of Liberty Valance: John Ford, Isaiah Berlin, and Tragic Choice On The Frontier." Creighton Law Review, Apr2004, Vol. 37 Issue 3, p471-492, 22p
UC users only

Pearson, Sidney A. Jr.
"It Is Tough to Be the Second Toughest Guy in a Tough Town: Ask the Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." Perspectives on Political Science. Winter 2007. Vol. 36, Iss. 1; p. 23 (6 pages)
UC users only

Pye, Douglas.
"Genre and History: Fort Apache and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 111-22. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996

Roche, Mark W.
"Vico's Age of Heroes and the Age of Men in John Ford's Film The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." CLIO: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History, vol. 23 no. 2. 1994 Winter. pp: 131-47.

Ross, T. J.
"Death and Deliverance in the Western: From 'The Virginian' to 'The Man Who Shot Liberary Valence'." Quarterly Review of Film Studies, Feb1977, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p75-87, 13p
UC users only

Ryan, Cheyney.
"Print the Legend: Violence and Recognition in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." In: Legal Reelism: Movies as Legal Texts / edited by John Denvir. pp: 23-43. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, c1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.J8.L45 1996
MainMoffitt PN1995.9.J8.L45 1996

Winchell, Mark Royden
"Cactus Rose : John Ford's The man who shot Liberty Valance (1962)." In: God, man, and Hollywood : politically incorrect cinema from "The birth of a nation" to "The Passion of the Christ" / Mark Royden Winchell. Wilmington, Del. : ISI Books, c2008.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S6.W53 2008
PFA PN1995.9.S6.W53 2008

Yawn, Mike; Beatty, Bob.
"John Ford's vision of the closing West: from optimism to cynicism." Film & History (26:1/4) 1996, 6-19.
As two cinematic depictions of the American frontier, My Darling Clementine (1946) and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) reflect director John Ford's transition from optimism to pessimism about the country's civilizing mission.

My Darling Clementine

Baxter, John.
The Cinema of John Ford. pp: 99-111. London, A. Zwemmer; New York, A. S. Barnes [1971]. Series title: The International film guide series.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 F568 B3

Blake, Michael F. (Michael Francis)
Hollywood and the O.K. Corral : portrayals of the gunfight and Wyatt Earp / Michael F. Blake. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 B583 2007
Bancroft (NRLF) PN1995.9.W4 B583 2007

Brooks, David
"Wyatt Usurped." National Interest, n37 (Fall, 1994):66 (5 pages).
An odd feature in Russia is that people who dress like Chicago gangsters actually claim they are like Wyoming cowboys. Many Russians associate their condition with American pioneers. This is an era of the triumph of the bourgeois. Aspiring bourgeoisie identify with the American Western myth. Henry Ford, who portrayed Wyatt Earp in John Ford's 1946 film 'My Darling Clementine,' plays a man fated to be a civilizer. Ford presented in this movie art, science, religion and education.

Cohen, Hubert I.
"Wyatt Earp at the O.K. Corral: six versions." Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA) June 2003 v26 i2 p204(20)
UC users only

Combs, Richard.
"My Darling Clementine." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4832 (Nov 10, 1995):35

Coyne, Michael.
"Puritan Paradigms: My Darling Clementine and Duel in the Sun." In: The crowded prairie : American national identity in the Hollywood western / Michael Coyne. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; [New York : distributed by St. Martin's Press], 1997.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C69 1997

Creekmur, Cory K.
"Acting like a Man: Performance in My Darling Clementine." In: Out in Culture: Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Essays on Popular Culture / edited by Corey K. Creekmur and Alexander Doty. pp: 167-82. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. Series title: Series Q.
UCB Main HQ76.2.U5 O98 1995

Darby, William.
"Musical Links in Young Mr Lincoln, My Darling Clementine, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance." Cinema Journal v. 31 (Fall '91) p. 22-36.

Erisman, Fred.
"The Night Christopher Lloyd Danced with Mary Steenburgen." (analyzing the myth of the Westen hero) Journal of Popular Film and Television v20, n1 (Spring, 1992):29 (5 pages).
UC users only
'My Darling Clementine' was produced in 1946 while 'Back to the Future 3' was produced in 1990, but the films share a highly similar narrative structure which upholds the myth of the Western genre's hero. This proves that the myth is not adversely affected by the modernization of society. The need for myths and their ability to generate symbolizations set in specific eras ensure their continued existence. These two Western films encourage viewers to accept change while applying the lessons learned in past experiences. Myths in this way provide a society with a vision for its future.

Gallafent, Edward.
"Four Tombstones 1946-1994." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 302-11. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Bancroft PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996 Non-circulating; may be used only in The Bancroft Library.)

Gomez, D.
"Mise-en-sc‚ne in John Ford's My Darling Clementine."Wide Angle II/4, 78; p.14-19. illus.
An analysis of the film illustrating Ford's complex visual style.

