Alfred Hitchcock:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Web Sites
Books & Videos
Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual films

Movies by Hitchcock in MRC
Videos on film and film history

Web Sites

Information on Hitchcock from the Internet Movie Database
MacGuffin Web Page

Books

Adair, Gene.
Alfred Hitchcock : filming our fears Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 A728 2002

The Hitchcock annual anthology : selected essays from volumes 10-15
Edited by Sidney Gottlieb and London ; New York : Wallflower Press, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H558 2009

After Hitchcock : influence, imitation, and intertextuality
Edited by David Boyd and R. Barton Palmer. 1st ed. Austin, TX : University of Texas Press, 2006.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.A68 2006
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip066/2006001351.html

"Alfred Hitchcock" In: Conversations with the great moviemakers of Hollywood's golden age at the American Film Institute / New York : A. A. Knopf, 2006.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.2 .A45 2006 DUE 05-09-10
Pacific Film Archive PN1998.2 .A45 2006

Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays
Edited by Richard Allen and S. Ishii-Gonzales. London: British Film Institute, 1999.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 A43 1999

Alfred Hitchcock: interviews
Edited by Sidney Gottlieb. Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2003. Conversations with filmmakers series.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.A5 2003
MoffittPN1998.3.H58.A5 2003
Contents: The talkie king talks / Evening News -- Advance monologue / Oswell Blakeston -- Half the world in a talkie / Evening News -- The man who made The 39 steps: pen portrait of Alfred Hitchcock / Norah Baring -- Britain's leading film director gives some hints to the film stars of the future / Mary Benedetta -- Mr. Hitchcock discovers love / Frank S. Nugent -- Production methods compared / The Cine-Technician -- Alfred Hitchcock's working credo / Gerald Pratley -- Story of an interview / Claude Chabrol -- Hitchcock / Ian Cameron and V. F. Perkins -- Alfred Hitchcock: Mr. chastity / Oriana Fallaci -- Alfred Hitchcock on his films / Huw Wheldon -- Let's hear it for Hitchcock / Emerson Batdorf -- Dialogue on film: Alfred Hitchcock / American Film Institute -- Alfred Hitchcock / Janet Maslin -- Hitch, hitch, hitch, hurrah! / Rui Nogueira and Nicoletta Zalaffi -- Alfred Hitchcock / Charles Thomas Samuels -- Alfred Hitchcock: the German years / Bob Thomas -- Conversation with Alfred Hitchcock / Arthur Knight -- Hitchcock / Andy Warhol

Allen, Richard
"Daphne du Maurier and Alfred Hitchcock." In: A companion to literature and film / edited by Robert Stam, Alessandra Raengo. Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell Pub., 2004. Blackwell companions in cultural studies ; 7
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0421/2004017778.html
Main Stack PN1995.3.C65 2004

Allen, Richard
"Hitchcock and Narrative Suspense: Theory and Practice." In: Camera obscura, camera lucida : essays in honor of Annette Michelson / edited by Richard Allen and Malcolm Turvey. Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, c2003.
Full-text available online (UCB users only0

Allen, Richard
"Hitchcock, Knowledge, and Sexual Difference." In: Recognition : the poetics of narrative : interdisciplinary studies on anagnorisis / edited by Philip New York : Peter Lang, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN56.R33 R43 2009

Allen, Richard
Hitchcock's romantic irony New York : Columbia University Press, c2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 A73 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0714/2007012808.html

Auiler, Dan.
Hitchcock's notebooks: an authorized and illustrated look inside the creative mind of Alfred Hitchcock / Dan Auiler. 1st ed. New York: Spike, c1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.A84 1999

Barr, Charles.
English Hitchcock /Charles Barr Moffat: Cameron & Hollis, c1999
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58 B32 1999

Barr, Charles
"Stannard and Hitchcock." In: Young and innocent? : the cinema in Britain, 1896-1930 / edited by Andrew Higson. Exeter : University of Exeter Press, 2002. Exeter studies in film history.
Main Stack PN1993.5.G7.Y68 2002

Bazin, Andre
The cinema of cruelty : from Bunuel to Hitchcock / by Andre Bazin; edited and with an introduction by François... 1st ed. New York : Seaver Books, 1982.
Main StackPN1995.9.C7.B313 1982

Bellour, Raymond.
L'Analyse du Film / Raymond Bellour. Paris: Albatros, c1979. Series title: Collection Ca cinema; 18.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .H527

Bellour, Raymond.
The Analysis of Film / Raymond Bellour; edited by Constance Penley. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c2000.
UCB MainPN1998.3.H58 B4513 2000

Bogdanovich, Peter
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock. [New York] Museum of Modern Art Film Library; distributed by Doubleday, Garden City, N.Y. [1963].
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H53

Bogdanovich, Peter
"Alfred Hitchcock." In: Who the Devil Made It / Peter Bogdanovich. 1st ed. New York: Alfred A. Knopf: Distributed by Random House, 1997. Conversations with Robert Aldrich, George Cukor, Allan Dwan, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Chuck Jones, Fritz Lang, Joseph H. Lewis, Sidney Lumet, Leo McCarey, Otto Preminger, Don Siegel, Josef von Sternberg, Frank Tashlin, Edgar G. Ulmer, Raoul Walsh.
Morrison Rm PN1995.9.P7.B58 1997
Moffitt PN1995.9.P7.B58 1997

Booker, M. Keith.
"American film in the long 1950s: from Hitchcock to Disney." In: The post-utopian imagination : American culture in the long 1950s / M. Keith Booker. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2002.
Main Stack PS374.P6.B66 2002

Brill, Lesley
The Hitchcock Romance: Love and Irony in Hitchcock's Films / Lesley Brill. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, c1988.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 B71 1988
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 B7 1988

Bruce, Graham (Graham Donald)
Bernard Herrmann : film music and narrative Ann Arbor, Mich. : UMI Research Press, c1985.
MAIN: ML410.H562 B81 1985

Butte, George
I know that you know that I know : narrating subjects from Moll Flanders to Marnie / George Butte. Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2004. Theory and interpretation of narrative series.
Main Stack PR830.P75.B87 2004

Cagle, Chris.
"Rough Trade: Sexual Taxonomy in Postwar America." In: RePresenting Bisexualities: Subjects and Cultures of Fluid Desire / edited by Donald E. Hall and Maria Pramaggiore. pp: 34-52. New York: New York University Press, c1996.
Main Stack HQ74.R46 19962

Carson, Diane.
"The Nightmare World of Hitchcock's Women." Florida State University Conference on Literature and Film (10th: 1985: Tallahassee) The Kingdom of Dreams in Literature and Film: Selected Papers from the Tenth Annual Florida State University Conference on Literature and Film / edited by Douglas Fowler. pp: 11-20. Tallahassee: University Presses of Florida, c1986.
Main Stack PN1993.4.F641 1985 NRLF #: B 3 567 225

Casting a shadow : creating the Alfred Hitchcock film
Edited by Will Schmenner and Corinne Granof ; exhibition curated by Will Schmenner; contributions by David Alan Robertson ... [et al.]. Evanston, Ill. : Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University : Northwestern University Press, c2007.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.C37 2007
Contents: Casting Alfred Hitchcock : an art historical perspective / David Alan Robertson -- Creating the Alfred Hitchcock film : an introduction / Will Schmenner -- The last word : images in Hitchcock's working method / Scott Curtis -- In and out of the frame : paintings in Hitchcock / Tom Gunning -- I confess and Nos deux consciences / Bill Krohn -- Hitchcock ?a la carte : menus, marketing, and the macabre / Jan Olsson.

Chandler, Charlotte.
It's only a movie : Alfred Hitchcock, a personal biography New York : Simon & Schuster, c2005.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 C53 2005

Cohen, Tom
Anti-mimesis From Plato to Hitchcock / Tom Cohen. Cambridge ; New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Literature, culture, theory; 10
Main Stack P106.C593 1994

Cohen, Paula Marantz
Alfred Hitchcock : the legacy of Victorianism / Paula Marantz Cohen. Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c1995.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 M27 1995
Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 M27 1995

Cohen, Tom
Hitchcock's Cryptonymies, Volume 1 : Secret Agents University of Minnesota Press, 2005
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.C62 2005

Cohen, Tom
Hitchcock's Cryptonymies, Volume 2 : War Machines University of Minnesota Press, 2005
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.C62 2005

Cooke, Lez.
"Hitchcock and the Mechanics of Cinematic Suspense." In: Twentieth-Century Suspense: The Thriller Comes of Age / edited by Clive Bloom. pp: 189-202. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1990.
Main Stack PR888.D4.T83 1990

Corber, Robert J.
In the Name of National Security: Hitchcock, Homophobia, and the Political Construction of Gender in Postwar America / Robert J. Corber. Durham: Duke University Press, 1993. Series title: New Americanists.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 C67 1993
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 C67 1993

Gilles, Deleuze; Tomlinson, Hugh; Habberjam, Barbara
"The crisis of the action-image: The Mental Image According to Hitchcock; Hitchcock brings the action-image to completion by carrying it to its limit." In: The movement-image / Gilles Deleuze ; translated by Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Minneapolis : University of Minnesota, c1986.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)

DeRosa, Steven.
Writing with Hitchcock: the collaboration of Alfred Hitchcock and John Michael Hayes New York: Faber and Faber, 2001.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 D47 2001

Derry, Charles
The suspense thriller: films in the shadow of Alfred Hitchcock / Charles Derry. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1988.
UCB Main PN1995.9.D4 D47 1988
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.D4 D47 1988

Douchet, Jean.
Alfred Hitchcock / par Jean Douchet. [Paris: Editions de l'Herne, 1967]. Series title: Herne cinema; 1.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H65 D6

Drumin, William A.
Thematic and methodological foundations of Alfred Hitchcock's artistic vision / William A. Drumin. Lewiston : Edwin Mellen Press, c2004. Studies in the history and criticism of film ; v. 8
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.D78 2004

Dufreigne, Jean-Pierre.
Hitchcock style. New York, NY : Assouline, c2004.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 D84 2004

Duncan, Paul.
Alfred Hitchcock : architect of anxiety, 1899-1980 / Paul Duncan Koln : Taschen, c2003
Main Stack PN1998.A3.H65 D6
Contents via Google books

Duncan, Paul.
Alfred Hitchcock Pocket Essentials, 1999
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]

Durgnat, Raymond.
The Strange Case of Alfred Hitchcock: Or, The Plain Man's Hitchcock / Raymond Durgnat. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1974.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H5464

Eugene, Jean-Pierre.
La musique dans les films d'Alfred Hitchcock / Paris: Dreamland, c2000.
MUSI: ML2075 .E89 2000

Everything You always Wanted to Know About Lacan: (But were Afraid to Ask Hitchcock)
Edited by Slavoj Zizek. London; New York: Verso, 1992.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 E9 1992
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 E9 1992
Contents via Google books

Fallaci, Oriana.
"Alfred Hitchcock: Mr. Chastity." In: The egotists : sixteen surprising interviews / Oriana Fallaci Chicago : H. Regnery Co., [1968, c1963
Main Stack CT120.F33
Bancroft CT120.F33

Falk, Quentin.
Mr Hitchcock London : Haus, c2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F35 2007;

Finler, Joel W. (Joel Waldo)
Alfred Hitchcock: The Hollywood Years / Joel W. Finler. London: B.T. Batsford, 1992.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 F57 1992

Finler, Joel W. (Joel Waldo)
Hitchcock in Hollywood / Joel W. Finler. New York: Continuum, 1992.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 F55 1992

Fleming, Alice Mulcahey
"Alfred Hitchcock." In: The moviemakers / Alice Fleming New York : St. Martin's Press, 1973
Main Stack PN1998.A2.F538

Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock Annual
Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002
Engendering Vertigo / Leland Poague -- Avian metaphor in The birds / Richard Allen -- Alfred Hitchcock: registrar of births and deaths / David Sterritt -- "A hero for our times": foreign correspondent, hero, and the bonfire of the vanities / Leslie Brill -- Echoes of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, The birds, and Frenzy in François Truffaut's Story of Adale H. / James M. Vest -- The myth of apocalypse and the horror film: the primacy of Psycho and The birds / Christopher Sharrett -- "See it from the beginning": Hitchcock's reconstruction of film history / Joan Hawkins -- Remaking Psycho / James Naremore.

Frank, Mike
"The radical monism of Alfred Hitchcock." In: The changing face of evil in film and television / edited by Martin F. Norden. Amsterdam ; New York, NY : Rodopi, 2007.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main Stack PN1995.9.E93.C43 2007

Freeman, David
The Last Days of Alfred Hitchcock: A Memoir Featuring the Screenplay of "Alfred Hitchcock's The Short Night" / David Freeman. Woodstock, N.Y.: Overlook Press, 1984.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H5469 1984
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H5469 1984

Freedman, Jonathan and Millington, Richard H.
Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58 H575 1999
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 H575 1999

Gates, Philippa
"Criminal investigation on film: Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980)." In: A companion to crime fiction / edited by Charles J. Rzepka and Lee Horsley. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN3448.D4 C557 2010

Giles, Paul.
"Guilt and salvation: Alfred Hitchcock and Martin Scorsese." In: American Catholic arts and fictions : culture, ideology, aesthetics / Paul Giles. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992. Cambridge studies in American literature and culture.
Main StackPS153.C3.G55 1992

Godard, Jean Luc
"Hitchcock and the Power of Cinema." In: Cinema : the archeology of film and the memory of a century (Archeologie du cinéma et memoire d'une siècle) Oxford, UK ; New York : Berg, 2005.
MAIN: PN1994 .G555 2005; MOFF: PN1994 .G555 2005; PFA : PN1994 .G555 2005; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip055/2004029767.html

Goodwin, James.
"Conrad and Hitchcock: Secret Sharers." In: The English Novel and the Movies / edited by Michael Klein and Gillian Parker. pp: 218-227. New York: Ungar, c1981
Main Stack PN1997.85.E53
Moffitt PN1997.85.E53

Gordon, Paul
Dial "M" for mother : a Freudian Hitchcock Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2008.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 G67 2008

Greven, David.
"Engorged with Desire: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock and the Gendered Politics Eating." In: Reel food : essays on food and film / edited by Anne L. Bower. New York : Routledge, 2004.
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0413/2004001358.html
Main Stack PN1995.9.F65.R44 2004

Haeffner, Nicholas.
Alfred Hitchcock Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2005.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 H34 2005

Haley, Michael.
The Alfred Hitchcock Album / by Michael Haley. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, c1981.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .H5472 1981

Harris, Robert A.
The Films of Alfred Hitchcock / by Robert A. Harris and Michael S. Lasky. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, c1976.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H54731

Hare, William
Hitchcock and the methods of suspense Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 H37 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip074/2006036817.html

Harvey, James
"Hitchcock's Blondes." In: Movie love in the fifties / James Harvey. 1st ed. New York: Alfred A. Knopf: Distributed by Random House, 2001.
Main Stack PN1995.9.L6.H37 2001
PFA PN1995.9.L6.H37 2001 Pacific Film Archive collection
Contents via Google books

Hepworth, John.
"Hitchcock's Homophobia." In: Out in Culture: Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Essays on Popular Culture. / edited by Corey K. Creekmur and Alexander Doty. pp: 186-96. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. Series Q
Main Stack HQ76.2.U5.O98 19952

Hitch: Alfred the auteur [VIDEO]
A two-part examination of the life and works of Alfred Hitchcock, the master of suspense, whose career spanned over 60 years. This second program traces the second half of his career. Commentary from Hitchcock, actors, and production specialists help chronicle the making of such classics as The Birds, Rear Window, Vertigo and Psycho. Also looks at Hitchcock's ambivalence toward the popular TV show that brought him into millions of living rooms. Features extensive film clips, interviews, and previously unavailable materials, including outtakes, filmed auditions, and Hitchcock's own home movies.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002Media Resources Center DVD 2338

Hitchcock, Alfred
"The benefits of shock." In: The dangerous edge / Gavin Lambert. London : Barrie & Jenkins, 1975.
Main StackPN3448.D4L331 1975

Hitchcock, Alfred
Hitchcock on Hitchcock: Selected Writings and Interviews / edited by Sidney Gottlieb. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1995.
UCB Moffitt PN1994 .H53 1995

Hitchcock, Alfred
Hitchcock on Hitchcock : selected writings and interviews / edited by Sidney Gottlieb Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.P7 H53 1997
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.P7 H53 1997

"Hitchcock and moralist narrative." In: Great film directors : a critical anthology / edited by Leo Braudy and Morris Dickstein New York : Oxford University Press, 1978
Main Stack PN1998.A2.G74

Hitchcock and philosophy : dial M for metaphysics
Edited by David Baggett and William A. Drumin. Place/Publisher Chicago : Open Court, c2007.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H68.H53 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip078/2007000242.html

The Hitchcock annual anthology : selected essays from volumes 10-15
Edited by Sidney Gottlieb and London ; New York : Wallflower Press, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H58 2009

Hitchcock: past and future
Edited by Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzales.London ; New York : Routledge, 2004.
Table of contents: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0410/2003023701.html
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58; H5727 2004

Hitchcock Poster Art: From the Mark H. Wolff Collection
Woodstock, NY: Overlook Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58 H573 1999

A Hitchcock Reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Ames: Iowa State University Press, c1986.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H547351 1986
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H547351 1986

A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009
Contents: Hitch and his public / Jean Douchet -- Hitchcock's imagery and art / Maurice Yacowar -- Retrospective / Robin Wood -- Hitch as matrix figure: Hitchcock and twentieth century cinema / John Orr -- Hitchcock's The lodger / Lesley Brill -- Criticism and/as history: rereading Blackmail / Leland Poague -- Alfred Hitchcock's murder: theater, authorship, and the presence of the camera / William Rothman -- Consolidation of a classical style: The man who knew too much / Elizabeth Weis -- Through a woman's eyes: sexuality and memory in The 39 steps / Charles L.P. Silet -- Rematerializing the vanishing "lady": feminism, Hitchcock, and interpretation / Patrice Petro -- All in the family: Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a doubt / James McLaughlin -- The moral universe of Hitchcock's Spellbound / Thomas Hyde -- Notorious: perversion par excellence / Richard Abel -- Strangers on a train / Robin Wood -- Hitchcock's Rear window: reflexivity and the critique of voyeurism / Robert Stam and Roberta Pearson -- Finding the right man in The wrong man / Marshall Deutelbaum -- Male desire, male anxiety: the essential Hitchcock / Robin Wood -- A closer look at scopophilia: Mulvey, Hitchcock and Vertigo / Marian Keane -- North by northwest / Stanley Cavell -- "Oh, I see": The birds and the culmination of Hitchcock's romantic vision / John P. McCombes -- Mark's Marnie / Michele Piso -- The queer voice in Marnie / Lucretia Knapp -- Rituals of defilement: Frenzy / Tania Modleski -- Psychosis, neurosis, perversion / Raymond Bellour -- Psycho's allegory of seeing / Christopher Morris -- On being Norman: performance and inner life in Hitchcock's Psycho / Deborah Thomas.

Hitchcock's America
Edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Hitchcock's Rereleased Films: from Rope to Vertigo
Edited by Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick; with a foreword by Andrew Sarris. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, c1991. Series title: Contemporary film and television series.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 H58 1991
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 H58 1991

Hock, Stephen.
"This Is Too Big for One Old Name: Hitchcock and Smithee in the Signature Centrifuge." In: Directed by Allen Smithee / Jeremy Braddock and Stephen Hock, editors ; foreword by Andrew Sarris. pp: 175-205. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2001. Commerce and mass culture series.
Main StackPN1995.9.P7.D53 2001

Horton, Andrew
"The Hitchcock Films: "Never in My Wildest Dreams!"" In: Henry Bumstead and the world of Hollywood art direction / Andrew Horton. Horton, Andrew, 1944- Austin : University of Texas Press, 2003.
Full-text available online (UCB users only0
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.2.B86 H67 2003 AVAILABLE
Pacific Film Archive PN1998.3.B83 H67 2003

Hughes, Rowland
"Shadows and doubts : Hitchcock, genre and villainy." In: The Devil himself : villainy in detective fiction and film / edited by Stacy Gillis and Philippa Gates. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2002. Contributions to the study of popular culture ; no. 73
Main Stack PR830.D4.D45 2002

Hunter, Evan
Me and Hitch / Evan Hunter. London: Faber, 1997.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H5474 1997

Hurley, Neil P.
Soul in Suspense: Hitchcock's Fright and Delight / by Neil P. Hurley. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1993.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 H87 1993
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 H87 1993

Hurley, Neil P.
"Alfred Hitchcock." In: Religion in film / edited by John R. May and Michael Bird 1st ed Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c1982
Main Stack PN1995.9.R4.R4 1982
Moffitt PN1995.9.R4.R4 1982

Iek Slavoj.
"Everything you always wanted to know about Schelling (but were afraid to ask Hitchcock)." In: Schelling now : contemporary readings / edited by Jason M. Wirth. Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, c2005.
Main Stack B2898.S2493 2005

Jacobs, Steven
The wrong house : the architecture of Alfred Hitchcock / Steven Jacobs. Rotterdam : 010 Publishers, c2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks NA2588 .J33 2007
Contents: 1. Space fright : The art director vanishes: Hitchcock and production design : Pure doorknob cinema: doors, windows, and stairs ; Family plots on single sets: cinematic confinement ; Torn curtains in rear windows: uncanny homes and gothic plots ; 2. The tourist who knew too much : City symphonies and cameos in the crowd: the suspense of urban modernity ; Montage of tourist attractions: Hitchcock's creative geography ; Sightseeing terror: metatourism and national monuments ; The trouble with museums: mausoleums of the gaze ; 3. Selected works: Hitchcock's domestic architecture : Houses : Under glass ceilings: Bunting House ; The old dark house: House number 17 ; Living behind the screen: Verloc House & Bijou Cinema ; Bad dream house: Newton House ; A comfortable little place: Wendice Apartment ; Kitchen sink claustrophobia: Balestrero House ; Schizoid architecture: Bates House & Motel ; Living in a cage: Brenner House ; Behind the jungle gym: Hayworth House ; Childhood memories: Edgar House -- Country homes and mansions : Simple family life: Moat House ; Vitrivius Britannicus: Pengallan House ; Bluebeard's castle: Manderley ; Design before the fact: Aysgarth House ; Building above all suspicion: McLaidlaw House ; Manhattan manners: Sutton House ; Psycho-building: Green Manors ; Nazi hominess: Sebastian House ; Unfathomable plans: Paradine House ; Bedroom of the picturesque: Hindley Hall ; Warm, cozy, and protective: Keane House ; Tropical classicism: Minyago Yugilla ; The Oedipal bedroom: Anthony House -- Modern hide-outs and look outs : Long-take architecture: Brandon-Phillip Penthouse ; Architecture of the gaze: Jeffries Apartment & Courtyard ; The machine in the garden: Vandamm House ; Appendix: Hitchcock's art directors.