Hughes, Howard
"'Shakespeare in Tombstone' - 'My Darling Clementine' (1946)." In: Stagecoach to tombstone : the filmgoers' guide to the great westerns / Howard Hughes. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; 2008.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4 H833 2008

Hutson, Richard.
"John Ford's My Darling Clementine (1946)." Representations. 84: 200-12. 2004.
UC users only
"A film about a legend of law and order in the American West was made by John Ford as a validation of the American past for the immediate post-World War II era, in an age of doubt and uncertainty, the serene but resolute figure of Wyatt Ear was designed to alleviate anxiety about the irrelevance of the past for the new era." [Expanded Academic Index]

Luhr, William.
"Reception, Representation, and the OK Corral: Shifting Images of Wyatt Earp." In: Authority and Transgression in Literature and Film / edited by Bonnie Braendlin and Hans Braendlin. pp: 23-44. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, c1996.
UCB Main PN56.A87 A87 1996

Magill's Survey of Cinema--English Language Films / edited by Frank N. Magill; associate editors, Patricia King Hanson, Stephen L. Hanson. Series I, v3, pp: 1685-88. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Salem Press, c1980.
UCB Hum/Area PN1995 .M3 V.1-4 (C1980)
UCB Info Ctr PN1995 .M3 1-4

"My Darling Clementine." (review)Cineaste, 2 (Fall 1968), pp:2-6

"My Darling Clementine." (review) Commonweal v. 45 (December 6 1946) p. 202

"My Darling Clementine." (review) Film Comment, 7 (Fall 2971), pp: 8-17.

"My Darling Clementine." (review) New Republic, v115 ((Dec. 16, 1946), p.836+

"My Darling Clementine." (review)New York Times, (Dec. 4, 1946), p. 44

"My Darling Clementine." (review) The New Yorker, v22 ((Dec. 14, 1946), p. 89

"My Darling Clementine." (review) Newsweek v. 28 (November 11 1946) p. 102+

"My Darling Clementine." (review) Theatre Arts v. 30 (December 1946) p. 715

"My Darling Clementine." (review) Time v. 48 (November 11 1946) p. 104

My Darling Clementine: John Ford, Director
Robert Lyons, ed. Series title: Rutgers films in print; v. 1. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c1984.
UCB Main PN1997 .M888 1984
UCB Moffitt PN1997 .M888 1984

Nichols, Mary P.
"Heroes and political communities in John Ford's Westerns: the role of Wyatt Earp in my Darling Clementine." Perspectives on Political Science Spring 2002 v31 i2 p78(7)
UC users only

Place, Janey Ann
The Western Films of John Ford. pp: 58-73. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, [1974].
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 F62

Quarterly Journal of Film, Radio and Television, v7 (Winter 1952), pp: 116-28

Romney, Jonathan.
"My Darling Clementine." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v8, n381 (Dec 1, 1995):35 (1 page).

Schatz, Thomas
Hollywood Genres: Formulas, Filmmaking, and the Studio system. pp: 67-70. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, c1981.
UCB Main PN1993.5.U6 .S32 1981b
UCB Moffitt PN1993.5.U6 .S32 1981b)

Sickels, Robert
"All East on the Western Frontier: John Ford's My Darling Clementine." Film & History Vol.XXXI nr.1 (2001); p.13-21
UC users only
"Argues that John Ford's film "My darling Clementine" is an example of the social attitudes taken in the early Cold War era, in which urban Eastern values win out over rural Western values." [FIAF Index to Film Periodicals]

Simmon, Scott.
"Concerning the Weary Legs of Wyatt Earp: The Classic Western According to Shakespeare." Literature-Film Quarterly v24, n2 (April, 1996):114 (14 pages).
UC users only
"John Ford's 1946 Western "My Darling Clementine" combines the story of Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and the OK Corral with elements of Shakespeare's "Hamlet." Ford interjects Hamlet's soliloquy into a scene to establish the tension between conscience and the rule of law as well as the possibility that conscience can look like cowardice when it leads to inaction. Henry Fonda's Wyatt and Victor Mature's Doc are combined to form Ford's Hamlet. Ford conveys the ambiguity of his main characters and the tensions in the film through visual means more than through dialogue." [Expanded Academic Index]

Tuska, Jon.
The Filming of the West. pp: 491-96+ 1st ed. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1976.
UCB Main PN1995.9.W4 T81
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.W4 T8

Yawn, Mike; Beatty, Bob.
"John Ford's vision of the closing West: from optimism to cynicism." Film & History (26:1/4) 1996, 6-19.
As two cinematic depictions of the American frontier, My Darling Clementine (1946) and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) reflect director John Ford's transition from optimism to pessimism about the country's civilizing mission.

The Quiet Man

Campbell, M.
"The Quiet Man."Wide Angle II/4, 78; p.44-51. illus.
Discusses Ford's use of the comic form as an ideological forum.

Dowling, William C.
"Johns Ford's festive comedy: Ireland imagined in The Quiet Man." (Critical Essay) Eire-Ireland: a Journal of Irish Studies Fall-Winter 2001 p190(23)
" Critics of director John Ford's film The Quiet Man (1952) commonly characterize the film's vision of a premodern Ireland of cattle fairs and donnybrooks as cultural imperialism, with Hollywood perpetuating assorted Irish myths. Those convinced of Ford's creative genius will understand that the director found in Ireland something akin to the imaginative resource that Yeats saw in Irish myth. The Quiet Man has much more in common with a Shakespearean romantic comedy - in which there is an opposition between the world of sober morality and responsibility and that of holiday freedom - than with anything in modern Irish culture. The film revolves around an underlying tension between Ireland (or at least the Ireland that Ford locates in an imaginary Irish village), and the opposing world, a distant America with its remorseless economic individualism." [America History and Life]

Sickels, Robert.
"Pastoral Dreams in Innisfree, Ireland, U.S.A.: A Re-Examination of John Ford's The Quiet Man." Popular Culture Review. 15 (1): 29-37. 2004.

Rio Grande

Keilar, Brianna
"John Wayne's America: Rio Grande" [UCB Student Paper].

Leighninger, Robert D., Jr.
"The Western as Male Soap Opera: John Ford's 'Rio Grande.'" Journal of Men's Studies v6, n2 (Wntr, 1998):135 (14 pages).
John Ford's 1950 Western 'Rio Grande' can be seen as a cultural preview of men's concerns. Scholars are beginning to realize that men experience conflicts between career and family, and Ford's film portrays a male-role struggle that cannot be resolved either by institutional power or violent physical action. The constraints for this situation are within rigid social expectations, generally the context for melodrama and soap opera.

McDonough, Kathleen
"Wee Willie Winkie Goes West: The Influence of the British Empire Genre on John Ford's Cavalry Trilogy." In: Hollywood's West : the American frontier in film, television, and history / edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 H58 2005

Morgan, Jack
"The Irish in John Ford's Seventh Cavalry Trilogy - Victor McLaglen's Stooge-Irish Character." MELUS v22, n2 (Summer, 1997):33 (12 pages).
UC users only
Victor McLaglen's portrayal of Irish characters in John Ford's trilogy of Seventh Cavalry films reinforced the stereotypical views of the time of Irish as essentially interested in combat, singing, dancing and drinking. Ford was Irish-American and often promoted Ireland in many of his films, but Ford's willingness to incorporate a simplistic view of his culture is one of his shortcomings.

Nolley, Ken.
"Printing the Legend in the Age of MX: Reconsidering Ford's Military Trilogy." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 2. 1986. pp: 82-88. Critical reappraisal of J.F.'s cavalry films, "Fort Apache", "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" and "Rio Grande".

Palmer, R. Barton.
"Masculinist Reading of Two Western Films: High Noon & Rio Grande." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 12 no. 4. 1984-1985 Winter. pp: 156-162.

"Rio Grande." (review) The New Republic v. 123 (December 11 1950) p. 28

"Rio Grande." (review) Newsweek v. 36 (November 27 1950) p. 84

"Rio Grande." (review) Saturday Review of Literature v. 34 (February 17 1951) p. 30

"Rio Grande." (review) Time v. 56 (December 11 1950) p. 98

Wetta, Frank J.; Novelli, Martin A.
"'Romantic, isn’t it, Miss Dandridge?': Sources and Meanings of John Ford’s Cavalry Trilogy." American Nineteenth Century History, Jun2006, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p299-321, 23p
UC users only

The Searchers

Alvis, J. David; Alvis, John E.
"Heroic Virtue and the Limits of Democracy in John Ford's The Searchers." Perspectives on Political Science, Spring2009, Vol. 38 Issue 2, p69-78, 10p
UC users only

Anderson, Lindsay
"The Searchers." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

Bridger, Bobby.
"The Searchers and the captivity narrative." In: Where the tall grass grows : becoming indigenous and the mythological legacy of the American West / Bobby Bridger. Golden, CO : Fulcrum Pub., c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books E78.W5 B75 2011

Buscombe, Edward The Searchers. London: British Film Institute, 2000.
MAIN: PN1997.S43 B873 2000;

Card, James Van Dyck.
"The Searchers: by Alan LeMay and John Ford." Literature/Film Quarterly (16:1) 2-9. 1988
UC users only

Church, Jeffrey.
"Recognition and Restlessness in John Ford's The Searchers." Perspectives on Political Science, Winter2009, Vol. 38 Issue 1, p47-57, 11p
UC users only

Clauss, James J.
"Descent Into Hell." (John Ford's 'The Searchers')(Critical Essay) Journal of Popular Film and Television v27, n3 (Fall, 1999):3.
UC users only
"The writer examines mythic paradigms in John Ford's The Searchers, focusing on the folktale motif of the descent into the underworld (katabasis). He outlines the characteristic elements of katabasis, which include a descent undertaken by a hero, either metaphorically or literally; a traveler who comes and goes at night, through caves, over rivers and mountains, and other geographical barriers; a hero who frequently needs a guide; a forbidding region which is often ruled by a despotic figure; and a hero who undergoes the death of the old self and the birth of the new. He then shows that all these elements are found in The Searchers. He argues that by accentuating these traditional elements of katabasis, Ford has raised the level of the narrative from a story about individuals on the frontier to a myth about a critical stage in the evolution of a culture in which the old way of life is dying and a new one is about to emerge." [ArtAbstracts]

Cohen, Hubert I.
"Red River and The Searchers: Deception in the Modern Western." Film Criticism, Fall2010, Vol. 35 Issue 1, p82-102, 21p
UC users only
The article focuses on deception in Western movies. It cites Marshal Wyatt Earp in John Ford's "My Darling Clementine" as the character who achieved advantage through deception. It narrates the adventures of Ethan Edwards in John Ford's "The Searchers" and Tom Dunson in Howard Hawk's "Red River." Other films with a theme of deception include "The Godfather," "The Maltese Falcon," and "A Face in the Crowd."