Kapsis, Robert E.
Hitchcock: The Making of a Reputation / Robert E. Kapsis. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, c1992.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 K36 1992
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 K36 1992
Contents via Google books

Kolker, Robert P.
"Algebraic Figures: Recalculating the Hitchcock Formula." In: Play It Again, Sam: Retakes on Remakes / edited by Andrew Horton and Stuart Y. McDougal; with an afterword by Leo Braudy. pp: 34-51 Berkeley: University of California Press, c1998.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main Stack PN1995.9.R45.P58 1998

Kraft, Jeff
Footsteps in the fog : Alfred Hitchcock's San Francisco / Jeff Kraft andAaron Leventhal ; foreword by Patricia Hitchcock O'Connell. Santa Monica, CA : Santa Monica Press, c2002.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 K73 2002
UCB Bancroft PN1998.3.H58 K73 2002
Publisher's website

Krohn, Bill.
Hitchcock at Work London: Phaidon, 2000.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58 K76 2000

Lane, Anthony
"Alfred Hitchcock." In: Nobody's perfect : writings from the New Yorker / Anthony Lane. New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2002.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .L28 2002

LaValley, Albert J.
Focus on Hitchcock. Edited by Albert J. LaValley. Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Prentice-Hall [1972]. Series title: Film focus. Series title: A Spectrum book.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H548

Leff, Leonard J.
Hitchcock and Selznick: the rich and strange collaboration of Alfred Hitchcock and David O. Selznick in Hollywood / Leonard J. Leff. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999 printing.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 L44 1999
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 L44 1999
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H54841 1987 (earlier edition)
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H5484 1987 (earlier edition)
Contents via Google Books

Leitch, Thomas M.
"The Adapter as Auteur: Hitchcock, Kubrick, Disney." In: Books in motion : adaptation, intertextuality, authorship / edited by Mireia Aragay. Amsterdam : Rodopi, 2005.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .B66 2005
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.3 .B66 2005

Leitch, Thomas M.
The encyclopedia of Alfred Hitchcock / Thomas Leitch ; foreword by Gene D. Phillips. New York, NY : Facts on File, c2002. Great filmmakers series.
Main StackPN1998.3.H58.L45 2002

Leitch, Thomas M.
Find the Director and Other Hitchcock Games / Thomas M. Leitch. Athens: University of Georgia Press, c1991.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 L46 1991
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 L46 1991

Leitch, Thomas M.
"Hitchcock and his writers : authorship and authority in adaption." In: Authorship in film adaptation / edited and with an introduction by Jack Boozer. Austin : University of Texas Press, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .A92 2008

Leonard, Garry
"Keeping Our Selves in Suspense: The Imagined Gaze and Fictional Constructions of the Self in Alfred Hitchcock and Edgar Allan Poe." In: Suspense : conceptualizations, theoretical analyses, and empirical explorations / edited by Peter Vorderer, Hans J. Wulff, Mike Friedrichsen. Mahwah, N.J. : L. Erlbaum Associates, 1996.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.S87 S87 1996
Contents Google books

Lyden, John
"Alfred Hitchcock." In: Film as religion : myths, morals, and rituals / John C. Lyden. New York : New York University Press, c2003.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.5 .L89 2003

Magistrale, Tony.
"The terror of Hitchcock: : Vertigo, Psycho, The birds." In: Abject terrors : surveying the modern and postmodern horror film / Tony Magistrale. New York : Peter Lang, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.M248 2005
Moffitt PN1995.9.H6.M248 2005
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip059/2005007036.html

Marantz Cohen, Paula
Alfred Hitchcock: The Legacy of Victorianism / Paula Marantz Cohen. Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky, c1995
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 M27 1995
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 M27 1995

Martin, Peter.
"Film masters and film mentors: Peter Martin calls on Hitchcock." In: Film makers on film making; statements on their art by thirty directors, edited by Harry M. Geduld. Bloomington, Indiana University Press [1967]
Main StackPN1995.9.P7.G4
Moffitt PN1995.9.P7.G4

Maxford, Howard.
The A-Z of Hitchcock / Howard Maxford. London : B.T. Batsford, 2002.
Media Center PN1998.3.H58.M35 2002

McDougal, Stuart Y.
"The Director Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock Remakes Himself." In: Play It Again, Sam: Retakes on Remakes / edited by Andrew Horton and Stuart Y. McDougal; with an afterword by Leo Braudy. pp: 52-69. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1998.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main Stack PN1995.9.R45.P58 1998

McElhaney, Joe
The death of classical cinema : Hitchcock, Lang, Minnelli Albany : State University of New York Press, c2006.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 M37 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip065/2005036236.html

McGilligan, Patrick.
Alfred Hitchcock : a life in darkness and light / Patrick McGilligan. 1st ed. New York : Regan Books, c2003.
Main StackPN1998.3.H58.M38 2003

The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012
Contents: Reading James with Hitchcock, reading Hitchcock with James / Susan Griffin and Alan Nadel -- National bodies / Susan Griffin -- Secrets, lies, and virtuous attachments : The ambassadors and The 39 steps / Brenda Austin-Smith -- Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock after the American century : circulation and non-return in The American scene and Strangers on a train / Brian T. Edwards -- Colonial discourse and the unheard other in Washington Square and The man who knew too much / Alan Nadel -- Bump : concussive knowledge in James and Hitchcock / Mary Ann O'Farrell -- James's Birdcage/Hitchcock's Birds / Patrick O'Donnell -- Sounds of silence in The wings of the dove and Blackmail / Donatella Izzo -- The perfect enigma / Judith Roof -- Hands, objects and love in James and Hitchcock : Reading the touch in The golden bowl and Notorious / Jonathan Freedman -- The touch of the real : circumscribing Vertigo / Eric Savoy -- Specters of respectability : Victorian horrors in The turn of the Screw and Psycho / Aviva Briefel -- Caged heat : feminist rebellion in Henry James's In the cage and Alfred Hitchcock's Rear window / John Carlos Rowe -- Shadows of modernity : What Maisie knew and Shadow of a Doubt / Thomas B. Byers -- Awkward ages : James and Hitchcock in between / Mark Goble.

Metz, Walter.
"Modernity in Fritz Lang and Alfred Hitchcock." In: Cinema and modernity / edited by Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2006.
Main Stack PN1994.C4885 2006

Modleski, Tania
The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory / Tania Modleski. New York: Methuen, 1988.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 M64 1988
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 M64 1988
Contents via Google books

Mogg, Ken.
The Alfred Hitchcock storyLondon: Titan, 1999.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 M65 1999b

Mogg, Ken.
"Hitchcock made only one horror film: matters of time, space, causality, and the Schopenhauerian will." In: Dark thoughts : philosophic reflections on cinematic horror / edited by Steven Jay Schneider, Daniel Shaw. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2003.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.D27 2003

Montes-Huidobro, Matias.
"From Hitchcock to Garcia Marquez: The Methodology of Suspense." In: Critical Perspectives on Gabriel Garcia Marquez / Bradley A. Shaw and Nora Vera-Godwin, editors. pp: 105-123. Lincoln, Neb.: Society of Spanish and Spanish-American Studies, c1986.
Main Stack PQ8180.17.A73.C741 1986
Moffitt PQ8180.17.A73.C7 1986

Morris, Christopher D.
The hanging figure : on suspense and the films of Alfred Hitchcock Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 M67 2002

Notorious: Alfred Hitchcock and Contemporary Art
Curated by Kerry Brougher, Michael Tarantino and Astrid Bowron; essays by Kerry Brougher and Michael Trantino. Oxford: Museum of Modern Art Oxford, 1999.
UCB PN1998.3.H58 N68 1999

Odabashian, Barbara.
"Double Vision: Scorsese and Hitchcock." In: Social and Political Change in Literature and Film: selected papers from the Sixteenth Annual Florida State University. pp: 21-35.
Main Stack PN51.F54 1991

Orr, John
Hitchcock and twentieth-century cinema London ; New York : Wallflower, 2005.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 O77 2005
MOFF: PN1998.3.H58 O77 2005
Contents: Hitch as matrix-figure : Hitchcock and twentieth-century cinema -- Lost identities : Hitchcock and David Hume -- Expressive moments : Hitchcock and Weimar cinema -- The flight and the gaze : Hitchcock and the British connection -- Hitchcock's actors : Notorious, Valli and the triptych effect -- Perverse miracles : Hitchcock and the French new wave -- Inside out : Hitchcock, film noir and David Lynch -- I confess, or I'm giving nothing away -- Hitch in the twenty-first century

Perry, George C.
The Films of Alfred Hitchcock. [New York: Dutton, 1965]. Series title: Dutton Vista pictureback.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H65 P4

Perry, George C.
Hitchcock / George Perry. London: Macmillan, 1975. Series title: The Movie makers.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H54951 1975b

Perry, Dennis R.
Hitchcock and Poe : the legacy of delight and terror / Dennis R. Perry. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2003. Filmmakers series.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P46 2003
Contents: "The purloined letter" and murder -- Apocalypse: crises of fragmentation: "The masque of the red death" and The birds -- Inexplicable predicaments: diffusion from the center: "The pit and the pendulum" and North by northwest -- Doubles: the universe of others: "William Wilson" and Strangers on a train -- Imps of the perverse: diffusion from the self: "The tell-tale heart" and Rope -- Voyeurism: eyes of the perverse: "A mAn of the crowd" and Rear window -- Romantic obsession: return to transcendence: "The fall of the house of Usher" and Vertigo -- Humor and horror: collapsing into unity: "Ligeia" and The 39 steps.

Perspectives on Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by David Boyd. New York: G.K. Hall, c1995. Series title: Perspectives on film.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 P47 1995
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 P47 1995

Peucker, B.
"The scene of art in Hitchcock I and II." In: The material image : art and the real in film / Brigitte Peucker. Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2007.
Main Stack PN1995.25.P46 2007

Phillips, Gene D.
Alfred Hitchcock / Gene D. Phillips. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984. Series title: Twayne's filmmakers series.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H5496 1984
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H5496 1984

Phillips, Gene D.
"Film Criticism versus Film Maker: Greene's Criticism of Hitchcock's Films." In: Essays in Graham Greene. pp: 119-126. Greenwood, Fla.: Penkevill Pub. Co., c1987
Main Stack PR6013.R44.Z6328

Pisters, Patricia.
"Hitchcock's universe: Zizek and deleuze." In: The matrix of visual culture : working with Deleuze in film theory / Patricia Pisters. Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2003.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .P53 2003

Polan, Dana.
"The Light Side of Genius: Hitchcock's Mr. and Mrs. Smith in the Screwball Tradition." In: Comedy/Cinema/Theory. Berkeley / edited by Andrew Horton. pp: 131-52. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1991.
Moffitt PN1995.9.C55.C65 1991

Pomerance, Murray.
An eye for Hitchcock / Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P66 2004
Contents: Introduction: his master's voice -- A great fall: action north by sincerity northwest -- A bromide for Ballantine: Spellbound, psychoanalysis, light -- The tear in the curtain: I forbid you to leave this room -- Once in love with Marnie -- I confess and the men inside -- Gabriel's horn: Vertigo and the golden passage.

Pomerance, Murray
"A Clean Well-lighted Place: Hitchcock's New York." In: City that never sleeps : New York and the filmic imagination / edited by Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.N49 C58 2007

Pomerance, Murray.
"Hitchcock and the dramaturgy of screen violence." In: New Hollywood violence / edited by Steven Jay Schneider. Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the USA by Palgrave, 2004.
Main Stack PN1995.9.V5.N49 2004

Price, Theodore
Hitchcock and Homosexuality: his 50-year Obsession with Jack the Ripper and the Superbitch Prostitute: A Psychoanalytic View / by Theodore Price. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1992.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 P75 1992
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 P75 1992

Rohmer, Eric
Hitchcock [par] Eric Rohmer & Claude Chabrol. Paris, Editions universitaires [1957]. Series title: Classiques du cinema 6.
UCB Main PN1993 .C5 v.6

Rohmer, Eric
Hitchcock, The First Forty-four Films / Eric Rohmer, Claude Chabrol; translated by Stanley Hochman. New York: F. Ungar, c1979. Series title: Ungar film library.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .H5513 1979
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 .H5513 1979

Rothman, William.
Hitchcock--The Murderous Gaze / William Rothman. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1982. Series title: Harvard film studies.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .H553
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 .H553

Rothman, William.
"Thoughts on Hitchcock's authorship." In: The "I" of the camera : essays in film criticism, history, and aesthetics 2nd ed. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1995.R68 2004
Electronic Table of Contents

Rothman, William.
"The Villain in Hitchcock: Does He Look Like a Wrong One to You?." In: Bad : infamy, darkness, evil, and slime on screen / edited by Murray Pomerance. Albany : State University of New York Press, c2004. The SUNY series, cultural studies in cinema/video
Main Stack PN1995.9.E93.B33 2004

Rothman, William.
"The villain in Hitchcock." "In: The "I" of the camera : essays in film criticism, history, and aesthetics / William Rothman. Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press,1988. Cambridge studies in film.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main StackPN1995.R681 1988
MoffittPN1995.R68 1988

Royer, Carl.
" "And I brought you nightmares" : the play of horror in Hitchcock's films." In: The spectacle of isolation in horror films : dark parades New York : Haworth Press, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.R69 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0422/2004020146.html

Ryall, Tom.
Alfred Hitchcock and the British Cinema With a new introduction / Tom Ryall. 2nd ed. London; Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Athlone, 1996.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H556 1996

Ryall, Tom.
Alfred Hitchcock & the British Cinema / Tom Ryall. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, c1986.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H556 1986

Ryall, Tom.
Alfred Hitchcock & the British Cinema / Tom Ryall. London: Croom Helm, c1986.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H5561 1986b

Saito, Ayako
"Hitchcock's trilogy: A logic of mise en Sc?ne." In: Endless night cinema and psychoanalysis, parallel histories Berkeley : University of California Press, c1999
Electronic Location(s): http://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/ft5k4006pk/ eScholarship. Restricted to UC campuses
MAIN: PN1995.9.P783 E53 1999

Salotto, Eleanor.
Gothic returns in Collins, Dickens, Zola, and Hitchcock New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
MAIN: PR878.D37 S25 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0642/2005057477-t.html

Samuels, Charles Thomas
"Alfred Hitchcock." In: Encountering directors New York, Putnam [1972]
Main StackPN1998.A2.S16
MoffittPN1998.A2.S16

Samuels, Robert
Hitchcock's bi-textuality: Lacan, Feminisms, and Queer Theory / Robert Samuels. Albany: State University of New York Press, c1998. Series title: SUNY series in psychoanalysis and culture.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 S26 1998

Sarris, Andrew
"Alfred Hitchcock." In: "You ain't heard nothin' yet" : the American talking film, history & memory, 1927-1949 / Andrew Sarris. New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
Main StackPN1995.7.S27 1998
Moffitt PN1995.7.S27 1998

Schickel, Richard.
Schickel on film: encounters--critical and personal--with movie immortals / Richard Schickel. 1st ed. New York: W. Morrow, c1989.
UCB Main PN1995 .S341 1989

Schneider, Lissa.
"The Woman Alone in Conrad and Hitchcock." In: Conrad on Film / edited by Gene M. Moore. pp: 61-77. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Main Stack PR6005.O4.Z581165 1997

Sharff, Stefan.
Alfred Hitchcock's High Vernacular: Theory and Practice / Stefan Sharff. New York: Columbia University Press, c1991.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 S48 1991
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 S48 1991

Sikov, Ed.
"Unrest in Peace: Hitchcock's Fifties Humor." In: Laughing hysterically : American screen comedy of the 1950s / Ed Sikov. New York : Columbia University Press, c1994.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.C55 S49 1994
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.C55 S49 1994
Contents via Google books

Simone, Sam P.
Hitchcock As Activist: Politics and the War Films / by Sam P. Simone. Ann Arbor, Mich.: UMI Research Press, c1985. Series title: Studies in cinema; no. 36.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H558 1985

Simsolo, Noel.
Alfred Hitchcock. Presentation par Noel Simsolo. Propos d'Alfred Hitchcock ... Paris, Seghers, 1969. Series title: Cinema d'aujourd'hui, 54.
UCB Main PN1993 .C4 v.54

Singer, Irving.
Three philosophical filmmakers : Hitchcock, Welles, Renoir / Irving Singer. Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2004.
Main StackPN1998.3.H58.S54 2004

Sloan, Jane
Alfred Hitchcock: A Filmography and Bibliography / Jane E. Sloan. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1995. Series title: A Reference publication in film.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 S57 1995

Sloan, Jane
Alfred Hitchcock: A Guide to References and Resources / Jane E. Sloan. New York: G.K. Hall; Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York: Maxwell Macmillan International, c1993. Series title: A Reference publication in film.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 A12 S57, 1993
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 A12 S57, 1993

Smith, Susan.
Hitchcock: suspense, humour and tone London: British Film Institute, 2000.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 S6 2000

Smith, Steven C.
A heart at fire's center the life and music of Bernard Herrmann Berkeley : University of California Press, c1991
Electronic Location(s): http://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/ft509nb37s/ eScholarship. Restricted to UC campuses

Spoto, Donald
The Art of Alfred Hitchcock: Fifty Years of His Motion Pictures / Donald Spoto. New York: Hopkinson and Blake, [1976].
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H5641
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H5641

Spoto, Donald
The Art of Alfred Hitchcock: Fifty Years of His Motion Pictures / Donald Spoto. 2nd ed., completely rev. and updated. New York: Doubleday, 1992.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 S68 1992
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 S68 1992

Spoto, Donald
The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock / by Donald Spoto. 1st ed. Boston: Little, Brown, c1983.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H565 1983
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H565 1983

Sterritt, David.
The Films of Alfred Hitchcock / David Sterritt. Cambridge [England]; New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Series title: Cambridge film classics.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 S74 1993
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 S74 1993

Straumann, Barbara.
Figurations of exile in Hitchcock and Nabokov / Barbara Straumann. Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN56.5.E96 S77 2008

Strauss, Marc.
Alfred Hitchcock's silent films / Marc Raymond Strauss. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2004.
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0422/2004020169.html
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.S76 2004

Strauss, Marc.
Hitchcock Nonetheless Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2007.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.S77 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0620/2006030123.html

Stromgren, Dick.
"'Now to the Banquet We Press': Hitchcook's Gourmet and Gourmand Offerings." In: Beyond the Stars III / edited by Paul Loukides and Linda K. Fuller. pp: 38-50. Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green University Popular Press, c1990
Main Stack PN1995.9.C36.B49 1990 Library has: v.[1]-5 (c1990-c1996)
Moffitt PN1995.9.C36.B49 1990 Library has: v.[1]-5 (c1990-c1996)

Sullivan, Jack Hitchcock's music New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, c2006.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
MAIN: ML2075 .S89 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0611/2006010348.html

Tatar, Maria
Secrets beyond the door : the story of Bluebeard and his wives Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2004.
Main Stack GR75.B52.T38 2004
Discusses the Bluebeard story in various contexts. Tatar's analysis moves through many media: folktale, broadsheet, stage play, short story, film, opera, novel, and novella. She also moves through centuries, from Charles Perrault's late seventeenth-century Tales of Mother Goose (1697) through a collection of Hitchcock films in the mid-twentieth century.

Taylor, John Russell.
Hitch: The Life and Times of Alfred Hitchcock / by John Russell Taylor. 1st Da Capo Press ed. New York: Da Capo Press, 1996.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 T38 1996

Taylor, John Russell.
Hitch: The Life and Times of Alfred Hitchcock / by John Russell Taylor. London; Boston: Faber and Faber, 1978.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .H567 1978b

Ian Scott Todd
"Hitchcock's 'good-looking blondes': first glimpses and second glances." In: Situating the feminist gaze and spectatorship in postwar cinema / edited by Marceline Block. Newcastle : Cambridge Scholars, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W6 S58 2008

Tout Ce Que Vous Avez Toujours Voulu Savoir Sur Lacan Sans Jamais Oser le Demander a Hitchcock
Edited by Mladen Dolar ... [et al.]; sous la direction de Slavoj Zizek; preface de Marie-France Pisier. [Paris]: Navarin, c1988.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 T68 1988

Tisseron, Serge.
Comment Hitchcock m'a gueri : Que cherchons-nous dans les images? Albin Michel, c2003.
MAIN: PN1995.9.P783 T56 2003

Truffaut, François.
Le Cinema Selon Hitchcock [par] F. Truffaut avec la collaboration de Helen Scott. Paris, R. Laffont [1966].
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H65 T7

Truffaut, François.
Hitchcock, by François Truffaut with the collaboration of Helen G. Scott. New York, Simon and Schuster [1967].
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H65 T72 1967
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 .H573

Truffaut, François.
Hitchcock / Truffaut; avec la collaboration de Helen Scott. Ed. definitive. [Paris]: Ramsay, c1983.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H571 1983

Truffaut, François.
Hitchcock / by François Truffaut; with the collaboration of Helen G. Scott. Rev. ed. New York: Simon and Schuster, c1984.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H5731 1984
UCB Morrison PN1998.A3 H5731 1984

Tuska, Jon.
Encounters with filmmakers: eight career studies / Jon Tuska. New York: Greenwood Press, 1991. Series title: Contributions to the study of popular culture no. 29.
UCB Main PN1998.2 .T8 1991
UCB Moffitt PN1998.2 .T8 1991

Vest, James M.
Hitchcock and France : the forging of an auteur / James M. Vest. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
Main StackPN1998.3.H58.V47 2003

Villien, Bruno.
Hitchcock / Bruno Villien. Paris: Colona, c1982. Series title: Collection L'Oil du cinema.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H5771 1982

Walker, Michael.
Hitchcock's motifs / Michael Walker. Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, c2005.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.W36 2005

Weis, Elisabeth
The Silent Scream: Alfred Hitchcock's Sound Track / Elisabeth Weis. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c1982.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .H578 1982
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 .H578 1982

Wollen, Peter
"Hitch: a tale of two cities (London and Los Angeles)." In: Paris Hollywood : writings on film London ; New York : Verso, 2002.
MAIN: PN1994 .W618 2002;

Wood, Robin
Hitchcock's Films. London, A. Zwemmer; New York, A. S. Barnes [1965].
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H65.W6

Wood, Robin
Hitchcock's Films. / Robin Wood. South Brunswick, N.J.: A. S. Barnes, c1977.
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3H58 1977

Wood, Robin
Hitchcock's Films Revisited New York : Columbia University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 W66 2002

Wood, Robin
Hitchcock's Films Revisited / Robin Wood. New York: Columbia University Press, c1989.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 W661 1989
UCB Moffitt PN1998.3.H58 W66 1989

Wood, Robin.
"The Murderous Gays: Hitchcock's Homophobia." In: Out in Culture: Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Essays on Popular Culture. / edited by Corey K. Creekmur and Alexander Doty. pp: 197-215. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. Series Q
Main Stack HQ76.2.U5.O98 19952

Yacowar, Maurice.
"Hitchcock's imagery and art (1977)." In: Auteurs and authorship : a film reader / edited by Barry Keith Grant. Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell Pub., 2008.
Moffitt PN1995.9.A837.A98 2008

Yacowar, Maurice.
Hitchcock's British Films / by Maurice Yacowar. Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1977.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 H591
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3 H591

Yanal, Robert J.
Hitchcock as philosopher. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2005.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 Y36 2005; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0512/2005014055.html

Zimmerman, Jacqueline Noll
"Hitchcock, chaos, and the devils of unreason." In: People like ourselves : portrayals of mental illness in the movies / Jacqueline Noll Zimmerman. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2003. Studies in film genres ; no. 3
Main Stack PN1995.9.M463.Z56 2003

Zizek, Slavoj.
Looking Awry: An Introduction to Jacques Lacan through Popular Culture / Slavoj Zizek. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, c1991.
GRDS: BF175.4.C84 Z59 1991; Non-circulating; may be used only in Graduate Services.
MAIN: BF175.4.C84 Z59 1991

Journal Articles

Abrash, Merritt.
"Hitchcock's Terrorists: Sources and Significance." Literature Film Quarterly, 2011, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p165-173, 9p
The article deals with various films directed by Alfred Hitchcock who is known to inject episodes of terror into his films almost akin to that of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack of the World Trade Center. It mentions that Hitchcock's intention was to generate suspense rather than to explore the character's motivation. It observes the absence of motivation or basis for negotiation only as a driving determination to kill or eliminate people as evidenced by the September 11 attack.