Cole, David L.
"Mose Harper: eccentricity and survival in "The Searchers"." Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n3 (July, 2000):" (5 pages).
UC users only
"The redemptive and triumphant aspects of the eccentric and pure character, Mose Harper, in John Ford's western film "The Searchers" are examined. Topics include the artistic debt the film owes to the novel on which it was based, the development of Mose Harper's character, and the conflict between civilization and the frontier life." [Expanded Academic Index]

Corkin, Stanley
"Korea, Containment, and Nationalism: High Noon, Shane, and The Searchers." In: Cowboys as cold warriors : the Western and U.S. history / Stanley Corkin. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2004.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C65 2004
Bancroft PN1995.9.W4 C65 2004

Courtney, Susan.
"Looking for (Race and Gender) Trouble in Monument Valley." Qui Parle: Literature, Philosophy, Visual Arts, History, vol. 6 no. 2. 1993 Spring-Summer. pp: 97-130.

Coyne, Michael.
"Dysfunctional Family Structures in Classical Westerns, 1956-1961: The Gunfighter, Shane, The Searchers, and The Last Sunset." In: The crowded prairie : American national identity in the Hollywood western / Michael Coyne. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; [New York : distributed by St. Martin's Press], 1997.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C69 1997

Day, Kirsten.
""What Makes a Man to Wander?": The Searchers as a Western Odyssey." Arethusa - Volume 41, Number 1, Winter 2008, pp. 11-49
UC users only
"This paper looks at John Ford's 1956 film The Searchers as a literary, cultural, and ideological heir to Homer's Odyssey. Each work centers on a morally ambiguous protagonist on a mission to preserve the integrity of his household and his own honor, a quest made urgent by the sexual threat posed by a woman. While Homer's story explores issues of Greek identity and the ethnic anxieties generated by trade and colonization, Ford's film addresses racial and Cold War tensions prevalent in1950s America. Both works ultimately destabilize the categories of "us" and "them," encouraging audiences to reconsider this dichotomy." [Project Muse]

Eckman-Jadow, Judith
"Love the Western Way: Shane, The Searchers, Unforgiven." Issues in Psychoanalytic Psychology. Vol 25(2), Fal 2003, pp. 67-80
"Presents an psychoanalytic review of the western films, Shane, The Searchers, and Unforgiven. The author discusses what is gratifying about watching these films. Specifically, it is noted that according to Freud, being present as a spectator allows one to identify with the hero, without risks. Freud thought the hero struggled between wish and inhibition and one or the other must be renounced. Today we understand that the struggle goes on, and that complete renunciation is not necessary. Compromise formations allow expression of both wish and inhibition, not always to the benefit of the hero. It is argued that in the myth of the frontier, depicted in the Western film, we have a regression to the primitive which signals a conflict between a wish and a prohibition. The author illuminates particular unconscious conflicts shown in male protagonists of the Western film. Compromise formations depicted as attempted solutions to these conflicts are delineated." [PsychInfo]

Eckstein, Arthur M.
"After the Rescue: The Searchers, the Audience and Prime Cut." Journal of Popular Culture, vol. 28 no. 3. 1994 Winter. pp: 33-53.
UC users only

Eckstein, Arthur M.
"Darkening Ethan: John Ford's The Searchers (1956) from Novel to Screenplay to Screen." Cinema Journal, 1998, 38:1, 3-24.
UC users only
"Director John Ford was intensely involved in a continuous process of darkening the racist Ethan Edwards character in his 1956 movie, The Searchers. The movie centers on a successful outlaw, played by the all-American icon John Wayne, whose antisocial behavior is not that of a traditional western hero but of a grim, solitary, and forbidding figure for whom social constraints are meaningless. Very little of this behavior is evident in Alan LeMay's eponymous novel, on which Frank S. Nugent's screenplay for the film was based, but much more of it appears in Nugent's final shooting script, which was supervised by Ford; during the filming of the movie, Ford made crucial and ad hoc decisions to darken the character, creating a fearsome, vicious, driven figure. The changes reveal Ford's negative attitude toward the character and his intention to depict a psychologically damaged, tragic figure." [ArtAbstracts]

Freedman, Carl.
"Versions of the American Imperium in Three Westerns by John Ford." Film International (, 2005, Vol. 3 Issue 18, p14-25, 12p
UC users only

Freedman, Jonathan.
"The affect of the market: economic and racial exchange in 'The Searchers'." (History in the Making)(Critical Essay) American Literary History v12, n3 (Fall, 2000):585 (15 pages).
John Ford's 1956 film 'The Searchers' links commerce to race. This motion picture portrays corrupt capitalism in the Jewish character Fetterman and the possible redemption of an immigrant community through miscegenation.
Baughman, James L.
"That'll be the day": response to Freedman.(History in the Making)(response to article in this issue, p. 585)(Critical Essay) American Literary History v12, n3 (Fall, 2000):605 (5 pages).