"Alfred Hitchcock, director." Newsweek v. 47 (June 11 1956) p. 105-8

"All About Melodrama." Cahiers du Cinéma, no537 (July/Aug. 1999) p. 20-4
Part of a special section on filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. The text of Hitchcock's lecture on the theme of melodrama in motion pictures, which was delivered at Radio City Music Hall in New York on March 30, 1939, is reproduced. Apart from melodrama, the director also discusses a number of topics, including the distinction between action and dialog, the development of a plot, and objective and subjective suspense,

Allen, Richard.
"Hitchcock, or the pleasures of metaskepticism." October no89 (Summer 1999) p. 69-86
"Alfred Hitchcock bestows an admixture of romance and irony upon what the audience perceives in his films. This double aspect could be termed "metaskepticism," as it evokes the sense that Hitchcock affirms the reality of appearances and the romance narrative that appearances serve to sustain, and yet, at the same time, calls into question the reality of appearances and exposes the fictiveness of the romance narrative to undermine it. The metaskeptical nature of this narrative is fashioned in relationship to the figuration of a duplicitous masculinity within the romance narrative. The conventional gentlemanly exteriors of these figures conceal the darker allure of a predatory desire, and Hitchcock's visual style evokes this disguised presence. The basis of the metaskeptical text lies not simply in male anxiety over sexual desire, but in the anxiety of the male author who places himself on display through the text." [Art Index]

Allen, Richard.
"Hitchcock and Cavell." The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism v. 64 no. 1 (Winter 2006) p. 43-53
"Part of a special issue on philosophy and film. The writer considers the validity of Stanley Cavell's view that film has an intrinsic relationship to philosophical skepticism. He provides a synthetic overview of central themes in Cavell's own philosophy, and he then turns to the films of Alfred Hitchcock to test Cavell's claim. He suggests that Hitchcock's films do not embody the philosophical skepticism so central to Cavell, so that one can question the validity of Cavell's understanding of film as an embodiment of this specific philosophical trope." [Art Index]

Allen, T.
"Hitchcock's half-century grin." America v. 134 (April 3 1976) p. 290-1

Almansi, Renato J. Alfred
"Hitchcock's disappearing women: A study in scopophilia and object loss." International Review of Psycho-Analysis.1992 Spr. 19 (1): p. 81-90
"A psychoanalytic investigation of A. Hitchcock's Rear Window shows that this film is essentially grounded in the coalescence of 2 psychic mechanisms: an intense fear of object loss that echoes throughout the film and a sadistically interpreted primal scene. It is suggested that this fusion may have been enhanced by the existence of a psychological link between these mechanisms in the fact that primal scene exposure may activate separation anxiety. The genetic connection between fear of object loss and the development of scopophilic tendencies is discussed, and literature on the topic is presented. The origins and operation of these mechanisms are examined in Hitchcock's films, in his character structure, and in his life history." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved) [Long Display]

Alleva, Richard.
"The Catholic Hitchcock." (cover story) Commonweal, 7/16/2010, Vol. 137 Issue 13, p14-19, 6p
The article features film director Alfred Joseph Hitchcock. He was born on August 13, 1899 in Leytonstone, England and was enrolled in a Jesuit school, St. Ignatius College where he stayed until he was fourteen years old. His Catholic upbringing prevailed through his lifetime in both England and the U.S. as he regularly attended Mass, had his wife converted to Catholicism and brought up his daughter as a Catholic. It narrates his films "Shadow of a Doubt," Strangers on a Train," and "I Confess" that reflected his concerns and his values as a Catholic.

Ansen, D.
"Minister of fear." [Obituary] Newsweek v. 95 (May 12 1980) p. 87-8

Bade, James N.
"Murnau's The last laugh and Hitchcock's subjective camera." (Critical essay). Quarterly Review of Film and Video 23.3 (July-Sept 2006): p257(10).
UC users only
"Alfred Hitchcock, the assistant director of an Anglo-German co-production, The Blackguard, was greatly attracted to the work of the greatest German film director, Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, as he learnt more about the subjective shot from Murnau who was making his masterpiece of silent cinema, The Last Laugh at the UFA studios in Neubabelsberg in the adjoining set. The influence of Murnau on Hitchcock's work has been noticed in the films and is regarded as one of the best exponents of subjective camera." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bannon, Barbara M.
"Double, Double, Toil and Trouble." (treatment of the double) Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 13 no. 1. 1985. pp: 56-65.
UC users only

Barbarow, George
"Hitchcockery." Hudson Review 4:4 (1952:Winter) p.603
UC users only

Barr, Charles
"Deserter or Honored Exile?: Views of Hitchcock from Wartime Britain." Hitchcock Annual 13 (2004-2005) p. 1-24
UC users only

Barr, Charles
"Hitchcock and Powell: Two Directions for British Cinema." Screen, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 5-13, Spring 2005.
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"Part of a special issue marking the centenary of the birth of British film director Michael Powell. The writer discusses the careers of Powell and Alfred Hitchcock and their significance in the development of British cinema. He outlines parallels between the directors' careers and discusses evidence for the points at which their paths crossed. Examining the parallels between the films they made, he argues that their careers represent two directions for British cinema: the choice to go to Hollywood (Hitchcock) or turn back to Britain (Powell). He contends that both succeeded, nevertheless, to avoid producing a nebulous kind of international product, creating instead a sharper and more dynamic form of British cinema." [Art Index]

Bayley, Sally.
"'Is it for this you widen your eye rings?' Looking, Overlooking and Cold War Paranoia: the art of the voyeur in the poetry of Sylvia Plath and the films of Alfred Hitchcock." Women's History Review, Sep2009, Vol. 18 Issue 4, p547-558, 12p
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Beckman, Karen
"Violent vanishings: Hitchcock, Harlan, and the disappearing woman." Camera Obscura no39 Sept 1996. p. 78-103 UC users only
"The writer analyzes the plot of the vanishing woman in the 1938 mystery/melodrama films The Lady Vanishes by Alfred Hitchcock and Verwehte Spuren (The Footprints Blown Away) by National Socialist director Veit Harlan. Both movies feature a middle-aged woman who mysteriously disappears--a spinster in Hitchcock's film and a mother in Harlan's. They also rely heavily upon the romance plot, which demands that this woman be obliterated to enable the progression of romantic love. Hitchcock repeatedly draws the viewer's attention to the complicity between cinematic and magic romance, disrupts the illusion of continuity, and refuses to allow the viewer a passive role. By contrast, Harlan supports the National Socialist idea that the State can annihilate its unwanted others by fully exploiting the complicity between the romance plot and cinematic illusions of continuity." [Art Index]

Belton, John
"Can Hitchcock Be Saved from Hitchcock Studies?" Cineaste - America's Leading Magazine on the Art and Politics of the Cinema 28:4 [Fall 2003] p. 16-21
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"Ten books that center on the work of Alfred Hitchcock and his collaborators are reviewed. The author discusses whether Hitchcock studies has devolved into another example of "cultural commodification, instrumentalization, and reification." Authors of books reviewed include Charles Barr, Raymond Bellour, Herbert Coleman, Peter Conrad, Stephen DeRosa, Raymond Durgnat, Jeff Kraft and Aaron Leventhal, Thomas Leitch, Tony Lee Moral, and Robin Wood." [Internationa Index to the Performing Arts]

Belton, John
"Charles Bennett and the Typical Hitchcock Scenario." Film History, Vol. 9, No. 3, Screenwriters and Screenwriting (1997), pp. 320-332
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Belton, John
"Dexterity In A Void: The Formalist Esthetics Of Alfred Hitchcock." Cineaste 10:3 (1980:Summer) 9

Bitsch, C.
"Alfred Hitchcock entre trois films." Cahiers du cinéma 16:92 (1959:f?vr.) p.24

Bitsch, C.; Truffaut, F.
"Rencontre avec Alfred Hitchcock." Cahiers du cinéma 11:62 (1956:ao?t/sept.) p.1

Bogdanovich, Peter.
"Hitchcocok par Hitchcock: entretien avec Peter Bogdanovich." Cahiers du Cinéma no537 July/Aug 1999. p. 32-5
"Part of a special section on filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. On the occasion of the centennial of the birth of Hitchcock, extracts from an interview conducted by Peter Bogdanovich in 1963 are presented. The director gives his opinions on a number of his films, including The Lodger and Psycho, and declares The Thirty-Nine Steps to be one of his favorite films."[Art Index]

Bogdanovich, Peter.
"Is That Ticking (pause) A Bomb?" New York Times, sec2 (Sun, April 11, 1999):AR15(N), AR15(L), col 2, 50 col in.

Braudy, Leo
"Hitchcock, Truffaut, and the irresponsible audience." Film Quarterly v 21 no4 Summer 1968. p. 21-7
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Brent, Jessica.
"Beyond the gaze: visual fascination and the feminine image in silent Hitchcock." Camera Obscura, May 2004 i55 p77(36)
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"Are not the traits which I indicated (the make-up, the whiteness, the wig, etc.) just like the blunting of a meaning too clear, too violent? Do they not give the obvious signified a kind of difficulty prehensible roundness, cause my reading to slip? An obtuse angle is greater than a right angle ...; the third meaning also seems to me greater than the pure, upright, secant, legal perpendicular of the narrative, it seems to open up the field of meaning totally, that is infinitely." [Expanded Academic Index]

Brody, Alan
"The Gift of Realism: Hitchcock and Pinter." Journal of Modern Literature 3:2 (1973:Apr.) p.149-172-172
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Brown, Royal S.
"Herrmann, Hitchcock, and the music of the irrational." Cinema Journal v 21 no2 Spring 1982. p. 14-49
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"The extremely fruitful collaboration between director Alfred Hitchcock and composer Bernard Herrmann allowed for the evolution of a cine-musical style that seems in many ways to be the only one possible for a director primarily concerned with the eruptions of the irrational within the context of a solidly established ethos." [Periodicals Contents Index]

Burlingame, John
"Scoring Hitchcock." Grand Street, No. 49, Hollywood (Summer, 1994), pp. 234-235
UC users only

Buscombe, Edward
"Dickens and Hitchcock." Screen 1970 11: 97-114 UC users only

Calendo, John
"Alfred Hitchcock at the Drag Ball: When Being Blonde and Soulless Is Not Enough." Bright Lights Film Journal, November 2008 | Issue 62

Caminer, Sylvia; Gallagher, John Andrew.
"An Interview with Joseph Stefano." Films in Review v47, n1-2 (Jan-Feb, 1996):27 (9 pages).

Camp, Jocelyn.
"John Buchan and Alfred Hitchcock." Literature/Film Quarterly 6:3 (1978:Summer) 230
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Carreras-Kuntz, Maria Elena de las.
"The Catholic Vision In Hollywood: Ford, Capra, Borzage and Hitchcock.' Film History [Australia] 2002 14(2): 121-135.
"Analyzes the influence of the Catholic faith on thefilms of directors John Ford, Frank Capra, FrankBorzage, and Alfred Hitchcock. The themes ofcommunion, mediation, and sacramentality recurin their films, as do moral epiphanies, originalsin, redemption, and gospel parables." [America History and Life]

Carson, Diane.
"The Nightmare World of Hitchcock's Women." Michigan Academician, vol. 18 no. 3. 1986 Summer. pp: 349-356.

Casetti, Francesco.
"Antonioni and Hitchcock: Two Strategies of Narrative Investment." Sub-Stance: A Review of Theory and Literary Criticism, vol. 15 no. 3 (51). 1986. pp: 69-86.

Castle, Robert
The Mothering of Evil In Several Hitchcock Films." Bright Lights Films Journal, May 2007 | Issue 56

Cavallero, Jonathan J.
"Hitchcock and Race: Is the Wrong Man a White Man?" Journal of Film and Video Volume 62, Number 4, Winter 2010 pp. 3-14
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Charles, Alec.
"Alfred Hitchcock and the monstrous gaze." Proceedings of the Institute for European Studies at International University Audentes, Tallinn University of Technology; No. 5 (2009), Jan2009, Issue 5, p180-196, 17p
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Chumo, Peter N., II.
"'The Crying Game,' Hitchcockian Romance, and the Quest for Identity." Literature-Film Quarterly v23, n4 (Oct, 1995):247 (7 pages).
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Cohen, Tom.
"Hitchcock and the Death of (Mr.) Memory." Qui Parle: Literature, Philosophy, Visual Arts, History, vol. 6 no. 2. 1993 Spring-Summer. pp: 41-74.

Cohen, Tom.
"Beyond 'The Gaze': Zizek, Hitchcock, and the American Sublime." AMLH vol. 7 no. 2. 1995 Summer. pp: 350-78.
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Cohen, Tom
"Hitchcock's Modernism." Critical Quarterly, May2010 Supplement, Vol. 52, p123-139, 17p
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Cohen, Tom.
"Zarathustran Bird Wars: Hitchcock's "Nietzsche" and the Teletechnic Loop." Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media & Culture, Winter/Spring2009, Vol. 31 Issue 1/2, p140-160, 21p
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Combs, R.
"Hitch in 3D: looking at an old master with polaroid glasses."Sight and Sound v 50 no2 Spring 1981. p. 82

Corber, Robert J.
"Reconstructing Homosexuality: Hitchcock and the Homoerotics of Spectatorial Pleasure." Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture, vol. 13 no. 2. 1991 Spring-Summer. pp: 58-82.

Dassanowsky, Robert von.
"A Caper of One's Own: Fantasy Female Liberation in 1960s Crime Comedy Film." Journal of Popular Film & Television 35:3 (Fall 2007) p. 107-118
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Davidson, James A.
"Some Thoughts on Alfred Hitchcock and Vladimir Nabokov." Images #3

de Mijolla-Mellor, Sophie.
"Hitchcock, the terror of fiction."Topique: Revue Freudienne. L' Esprit du Temps 1994. 24 (53): p. 231-251
Suggests that motion picture director Alfred Hitchcock based is creation of images on the primal experience of vertigo, which was the source of the power they exerted on the viewer. The metaphysical idea (the result of an authentic childhood incident) is communicated through a silent accumulation of effects and transmitted through the film characters. The themes of incommunicability and false guilt reflect the vertigo of being neither attached nor heard anywhere. Hitchcock's solution consists of mobilizing the residues of infantile sexual theories where the primal scene appears as murder, and organizing them into a scenario that allows the viewer to share an illusory world where terror can be a source of pleasure."(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved)

"Directors on Hitchcock." Sight and Sound ns9 no8 Aug 1999 supp. p. 20-36
A selection of film directors comment on two questions regarding Hitchcock: what they believe is Hitchcock's most definitive scene or moment and what the importance of Hitchcock is to them personally. Among the directors who respond are Woody Allen, Theo Angelopoulos, Atom Egoyan, Martin Scorsese, and John Waters.

Dick, Bernard F.
"Hitchcock's terrible mothers." (filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock's portrayal of women)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n4 (Oct, 2000):238 (12 pages).
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This article examines the mother-child relationships in the films by Alfred Hitchcock, focusing on 'Psycho' and 'The Birds.' Topics addressed include matricide, as well as the psychological and sexual dynamics of mother-child relationships.

"Directors on Hitchcock."
Sight and Sound ns9 no8 Aug 1999 supp. p. 20-36
A selection of film directors comment on two questions regarding Hitchcock: what they believe is Hitchcock's most definitive scene or moment and what the importance of Hitchcock is to them personally. Among the directors who respond are Woody Allen, Theo Angelopoulos, Atom Egoyan, Martin Scorsese, and John Waters.

Doherty, Thomas.
"We are all Hitchcock's children." (Alfred Hitchcock) Chronicle of Higher Education v45, n48 (August 6, 1999):B6 (2 pages).
Contemporary filmmakers and audiences have been greatly influenced by the films of Alfred Hitchcock, which were once thought to be unworthy of critical scholarship. Hitchcock took the art of suspense and cinematography to new heights through his fluid camera work, unnerving jump cuts, and voyeuristic scenes. Hitchcock's wide appeal is evident in his popular culture status and the amount of scholarship his work has generated.

Durgnat, Ray
"The business of fear." Sight and Sound ns9 no8 Aug 1999 supp. p. 2-11
"A survey of Alfred Hitchcock's early thrillers. His "Big Six" thrillers--The Man Who Knew Too Much, The 39 Steps, Secret Agent, Sabotage, The Lady Vanishes, and Young and Innocent--were all made during his English period and are all socially mobile. These thrillers display little faith in English justice, leaving several killings unsolved, and often making a wrongly suspected hero become a fox on the run. Theorists have described Hitchcock's philosophy as rigorously moralist, healthily humanist, ignominiously neurotic, misogynistic, and male-voyeuristic. Some of these views may be obviously hypochondrial, but they do contain some insights." [Art Index]

Domarchi, Jean; Douchet, Jean
"Entretien avec Alfred Hitchcock." Cahiers du cinéma 17:102 (1959:d?c.) p.17

Due, Reidar.
"Hitchcock's Innocence Plot." Film Studies, Summer2004, Vol. 4 Issue 0, p48-57, 57p
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During a twenty-five year period, spanning the Second World War and his move from England to America, Hitchcock showed a particular preference for plots involving an unjustified accusation against the film's central character. The 39 Steps (1935), Young and Innocent (1937), Saboteur (1942), Strangers on a Train (1951), I Confess (1953), The Wrong Man (1956) and North by Northwest (1959) are all variations on the same pattern with different thematic emphases. This article discusses the narrative logic and moral content of this 'innocence plot', running through Hitchcock's films from the mid-thirties to the late fifties. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Durgnat, Ray; Gross, Larry.
"Hitchcock." (film director Alfred Hitchcock) Sight and Sound v9, n8 (August, 1999):1H (4 pages).
A filmography of the entire works of Alfred Hitchcock is included in a supplement dedicated to the film director on the centenary of his birth. Hitchcock's career began in 1925 with 'The Pleasure Garden', and his last film was 'Family Plot', which was released in 1976. Contemporary film directors comment on what they consider to be Hitchcock's most definitive

Durgnat, Raymond.
"If the ''Punishment'' Fits (Defense of Alfred Hitchcock) Film Comment, Jan-Feb V33; N1; 1997; 87

Durgnat, Raymond.
"To Catch a 'Hitch': The Murderous Gaze." Quarterly Review of Film Studies, vol. 8 no. 1. 1983 Winter. pp: 43-48.

Dynia, Philip A.
"Alfred Hitchcock and the Ghost of Thomas Hobbes." Cinema Journal 15:2 (1976:Spring) 27
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Eaton, Michael.
"Drella and the MacGuffin Alfred Hitchcock meets Andy Warhol and both get out of the encounter alive - just." Senses of Cinema Issue No. 6, May 2000

Edelman, Lee.
"Piss Elegant: Freud, Hitchcock, and the Micturating Penis." GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol. 2 no. 1-2. 1995. pp: 149-77.

Everson, W. K.
"Rediscovery; Easy virtue."Films in Review v 26 May 1975. p. 293-6

Fawell, John.
"Fashion dreams: Hitchcock, women, and Lisa Fremont." Literature/Film Quarterly (28:4) 2000, 274-83. (2000)
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Fell, J.L.
"Structuring Charts and Patterns in Film." Quarterly Review of Film Studie III/3, Summer 78; p.371-388.
Surveys diagrams of narrative structure by Mark Sandrich in "Follow the fleet", by King Vidor in "The Citadel" and "War and Peace", by Thomas Wright in "Family Plot" and others by scholars.

Ferrara, Patricia.
"The Discontented Bourgeois: Bourgeois Morality and the Interplay of Light and Dark Strains in Hitchcock's Films." New Orleans Review, vol. 14 no. 4. 1987 Winter. pp: 79-87

"Filmography: Hitchcock's feature films."
Sight & Sound, ns9 no8 (Aug. 1999 supp) p. 12-19
An annotated chronological filmography of Alfred Hitchcock's feature films from 1925 to 1976 is provided.