Henderson, Brian.
"'The Searchers': An American Dilemma." Film Quarterly 34:2 (1980/1981:Winter) 9-23
Structural analysis of the J.F. western, emphasizing the film's mythic aspects.

Hughes, Howard
"'That'll be the Day' - 'The Searchers' (1956)." In: Stagecoach to tombstone : the filmgoers' guide to the great westerns / Howard Hughes. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; 2008.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4 H833 2008

Hui, Arlene.
"The Racial Frontier in John Ford's The Searchers." Revista Complutense de Historia de America, 2004, Vol. 30, p187-207, 21p

Kindem, G.
"Color Signification in John Ford's 'The Searchers'." (Article). Film Reader /2, Jan 77; p.78-84.
An analysis of color in "The searchers", applying the semiotic theories of Peirce, Metz, and Wollen; color's function in the narrative; and alterations of the color signs in the literary source.

Kinder, Marsha.
"Ideological Parody in the New German Cinema: Reading The State of Things, The Desire of Veronika Voss, and Germany Pale Mother as Postmodernist Rewritings of The Searchers, Sunset Boulevard, and Blonde Venus." Quarterly Review of Film and Video v. 12 (May '90) p. 73-103.

Lee, Karen A.
"John Ford's The Searchers (1956) in Chuang Hua's Crossings: A Chinese American Woman's Categorical Liminality in a Cold War Society." Hitting Critical Mass: a Journal of Asian American Cultural Criticism, 4 (2): 79-86 1997 Summer.

Lehman, Peter.
"Looking at Look's Missing Reverse Shot: Psychoanalysis and Style in John Ford's "The Searchers"."Wide Angle IV/4, 81; p.65-69. illus.
On the conventions of the western which allow J.F. to displace racial tensions.

Lehman, Peter.
"Texas 1868 / America 1956: The Searchers." In: Close Viewings: An Anthology of New Film Criticism/ edited by Peter Lehman. pp: 387-415. Tallahassee: Florida State University Press, c1990.
Main Stack PN1995.C543 1990

Lethem, J.
"Defending The searchers." In: The disappointment artist and other essays / Jonathan Lethem. New York : Doubleday, c2005. (Full text available online [UC Berkeley users only]; Print: Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3562.E8544 D57 2005

Luhr, William.
Authorship and Narrative in the Cinema: Issues in Contemporary Aesthetics and Criticism / William Luhr, Peter Lehman, pp: 85-136 New York: Putnam, c1977.
UCB Main PN1995 .L831 *c2 copies

Magill's Survey of Cinema--English Language Films / edited by Frank N. Magill; associate editors, Patricia King Hanson, Stephen L. Hanson. Series I, v4, pp: 1502-1506. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Salem Press, c1980.
UCB Hum/Area PN1995 .M3 V.1-4 (C1980)
UCB Info Ctr PN1995 .M3 1-4)

Matheson, Sue.
"'Let's Go Home, Debbie': The Matter of Blood Pollution, Combat Culture, and Cold War Hysteria in The Searchers (1956)." Journal of Popular Film & Television, 2011, Vol. 39 Issue 2, p50-58, 9p,
UC users only

McBride, Joseph.
John Ford / Joseph McBride and Michael Wilmington. pp: 147-63 London: Secker & Warburg, 1974. Series title: Cinema two. (UCB Main PN1998.A3 F591 1974)

McGhee, Richard D.
"John Wayne: Hero With A Thousand Faces." Literature Film Quarterly; 1988, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p10, 12p
UC users only

Miller, Pat .
"The race to settle America: nice guys do finish last." Literature-Film Quarterly, Oct 2001 v29 i4 p315(6)
"John Ford's adaptation of 'The Searchers' presented improved relations between Native Americans and whites as a metaphor for 1940s and 1950s US Supreme Court decisions about race relations. Ford's film argued race had to be accepted to ensure civilization, which continues to be an American reality." [Expanded Academic Index]

Morris, Gary
"The Searcher: On Ethan Edwards and John Ford's Masterpiece." Bright Lights Films Journal, November 2007 | Issue 58

Movshovitz, Howard.
"The Still Point: Women In The Westerns Of John Ford." Frontiers 1984 7(3): 68-72.
In Stagecoach (1939) and The Searchers (1956), director John Ford presents women as living in a world fundamentally different from that of men; the outward manifestation of the difference is the stillness (not necessarily passivity) of the women and the contrasting activity of the men.