Fisher, Jean
"Chasing dreams: Victor Hitchcock and Alfred Burgin." Artforum International v 22 May 1984. p. 39-43

French, Philip
"Alfred Hitchcock: the film-maker as Englishman and exile" Sight and Sound v 54 Spring 1985. p. 116-22
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French, Philip
"Alfred Hitchcock: the film-maker as Englishman and exile." Sight and Sound v 54 Spring 1985. p. 116-22

Friedman, S. P.
"The Wrong Man." (Alfred Hitchcock, Relation To Robert Benton, 'Still Of The Night') Film Comment, Nov-Dec V31; N6; 1995; 86

Gallagher, Tag.
"Hitchcock, Machines, and Us." Senses of Cinema: an Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious & Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 24:(no pagination). 2003 Jan-Feb

Garncarz, Joseph
"German Hitchcock." Hitchcock Annual [2000-2001] 73-99
"Explains that in 1924, Hitchcock worked as the screenwriter and set-designer of "The Blackguard" ("Die Prinzessin und der Geiger," translated as "The Princess and the Violinist") for Ufa in Berlin, and in 1925-1926 he directed his first two films, "The Pleasure Garden" ("Irrgarten der Leidenschaft," translated as "The Labyrinth of Passion") and "The Mountain Eagle" ("Der Bergadler"), for Emelka in Munich. Attempts to reconstruct Hitchcock's career during this time period. Takes a look at which companies were involved in these productions, what the production conditions were like, which type of film was to be produced, and what kind of role Hitchcock was to play. Addresses the question as to whether Hitchcock lived up to expectations or did things his own way. Touches upon the subject of the critical and commercial success of Hitchcock's films in Germany. Examines the significance of Hitchcock's experience in Germany for his later career." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Garrett, Greg.
"Alfred Hitchcock and the Deviant Audience." New Orleans Review, vol. 18 no. 4. 1991 Winter. pp: 29-32.

Garrett, Greg.
"Hitchcock's Women on Hitchcock: A Panel Discussion with Janet Leigh, Tippi Hedren, Karen Black, Suzanne Pleshette, and Eva Marie Saint." Literature Film Quarterly, 1999, Vol. 27 Issue 2, p78, 12p
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Garrett, Greg.
"The Men Who Knew Too Much: The Unmade Films of Hitchcock and Lehman." North Dakota Quarterly, vol. 61 no. 2. 1993 Spring. pp: 47-57.
The 1957-79 professional collaboration between director Alfred Hitchcock and Hollywood screenwriter Ernest Lehman produced the films North by Northwest (1959) and Family Plot (1976), but the two also worked on three film ideas they failed to make: The Wreck of the Mary Deare (1957), Blind Man (1960-61), and The Short Night (1978-79).

Gilliatt, P.
"Current cinema [A. Hitchock]." The New Yorker v. 47 (September 11 1971) p. 91-4

Gliatto, Tom.
"Wicked, Wicked Hitch: Alfred Hitchcock took a genius's diabolical pleasure in making movie audiences shriek." (Out Of The Past) People Weekly v52, n11 (Sept 20, 1999):252+.

Golden, Cameron
"From punishment to possibility: re-imagining Hitchcockian paradigms in The New York Trilogy." (Critical Essay). Mosaic (Winnipeg) 37.3 (Sept 2004): p93(16). (7608 words)
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This essay examines intertextual links between Paul Auster, a fiction writer with a filmmaker's sensibility, and Alfred Hitchcock, suggesting that Auster has re-narrated Hitchcock's work to allow his detectives the postmodern (and American) possibility of reinvention.

Gottlieb, Sidney
"Early Hitchcock: The German Influence."Hitchcock Annual [1999-2000] 100-130
"Discusses the stylistic, thematic, and generic aspects of the German influence on Alfred Hitchcock. Explores the relationship between Hitchcock and several key German directors. Examines how Hitchcock's "idea of cinema"--his vision of the ideal production system, the role of the director, the definition of film as art and entertainment--was deeply influenced by the German model. States the German influence on Hitchcock was arguably the most significant, noting it involves not only a debt to a few great filmmakers, and a few important films, but also an immersion in a broad-based production environment, culture, and aesthetic of cinema." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

"Great relationships." American Cinematographer v 79 no11 Nov 1998. p. 68-81
"A special section on notable filmmaking partnerships. The following collaborative relationships have produced outstanding work and inspired others to examine and foster their own creative partnerships: director D. W. Griffith and cinematographer G. W. "Billy" Bitzer; director Frank Capra and cinematographer Joseph Walker; director Alfred Hitchcock and cinematographer Robert Burks; cinematographer Sven Nykvist and director Ingmar Bergman; director Clint Eastwood and cinematographers Jack Green and Bruce Surtees; and cinematographer Robert Richardson and director Oliver Stone." [Art Index]

Greig, Donald.
"The Sexual Differentiation of the Hitchcock Text" Screen, v. 28 (Winter '87) p. 28-46.

Gross, Larry
"Parallel lines: Hitchcock the screenwriter." Sight & Sound, ns9 no8 (Aug. 1999 supp) p. 38-44
"Although one aspect of Alfred Hitchcock's rhetoric drastically privileged the image over the word, he also insisted that it was during the screenwriting that his most serious work was done. He defined the screenwriting process as the space where all fundamental directorial decisions have already been made; he did not think of "writing" apart from the work he planned for the camera to do. Screenwriting meant not only creating the imagery that would be the bone-structure of the story but also forming a total system where the literary and visual elements of the movie would be designed in a dynamic interaction." [Art Index]

Gunning, Tom.
"Hitchcock and the Picture in the Frame." New England Review. 2007. Vol. 28, Iss. 3; pg. 14, 19 pgs
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"Gunning traces the interrelation between paintings, their frames, and the frame of Alfred Hitchcock's camera. He looks at precisely the way the formal aspects of painting, the differentiation between the space of representation and the space of the world of the observer, are both kept apart and interrelated. Paintings in Hitchcock rarely play a merely decorative role. Instead, through their dynamic relation to the act of framing, they project an influence into the world of the character as conduits of guilt and desire." [ProQuest]

Gustainis, J. Justin; DeSilva, Deborah Jay.
"Archetypes as propaganda in Alfred Hitchcock's 'lost' World War II films."
Film & History (27:1-4) 1997, 80-7.
UC users only
"Elaborates on the lesser-known wartime film contributions made by director Alfred Hitchcock. Explains Hitchcock's involvement in the making of short narrative films, produced by the British Ministry of Information, designed to glorify the French Resistance movement during World War II. States that given a British film crew, and with a group of French actors-in-exile called the Moliere Players, Hitchcock produced "Bon Voyage" (1941), and "Aventure Malgache" (1941)." [IIPA]

Hall, Kenneth E.
"Cabrera Infante and the Work of Alfred Hitchcock." World Literature Today: A Literary Quarterly of the University of Oklahoma, vol. 61 no. 4. 1987 Autumn. pp: 598-600.
UC users only

Handlin, O.
"Fear and laughter." The Atlantic v. 221 (January 1968) p. 116+

Havemann, Ernest.
"We Present Alfred Hitchcock." Theatre Arts 40:9 (1956:Sep) 27

Hawkins, Joan:
""See It from the Beginning": Hitchcock's Reconstruction of Film History."Hitchcock Annual [1999-2000] 13-29
"Examines the changes which filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock introduced in film spectatorship with the release of his 1960 film "Psycho." States that Hitchcock demanded exhibitors enforce the policy that once the film had started, nobody would be admitted inside the theater. Informs that a special manager training film sought to ensure that theater managers would know how to maximize the audience anticipation which Hitchcock so carefully fostered. Considers the explicit reasons why "Psycho" seemed to demand such a unique spectator policy. Imparts that Hitchcock effectively engaged both art cinema and horror conventions, by forcing spectators to view "Psycho" from beginning to end." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Hemmeter, Thomas.
"Hitchcock's Melodramatic Silence." Journal of Film and Video v48, n1-2 (Spring-Summer, 1996):32 (9 pages).
UC users only
Application of silence by film director Alfred Hitchcock in his works is dualistic in nature. It reveals a kind of truth, and at the same time calls the truth into question. Hitchcock relies more on visual signs and images, than verbal language, to give melodramatic touches to his films. He preferred the pure films of the silent era. The silence in Hitchcock's films are not merely empty dialogues but actual silence or failure to respond verbally in horror or absurd scenes. His works reveal his distrust in conventional speech as a medium of communication.

Hemmeter, Thomas.
"Horror beyond the camera: cultural sources of violence in Hitchcock's mid-century America." Post Script, Wntr-Spring 2003 v22 i2 p7(13)
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Hesling, W.
"Classical Cinema and the Spectator." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 15 no. 3. 1987. pp: 181-189.
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Higham, Charles
"Hitchcock's world." Film Quarterly v 16 no2 Winter 1962/1963. p. 3-16
UC users only

Hitchcock, Alfred
"All about melodrama." Cahiers du Cinéma no537 July/Aug 1999. p. 20-4
"Part of a special section on filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. The text of Hitchcock's lecture on the theme of melodrama in motion pictures, which was delivered at Radio City Music Hall in New York on March 30, 1939, is reproduced. Apart from melodrama, the director also discusses a number of topics, including the distinction between action and dialog, the development of a plot, and objective and subjective suspense." [Art Index]

Hitchcock, Alfred
"Core of the movie, the chase." [interview]. The New York TimesMagazine (October 29 1950) p. 22-3+

Hitchcock, Alfred
"If it's Thursday, it must be Hitchcock." [interview at Chasen's restaurant, ed by S. Drake]. Holiday v. 57 (June 1976) p. 32-3+

Hitchcock, Alfred
"Mes souvenirs de l'ecran." Cahiers du Cinéma no537 July/Aug 1999. p. 26-8
"Part of a special section on filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Excerpts from Hitchcock's memoirs about his involvement in the direction and production of motion pictures are presented. These appeared in the English magazine Film Weekly in 1936. The text provides a rich account of Hitchcock's cinema through anecdotes about the making of films and his thoughts on directing actors and making film adaptations of books." [Art Index]

Hitchcock, Alfred
My Own Methods." Sight and Sound 6:22 (1937:Summer) 61
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Alfred Hitchcock writes about films he has made and films he would like to make.

"Hitchcock's women on Hitchcock: a panel discussion with Janet Leigh, Tippi Hedren, Karen Black, Suzanne Pleshette, and Eva Marie Saint." (Panel Discussion) Literature-Film Quarterly v27, n2 (April, 1999):78 (12 pages).
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A panel of 5 actresses who have worked with Alfred Hitchcock discuss the filmaker's personality and treatment of women in his films. They believe Hitchcock was not a misogynist, and their overall perception of his character is that of a brilliant, dedicated, and lively man.

Houston, Penelope
"Figure in the carpet." Sight and Sound v 32 no4 Autumn 1963. p. 158-64

Houston, Penelope
"Hitchcockery" Sight and Sound v 37 no4 Autumn 1968. p. 188-9
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Hunter, Evan.
"Me and Hitch." (Evan Hunter remembers Alfred Hitchcock) Sight and Sound v7, n6 (June, 1997):24 (14 pages).
"Ed McBain discusses his collaboration with Alfred Hitchcock on The Birds. McBain recounts his decision to make the film into a screwball comedy that gradually turns into stark terror. He provides an account of his experience on the set of the film and the changes that were made to its adaptation. He comments on his drafts for Hitchcock's next project, Marnie, and the events that led to his dismissal as Hitchcock's screenwriter." [Art Index]

Houston, Penelope
"Hitchcockery." Sight & Sound v. 37 no. 4 (Autumn 1968) p. 188-9

Hurley, Neil P.
"Inside the Hitchcock vision." America v. 134 (June 12 1976) p. 512-4

Hurley, Neil P.
"Neil Hurley on Sir Alfred Hitchcock." New Orleans Review 7:2 (1980:Summer) 190

Hurley, Neil P., S.J.
"Soul in Suspense: The Catholic/Jesuit Influences on Hitchcock." New Orleans Review, vol. 17 no. 4. 1990 Winter. pp: 44-52.

Hutchings, Peter J.
"Modernity: a film by Alfred Hitchcock." Senses of Cinema Issue No. 6, May 2000

"Interview with Alfred Hitchcock." INTERVIEW WITH ALFRED HITCHCOCK Monthly Film Bulletin 34:396/407 (1967) p.192
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Jacobs, Lewis.
"Film Directors at Work, I. Alfred Hitchcock; II. Frank Capra; III. Garson Kanin; IV. Fritz Lang." Theatre Arts 25 (1941) 40

Jacobs, Steven.
"Sightseeing fright: Alfred Hitchcock's monuments and museums." Journal of Architecture, Nov2006, Vol. 11 Issue 5, p593-601, 9p,
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Jhirad, Susan.
"Hitchcock's Women." Cineaste, vol. 13 no. 4. 1984. pp: 31-33.

Kane, Lawrence.
"The Shadow World of Alfred Hitchcock." Theatre Arts 33:4 (1949:May) 32

Kaplan, George
"The Hitchcock Dilemma: Lost in the Woods." Film Comment 8:4 (Nov./Dec. 1972) p. 46
UC users only

Kapsis, Robert E.
"Alfred Hitchcock: Auteur or Hack? How the Filmmaker Reshaped His Reputation among the Critics." Cineaste, vol. 14 no. 3. 1986. pp: 30-35.

Kapsis, Robert E.
"Hitchcock in the James Bond Era." Studies in Popular Culture, vol. 11 no. 1. 1988. pp: 64-79.

Kapsis, Robert E.
"Reputation Building and the Film Art World: The Case of Alfred Hitchock." Sociological Quarterly 1989 30(1): 15-35.
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"The change in Alfred Hitchcock's reputation from popular entertainer to distinguished auteur over the last 25 years is usually attributed to the efforts of some admiring European film figures. This article traces the reevaluation of Hitchcock's work beginning in the 1960's, but emphasizes, in addition to the role of sponsors, Hitchcock's own part in orchestrating the transformation. The author also examines other factors that might speed up, slow down, or undermine altogether the reputational process and explores the probable effects of Hitchcock's changing reputation on subsequent developments in the suspense thriller genre." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Kapsis, Robert E.
"Reputation Building and the Film Art World: The Case of Alfred Hitchcock." Sociological Quarterly v30, n1 (Spring, 1989):15 (21 pages).

Kehr, Dave
"Hitchcock is guilty (is Alfred Hitchcock an artist) Film Comment v 20 May/June 1984. p. 9-18
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Kehr, Dave
"Hitchcock's riddle." Film Comment v 20 May/June 1984. p. 9-18

Kelly, David.
"Oedipus at Los Angeles: Hitch and the Tragic Muse." Senses of Cinema: an Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious & Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 24:(no pagination). 2003 Jan-Feb

Kerbel, M.
"3-D or not 3-D." Film Comment v. 16 (November/December 1980) p. 11-20

Kersoncuf, Alain
"Alfred Hitchcock and The Fighting Generation." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema, vol. 49, pp. (no pagination), 2008
Hitchcock scholar Alain Kerzoncuf resurrects some insightful archival material regarding Hitchcock’s 1944 short war-effort propaganda film.

Kerzoncuf, Alain; Bokor, N.
"Alfred Hitchcock's Trailers." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema, vol. 35, pp. (no pagination), Spring 2005.

Kirshner, Jonathan.
"Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Research." PS: Political Science & Politics v29, n3 (Sept, 1996):511 (3 pages).
"Alfred Hitchcock's filmmaking techniques can be used to guide political scientists in making good research. In each of his films, Hitchcock focused on only a single concept which he expounded through clear communication. He also used only shots that would contribute to the story and promoted suspense and not surprise in his films. Similarly, political scientists should confine their research on a single topic, which they will expand in a clear and concise manner. They should avoid cluttering the study will unnecessary details and discuss their aim and hypotheses at the beginning of the study." [Expanded Academic Index]

Kerbel, Michael
"3-D or not 3-D." Film Comment v 16 Nov/Dec 1980. p. 11-20

Krohn, Bill
"Hitchcock-Dali, le rêve mutile." Cahiers du Cinéma no559 July/Aug 2001. p. 71

Landau, Idan
"Hierarchical structure in schematic representations: Aspects of meaning in the cinematic shot." Journal of Pragmatics. 1996 Dec. 26 (6): p. 737-766
The observation that the cinematic medium employs distinctive meaning-construction devices combined with the conviction that interpretation presupposes some preliminary cognitive processing, motivate attempts to explicate the former in terms of the latter. Focusing 1 device, the cinematic shot, this paper examines such an attempt against cinematic samples from the movies of Alfred Hitchcock. First, a hierarchical model of cinematic representation is developed, applying the basic level analysis of categorial organization, proposed by E. Rosch et al (1976), to the script model of stereotyped schematic representations, proposed by R. C. Schank and R. Abelson (1977). Second, a scrutiny of discourse-violations of the basic level in the cinematic exemplars is given a pragmatic account, shedding light on how these devices trigger meaning-construction in real-time viewing. A conclusion ensues, surveying some of the implications and consequences this study carries to both film criticism and cognitive theory. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

Lane, Anthony
"In love with fear." The New Yorker v 75 no23 Aug 16 1999. p. 80-6

Lang, Robert.
"Alfred Hitchcock's Rereleased Films, part one." (Conference report, Pace University, New York, June 13-15, 1986) Quarterly Review of Film and Video v11, n2 (August, 1989):91 (9 pages).

Lang, Robert.
"Alfred Hitchcock's Rereleased Films, part two. (Conference report, Pace University, New York, June 13-15, 1986) Quarterly Review of Film and Video v11, n2 (August, 1989):101 (7 pages).

Lauder, Robert E
"Alfred Hitchcock: a film maker of the conscience." America v 151 Aug 4/11 1984. p. 52-4

Lee, Sander H.
"Alfred Hitchcock: Misogynist or Feminist?" Post Script, vol. 10 no. 3. 1991 Summer. pp: 38-48.

Leff, Leonard J.
"Hitchcock and the Censors." World and I v14, n8 (August, 1999):108.
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Film director Alfred Hitchcock's skill at working around censorship issues is explored, along with the subtlety and mystery it lent to his works. Examples include scenes from 'Rebecca,' 'Rear Window,' 'Shadow of a Doubt,' and 'Psycho.'

Leitch, Thomas M.
"It's the Cold War, Stupid: An Obvious History of the Political Hitchcock." Literature-Film Quarterly v27, n1 (Jan, 1999):3 (13 pages).
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The director Alfred Hitchcock was thought to be apolitical, but his films, such as 'North by Northwest' and 'Marnie,' express structures of cold war logic. Hitchcock was under surveillance by the FBI for 3 months. Academics should not be telling students what everybody knows. They should be teaching things people do not already know.

Leitch, Thomas M.
"Narrative as a Way of Knowing: The Example of Alfred Hitchcock." The Centennial Review, vol. 30 no. 3. 1986 Summer. pp: 315-330.

Lewis, Michael.
"The Canonical Alfred Hitchcock." Academic Questions, Dec2010, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p458-468, 11p
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The article focuses on the work of English film director Alfred Hitchcock. It notes that Hitchcock was one of the founding fathers of the cinematic art who helped define its visual language of film together filmmakers Sergei Eisenstein and F. W. Murnau. It states that Hitchcock has sold his gift for the visual language of film cheaply to make the cinematic equivalent of penny dreadfuls. His films include "The Birds," "The Lodger," and "Rear Window."

Macnab, Geoffrey.
"Alfred Hitchcock: The Wartime Resistance Films." Sight & Sound, Feb2009, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p85-85,

Magny, Joel
"Encore un effort pour etre hitchcocko-hawksiens!" Cahiers du Cinéma no517 Oct 1997. p. 14
"The current interest in the cinema of Alfred Hitchcock is the symptom of an era when knowledge of the how has replaced that of the work itself. This knowledge, obtained through the confidences of the filmmaker himself, is the secret of production. However, while Hitchcock had savoir-faire and a style, the question of the philosophy of his films and his effect on the public should be left to the professional thinkers." [Art Index]

Macksey, Richard.
"Four Emigre Directors: Shadows of Careers." MLN, vol. 98 no. 5. 1983 Dec. pp: 1187-1196.
Ernst Lubitsch, Fritz Lang, Max Ophuls, Alfred Hitchcock.

Madsen, Axel
"Who's afraid of Alfred Hitchcock? an interview of sorts with Ernest Lehman." Sight and Sound v 37 no1 Winter 1967/1968. p. 26-7
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Manlove, Clifford T.
"Visual "Drive" and Cinematic Narrative: Reading Gaze Theory in Lacan, Hitchcock, and Mulvey." Cinema Journal v. 46 no. 3 (Spring 2007) p. 83-108
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This essay reconsiders the psychoanalytic theory derived from Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan that Laura Mulvey uses to support her theory of the gaze in the 1975 essay "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema." "Visual 'Drive' and Cinematic Narrative" also reconsiders and rereads the three Alfred Hitchcock films Mulvey uses to prove her theory of the patriarchal gaze: Vertigo, Rear Window, and Marnie. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

McBride, Joseph
"Hitchcock: a defense and an update." Film Comment v 15 May 1979. p. 69-70

McBride, Joseph
"Alfred Hitchcock's Mary Rose: An Old Master's Unheard Cri deCoeur." (project for film version of play by Sir James M. Barrie) Cineaste v26, n2 (Spring, 2001):24.
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"Mary Rose is the most intriguing unfilmed project of Alfred Hitchcock's career. Hitchcock's dream project for over half a century, Mary Rose was intended to be a darker version of Sir James M. Barrie's whimsically haunting 1920 play about an enchanted island that acts as "a safe place" for lost children. Hitchcock worked on the adaptation with Jay Presson Allen, who produced two drafts of the script. Mary Rose would have taken Hitchcock's characteristic mingling of eroticism and death into dimensions beyond any he had explored in his films, but, ultimately, it proved too troubling for Universal Pictures, which would not permit him to make it. However, the director did manage to sneak some elements of Mary Rose into the opening scene of Family Plot, his final film." [Art Abstracts]

McGilligan, Patrick.
"Alfred Hitchcock: before the flickers" (includes early magazine stories from the Henley Telegraph) Film Comment v35, n4 (July, 1999):22.
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"In an excerpt from the forthcoming Darkness and Light: A Biography of Alfred Hitchcock, the writer discusses the director's early career at W. T. Henley's Telegraph Works in London, England. Henley's was a leader in the field of telegraph and electrical cables, and, after joining the firm in 1914, Hitchcock spent three years developing his draftsmanship and mechanical abilities in its Sales Section. His increasing interest in art led to his transfer to the advertising department in late 1917 or early 1918. While there, he was instrumental in establishing a company periodical called The Henley Telegraph, in which he published his first short stories. Hitchcock remained in the department until he left to work for the Famous Players Lasky film studio in 1921. Several of Hitchcock's short stories that were published in the company periodical are presented." [Art Index]

McNeill, David.
"Cohesion and Gesture." Discourse Processes: A Multidisciplinary Journal, vol. 16 no. 4. 1993 Oct-Dec. pp: 363-86.