Nachbar, Jack G.
"As Sure as the Turning of a Page: A Bibliography for "The Searchers"." Journal of Popular Film & Television 30:4 [Winter 2003] p.228-229
UC users only

Nowell-Smith, Geoffrey
"Six Authors in Pursuit of The Searchers." Screen 1976 17: 26-33
UC users only

Nowell-Smith, Geoffrey
"Six Authors in Pursuit of The Searchers." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

O'Brien, Geoffrey.
"The Movie of the Century: it looks both backward to everything Hollywood had learned about Westerns and forward to things films hadn't dared do." (influence of John Ford's 1956 motion picture 'The Searchers'. American Heritage v49, n7 (Nov, 1998):16 (4 pages).
John Ford's film 'The Searchers' represents the classic Hollywood Western with many differences. Its innovative script elements with unanswered questions, implied physical violence, cinematic conflicts and the fulfilled and unfulfilled human search for meaning underscore life's uncertainties instead of providing a misleading happy ending.

Peek, Wendy Chapman.
"Cherchez la Femme: The Searchers, Vertigo, and Masculinity in Post-Kinsey America." Journal of American Culture vol. 21 no. 2. 1998 Summer. pp: 73-87.

Pippin, Robert B.
"What Is a Western? Politics and Self-Knowledge in John Ford's The Searchers." Critical Inquiry, Winter2009, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p223-253, 31p
UC users only

Pye, Douglas.
"Double Vision: Miscegenation and Point of View in The Searchers." In: The Book of Westerns / edited by Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye. pp: 229-35. New York: Continuum, 1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996
Bancroft PN1995.9.W4.B66 1996

Roth, Marty.
"'Yes My Darling Daughter': Gender, Miscegenation, and Generation in John Ford's The Searchers." New Orleans Review, vol. 18 no. 4. 1991 Winter. pp: 65-73.

"The Searchers" (review) Film Comment, 7 (Spring 1971), pp: 56-61

"The Searchers" (review) Film Quarterly, 34 (Winter 1980-81), pp: 9-23

"The Searchers" (review) Films and Filming, 34 (Sept. 1956), pp: 25-26

"The Searchers" (review) Films in Review,7 (June-July 1956), pp: 284-285

"The Searchers" (review) The Nation v. 182 (June 23 1956) p. 536

"The Searchers" (review)New York Time, (May 31, 1956), p. 21

"The Searchers" (review)New Yorker, 32 (June 9, 1956), p. 54

"The Searchers" (review) Newsweek v. 47 (May 21 1956) p. 116

"The Searchers" (review) Sight and Sound, 26 (Fall 1956), pp: 94-95

"The Searchers" (review) Sight and Sound, 40 (Fall 1971), pp: 210-14

"The Searchers" (review) Time v. 67 (June 25 1956) p. 58+

"The Searchers" (review) Wide Angle, v2 (1978), pp: 36-42

"The Searchers" (review) Wide Angle, v4 (1981), pp: 65-70

The searchers : essays and reflections on John Ford's classic western
Edited by Arthur M. Eckstein and Peter Lehman. Detroit, Mich. : Wayne State University Press, c2004. Contemporary approaches to film and television series.
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0410/2003023827.html
Main Stack PN1997.S3197.S43 2004

Siegel, J. F.
"Tragic Features in John Ford's The Searchers." In: Classical myth & culture in the cinema / edited by Martin M. Winkler. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main Stack PN1995.9.M96.C59 2001
PFA PN1995.9.M96.C59 2001

Skerry, Philip J.
"What Makes a Man to Wander? Ethan Edwards of John Ford's The Searchers." New Orleans Review, vol. 18 no. 4. 1991 Winter. pp: 86-91.

Soliz, Cristine.
"The Searchers and Navajos: John Ford's Retake on the Hollywood Indian." Wicazo Sa Review - Volume 23, Number 1, Spring 2008, pp. 73-95
UC users only

Thomson, David.
"Open and Shut: A Fresh Look at 'The Searchers.'" Film Comment v33, n4 (July-August, 1997):28 (4 pages).
UC users only
"John Ford's The Searchers is one of the best American films ever made. The film's central character, a wandering loner played by John Wayne, is a figure of frightening, impacted desire who knows that he has to deny himself. Neither Ford nor Wayne could bear the idea of the romantic, windswept loner being part of humdrum society, becoming old or ordinary, or being beholden. Thus, at the end of the film Wayne's character returns to the desert to become a sort of perpetual nomad. In the end, the movie demands that the viewer disregard what the film means and instead feel its wonder and romance." [Art Abstracts]

Travers, Peter.
"The Searchers." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n658 (June 10, 1993):73 (2 pages).

Winkler, Martin M.
"Tragic features in John Ford's The Searchers." Bucknell Review (35:1) 1991, 185-208.

Sergeant Rutledge

Manchel, Frank.
"Losing and finding John Ford's 'Sergeant Rutledge'" (1960). (director; motion picture) Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television v17, n2 (June, 1997):245 (15 pages).
UC users only
Director John Ford's motion picture 'Sergeant Rutledge' is a striking example of an excellent message film which was ridiculed at the box office despite mostly positive reviews and support from civil rights leaders. The 1960s morality film about the 1881 trial of an African-American trooper wrongly accused of rape and murder deserves to be honored because of its important insights into John Ford, Hollywood and African-Americans in the 1960s.