Meola, Frank M.
"Hitchcock's Emersonian Edges." Hitchcock Annual [2000-2001] 23-46
"Examines some of Alfred Hitchcock's signature films of the American period in terms of the way they consider enduring American cultural and spiritual tendencies that were first and most powerfully articulated in the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Millar, Gavin
"Hitchcock versus Truffaut." Sight and Sound v 38 no2 Spring 1969. p. 82-7
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Miller, Ann.
"Goddam!?! Blake and Mortimer Meet Hitchcock." French Studies Bulletin: A Quarterly Supplement vol. 67. 1998 Summer. pp: 1-4.

Miller, D. A.
"Hitchcock's Hidden Pictures." Critical Inquiry, Autumn2010, Vol. 37 Issue 1, p106-130, 25p,
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An essay is presented on the appearance of film director Alfred Hitchcock in his film "Strangers on a Train." The author says that the familiarity of the people in the theater with Hitchcock's identity is not shared by anyone on screen. He contends that Hitchcock is never a character who bears another name or anonymously exercises the narrative function. Further, he stresses that the appearance of Hitchcock in the film dramatizes his invisibility to their world.

Miller, M.C.
"In memoriam--A.H. (1899-1980)." The New Republic v. 183 (July 261980) p. 27-31

Minissale, Gregory
"Beyond Internalism and Externalism: Husserl and Sartre’s Image Consciousness in Hitchcock and Buñuel." Film-Philosophy Journal, Vol 14, No 1 (2010)

Montagu, Ivor
"Working with Hitchcock." Sight and Sound v 49 no3 Summer 1980. p. 186-93
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A personal reminiscence by Ivor Montagu who was associate producer on "The Man Who Knew Too Much, The Thirty Nine Steps, Secret Agent" and "Sabotage"

Morris, Christopher D.
"The Allegory of Seeing in Hitchcock's Silent Films." (Alfred Hitchcock) Film Criticism v22, n2 (Winter, 1997):27 (22 pages).
UC users only
"The writer interprets the silent films of Alfred Hitchcock as an allegory of the viewing process as inevitable error. Arguing that these films imply that humanity has the permanent delusion of believing that the visible world is real, he discusses the two ways in which they dramatize this human delusion, thus forming Hitchcock's allegory of seeing: Firstly, through the depiction of the world as "postal," in Derrida's sense of a network of signifiers that precede the human and ensure that the meaning of its messages never coincides with the intention of the sender or interpretation of the recipient; and secondly, through the misapprehensions of visual signs by viewers and characters. He then summarizes the contribution of deconstruction to the present debate in film theory, which places belief in the existence of a subjectivity determined to a large extent by a cultural environment that includes film on one side and, on the other, belief in a rational biological subject whose responses to film are to a large extent independent of culture." [Art Index]

Morrisson, Ian
"The Art of Murder." Images
"Before the "shower scene" in Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock had directed only three other sustained murder sequences. The vast majority of murders in Hitchcock's movies occur either off-screen, or they are as brief as the flash of a gun. The three prolonged sequences prior to Psycho include the stabbing of Crewe in Blackmail, the stabbing of Swann in Dial M for Murder, and the strangling of Miriam in Strangers on a Train."

Naremore, James
"Hitchcock and Humor." Strategies: Journal of Theory, Culture & Politics; May2001, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p13-25, 13p
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Discusses British director Alfred Hitchcock's technique of mixing suspense and humor in his films. Generic screwball comedic tendencies of his films; Suspenseful melodrama's transformation into a comical satire; Ironic laughter device; Identification with black humor through the television show 'Alfred Hitchcock Presents' and the film 'Psycho.'

Ness, Richard R.
"Hitchcock, Bergman, and the Divided Self." Hitchcock Annual 2002-2003. pgs. 181-203

Ngai, Sianne.
"Moody Subjects/Projectile Objects: Anxiety and Intellectual Displacement in Hitchcock,Heidegger, and Melville." Qui Parle: Literature, Philosophy, Visual Arts, History. 12(2):15-55. 2001

Nochimson, Martha P.
"Amnesia 'R' Us: The Retold Melodrama, Soap Opera, and the Representation of Reality." Film Quarterly vol. 50 no. 3. 1997 Spring. pp: 27-38.
UC users only
Compares the treatment of the 'amnesia' storyline in film melodrama and tv soap opera (respectively, "Vertigo" and 'One life to live'), showing how tricks are played with the viewer's expectations of 'reality'.

Oppermann, Michael
"Alfred Hitchcock - A Silent Vision." Journal of American Studies of Turkey 1 (1995): 49-52.

Orr, John
"The Death of Classical Cinema: Hitchcock, Lang, Minnelli." Screen, Autumn 2007; 48: 401 - 404.

Peary, Gerald.
"At home with Hitchcock." (Alfred Hitchcock) Washington Post v107 (Sun, Oct 7, 1984):L8, col 2, 48 col in.

Pechter, W.S.
"Hitchcock in retrospect." Commentary v. 62 (November 1976) p. 75-8

Peele, Stanton.
"Personality, Pathology, and the Act of Creation: The Case of Alfred Hitchcock." Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, vol. 9 no. 3. 1986 Summer. pp: 202-218.
"Recent biographies of Alfred Hitchcock-especially Spoto's (1983)-have emphasized the deterministic role of Hitchcock's emotional problems in his art. Such analyses of Hitchcock's personality and creativity touch on classic issues of the relationship between art and artist. However, any reduction of artistic themes like those in Hitchcock's films into terms of personal psychopathology is inadequate for apprehending artistic creation." [Periodicals Contents Index]

Perry, Dennis R.
"Bibliography of Scholarship Linking Alfred Hitchcock and Edgar Allan Poe." Hitchcock Annual 2000-2001, 163-73.
"Explains that based on the growing number of scholarly connections made between Edgar Allen Poe and Alfred Hitchcock, Poe is fast becoming recognized as perhaps the major single literary influence on Hitchcock's American films. Presents a bibliography of scholarship that links Hitchcock and Poe." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Perry, George
"Hitchcock on Location." American Heritage; Apr/May2007, Vol. 58 Issue 2, p37-41, 5p
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The article presents information on films made by Alfred Hitchcock, a film producer and director. According to the author, Hitchcock can be considered to be a courteous person as he used the word "please," while giving any command to actors while shooting. An overview is presented of the shooting locations of Hitchcock's films such as "Rebecca," "Shadow of a Doubt," and "The Birds."

Perilli, P.
"Alfred Hitchcock: A rear window on the Ego." L'Architettura v. 47 (February/March 2001) p. 153-60
"The work of Alfred Hitchcock is discussed. The writer highlights the finely tuned expressive method and aesthetic vision of this legendary filmmaker, for whom action comes first, closely followed by technique. He discusses the actors, actresses, dialogues, and settings of a number of Hitchcock's movies, including Rear Window, North By Northwest, and The Man Who Knew Too Much." [Art Index]

Phillips, Gene D.
"Hitchcock's Forgotten Films: The Twenty Teleplays." Journal of Popular Film and Television 1982 10(2): 73-76.
Alfred Hitchcock consistently directed television films from 1955-62 that paralleled the situations and themes found in his movies.

Pomerance, M.
"Hitchcock Quotes." Quarterly Review of Film and Video v. 23 no. 2 (2006) p. 139-54
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"The writer suggests five cases in which director Alfred Hitchcock employed "quotations" from other films. He states that his goal is both to consider some particular material in new light, and also to suggest to some degree the hidden riches to be found by watching Hitchcock rather than merely hearing the stories he narrates. He examines such "quotations" in Hitchcock's Vertigo from David Miller's Sudden Fear and from James Whale's Frankenstein, in Saboteur (1942) from Whale's Bride of Frankenstein, in Rebecca (1940) from F. W. Murnau's Sunrise, and in particular, a "quotation" in The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) from Edward Dmytryk's Crossfire. He asserts that Hitchcock's quotations are a way of sharing with the viewer the original filmmaker's sense, now reconfigured and recontextualized to suffer augmentation and rebirth, and of offering his view of others' films." [Art Index]

Porter, H. C.
"Dial "H" for Hitchcock." Cambridge Review 76 (1954:Oct.-1955:June) p.47
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Pratley, Gerald
"Alfred Hitchcock's Working Credo." Films in Review 3:10 (1952:Dec.) 500

Pressler, Michael.
"Hitchcock and the Melodramatic Pattern." Chicago Review, vol. 35 no. 3. 1986 Spring. pp: 4-16.
UC users only

Roberts, John W.
"Survival Versus Salvation: The Conflicting Visions of Welles and Hitchcock." (Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock) Midwest Quarterly v32, n2 (Wntr, 1991):197 (14 pages).

Rothman, William.
"Hitchcock: Ten mysteries from the master of suspense." American Film v 9 Oct 1983. p. 81-6

Robinson, M.
"The Poetics of Camp in the Films of Alfred Hitchcock." Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature Vol. 54, No. 1 (2000), pp. 53-65

Roche, Catherine de la
"Conversation with Hitchcock." Sight and Sound 25:3 (1955/1956:Winter) p.157
UC users only

Rothman, William.
"The Villain in Hitchcock." Hitchcock Annual 2002-2003. pgs. 149-63

Raubicheck, Walter (ed.).
"Working with Hitchcock: A Collaborators' Forum with Patricia Hitchcock, Janet Leigh, Teresa Wright, and Eva Marie Saint." Hitchcock Annual2002-2003. pgs. 32-66

Russell, Lee
"Alfred Hitchcock." New Left Review 35 (1966:Jan./Feb.) 89

Russell, Lee
"Alfred Hitchcock." New Left Review 35 (1966:Jan./Feb.) p.89

Saada, Nicolas; Toubiana, Serge
"Alfred Hitchcock, portrait(s) de l'artiste en jeune homme." Cahiers du Cinéma no537 July/Aug 1999. p. 18-19
"Part of a special section on filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. An introduction to two texts written by Hitchcock during his "English" period: A lecture given at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMa), New York, in 1939; and extracts from his memoirs that were published in the British magazine Film Weekly in 1936. These two texts display an intelligence and soundness of analysis that reflect the profound and methodical work carried out by Hitchcock since his 1926 film The Lodger."[Art Index]

Samuels, C.T.
"Hitchcock." The American Scholar v. 39 (Spring 1970) p. 295-304

Sandis, Constantine.
"Hitchcock's Conscious Use of Freud's Unconscious.." Europe's Journal of Psychology, Aug2009, p56-81, 26p
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Sarris, Andrew
"Alfred Hitchcock - Prankster Of Paradox Film Comment 10:2 (1974:Mar./Apr.) 8
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Schantz, Ned
"Hospitality and the Unsettled Viewer: Hitchcock's Shadow Scenes." Camera Obscura 25(1 73): 1-27 (2010)
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Schickel, R.
"Master of existential suspense." Time v. 115 (May 12 1980) p. 74-5

Schickel, R.
"Return of Alfred the Great." Life v. 72 (June 2 1972) p. 25

"Le siecle Hitchcock." Cahiers du Cinéma no537 July/Aug 1999. p. 18-35
"A special section on filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock features an article on the remarkable maturity of the director's analysis of his own cinema in a lecture delivered in New York in 1939 and in his memoirs that were published in Film Weekly in 1936, a reprint of the former and extracts from the latter, an analysis of Tippi Hedron's screen tests for the film The Birds, and extracts from an interview with Hitchcock that was recorded in 1963." [Art Index]

Silet, Charles L.
"Hitchcock's rereleased films: from Rope to Vertigo."Film Criticism v 18 Fall 1993. p. 54-60

Simper, DeLoy.
"Poe, Hitchcock and the Well-wrought Effect." Literature Film Quarterly, Summer75, Vol. 3 Issue 3, p226, 6p

Sinclair, Ian.
"London Necropolis of Fretful Ghosts." (portrayal of the city of London in motion pictures) Sight and Sound v4, n6 (June, 1994):12 (4 pages).
UC users only
Film-makers such as Alfred Hitchcock and Patrick Keiller portray the city of London, England, in their documentaries and motion pictures. Although they adopt different techniques to depict the city, they seem to share a similar thought that the soul of London is missing. The city, despite its drawbacks, instills in the protagonists silent power to combat the problems that it offers. The films of Hitchcock and Keiller are a reflection of an intense longing for solitude and fulfillment of dreams.

Smith, John M.
"Conservative Individualism: A Selection of English Hitchcock." Screen, Autumn 1972; 13: 51 - 70.

Smith, Susan
"Spatial world of (Alfred) Hitchcock's films: the point-of-view shot, the camera and 'intrarealism'." CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p2-15. Word Count: 12555.

Zizek, Slavoj; Miller, Richard
"Hitchcock." October, Vol. 38, (Autumn, 1986), pp. 99-111
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Sloan, Kay.
"Three Hitchcock Heroines: The Domestication of Violence." New Orleans Review, vol. 12 no. 4. 1985 Winter. pp: 91-95.

Smith, Murray.
"Altered States: Character and Emotional Response in the Cinema." Cinema Journal v. 33 (Summer '94) p. 34-56.
UC users only
"The writer discusses the notion of "identification" in the context of theories of narrative and narration. He considers how the various senses of the term can be developed into a systematic explanation of emotional response to fictional characters. He also engages with other theories, such as semiotics, and addresses the question of the relationship between the (broadly) cognitive model that he advocates, and psychoanalytic models. He proposes that "identification" includes three levels of imaginative engagement with characters--recognition, alignment, and allegiance--which together comprise a structure of sympathy. Within this context, the writer analyzes The Man Who Knew Too Much by Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980)." [Art Index]

Smuts, Aaron.
"The Desire-Frustration Theory of Suspense." Journal of Aesthetics & Art Criticism; Summer2008, Vol. 66 Issue 3, p281-290, 10p
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The author develops a theory of suspense that attempts to explain the mechanisms behind director Alfred Hitchcock's technique for creating cinematic suspense. Hitchcock's method operates by providing the audience with information that is unavailable to his characters. The author's theory argues that the frustration for a desired outcome of an event underlies Hitchcock's method and explains various human responses to suspense.

Smuts, Aaron.
"Hitchcock as Philosopher." The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism v. 65 no. 3 (Summer 2007) p. 339-41
UC users only

Spoto, Donald.
"The 53 steps: a filmography." Esquire 1982 (97:4) Apr., 102.

Spoto, Donald.
"Hitchcock the designer." Print (New York, NY) v 31 July 1977. p. 37-43

Stam, Robert.
"Hitchcock and Buñuel: Desire and the Law." Studies in the Literary Imagination, vol. 16 no. 1. 1983 Spring. pp: 7-27.
UC users only

Stengel, Wayne.
"Brian DePalma's Body Double and the Shadow of Alfred Hitchcock." New Orleans Review, vol. 12 no. 3. 1985 Fall. pp: 88-93.

Strauss, Marc
"The Painted Jester: Notes on the Visual Arts in Hitchcock's Films." Journal of Popular Film & Television. 2007. Vol. 35, Iss. 2; p. 52 (5 pages)
UC users only

Taylor, Sue.
"The Man Who Saw Too Much." [Hitchcock and art! fatal coincidences]. Art in America June 2001 v89 i6 p36 (2868 words)
"The Centre Pompidou in Paris, France, will host an exhibition that explores the myriad visual links between Alfred Hitchcock's films and modern art. Organized by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, "Hitchcock and Art: Fatal Coincidences" situates the director's 50 years of artistic production within the larger culture of the late 19th and 20th centuries. It provocatively juxtaposes film clips, storyboards, publicity stills, and costume designs with works by artists including Auguste Rodin, Edvard Munch, and Max Ernst." [Art Index]

Taylor, John Russell
"Surviving: Hitchcock and Cukor." Sight and Sound 46:3 (1977:Summer) p.174
UC users only

Teachout, Terry.
"Hitchcock at 100." (filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock)(Critical Essay) National Review v51, n16 (August 30, 1999):45.
Film director Alfred Hitchcock has become an icon of American popular culture, but he is really a major minor master rather than a true genius. His work was image oriented and heavily influenced by the aesthetic of silent films. His collaboration with composer Bernard Herrmann was an important factor in his best films.

Teachout, Terry.
"The Trouble With Alfred Hitchcock." Commentary; Feb2009, Vol. 127 Issue 2, p43-46, 4p
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The article discusses the posthumous rise of the reputation among film critics of the work of British-American filmmaker and producer Alfred Hitchcock. An overview of Hitchcock's career and filmography is presented, and the main elements of his style--plot, dialogue, and visual imagery--are discussed. The sexual content of many of his thrillers is discussed, as is the comedic content, and a number of reviews of his movies by prominent critics are quoted.

Terr, Lenore C.
"Childhood trauma and the creative product: a look at the early lives and later works of Poe, Wharton, Magritte, Hitchcock, and Bergman." The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child v 42 1987. p. 545-72

Terr, Lenore C.
"Childhood trauma and the creative product: a look at the early lives and later works of Poe, Wharton, Magritte, Hitchcock, and Bergman." The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child v 42 1987. p. 545-72
" Demonstrates that early trauma has expressed itself through content, subject matter, and tone in the works of a number of creative geniuses. It is argued that traumatic art draws nontraumatized audiences that become affected by patterns and themes that serve to heighten anxiety. An example of traumatic "infection" is discussed in children exposed to the symptoms of a child kidnapping victim." [PsychInfo]

Thomsen, Christian B.
"Hitchcock's fear/Hitchcocks angst." Psyke & Logos. Special Issue: Anxiety. Vol 14(1), 1993, pp. 195-203
" Discusses the psychological background and implications of the films of the British director Alfred Hitchcock. The roles of suspense, fear, and women, particularly the threatening mother, in Hitchcock's movies are described. Significant experiences from Hitchcock's childhood that may have influenced his point of view are considered. Crime for Hitchcock represented a magnifying glass that allowed him to see his own repressions and darker side." [PsychInfo]

Thomson, David
"Big fix" (are directors under the influence of drugs or just modernism) Film Comment v 19 July/Aug 1983. p. 24-7+
Includes: Kinski, Nastassia: p. 25-6; Dean, James: p. 30; Hitchcock, Alfred: p. 30-1; Godard, Jean Luc: p. 31; Antonioni, Michelangelo: p. 31-2; Altman, Robert: p. 32

Thomson, David
"Big Hitch." Film Comment v 15 Mar 1979. p. 26-9
UC users only
"This year, Alfred Hitchcock receives the AFI's Life Achievement Award. But Hitch's true achievement, says David Thomson, is much more ominous."
Rebuttal to David Thomson by David Lubin. Film Comment 15:3 (1979:May/June) 66
UC users only

Thomson, David.
"H for Hitchcock." (filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock) Sight and Sound v7, n1 (Jan, 1997):26 (4 pages).
UC users only
The career and films of English filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock is discussed. Different aspects of his art such as the conception of pictures as storyboards, the diagrammatics, and the conversation style are examined. The manner in which Hitchcock's themes and motives differ from those of other directors is also touched upon. The typical Englishness of Hitchcock's films and the touch of humor present in them is considered. A chronology of Hitchcock's life and career is given.

Teachout, Terry
"Hitchcock at 100." National Review v 51 no16 Aug 30 1999. p. 45-6

Terr, Lenore C.
"Childhood Trauma and the Creative Product?A Look at the Early Lives and Later Works of Poe, Wharton, Magritte, Hitchcock, and Bergman." Psychoanalytic Study of the Child,(1987) 42:545-572

"Thornton Wilder and Alfred Hitchcock." Theatre Arts 27:1 (1943:Jan.) p.24

Truffaut, François
"Le cinema selon Alfred Hitchcock." Cahiers du cin?ma 184 (1966:nov.) p.50

Truffaut, François
"Slow Fade: The Declining Years of Alfred Hitchcock." American Film v. 10 (Nov. '84) p. 40-7.

Truffaut, François; Bitsch, C.
"Rencontre avec Alfred Hitchcock." Cahiers du Cinéma 11:62 (1956:ao?t/sept.) p.1

Truffaut, Fran?ois; Chabrol, Claude
"Entretien avec Alfred Hitchcock." Cahiers du cin?ma 8:44 (1955:f?vr.) p.19

Turner, George
"Hitchcock's Mastery is Beyond Doubt in Shadow." American Cinematographer v. 74 (May '93) p. 62-7.

Turner, John B.
"On Suspense And Other Film Matters: An Interview with Alfred Hitchcock." Films in Review 1:3 (1950:Apr.) 21

Vanneman, Alan
"A Hank of Hair and a Piece of Bone: A photo study of the Master's fetishes ? uh, motifs." Bright Lights, Issue 42, November 2003

Vermilye, Jerry
"An Alfred Hitchcock Index." Films in Review 17:4 (1966:Apr.) 231

Vest, James M.
"The Emergence of an Auteur: Hitchcock and French Film Criticism, 1950-1954." Hitchcock Annual [2001-2002] 108-124
"Discusses why writers for the French film criticism and theory magazine "Cahiers du Cin?ma" defended Alfred Hitchcock as an auteur. Highlights the writings about the director of Eric Rohmer, Fran?ois Truffaut, and Claude Chabrol from 1950-1954. Touches on the sociocultural influence of the philosophy and theology of the critics on their Hitchcockian stance." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Wark, McKenzie.
"Vectoral Cinema." Senses of Cinema Issue No. 6, May 2000

Warner, Rick
"Difficult work in a popular medium: Godard on 'Hitchcock's method'." Critical Quarterly, Oct2009, Vol. 51 Issue 3, p63-84, 22p
UC users only

Wheldon, Huw
"Alfred Hitchcock on his films." Listener 72:1845 (1964:Aug. 6) 189

White, Susan M.
"Review Essay: With Regard to Female Spectatorship." Quarterly Review of Film and Video v. 12 (Sept. '91) p. 93-105.

Wollaeger, Mark A.
"Killing Stevie: Modernity, Modernism, and Mastery in Conrad and Hitchcock." (novelist Joseph Conrad and filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock) Modern Language Quarterly v58, n3 (Sept, 1997):323 (28 pages).
(UCB users only)

Wood, Catherine.
"The influence on art of the master of suspense." (Statistical Data Included) Lancet v354, n9181 (Sept 4, 1999):872.

Wolcott, James
"Death and the master." Vanity Fair no464 Apr 1999. p. 136+

Zaniello, Tom.
"Hitched or Lynched: Who Directed Twin Peaks?" Studies in Popular Culture, vol. 17 no. 1. 1994 Oct. pp: 55-64.

Zimmerman, P. D.
"Return of the master." Newsweek v. 79 (June 26 1972) p. 83-4

Zirnite, Dennis.
"Hitchcock, on the Level: The Height of Spatial Tension." Film Criticism, vol. 10 no. 3. 1986 Spring. pp: 2-21.

(UCB users only)

Zizek, Slavoj.
"Grimaces of the Real: Or, When the Phallus Appears." October, vol. 58. 1991 Fall. pp: 45-68.

Zizek, Slavoj.
"How the Non-Duped Err." Qui Parle: Literature, Philosophy, Visual Arts, History, vol. 4 no. 1. 1990 Fall. pp: 1-20.

Articles and Books on Individual Films

Aventure Malgache

Gustainis, J. Justin; DeSilva, Deborah Jay.
"Archetypes as propaganda in Alfred Hitchcock's 'lost' World War II films."
Film & History (27:1-4) 1997, 80-7.
UC users only
"Elaborates on the lesser-known wartime film contributions made by director Alfred Hitchcock. Explains Hitchcock's involvement in the making of short narrative films, produced by the British Ministry of Information, designed to glorify the French Resistance movement during World War II. States that given a British film crew, and with a group of French actors-in-exile called the Moliere Players, Hitchcock produced "Bon Voyage" (1941), and "Aventure Malgache" (1941)." [IIPA]

Kemp, Philip.
"Aventure Malgache." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v3, n11 (Nov, 1993):57.

Rivers, Kenneth.
"Alfred Hitchcock's WWII French Films and the Limits of Propaganda." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture

Rivers, Kenneth
"Alfred Hitchcock's WWII French Films and the Limits of Propaganda." Images (online journal)

Vest, James M.
"Phones as instruments of betrayal in Alfred Hitchcock's 'Bon Voyage' and 'Aventure Malgache.'" French Review v72, n3 (Feb, 1999):529 (14 pages). UC Berkeley users only
"These French-language films, made in 1944 with French cast and crew to encourage Resistance efforts, emphasize telephones as means of entrapment. This article examines cinematic treatment of phones in Bon Voyage and Aventure Malgache and explores connections with Hitchcock's other films from The Lady Vanishes to Dial M for Murder. Telephonic images serve to reinforce the central theme of the problematic nature of human contact. They highlight situations that should facilitate communication but instead render it threatening. As surrogates for the microphones and other machinery used in filmmaking, they underscore the limitation of the director's own attempts at control. Taken together these images of transmitting devices reveal a patently Hitchcockian conception of technology as a medium of connection and conflict." [JSTOR]

Wood, Brett.
"Foreign correspondence: the rediscovered war films of Alfred Hitchcock." (includes related article on Hitchcock's documentary on Nazi concentration camps) Film Comment v29, n4 (July-August, 1993):54 (5 pages).
UC users only
Hitchcock's war films are not very well known because they were not made for a movie studio, but rather for the British Ministry of Information. The two excellent films, 'Bon Voyage' and 'Aventure Malgache,' were in French and focused on the efforts of French Resistance fighters.

The Birds

Allen, Richard
"Avian metaphor in The birds." In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock Annual
Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Bergstrom, Janet
"Enunciation and Sexual Difference (part I). Camera Obscura, Summer 79; p.32-69.
Introduction to Raymond Bellour, Thierry Kuntzel and Stephen Heath and their method of textual film analysis. Incl. examples, with frame enlargements, from Hitchcock's "The Birds" and "Marnie".

Buchanan, Ian
"Schizoanalysis and Hitchcock: Deleuze and The Birds." Strategies: Journal of Theory, Culture & Politics, 2002, 15, 1, May, 105-118
UC users only
"Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari's (1987) schizoanalytic perspective is used to interpret Alfred Hitchcock's film The Birds. Problems with Slavoj Zizek's (1991) interpretation of Hitchcock's film are identified; specifically, it is contended that Zizek's reading perceives the birds' attacks as linked to the tension between the characters Lydia Brenner & Melanie Daniels. Rather than understand the tension between Lydia, Melanie, & Mitch Daniels as falling under an Oedipal framework, it is suggested that Lydia & Melanie overcome this normative triangular relationship. Rather than associate the birds with Lydia, it is contended that Melanie has a strong connection to the birds throughout the film. Traditional explanations behind the audience's expectation that it will learn why the birds attack are questioned; conversely, it is stated that this problem must be approached from a nonlinear & rhizomatic perspective. After discussing Deleuze & Guattari's differentiation of the tale & the novella, it is stressed that Hitchcock's film should be comprehended as a novella since Melanie is incapable of understanding that the real her & reality have collided. It is suggested that a schizoanalytic approach provides a superior interpretation of Hitchcock's film than those offered by psychoanalytic models." [Sociological Abstracts]

Cohen, Clelia
"L'oeil et la bouche." Cahiers du Cinéma no537 July/Aug 1999. p. 30-1
"Part of a special section on filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. The writer discusses actress Tippi Hedren's screen tests for Hitchcock's film The Birds. These filmed auditions are about 30 minutes long and feature several types of scenes, including reenactments of scenes from his earlier films. At the time, Hitchcock was looking for a new blonde heroine with a glacial incandescence, and Hedren interested him because she was beautiful, elegant, and especially because she had never acted in a movie before. The tests reveal an astonishingly playful and erotic relationship between the director and the actress." [Art Index]

Deleyto, Celestino.
"Focalisation in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds." Miscelanea: A Journal of English and American Studies, vol. 15. 1994. pp: 155-91.

Dick, Bernard F.
"Hitchcock's terrible mothers." (filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock's portrayal of women)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n4 (Oct, 2000):238 (12 pages).
UC users only
This article examines the mother-child relationships in the films by Alfred Hitchcock, focusing on 'Psycho' and 'The Birds.' Topics addressed include matricide, as well as the psychological and sexual dynamics of mother-child relationships.

Fogg, Claire.
"The Birds." Historical Journal of Film, Radio, and Television. Jun 1999. Vol. 19, Iss. 2; pg. 289, 2 pgs
UC users only

Freeland, Cynthia
"Natural evil in the horror film : Alfred Hitchcock's The birds." In: The changing face of evil in film and television / edited by Martin F. Norden. Amsterdam ; New York, NY : Rodopi, 2007.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main Stack PN1995.9.E93.C43 2007

Gordon, Paul
"The end of the world : The Birds." In: Dial "M" for mother : a Freudian Hitchcock / Paul Gordon. Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 G67 2008

Horwitz, M.M.
"The Birds: A Mother's Love." Wide Angle V/1, 82; p.42-48.
In "The Birds", conflict between the female characters is equally as important as male aggression against a female protagonist.

Humbert, David.
"Desire and Monstrosity in the Disaster Film." Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis & Culture, 2010, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p87-103, 17p
UC users only
An essay is presented on the relationship between desire and violence in the film "The Birds," directed by Alfred Hitchcock, with emphasis on the relevance of the mimetic theory of violence. For the author, it is the only work by Hitchcock which envisions total societal breakdown. He discusses the analogy between the role of the birds in the film and the role of the plague in ancient myth and in historical times. He points out the appearance of scapegoats of one kind or another as a necessary object of scorn in the film.

Johnson, Albert
"Echoes from The Birds." Sight and Sound v 32 no2 Spring 1963. p. 65-6

Kapsis, Robert E.
"Hollywood Filmmaking and Reputation Building: Hitchcock's The Birds." Journal of Popular Film and Television vol. 15 no. 1. 1987 Spring. pp: 5-15.
With his film The Birds (1963), director Alfred Hitchcock launched a campaign to gain acceptance as a cinematic artist from highbrow critics while maintaining his reputation as a popular entertainer.

Kolin, Philip C.
"'A Play about Terrible Birds': Tennessee Williams's The Gnadiges Fraulein and AlfredHitchcock's The Birds." South Atlantic Review. 66(1):1-22. 2001 Winter.

Lessard, Bruno.
"'It's the End of the World!': The Paradox of Event and Body in Hitchcock's The Birds." Film-Philosophy, 2010, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p144-173, 30p

McCombe, John P
"'Oh, I See ...': The Birds and the Culmination of Hitchcock's Hyper-Romantic Vision." Cinema Journal, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 64-80, Spring 2005.
UC users only

McCombe, John P
"'Oh, I See ...': The Birds and the Culmination of Hitchcock's Hyper-Romantic Vision." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Mogg, Ken
"The Day of the Claw: A Synoptic Account of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema, vol. 51, pp. (no pagination), 2009
UC users only

Mogg, Ken
"Will and wilfulness: recent commentary on Hitchcock's The birds." Screening the Past, Issue Issue 12, 2001.

Morris, Christopher D.
"Reading the birds and 'The Birds'." (Alfred Hitchcock)(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n4 (Oct, 2000):250 (9 pages).
UC users only
"This article examines the significance of the title of Alfred Hitchcock's classic film, 'The Birds,' focusing on the symbolism of birds. Topics addressed include Hitchcock's reference to Aristophanes's play by the same name, the construction of meaning between sign and referent, and the birds as signifiers of death." [Expanded Academic Index]

Nichols, Bill
"The Birds: At the Window." Film Reader /4, 79; p.120-144.
Use of psychoanalytical concepts to analyze the themes of sexuality and aggression in 'The Birds'.

O'Donnell, Patrick
"James's Birdcage/Hitchcock's Birds." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Paglia, Camille
"Beauty and the beasts." Sight and Sound ns8 no10 Oct 1998. p. 65<
UC users only dd>"The writer discusses the relationship between nature and civilization in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. She admires Tippi Hedren's portrayal of Melanie as a fashionable, chic woman, noting the surreal character of the film, which is obvious in the scene where Melanie is wearing a fur coat, while holding a bird cage in a rowing boat. Discussing the scene where Melanie sits alone near the school house as the birds begin to gather, she states that it is a symbolic depiction of human life, both nature and culture." [Art Index]

O'Donnell, Patrick.
"James's Birdcage/Hitchcock's Birds." Arizona Quarterly, Autumn2006, Vol. 62 Issue 3, p45-62, 18p
UC users only
"This article discusses the modernity of Henry James in his novel "In the Cage" and Alfred Hitchcock in his motion picture "The Birds." "In the Cage" is a voyeuristic novel, while "The Birds" is an epic devoted to possessive mothers, bad daughters and possessed adults. The subject of both works is fundamentally voyeuristic and both James and Hitchcock present different voyeuristic logic. Part of the difference between the two resides on the media used in presenting their works. The free modern subject existing as a mode of reflection in both works is a manifestation of drive and fulfillment of desire." [EBSCO]

Oliver, Kelly
"Alfred Hitchcock : fowl play and the domestication of horror." In: Cinematic thinking : philosophical approaches to the new cinema / edited by James Phillips. Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .C5352 2008

Paglia, Camille
The Birds / Camille Paglia. London: British Film Institute, 1998. BFI film classics
Main Stack PN1997.B547.P24 1998

Perry, Dennis R.
"Apocalypse: crises of fragmentation: "The masque of the red death" and The birds." In: Hitchcock and Poe : the legacy of delight and terror / Dennis R. Perry. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2003. Filmmakers series.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P46 2003

Sharrett, Christopher
"The myth of apocalypse and the horror film: the primacy of Psycho and The birds."In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock annual Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Smith, Bob
"The Birds as a Pre-Stonewall Parable." (Critical Essay) Gay & Lesbian Review v8, n2 (March, 2001):25.

Truffaut, François
"Conversation avec Alfred Hitchcock (au sujet des Oiseaux)." Cahiers du cinéma 25:147 (1963:sept.) p.1

Vest, James M.
"Echoes of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, The birds, and Frenzy in François Truffaut's Story of Adale H." In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock Annual Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Weis, Elisabeth
"The Sound of One Wing Flapping." Film Comment XIV/5, Sept-Oct 78; p.42-48.
Analysis of Hitchcock's use of sound concentrating on "The birds".

Wollen, Peter
"Theme Park and Variations." Sight & Sound III/7, July 93; p.6-9.
On the history of dinosaur attractions and theme parks, horror and monster movies, comparing "Jurassic Park" to "The Birds".

Wood, Robert Paul
"Looking at The birds and Marnie through the Rear window." CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p80-5. Word Count: 5626. UC users only

Zizek, Slavoj
"The Trouble with Harry: the corpse that wouldn't die; The Birds: the maternal superego." October (Cambridge, Mass) no38 Fall 1986. p. 99-111

Blackmail

Barr, Charles
"Blackmail: Silent and Sound." Sight & SoundLII/2, Spring 83; p.123-126.
Analysis of the silent and the sound versions of the film.
UC users only

Belton, John
"Awkward Transitions: Hitchcock's "Blackmail" and the Dynamics of Early Film Sound." The Musical Quarterly Vol. 83, No. 2 (Summer, 1999), pp. 227-246
UC users only

Brophy, Stephen
"Use of glass in Alfred Hitchcock's Blackmail." CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p20-3
UC users only

Eyuboglu, Selim.
"The Authorial Text and Postmodernism: Hitchcock's Blackmail." Screen, vol. 32 no. 1. 1991 Spring. pp: 58-78.
UC users only
Concerns the narrative aspects and importance of language in Hitchcock's "Blackmail".

Izzo, Donatella
"Sounds of silence in The wings of the dove and Blackmail." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Kamir, Orit
"Blackmail : Hitchcock's sound and the new woman's guilty silence." In: Framed : women in law and film / Orit Kamir. Durham : Duke University Press, 2006.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W6 K235 2006

Linderman, D.
"The Screen in Hitchcock's Blackmail. Wide Angle IV/1, 80; p.20-28. illus.
A feminist/psychoanalytical reading of the film.

McNeill, David.
"Cohesion and Gesture." Discourse Processes: A Multidisciplinary Journal, vol. 16 no. 4. 1993 Oct-Dec. pp: 363-86.

Modleski, Tania.
"Rape versus Mans/Laughter: Hitchcock's Blackmail and Feminist Interpretation." PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, vol. 102 no. 3. 1987 May. pp: 304-315.
UC users only
"In film studies the work of Alfred Hitchcock has often been considered misogynist, and feminist critics have assumed that the female spectator can enjoy the films only by adopting the position of a masochist or the perspective of a man. An analysis of "Blackmail", however, reveals that women's relation to the text is much more complicated than has generally been supposed. The film is constructed as an elaborate joke on the heroine, who, as in the Freudian paradigm, is ultimately transformed into an object between two male subjects; nevertheless, because much of the film stresses her subjectivity, a reading that insists on woman's point of view and experience becomes possible. This reading, which activates the word "rape" - a term seldom used in analytical discussions of the film's central episode - has serious implications for feminist critics in their struggle for interpretive truth." [author's abstract: Periodicals Contents Index]

Morrisson, Ian.
" The Art of Murder." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture Issue 9
Examines The Art of Murder in Strangers On a Train, Dial M For Murder, Blackmail, and Psycho.

Poague, Leland
"Criticism and/as history: rereading Blackmail." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Telotte, J. P.
"The sounds of blackmail: Hitchcock and sound aesthetic." Journal of Popular Film and Television v 28 no4 Winter 2001. p. 184-91
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on film and technology. The writer discusses the introduction of sound technology into film, focusing on Hitchcock's Blackmail. He compares the narrative practices of film before and after the introduction of sound. He considers Hitchcock's use in Blackmail of techniques such as off-screen dialogue and impressionistic sound. He suggests that Blackmail offers more than a series of experiments with new narrative devices, however. He argues that it also meditates on the larger narrative impact of sound technology, so that its story becomes, subtly, the story of film sound and of its potentially "perilous" effects. He also contends that Hitchcock found a liberating potential in film's new capacity for sound and used it to tell a story about a conservative ethos of silence, repression, and limitation." [Art Index]

Bon Voyage

Gustainis, J. Justin; DeSilva, Deborah Jay.
"Archetypes as propaganda in Alfred Hitchcock's 'lost' World War II films."
Film & History (27:1-4) 1997, 80-7.
UC users only
"Elaborates on the lesser-known wartime film contributions made by director Alfred Hitchcock. Explains Hitchcock's involvement in the making of short narrative films, produced by the British Ministry of Information, designed to glorify the French Resistance movement during World War II. States that given a British film crew, and with a group of French actors-in-exile called the Moliere Players, Hitchcock produced "Bon Voyage" (1941), and "Aventure Malgache" (1941)." [IIPA]

Kemp, Philip.
"Bon Voyage." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v3, n11 (Nov, 1993):57.

Rivers, Kenneth.
"Alfred Hitchcock's WWII French Films and the Limits of Propaganda." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture

Sterritt. David.
"Hitchcock work resurfaces; a distributor recovers two obscure short films. (motion pictures, 'Bon Voyage,' and 'Aventure Malgache,' by Alfred Hitchcock; includes dates and locations of planned screenings)" Christian Science Monitor v85, n159 (Wed, July 14, 1993):13, col 1, 27 col in.

Vest, James M.
"Phones as instruments of betrayal in Alfred Hitchcock's 'Bon Voyage' and 'Aventure Malgache.'" French Review v72, n3 (Feb, 1999):529 (14 pages). UC Berkeley users only
"These French-language films, made in 1944 with French cast and crew to encourage Resistance efforts, emphasize telephones as means of entrapment. This article examines cinematic treatment of phones in Bon Voyage and Aventure Malgache and explores connections with Hitchcock's other films from The Lady Vanishes to Dial M for Murder. Telephonic images serve to reinforce the central theme of the problematic nature of human contact. They highlight situations that should facilitate communication but instead render it threatening. As surrogates for the microphones and other machinery used in filmmaking, they underscore the limitation of the director's own attempts at control. Taken together these images of transmitting devices reveal a patently Hitchcockian conception of technology as a medium of connection and conflict." [JSTOR]

Wood, Brett.
"Foreign correspondence: the rediscovered war films of Alfred Hitchcock." (includes related article on Hitchcock's documentary on Nazi concentration camps) Film Comment v29, n4 (July-August, 1993):54 (5 pages).
UC users only
Hitchcock's war films are not very well known because they were not made for a movie studio, but rather for the British Ministry of Information. The two excellent films, 'Bon Voyage' and 'Aventure Malgache,' were in French and focused on the efforts of French Resistance fighters.

Caught

Doane, Mary Ann.
"Caught and Rebecca: The Inscription of Femininity as Absence." In: Feminist Film Theory: A Reader / edited by Sue Thornham. pp: 70-82. New York: New York University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.F465 1999

Dial M for Murder

Bordonaro, Peter
"Dial M for Murder." Sight and Sound 45:3 (1976:Summer) p.175
UC users only

Cohen, R.
"Dial M for Murder." Films and Filming no349 Oct 1983. p. 37

Foreign Correspondent

Hall, S.
"Dial M for Murder." Film History v. 16 no. 3 (2004) p. 243-55
UC users only

Rossi, John.
"Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent (1940)." Film & History 1982 12(2): 25-35.
UC users only
Alfred Hitchcock's movie, Foreign Correspondent, was a success on several levels, not the least of which was as a piece of anti-Nazi propaganda.

Turner, George
"Foreign Correspondent--The Best Spy Thriller Of All." 1995. American Cinematographer v. 76 (Aug. '95) p. 75-81.
Detailed production history.

Wood, B.
"Foreign Correspondence. The Rediscovered War Films of Alfred Hitchcock."Film Comment XXIX/4, July-Aug 93; p.54-58.
UC users only
"Foreign Correspondent, the 1940 spy thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock, is discussed. Based on the biographical work Personal History by well-known foreign correspondent Vincent Sheean, the film's screen rights were bought by Walter Wanger, a producing member of United Artists. Wanger decided that Alfred Hitchcock would be an ideal director to insert some excitement into the tale. Hitchcock was delighted to accept the assignment and, as usual, built his sketchy story to accommodate several scenes that he already had in mind. The final script featured a tough New York editor (Harry Davenport) sending crime reporter Johnny Jones (Joel McCrea) to cover the European crisis. In 1995 a panel of ten leading directors voted Foreign Correspondent second place in the all-time ten best spy movies. The making of the film and its wartime background are described in detail." [Art Index]

Frenzy

Allen, Jeanne Thomas.
"The Representation of Violence to Women: Hitchcock's Frenzy." Film Quarterly v. 38 (Spring '85) p. 30-8.
UC users only

Figlerowicz, Marta
"Timing and Vulnerability in Three Hitchcock Films." Film Quarterly , Vol. 65, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 49-58
UC users only

Gow, Gordon
"Frenzy." (Film review). Films & Filming XVIII/10, July 72; p.58-59.

Houston, Penelope
"Frenzy." (Film review). Sight & Sound XVI/3, Summer 72; p.166-167. illus.

Johnson, William
"A Fine Frenzy."Film Comment VIII/4, Nov-Dec 72; p.54-57.
UC users only

Johnson, Albert
"Frenzy." (Film review). Film Quarterly XXVI/1, Fall 72; p.58-60.

Pechter, W.S.
"Frenzy." (Film review). Commentary v. 54 (September 1972) p. 77-9

Robinson, H.
"Frenzy." (Film review). Films in Review XXIII/7, Aug-Sept 72; p.429-430.

Sgammato, Joseph
"Discreet qualms of the bourgeoisie; Hitchcock's "Frenzy."" Sight and Sound v 42 no3 Summer 1973. p. 134-7

Thomas Allen, J.
"The Representation of Violence to Women: Hitchcock's Frenzy."Film Quarterly XXXVIII/3, Spring 85; p.30-38.
UC users only
On the victimization of women and men's need for control and dominance in Alfred Hitchcock's "Frenzy". Also discusses the misogyny apparent in his other films.

I Confess

Lawrence, Amy
"Constructing a priest, silencing a saint: The PCA and I Confess (1953)." Film History 19.3-4 (July 2007): p58(15). (10577 words)
UC users only
"Alfred Hitchcock's I Confess was based on Paul Anthelme's 1902 play Nos Deux Consciences. Hitchcock began working on the film in 1947 but had great difficulty in fashioning a script which met both his requirements and those of various other interested parties, including the Production Code Administration and the Roman Catholic Church. The paper traces the compromised development of the project through to its location filming in Quebec in 1952, and suggests that problems with the film cited by Robin Wood and others can be traced to this troubled development process." [Expanded Academic Index]

Lyons, Donald
"I Confess." (motion picture review) Film Comment v 31 May/June 1995. p. 80-3+
"In religious movies, priests can work such visible attributes as loneliness and openness to/transparency of suffering into signs of holiness and grace. The writer discusses concepts of priestliness presented in Alfred Hitchcock's I Confess (1953), Robert Bresson's Diary of a Country Priest (1950), and Antonia Bird's Priest (1995)." [Art Index]

Roche, M.W.
"Hitchock and the Transcendence of Tragedy: I Confess as Speculative Art." Post Script X/3, Summer 91; p.30-37. bibliogr.
Hegelian reading of Hitchcock's depiction of tragedy in "I confess".