McBride, Joseph; Wilmington, Michael.
"Sergeant Rutledge." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Aug71 Issue 2, p16-18, 3p

Smoodin, Eric
"The Image and the Voice in the Film with Spoken Narration." Quarterly Review of Film Studies; Fall1983, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p19-32, 14p

White, Armond.
"Stepping Forward, Looking Back." ('Sergeant Rutledge' by John Ford) Film Comment v36, n2 (March, 2000):32.
"John Ford's 1960 courtroom Western Sergeant Rutledge offers a complex examination of racism as an impulse at the heart of American institutions. The Western genre flattered white people, frequently denigrating African-Americans and Native Americans, but in Sergeant Rutledge Ford abandoned his usual white-hero sentiment to explore the specter of white hatred and the judicial, military, commercial, and familial customs that engender it. The imposing Woody Strode plays Braxton Rutledge, a sergeant-at-arms of the 9th Cavalry of black soldiers whose trial for the rape and murder of a white woman is emblematic of the stigmatized threat of black males. By emphasizing Rutledge's heroism and placing him center stage, Ford affords the character a level of dignity that Hollywood has withheld from black males. Ford acknowledges that racism exists, and its evidence is in America's historical, cultural, and cinematic records." [ArtAbstracts]

Seven Women

Narboni, Jean
"Casting Out the Eights: John Ford's Seven Women." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

Schwartz, Nancy
"The Role of Women in Seven Women." The Velvet Light Trap - A Critical Journal of Film and Television 2 (Aug. 1971) p. 22

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

Coyne, Michael.
"'The Lonely Crowd': Catholicism and Consensus on the Prairie: Red River, Fort Apache, and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon." In: The crowded prairie : American national identity in the Hollywood western / Michael Coyne. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; [New York : distributed by St. Martin's Press], 1997.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C69 1997

Deutelbaum, Marshall
"Narrative Structure of 'She wore a Yellow Ribbon'."Cinema Journal, XIX/1, Fall 79; p.60-70.
UC users only

Hughes, Howard
"'Tomorrow's All I Need' - 'She Wore a Yellow Ribbon' (1949)." In: Stagecoach to tombstone : the filmgoers' guide to the great westerns / Howard Hughes. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; 2008.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4 H833 2008

McDonough, Kathleen
"Wee Willie Winkie Goes West: The Influence of the British Empire Genre on John Ford's Cavalry Trilogy." In: Hollywood's West : the American frontier in film, television, and history / edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2005.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 H58 2005

Morgan, Jack
"The Irish in John Ford's Seventh Cavalry Trilogy - Victor McLaglen's Stooge-Irish Character." MELUS v22, n2 (Summer, 1997):33 (12 pages).
UC users only
Victor McLaglen's portrayal of Irish characters in John Ford's trilogy of Seventh Cavalry films reinforced the stereotypical views of the time of Irish as essentially interested in combat, singing, dancing and drinking. Ford was Irish-American and often promoted Ireland in many of his films, but Ford's willingness to incorporate a simplistic view of his culture is one of his shortcomings.

Nolley, Ken.
"Printing the Legend in the Age of MX: Reconsidering Ford's Military Trilogy." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 2. 1986. pp: 82-88. Critical reappraisal of J.F.'s cavalry films, "Fort Apache", "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" and "Rio Grande".

Westbrook, Laurel
"Propaganda and American Values in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon." [UCB Student Paper]

Wetta, Frank J.; Novelli, Martin A.
"'Romantic, isn’t it, Miss Dandridge?': Sources and Meanings of John Ford’s Cavalry Trilogy." American Nineteenth Century History, Jun2006, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p299-321, 23p
UC users only

Stagecoach

Browne, Nick.
"The Spectator-in-the-Text: The Rhetoric of Stagecoach." In: Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings / edited by Leo Braudy, Marshall Cohen. pp: 148-63. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1994.M364 1999

Browne, Nick.
"The Rhetoric of the Spectacular Text, with Reference to Stagecoach." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

Buscombe, Edward.
Stagecoach London: BFI Publishing, 1992. BFI film classics.
MainMoffitt PN1997.S65733.B87 1992

Clandfield, David.
"The Onomastic Code of Stagecoach." Literature Film Quarterly, Spring77, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p174, 7p
UC users only
Discusses the motion picture 'Stagecoach,' directed by John Ford, which was adapted from the short story 'Stage to Lordsburg,' by Ernest Haycox. Changes made by Dudley Nichols to the script; Overview of the story; Qualities and aspirations embodied by the characters in the story.

Coyne, Michael.
"Mirror for Prewar America: Stagecoach and the Westerns, 1939-1941." In: The crowded prairie : American national identity in the Hollywood western / Michael Coyne. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; [New York : distributed by St. Martin's Press], 1997.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W4 C69 1997

Engel, Leonard.
"Mythic Space and Monument Valley: Another Look at John Ford's Stagecoach." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 22 no. 3. 1994. pp: 174-80.
UC users only

Hughes, Howard
"'The Tumbril Awaits' - 'Stagecoach' (1939)." In: Stagecoach to tombstone : the filmgoers' guide to the great westerns / Howard Hughes. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; 2008.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Moffitt PN1995.9.W4 H833 2008

John Ford's Stagecoach
Edited by Barry Keith Grant. Cambridge, U.K. : New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
MAIN: PN1997.S65733 J65 2003

Kriegel, Leonard.
"Images of the American Male." CUNY English Forum, Vol. 1 pp: 5-21.