Thomas, Deborah.
"Confession as betrayal: Hitchcock's I Confess as Enigmatic Text." Cineaction, 1996, Issue 40, p32-37, 6p
UC users only

Juno and the Paycock

Monahan, Barry
"Sean O'Casey by Alfred Hitchcock and John Ford." In: Ireland's theatre on film : style, stories and the national stage on screen / Barry Monahan Dublin, Ireland ; Portland, Ore. : Irish Academic Press, c2009
Main Stacks PN1993.5.I85 M66 2009

Morgan, Jack.
Alfred Hitchcock's Juno and the Paycock." Irish University Review, vol. 24 no. 2. 1994 Fall-Winter. pp: 212-16

The Lady Vanishes

Beckman, Karen.
"Violent vanishings: Hitchcock, Harlan, and the disappearing woman." Camera Obscura, no39 (Sept. '96) p. 78-103
"The writer analyzes the plot of the vanishing woman in the 1938 mystery/melodrama films The Lady Vanishes by Alfred Hitchcock and Verwehte Spuren (The Footprints Blown Away) by National Socialist director Veit Harlan. Both movies feature a middle-aged woman who mysteriously disappears--a spinster in Hitchcock's film and a mother in Harlan's. They also rely heavily upon the romance plot, which demands that this woman be obliterated to enable the progression of romantic love. Hitchcock repeatedly draws the viewer's attention to the complicity between cinematic and magic romance, disrupts the illusion of continuity, and refuses to allow the viewer a passive role. By contrast, Harlan supports the National Socialist idea that the State can annihilate its unwanted others by fully exploiting the complicity between the romance plot and cinematic illusions of continuity." [from Art Index]

Beckman, Karen.
"Violent vanishings: Hitchcock, Harlan, and the disappearing woman." In: Vanishing women : magic, film, and feminism Durham : Duke University Press, 2003.
MAIN: PN1995.9.W6 B385 2003

Petro, Patrice
"Rematerializing the vanishing "lady": feminism, Hitchcock, and interpretation." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

The Lodger

Allen, Richard:
"The Lodger" and the Origins of Hitchcock's Aesthetic Hitchcock Annual [2001-2002] 38-78
"Explores some of the origins of Alfred Hitchcock's aesthetic in late Victorianand early twentieth-century culture that lay the basis for the first "Hitchcock"film, "The Lodger." Examines the movie itself to identify artistic preoccupationsthat surface throughout Hitchcock's directorial career. Highlights the influenceof the Jack the Ripper murders, Robert Louis Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.Hyde," and Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray" on Hitchcock'sadaptation of Marie Belloc Lowndes' novel. Demonstrates the ways Sovietcinema influenced the visual narration in the movie. Comments on howsexuality is depicted in the characters." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Brill, L.W.
"Hitchcock's The Lodger."Literature/Film Quarterly XI/4, Oct 83; p.257-265.
UC users only
Argues that the significance of "The lodger" for the rest of A.H.'s career is underrated.

Brill, Lesley
"Hitchcock's The lodger." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main: PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Cohen, Tom.
"Beyond 'The Gaze': Zizek, Hitchcock, and the American Sublime." AMLH vol. 7 no. 2. 1995 Summer. pp: 350-78.
UC users only

Manvell, Roger
"Revaluations: The Lodger." Sight and Sound 19:9 (1951:Jan.) p.377

Pomerance, Murray.
"Light, Looks, and The Lodger." Quarterly Review of Film and Video, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 425-433, Oct 2009
UC users only

The Man Who Knew Too Much

Benson, Thomas W.
"Mother and monster: the rhetorical structure of Alfred Hitchcock's The man who knew too much.'" In: In: Monsters in and among us : toward a Gothic criminology / edited by Caroline Joan (Kay) Picart and Cecil Greek. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.P57 M66 2007

Coe, Jonathan.
"The Man who Knew too Much." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v9, n9 (Sept, 1999):50 (1 page).
" The rerelease of the British version of The Man Who Knew Too Much is a fascinating contribution to the Hitchcock centenary and reveals a film so different to its American remake in pace, atmosphere, and emotional texture that comparisons become pointless. Aside from its East End setting, this earlier version is superior in having Peter Lorre's brilliant performance, and in its climax, a tense and well-orchestrated recreation of the Sidney Street siege of 1911." [Art Index]

Cohen, Tom.
"Beyond 'The Gaze': Zizek, Hitchcock, and the American Sublime." AMLH vol. 7 no. 2. 1995 Summer. pp: 350-78.
UC users only

Figlerowicz, Marta
"Timing and Vulnerability in Three Hitchcock Films." Film Quarterly , Vol. 65, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 49-58
UC users only

Greven, David
"Cruising, Hysteria, Knowledge: The Man Who Knew Too Much." The European Journal of American Culture, 28.3, 2009
UC users only

Hark, Ina Rae
"Keeping your Amateur Standing: Audience Participation and Good Citizenship in Hitchcock's Political Films." Cinema Journal XXIX/2, Winter 90; p.8-22. bibliogr.
"The Man Who Knew Too Much" and "The Thirty-nine Steps" chosen as representative of Hitchcock's theme of the innocent thrown into the world of espionage; also shows how his move from political passivity to action mirrors the increasing emotional involvement of the cinema audience.

Lightning, Robert K.
"Domestic trilogy (The man who knew too much; The trouble with Harry;`/The wrong man). CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p32-42.
UC users only

McEwen, Duncan
"Hitchcock: An analytic movie review." Psychoanalytic Review. Vol 74(3), Fal 1987, pp. 401-409
"Argues that the latent meaning of A. Hitchcock's film, The Man Who Knew Too Much, which concerns a threat to a prepubertal boy in an American family, has to do with the preoedipal and oedipal conflicts that are characteristic of pubescence. Analytic interpretations are based on the views of psychoanalysts such as A. Freud (1936, 1958) and P. Blos (1965, 1967)." [PsychInfo]

Michie, Elsie B.
"Unveiling Maternal Desires: Hitchcock and American Domesticity." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 29-53. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Minissale, Gregory
"Beyond Internalism and Externalism: Husserl and Sartre’s Image Consciousness in Hitchcock and Buñuel." Film-Philosophy, Vol 14, No 1 (2010)

Nadel, Alan
"Colonial discourse and the unheard other in Washington Square and The man who knew too much." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Pomerance, Murray.
"Finding release: "Storm clouds" and The man who knew too much." In: Music and cinema / edited by James Buhler, Caryl Flinn, and David Neumeyer. p. 207-46. Hanover, NH : University Press of New England [for] Wesleyan University Press, c2000. Music/culture.
Music ML2075.M875 2000

Pomerance, Murray.
"Two Bits for Hitch: Small Performanace and Gross Structure in The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)." Hitchcock Annual 2000-2001, 127-45.
"Opines that for Alfred Hitchcock, the bit performance is neither padding nor ornamentation - it is an essential part of a delicate and ingenious construction for moving a viewer through the narrative. Focuses specifically on two Hitchcockian bits from his 1956 film "The Man Who Knew Too Much" - the theatrical impresario Val Parnell, played by Alan Mowbray, and the assistant manager of the Royal Albert Hall, played by Richard Wattis - that prove this point. Indicates that these two filmic moments show the density and reach of Hitchcock's architectonic concern as a filmmaker." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Pulleine, Tim
"The Man Who Knew Too Much." (motion picture review) Films and Filming no[358] July 1984. p. 20-1

Smith, Murray
"Altered States: Character and Emotional response in the Cinema." Cinema Journal XXXIII/4, Summer 94; p.34-56.
"The writer discusses the notion of "identification" in the context of theories of narrative and narration. He considers how the various senses of the term can be developed into a systematic explanation of emotional response to fictional characters. He also engages with other theories, such as semiotics, and addresses the question of the relationship between the (broadly) cognitive model that he advocates, and psychoanalytic models. He proposes that "identification" includes three levels of imaginative engagement with characters--recognition, alignment, and allegiance--which together comprise a structure of sympathy. Within this context, the writer analyzes The Man Who Knew Too Much by Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980)." [Art Index]

Weis, Elizabeth
"Consolidation of a classical style: The man who knew too much." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Marnie

Bailin, R.
"Feminist Readership, Violence, and Marnie." Film Reader /5, 82; p.24-36. bibliogr.
A reading of "Marnie" for the female spectator, basing the film's fascination for women on its perspective of violence in their daily lives.

Bellour, Raymond
"Hitchcock, the Enunciator." Camera Obscura /2, Fall 77; p.66-91. UC users only
Shot-by-shot analysis of parts of Hitchcock's "Marnie", with examples from some of his other films. Illustrated with frame enlargements from the film.

Bergstrom, Janet
"Enunciation and Sexual Difference (part I). Camera Obscura, Summer 79; p.32-69.
Introduction to Raymond Bellour, Thierry Kuntzel and Stephen Heath and their method of textual film analysis. Incl. examples, with frame enlargements, from Hitchcock's "The Birds" and "Marnie".

Columpar, Corinn
""Marnie": A Site/Sight for the Convergence of Gazes."Hitchcock Annual [1999-2000] 51-73
"Examines the female body in Alfred Hitchcock's 1964 film "Marnie" as spectacle, hysterical text, and commodity in order to synthesize prior theoretical contentions and assess the potential for a discourse of resistance deployed at the level of the corporeal. Indicates "Marnie" has proven difficult to describe and resistant to generic categorization. Considers the main character's representational challenge to the erotic gaze, the medical gaze, and their convergence on the site/sight of the female body. Stresses that "Marnie" is not a feminist text, noting a challenge does not constitute a subversion." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Figlerowicz, Marta
"Timing and Vulnerability in Three Hitchcock Films." Film Quarterly , Vol. 65, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 49-58
UC users only

Knapp, Lucretia.
"The Queer Voice in Marnie." In: Out in Culture: Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Essays on Popular Culture. / edited by Corey K. Creekmur and Alexander Doty. pp: 62-81. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. Series Q
Main Stack HQ76.2.U5.O98 19952

Knapp, Lucretia.
"The Queer Voice in Marnie." Cinema Journal v. 32 (Summer '93) p. 6-23.
UC users only
Despite the lengthy reappraisal of Hitchcock's work via homosexual theory, little has been addressed in a specifically lesbian context; the author considers "Marnie" from such a perspective and counters previous feminist findings.

Knapp, Lucretia
"The Queer Voice in Marnie." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Moral, Tony Lee.
Hitchcock and the making of Marnie Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 2002.
MAIN: PN1997.M2635 M67 2002

Piso, Michele
"Mark's Marnie." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Pomerance, Murray.
"Once in Love with Marnie." In: An eye for Hitchcock / Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P66 2004

Smith, Allan Lloyd.
"Marnie, the Dead Mother, and the Phantom." Hitchcock Annual2002-2003. pgs. 164-80

Wood, Robert Paul
"Looking at The birds and Marnie through the Rear window." CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p80-5. Word Count: 5626. UC users only

Murder

Combs, Richard.
"Hitchcock's German double." ('Mary', the German language version of Hitchcock's film 'Murder!') Sight and Sound v59, n4 (Autumn, 1990):220 (2 pages).

Rothman, William
"Alfred Hitchcock's Murder!" Wide Angle IV/1, 80; p.54-61.
Underlying "Murder"'s argument are its reflections on its nature as film.

Rothman, William
"Alfred Hitchcock's murder: theater, authorship, and the presence of the camera." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

North By Northwest

Baker, Brian.
"The Psycho in the Grey Flannel Suit." In: Masculinity in fiction and film : representing men in popular genres 1945-2000 / Brian Baker. London ; New York : Continuum, c2006.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN56.M316 B35 2006

Beebe, John
"Hitchcock's rite of passage : a Jungian reading of North by Northwest" In: Initiation : the living reality of an archetype / edited by Thomas Kirsch, Virginia Beane Rutter and Thomas Singer. London ; New York : Routledge, 2007.
Educ/Psych RC506.I548 2007

Brill, Lesley
"North by Northwest and Hitchcockian Romance." Film Criticism VI/3, Spring 82; p.1-17.
Discusses the importance of romance to Hitchcock's films.

Brill, Lesley.
"Packs, predators, and love in Hitchcock's North by northwest." In: Crowds, power, and transformation in cinema / Lesley Brill. Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2006.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.C67 B75 2006

Cavell, Stanley.
"North by Northwest." Critical Inquiry, vol. 7 no. 4. 1981 Summer. pp: 761-776.

Camp, J.
"John Buchan and Alfred Hitchcock." Literature/Film Quarterly VI/3, Summer 78; p.230-240. illus.
A consideration of J.B.'s novel and the use made of its plot, structure and theme in A.H.'s "The Thirty-nine Steps" and "North by Northwest". North by northwest (motion picture review)

Cohan, Steven
"The spy in the gray flannel suit : gender performance and the representation of masculinity in North by Northwest." In: The masculine masquerade : masculinity and representation / Andrew Perchuk and Helaine Posner, editors. Cambridge, Mass. : MIT List Visual Arts Center : MIT Press, c1995.
Main (Gardner) Stacks N8222.M38 M38 1995
Also in:
Masked men : masculinity and the movies in the fifties / Steven Cohan. Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1997.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.M46 C65 1997
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.M46 C65 1997

Cook, P
"North by Northwest." (review) Films in Review v 31 Dec 1980. p. 615-16

Daniel-Richard, Debra
"The Dance of Suspense: Sound and Silence in North by Northwest." Journal of Film and Video Volume 62, Number 3, Fall 2010 pp. 53-60
UC users only

Epp, Todd David.
"Alfred Hitchcock's "Expedient Exaggerations" and the Filming Of North By Northwest At Mount Rushmore." South Dakota History 1993 23(3): 181-196.

Gordon, Paul
"ROT in North by northwest." In: Dial "M" for mother : a Freudian Hitchcock / Paul Gordon. Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 G67 2008

Jack, Edward
"Literary Cinema: North by Northwest and Hamlet." Shakespeare Studies, vol. 47, pp. 17-36, 2009

Keane, M.
"The Designs of Authorship: An Essay on 'North by Northwest'." Wide Angle IV/1, 80; p.44-52. illus.
"North by Northwest" is a romantic comedy that reveals tragic possibilities as a result of its nature as a film.

Lazar, David.
"On the Art of Survival: North by Northwest." Denver Quarterly, vol. 30 no. 4. 1996 Spring. pp: 121-31.

Lehman, Ernest
North by northwest. Screenplay by Ernest Lehman. New York, Viking Press [1972, c1959]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997 .L46 1972

Lehman, Ernest
"North by Northwest." Sight and Sound ns10 no3 Mar 2000 supp. p. vi-xii, 1-196
"Ernest Lehman's screenplay for North by Northwest, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, is presented. In an introduction, Lehman discusses how Hitchcock persuaded him to work on the project and how the famous crop-duster sequence and the chase scene across the faces of Mount Rushmore in the film came about."

Lehmann, Ulrich.
"Language of the PurSuit: Cary Grant's Clothes in Alfred Hitchcock's 'North by Northwest'." Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress Body and Culture 2000, 4:4, 467-85.

Millington, Richard H.
"Hitchcock and American Character: The Comedy of Self-Construction in North by Northwest." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 135-54. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Martin, Carey
"The Master of Suspense and the Acrobat of the Drawing Room: How the Relationship of Cary Grant and Alfred Hitchcock Shaped Their Collaborations in Suspicion , Notorious, To Catch a Thief and North by Northwest." Film Journal, Issue 12 April 2005

Morris, Christopher D.
"The Direction of North by Northwest." Cinema Journal, vol. 36 no. 4. 1997 Summer. pp: 43-56.
UC users only
"The writer presents a deconstructive reading of Alfred Hitchcock's film North by Northwest. He argues that the film questions both the notion of the maturation of the hero figure as seen by hermeneutic criticism and the meaning of direction, whether that is understood to be character change or movement toward some representable theme. He suggests that the film narrates the groundlessness of character and interpretation, and he goes on to discuss these broader concerns in relation to the film's title and its depiction of a world where the very idea of a changeable human subject arises only as the misinterpretation of arbitrary messages. He also considers the film's romantic ending in terms of the persistence of groundless interpretation by both characters and film critics." [Art Index]

North by Northwest: Alfred Hitchcock, Director
James Naremore, editor. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c1993. Series title: Rutgers films in print; [v. 20].
UCB Main PN1997.N5373 N67 1993

Pomerance, Murray.
"The Consumer Perversity of Roger Thornhill." Quarterly Review of Film and Video v17, n1 (March, 2000):19 (16 pages).
" A discussion of the consumer nonconformism of Roger Thornhill, lead character in Alfred Hitchcock's film North by Northwest. A paragon of middle-class virtue, Thornhill is an advertising man who typifies the glorious potency of financial fluidity. During the film, however, he is demoted from a man who is above the economy (a controller) to a series of characters that progress in a downward spiral: an alien in a strange environment, a fugitive, a victim, and, finally, a criminal. As performed by actor Cary Grant, Thornhill appears far too genteel to stoop to situated theft maliciously, and, therefore, performs it with dignified but disattending panache, all the time creating for himself the character of a perverse consumer: an advertiser who does not do at the market what he tells everyone else to do. Thornhill's descent into the marketplace is the film's moral lesson: Originating above consumption, he finds himself compelled to scramble in order to survive." [Art Index

Pomerance, Murray.
"A Great Face." In: The horse who drank the sky : film experience beyond narrative and theory / Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2008.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1994 .P6535 2008

Pomerance, Murray.
"A great fall: action north by sincerity northwest." In: An eye for Hitchcock / Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P66 2004

Rothman, William.
"North by Northwest: Hitchcock's Monument to the Hitchcock Film." North Dakota Quarterly, vol. 51 no. 3. 1983 Summer. pp: 11-23

Rothman, William.
North by Northwest: Hitchcock's monument to the Hitchcock film." In: The "I" of the camera : essays in film criticism, history, and aesthetics / William Rothman. Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press,1988. Cambridge studies in film.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1995.R68 2004
Main StackPN1995.R681 1988 (another edition)
Moffitt PN1995.R68 1988 (another edition)

Saito, Ayako
"Hitchcock's Trilogy: A Logic of mise en Scene." In: Endless Night: Cinema and Psychoanalysis, Parallel Histories / edited by Janet Bergstrom. pp: 200-248 Berkeley: University of California Press, c1999
Main Stack PN1995.9.P783.E53 1999
Introduction Challenges the way Lacanian theory, as construed within film theory, has narrowed the field of possibilities of psychoanalytic approaches to cinema. Specifically, the question of affect is focused on, and how it may be traced through textual analysis. The author argues that affect has attracted little attention within psychoanalytic film theory because of the strong emphasis on the Lacanian psychoanalytic model, which revolves around the question of language and the gaze. Drawing on the writings of Andre Green, Nicolas, Abraham and Maria Torok as well as Raymond Bellour and Lacan, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho as components of a single filmic system in the light of 3 psychical structures: melancholia, mania and paranoia/schizophrenia, the degree to which the narrative, visual style and dominant affectivity of each film are interrelated and determined by each other is demonstrated. [abstract from PsychInfo]

Todd, David.
"Alfred Hitchcock's "Expedient Exaggerations" And The Filming Of North By Northwest At Mount Rushmore." South Dakota History 1993 23(3): 181-196.

Williams, Dan.
North by northwest: director, Alfred Hitchcock Harlow: Longman ; London: York Press, 2001.
Main: PN1997.N5373 W55 2001

Wilson, George M.
"The Maddest McGuffin: Some Notes on North by Northwest" MLN, Vol. 94, No. 5, Comparative Literature. (Dec., 1979), pp. 1159-1172.
UC users only

Notorious

Abel, Richard
"Notorious: Perversion Par Excellence." (Review). Wide Angle I/1, 79; p.66-71.

Abel, Richard
"Notorious: perversion par excellence." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Abele, Elizabeth.
"The Feminine Gaze." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture Issue 9
"Though the privileging of the male spectator and gaze may exist in Vertigo and Rear Window, Hitchcock's use of the gaze is generally more complicated. Though a male gaze perspective may be present, the controlling gaze in several films is actually female. In these films, Hitchcock's female gaze may be as objectifying and controlling of the man as a male gaze is to a woman, while in other cases it exists as a knowing, patient and protective gaze. To examine Hitchcock's use of a secondary, non-male gaze, I will discuss two films from his Selznick period (1940-49): Notorious (1946) and The Paradine Case (1947). Hitchcock's use of the feminine gaze gives his female characters power, agency and depth--despite Hitchcock's self--cultivated reputation as a misogynist."

Beebe, John.
"The Notorious Postwar Psyche." Journal of Popular Film and Television 1990 18(1): 28-35.
UC users only
Discusses the making of Notorious (1946), a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, providing a Jungian analysis of the movie as a reflection of America's postwar fears and uncertainty.

Blegvad, Peter.
"Phosphorescent Milk." Sight and Sound, vol. 3 no. 4. 1993 Apr. pp: 33
UC users only

Byars, Jackie & Meehan,Eileen R.
"Once in a Lifetime: Constructing 'The Working Woman' Through Cable Narrowcasting." Camera Obscura /33-34, May-Jan 94-95; p.12-41. illus., bibliogr.
The Lifetime channel's remake of "Notorious" examined as an example of its gender-specific programming; notes changes made from the original film.

Devereaux, M.
"In Defense of Talking Film." Persistence of Vision /5, Spring 87; p.17-27.
Examines the relationship between words and visual images and uses scenes from "Notorious" and "His Girl Friday" as examples.

Fabe, Marilyn
"Hollywood auteur: Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious ." In: Closely watched films : an introduction to the art of narrative film technique / Marilyn Fabe Berkeley : University of California Press, 2004
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0413/2004000202.html
Main Stack PN1995.9.E9.F17 2004
Moffitt PN1995.9.E9.F17 2004
PFA PN1995.9.E9.F17 2004

Freedman, Jonathan
"Hands, objects and love in James and Hitchcock : Reading the touch in The golden bowl and Notorious." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Flitterman-Lewis, Sandy.
"To See and Not To Be: Female Subjectivity and the Law in Hitchcock's Notorious." Literature and Psychology, vol. 33 no. 3-4. 1987. pp: 1-15.
"Discusses the film Notorious, the title of which refers to its chief protagonist, a female character granted both force of action and subjectivity. The film works to restore the psychoanalytic authority of patriarchy. In spite of the subjective prominence of Alicia's point of view throughout most of the film, it is a question of the law (whether legitimate, as in the case of the US government, or illegitimate, as with the Nazi cartel) that begins and ends the film." [PsychInfo]

Hatt, Harold.
"Notorious: Penance as a Paradigm of Redemption." In: Image and Likeness: Religious Visions in American Film Classics / edited by John R. May. pp: 126-34. New York: Paulist Press, c1992. Isaac Hecker studies in religion and American culture.
Main Stack PN1995.5.I46 1992

Leff, Leonard J.
"Ingrid in the Lion's Den: Cutting Notorious." (editing notes for film) Film Comment v35, n2 (March, 1999):26-9
UC users only
"The cutting of Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious is examined. Cutting may be the most elusive element of film production, particularly in Hollywood, where invisible editing remains the industry standard. As Hitchcock's notes on Notorious show, he was sensitive to Hollywood norms--the respect for clarity, the economy of plot, and the proper rhythm of long, medium, and close shots of characters. He was nonetheless an original, as his cutting notes and other films show. The editing of Notorious shows his ability to use shot length and shot arrangement to energize scenes, sequences, and movies. Hitchcock shaped his characters' motivation and psychological depth both through performance and cutting patterns." [Art Index]

Martin, Adrian
"Inside Notorious." Senses of Cinema.