Lehman, Peter.
"'Tonight Your Director Is John Ford': The Strange Journey of Stagecoach from Screen to Radio." Play It Again, Sam: Retakes on Remakes/ edited by Andrew Horton and Stuart Y. McDougal; with an afterword by Leo Braudy. pp: 295-309. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1998.
UCB Main PN1995.9.R45 P58 1998

Maland, Charles.
"Movies and American Culture in the Annus Mirabilis: A Closer Look: Stagecoach and Juarez." In: American cinema of the 1930s : themes and variations / edited by Ina Rae Hark. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 A85735 2007

Movshovitz, Howard.
"The Still Point: Women In The Westerns Of John Ford." Frontiers 1984 7(3): 68-72.
In Stagecoach (1939) and The Searchers (1956), director John Ford presents women as living in a world fundamentally different from that of men; the outward manifestation of the difference is the stillness (not necessarily passivity) of the women and the contrasting activity of the men.

Young Mr. Lincoln

Abel, Richard
"Paradigmatic Structures in Young Mr. Lincoln." Wide Angle II/4, 78; p.20-26. illus.
Deals with the recurrence of specific paired sequences and the position/movement of the Lincoln figure in related sequences.

Abramson, Ronald; Thompson, Richard
"Young Mr. Lincoln Reconsidered: An Essay on the Theory and Practice of Film Criticism.." Screening the Past, Issue 22 Uploaded Sunday, 23 December 2007

Brewster, Ben
"Notes on the Text 'John Ford's Young Mr Lincoln' by the Editors of Cahiers du Cinéma Screen 1973 14: 29-43
UC users only

Browne, Nick
"Cahiers du Cinema's rereading of Hollywood Cinema: An Analysis of Method." Quarterly Review of Film Studies, III/3, Summer 78; p.405-416. A critique of method though an analysis of 'Cahiers' practice of critical reading, using the texts on "Young Mr. Lincoln" and "Morocco".

Browne, N.
"The Spectator of American Symbolic Forms: Re-reading John Ford's 'Young Mr. Lincoln'. "Film Reader /4, 79; p.180-188.
Analysis of how the film preaches its political message.

Cahiers du Cinéma
"John Ford's Young Mr Lincoln: A collective text by the Editors of Cahiers du Cinéma" Screen 1972 13: 5-44
UC users only

Darby, W.
"Musical links in Young Mr. Lincoln, My Darling Clementine, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance."Cinema Journal XXXI/1, Fall 91; p.22-36.
Analyses the dramatic use made of music in four John Ford films.

"John Ford's Young Mr. Lincoln. A Collective Text by the Editors of Cahiers du Cinema." Screen, XIII/3, Autumn 72; p.5-44. Extended analysis of the film, pointing out the director's underlying ideology in the presentation of Lincoln. Translation from 'Cahiers du Cinema.'

Kinder, Marsha
"The Image of Patriarchal Power in Young Mr. Lincoln and Ivan the Terrible, Part I." Film Quarterly XXXIX/2, Winter 85-86; p.29-49.
Examines how both films use the iconic hero as a stylistic pattern to direct the reading of the narrative, and how each comments on the contemporary political context in which they were made.

Lawrence, John Shelton.
"Monomythic Expansion in the Young Mr. Lincoln." In: The myth of the American superhero / John Shelton Lawrence and Robert Jewett. Grand Rapids, Mich. : W.B. Eerdmans, c2002.
Main (Gardner) Stacks E169.12 .L36 2002

Oudart, Jean-Pierre
"Young Mr. Lincoln." In: Theories of authorship : a reader / edited by John Caughie Place/Publisher London ; Boston : Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute, 1981
Main Stack PN1996.T44 1981
Moffitt PN1996.T44 1981

Place, J.A.
"Young Mr. Lincoln, 1939." Wide Angle II/4, 78; p.28-35.
In-depth analysis of 'Young Mr. Lincoln' illustrates the treatment of historical and cultural myth-making in Ford's films

Smyth, J.E.
"Young Mr. Lincoln : between myth and history in 1939." Rethinking History, Jul2003, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p193, 22p
UC users only

Thompson, Frank T.
Abraham Lincoln : twentieth century popular portrayals Dallas, Tex. : Taylor Pub., 1999.
MAIN: PN1995.9.L53 T49 1999

Wexman, Virginia Wright
"'Right and Wrong; That's [Not] All There Is to It!': Young Mr. Lincoln and American Law." Cinema Journal, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 20-34, Spring 2005.

Wiederhold, Eve.
"Called to the Law: Tales of Pleasure and Obedience." Rhetoric Review, 2001, Vol. 20 Issue 1/2, p130, 17p
UC users only

Wollen, Peter
"Young Mr. Lincoln." (Film review).Screen XIII/3, Autumn 72; p.44-47.

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