Renov, Michael
"From Identification to Ideology: The Male System of Hitchcock's Notorious." Wide Angle IV/1, 80; p.30-37. illus.
On the gendered system of spectatorship in "Notorious" and the enunciation of sexual difference.

Rothman, William
"Alfred Hitchcock's 'Notorious.'" Georgia Review 29:4 (1975:Winter) 884

Schwartz, Ronald
"Notorious." In: Noir, now and then : film noir originals and remakes, (1944-1999) / Ronald Schwartz. Westport, CT : Greenwood Press, 2001.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.F54 S39 2001

The Paradine Case

Abele, Elizabeth.
"The Feminine Gaze." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture Issue 9
"Though the privileging of the male spectator and gaze may exist in Vertigo and Rear Window, Hitchcock's use of the gaze is generally more complicated. Though a male gaze perspective may be present, the controlling gaze in several films is actually female. In these films, Hitchcock's female gaze may be as objectifying and controlling of the man as a male gaze is to a woman, while in other cases it exists as a knowing, patient and protective gaze. To examine Hitchcock's use of a secondary, non-male gaze, I will discuss two films from his Selznick period (1940-49): Notorious (1946) and The Paradine Case (1947). Hitchcock's use of the feminine gaze gives his female characters power, agency and depth--despite Hitchcock's self--cultivated reputation as a misogynist."

Anderegg, Michael.
"Hitchcock's The Paradine Case and Filmic Unpleasure." Cinema Journal v. 26 (Summer '87) p. 49-59.
UC users only
Argues that "The Paradine case" has come to be regarded as a minor work due to its denial of viewers' expectations of pleasure.

Price, Theodore.
"Hitchcock and Homosexuality: The Truth about The Paradine Case." In: Film Conference of Kent State University (2nd: 1984) Sex and Love in Motion Pictures: Proceedings of the Second Annual Film Conference of Kent State University, April 11, 1984 / edited by Douglas Radcliff-Umstead. pp: 18-24. [Kent, Ohio]: Romance Languages Dept., Kent State University, c1984.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S45.F551 1984

Psycho

Alfred Hitchcock's psycho: a casebook
Edited by Robert Kolker. New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
Full-text available online [UCB users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.P79 P78 2004

Allen, Jeanne T.
"Jeanne T. Allen Responds to R. Barton Palmer's 'The Metafictional Hitchcock: The Experience of Viewing and the Viewing of Experience in Rear Window and Psycho'." Cinema Journal, vol. 25 no. 4. 1986 Summer. pp: 54-58.

Ardolino, Frank.
"The Iconic Influence of the Dead: Iconoclasm and Idolatry in Hitchcock's Rebecca, Vertigo, and Psycho." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, vol. 12 no. 1-2. 1991 Mar. pp: 130-41.

Bellour, Raymond
"Psychosis, Neurosis, Perversion." Camera Obscura , Summer 79; p.104-132.
Detailed textual/psychoanalytic analysis of Hitchcock's "Psycho". Illustrated with frame enlargements.

Blennerhassett, Richard
"The serial killer in film: An archetype for our time." Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine. Vol 10(2), Jun 1993, pp. 101-104
"Presents a Jungian perspective on the cinematic portrayal of the evolution of the serial killer, focusing on mythic aspects of the serial killer and representation of the archetype of the shadow. Films discussed include F. Lang's "M," A. Hitchcock's "Psycho," and J. Demme's "The Silence of the Lambs." It is suggested that the popularity of the serial killer genre reflects the need of the individual to find new images for the old concepts of good and evil."

Briefel, Aviva
"Specters of respectability : Victorian horrors in The turn of the Screw and Psycho." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Briggs, Scott D.
"The Keys to the Bates Motel: Robert Bloch's Psycho Trilogy." In: The man who collected psychos : critical essays on Robert Bloch / edited by Benjamin Szumskyj ; foreword by Robert Hood. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3503.L718 Z77 2009

Caminer, Sylvia and Gallagher, John Andrew
"Joseph Stefano." (Interview). Films in Review XLVII/1-2, Jan-Feb 96; p.27-35.
Joseph Stephano confesses that at first glance the book 'Psycho' appeared to him to be unsuitable for a Hitchcock film. Hitchcock liked the alterations that Stephano made in the story and chose him to write the script for his film. Stephano affirms that Hitchcock had a fascination for the triangle setup of the smart man, the beautiful woman, and the smartass man. He notes that present-day Hollywood producers feel the need for controlling writers.

Cohen, Keith.
"Psycho: The Suppression of Female Desire (and Its Return)." Reading Narrative: Form, Ethics, Ideology / edited by James Phelan. pp: 147-161. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, c1989.
Main Stack PN212.R431 1989

Crawford, Larry.
"Looking, Film, Painting: The Trickster's In Site/In Sight/ Insight/ Incite." Wide Angle, vol. 5 no. 3. 1983. pp: 64-69.

Deutsch, Stephen
"Psycho and the orchestration of anxiety." Soundtrack, 2010, Vol. 3 Issue 1, p53-66, 14p
UC users only

Dick, Bernard F.
"Hitchcock's terrible mothers." (filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock's portrayal of women)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n4 (Oct, 2000):238 (12 pages).
This article examines the mother-child relationships in the films by Alfred Hitchcock, focusing on 'Psycho' and 'The Birds.' Topics addressed include matricide, as well as the psychological and sexual dynamics of mother-child relationships.

Doty, Alexander
"'He's a Transvestite!' 'Ah, Not Exactly.' How Queer is My Psycho." In: Flaming classics : queering the film canon / Alexander Doty. New York : Routledge, 2000.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.H55 D68 2000

Durgnat, Raymond.
A long hard look at 'Psycho' London : BFI Pub., 2002.
MAIN: PN1997.P793 D87 2002

Erb, Cynthia Marie
"'Have You Ever Seen the Inside of One of Those Places?': Psycho, Foucault, and the Postwar Context of Madness." Cinema Journal, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 45-63, Summer 2006
UC users only

Genter, Robert.
"'We All Go a Little Mad Sometimes': Alfred Hitchcock, American Psychoanalysis, and the Construction of the Cold War Psychopath." Canadian Review of American Studies, 2010, Vol. 40 Issue 2, p133-162, 30p
UC users only

Gordon, Paul
"Disrespectful respectabilities : Psycho." In: Dial "M" for mother : a Freudian Hitchcock / Paul Gordon. Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 G67 2008

Gough-Yates, Kevin
"Private Madness and Public Lunacy." Films & Filming XVIII/5, Feb 72; p.26-30. illus.
Discusses the similarities in the following three films: "Peeping Tom", "Lilith", "Psycho" which all explore abnormalities inherent in the main characters.

Griffith, James
"Psycho. Not Guilty As Charged." Film Comment XXXII/4, July-Aug 96; p.76-79.
"Although the images in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho--a Victorian mansion on a hill, a motel shower, a corpse in the cellar, a man in a dress and a wig--have been disinterred too often in "hommages" (not to mention the sequels), the original film still has a power to disturb. Critics frequently identify the film's power with Hitchcock's masterful use of the essential voyeurism of the cinema: Viewers participate in evil by secretly peeping at illicit scenes and then identifying with the illicit, even criminal, acts shown. The real reason that Psycho disturbs viewers, however, is not because of what it allows them secretly to watch but because of what it makes them confront--the terror of being secretly watched." [Art Index]

Grimes, Larry E.
"Shall These Bones Live? The Problem of Bodies in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho and Joel Coen's Blood Simple." In: Screening the Sacred: Religion, Myth, and Ideology in Popular American Film / edited by Joel W. Martin, Conrad E. Ostwalt, Jr. pp: 19-29. Boulder: Westview Press, 1995.
Main Stack PN1995.5.S36 1995

Hall, John W.
"Touch of Psycho? Hitchcock's Debt to Welles."Bright Lights /14, 95; p.18-22.
A comparison of the work and personality of Hitchcock and Welles, noting the similarities in "Psycho" to "Touch of evil".

Hark, Ina Rae
"Psycho or psychic?" In: After Hitchcock : influence, imitation, and intertextuality
Edited by David Boyd and R. Barton Palmer. 1st ed. Austin, TX : University of Texas Press, 2006.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.A68 2006
Contents via Google books

Harvey, James
"Janet Leigh and Psycho." In: Movie love in the fifties / James Harvey. 1st ed. New York: Alfred A. Knopf: Distributed by Random House, 2001.
Main Stack PN1995.9.L6.H37 2001
PFA PN1995.9.L6.H37 2001 Pacific Film Archive collection
Contents via Google books

Hawkins, Joan:
""See It from the Beginning": Hitchcock's Reconstruction of Film History." Hitchcock Annual [1999-2000] 13-29
"Examines the changes which filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock introduced in film spectatorship with the release of his 1960 film "Psycho." States that Hitchcock demanded exhibitors enforce the policy that once the film had started, nobody would be admitted inside the theater. Informs that a special manager training film sought to ensure that theater managers would know how to maximize the audience anticipation which Hitchcock so carefully fostered. Considers the explicit reasons why "Psycho" seemed to demand such a unique spectator policy. Imparts that Hitchcock effectively engaged both art cinema and horror conventions, by forcing spectators to view "Psycho" from beginning to end." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Hendershot, Cyndy.
"The Cold War Horror Film: Taboo and Transgression in The Bad Seed, The Fly, and Psycho." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 2001 Spring, 29:1, 20-31.
UC users only
"The writer analyzes the interplay of taboo and transgression in three cold war-era films--Mervyn LeRoy's The Bad Seed, Kurt Neumann's The Fly, and Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho--drawing on the theories of Georges Bataille. She points out that in cold war America, the transgressive individual became equated with the communist who threatened to destroy America from within. She considers the characters of Rhoda in The Bad Seed, Andre and Helene in The Fly, and Marion and Norman Bates in Psycho. She reveals that Psycho's Norman Bates is the most frightening of these films' three cold war transgressors because he transgresses taboos without his conscious knowledge." [Art Index]

Hendershot, Cyndy.
"The Possession of the Male Body: Masculinity in The Italian, Psycho, and Dressed to Kill." Readerly/Writerly Texts, vol. 2 no. 2. 1995 Spring-Summer. pp: 75-112.

Hesling, W.
"Classical Cinema and the Spectator. Literature/Film Quarterly XV/3, 87; p.181-189.
On the way in which "Psycho" confirms Christian Metz's view of the way in which a Hollywood film positions the spectator.

Hitchcock, Alfred
Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho / [direction and screenplay by Alfred Hitchcock] ; edited by Richard J. New York : Universe Books, 1974.
Pacific Film Archive PN1997.P79 H5 1974

Husarik, Stephen
"Transformation of "The Psycho Theme" in Bernard's Herrmann's Music for Psycho." Interdisciplinary Humanities; Fall2009, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p144-158, 15p
UC users only

Kendrick, James
"Disturbing New Pathways: Psycho and the Priming of the Audience." Journal of Popular Film and Television Spring2010, Vol. 38 Issue 1, p2-9, 8p
UC users only

Klinger, Barbara.
"Psycho: The Institutionalization of Female Sexuality." Wide Angle, vol. 5 no. 1. 1982. pp: 49-55.
In "Psycho" the narrative system is inextricably bound up in questions of sexuality and the orchestrations of its containment.

Kraft, Jeff
Footsteps in the fog : Alfred Hitchcock's San FranciscoSanta Monica, CA : Santa Monica Press, c2002.
BANC: PN1998.3.H58 K73 2002; Non-circulating; may be used only in The Bancroft Library.
Main StackPN1998.3.H58.K73 2002

Leitch, Thomas M.
"101 ways to tell Hitchcock's 'Psycho' from Gus Van Sant's." (Gus Van Sant's 1998 remake of Alfred Hitchcock's 'Pyscho') Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n4 (Oct, 2000):269 (5 pages).
UC users only
This article lists the ways in which Gus Van Sant's 1998 remake of Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror movie 'Psycho' is different from the original. Topics discussed include casting, dialogue changes, camera angles, sound, and pacing.

Kolker, Robert Phillip
Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho : A Casebook Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2004
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]

Leonard, Garry
"Monsters and Mortgages: The Horror Movie as Prime Economic Indicator." Film International, vol. 8, no. 1 [43], pp. 11-17, 2010
UC users only

Luna, Alina M.
"To spare a fly and harm a son: Hitchcock's Norma Bates." In: Visual perversity : a re-articulation of maternal instinct / Alina M. Luna. Lanham, Md. : Lexington Books, c2004.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN56.5.M67 L86 2004

Lunde, Erik S.
"'Saying It With Pictures': Alfred Hitchcock and Painterly Images in 'Psycho'." In: Beyond the Stars III / edited by Paul Loukides and Linda K. Fuller. pp: 97-105 Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green University Popular Press, c1990
Main Stack PN1995.9.C36.B49 1990 Library has: v.[1]-5 (c1990-c1996)
Moffitt PN1995.9.C36.B49 1990 Library has: v.[1]-5 (c1990-c1996)
Contents via Google books

Lyden, John
"Psycho." In: Film as religion : myths, morals, and rituals / John C. Lyden. New York : New York University Press, c2003.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.5 .L89 2003

Magistrale, Tony.
"The terror of Hitchcock: : Vertigo, Psycho, The birds." In: Abject terrors : surveying the modern and postmodern horror film / Tony Magistrale. New York : Peter Lang, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.M248 2005
Moffitt PN1995.9.H6.M248 2005
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip059/2005007036.html

Matthew-Walker, R.
"Hitchcock's Little Joke." Films & Filming /382, July 86; p.26-27.
Study of inconsistencies in the time span of the film.

McGonigal, Jane.
"Watching Horror: A Gendered Look at Terrorism, or, Everything I Need to Know I Learnedin Psycho." Senses of Cinema: an Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious & Eclectic Discussion of Cinema.17:(no pagination). 2001 Nov-Dec.

Miller, Toby.
"Psycho's Bad Timing: The Sensual Obsessions of Film Theory." In: A companion to film theory / edited by Toby Miller and Robert Stam. Malden : Blackwell, 1999.
Contents via Google books
Graduate Services PN1995 .C626 1999
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .C626 1999

Misek, Richard.
"A Parallax View of Psycho." International Journal of Zizek Studies,Vol 2, No 1 (2008)
UC users only

Mogg, Ken
"Hitchcock made only one horror film: Matters of time, space, causality, and the Schopenhauerian will." In: Dark thoughts : philosophic reflections on cinematic horror / edited by Steven Jay Schneider, Daniel Shaw. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2003.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.H6 D27 2003

Morris, Christopher D.
"Psycho's Allegory of Seeing."Literature/Film Quarterly XXIV/1, Jan 96; p.47-51.
UC users only
The ways in which Alfred Hitchcock's film 'Psycho' confounds the sense of understanding typically attached to seeing reflect the influence of surrealism on his films. The film detaches the signifier from the object it is intended to signify to undermine the viewer's assumption that what the viewer sees the viewer understands. Impersonations, shadows and rapid cut editing are used to heighten the sense that all human visual interpretation has a component of delusion and deception.

Morris, Christopher D.
"Psycho's allegory of seeing." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Morrisson, Ian.
"The Art of Murder." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture Issue 9
Examines The Art of Murder in Strangers On a Train, Dial M For Murder, Blackmail, and Psycho.

Mun-Hou, Lo
"Alfred Hitchcock and the Phobic Maternal Body." In: Motherhood misconceived : representing the maternal in U.S. films / edited by Heather Addison, Mary Kate Goodwin-Kelly, Elaine Roth. Albany : State University of New York Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks HQ759 .M8745 2009

Naremore, James.
Filmguide to Psycho. Bloomington, Indiana University Press [1973]. Series title: Indiana University Press filmguide series; FG-4.
UCB Moffitt PN1997.P79 .N3

Naremore, James.
"Remaking Psycho." In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock Annual Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Negra, Diane.
"Coveting the Feminine: Victor Frankenstein, Norman Bates, and Buffalo Bill." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 24 no. 2. 1996. pp: 193-200.
A psychoanalytical reading of "Psycho", "The silence of the lambs" and Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein', focusing on the gender anxiety of the villain or monster in each.

Palmer, R. Barton
"The Metafictional Hitchcock: The Experience of Viewing and the Viewing of Experience in Rear Window and Psycho." Cinema Journal v. 25 (Winter '86) p. 4-19
UC users only
Discusses how Hitchcock's later films conform to and, at the same time, critique narrative traditions.

Jeanne T. Allen Responds to R. Barton Palmer's "The Metafictional Hitchcock: The Experience of Viewing and the Viewing of Experience in "Rear Window" and "Psycho" ("Cinema Journal," Winter 1985) Cinema Journal, Vol. 25, No. 4, Summer, 1986
UC users only

Petlewski, Paul.
"Generic Tension in Psycho." In: Ambiguities in Literature and Film: selected papers from the Seventh Annual Florida State University Conference on Literature and Film. pp: 50-55. Gainesville, FL: University Presses of Florida; Tallahassee: Florida State University Press, c1987.
Main Stack PN56.A55.F551 1987

Pomerance, Murray
"A modern gesture: perpetual motion and screen suspense." Film International v. 5 no. 5 (2007) p. 42-53
UC users only
"Murray Pomerace describes some features of a particular modern gesture in cinema, by which he means a way that film has of speaking about the modern world by showing that world emphatically. He believes that such an interrogation will enable consideration of the especially filmic quality of modernity. He illustrates his thesis with examples from F. W. Murnau's The Last Laugh (Der Lttze Mann) (1924), Charlie Chaplin's Modern Times (1936), and Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960). In Murnau's film a revolving door is used in a fashion that expresses the mouvement perpetuel of modernity. Chaplin's performance of the "Nonsense Song" in his film carries no particular meaning or relevance, thereby enabling it to have all possible meaning and relevance while recapturing some of that directness and uncertainty which imbued the earliest cinema. A simple hand gesture in Hitchcock's film is able to conjure up implications of movement toward both the future and past. This gesture is quintessentially modern, locating the character in a state of permanent suspense." [Art Index]

Pool, Jay
"Psycho: Queering Hitchcock's Classic." Bright Lights, August 2008 | Issue 61

Recchia, Edward.
"Through a Shower Curtain Darkly: Reflexivity as a Dramatic Component of 'Psycho.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v19, n4 (Oct, 1991):258 (9 pages).
Hitchcock uses reflexivity to good effect in 'Psycho'(1960) by making the viewers actors in the on-screen drama. The direction tells the story first from Marion's point of view. The perspective shifts shortly before Marion's murder, but the true identity of the murderer is not revealed. Hitchcock encourages the audience's identification with Marion, and then with Norman Bates, but also slowly reveals to them a more realistic perspective. The audience is both participant and viewer in 'Psycho.'

Rebello, Stephen.
"Alfred Hitchcock Goes Psycho." (the making of the motion picture "Psycho") American Film v15, n7 (April, 1990):38 (8 pages).

Rebello, Stephen.
Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho / Stephen Rebello. New York: Dembner Books: Distributed by Norton, c1990.
UCB Main PN1997.P793 R43 1990

Recchia, Edward.
"Through a Shower Curtain Darkly: Reflexivity as a Dramatic Component of 'Psycho.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v19, n4 (Oct, 1991):258 (9 pages).

Roth, Marty.
"Remembering Psycho." North Dakota Quarterly, vol. 62 no. 3. 1994-1995 Summer. pp: 161-74.

Saito, Ayako
"Hitchcock's Trilogy: A Logic of mise en Scene." In: Endless Night: Cinema and Psychoanalysis, Parallel Histories / edited by Janet Bergstrom. pp: 200-248 Berkeley: University of California Press, c1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P783.E53 1999
Introduction Challenges the way Lacanian theory, as construed within film theory, has narrowed the field of possibilities of psychoanalytic approaches to cinema. Specifically, the question of affect is focused on, and how it may be traced through textual analysis. The author argues that affect has attracted little attention within psychoanalytic film theory because of the strong emphasis on the Lacanian psychoanalytic model, which revolves around the question of language and the gaze. Drawing on the writings of Andre Green, Nicolas, Abraham and Maria Torok as well as Raymond Bellour and Lacan, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho as components of a single filmic system in the light of 3 psychical structures: melancholia, mania and paranoia/schizophrenia, the degree to which the narrative, visual style and dominant affectivity of each film are interrelated and determined by each other is demonstrated. [abstract from PsychInfo]

Schaffer, Bill
"Cutting the Flow: Thinking Psycho." Senses of Cinema Issue No. 6, May 2000

Schantz, Ned
"Hospitality and the Unsettled Viewer: Hitchcock's Shadow Scenes." Camera Obscura: A Journal of Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, vol. 25, no. 73 [1], pp. 1-27, 2010
UCB users only

Schneider, Irving.
"Deus ex Animo: Or, Why a Doc?" Journal of Popular Film and Television vol. 18 no. 1. 1990 Spring. pp: 36-39.

Schneider, Steven
"Manufacturing horror in (Alfred) Hitchcock's Psycho." CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p70-5. Word
UCB users only

Schmidt, Michael.
"The Parlor Scene from Psycho: Images of Duality." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture
"Though tame by today's standards, Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has done more to advance the horror genre (slasher films in particular) than any other film of its time; however, the brilliance of Psycho does not lie in its abhorrent concept, but rather in the way that Hitchcock melds the obvious and the mysterious. Indeed, in one of the most revealing scenes, just one third of the way through the film, Hitchcock is outrageously obvious in his intentions; yet his artistry in lighting, camera angle, and mise-en-scene make it possible to hide in plain sight and create a world that is rife with duality."

Sharrett, Christopher
"The myth of apocalypse and the horror film: the primacy of Psycho and The birds." In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock annual Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Skerry, Philip J.
The shower scene in Hitchcock's "Psycho" : creating cinematic suspense and terror / Philip J. Skerry Lewiston : Edwin Mellen Press, c2005.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.P79 S54 2005

Sterritt, David.
"Hitchcock's 'Psycho' still influences movies." (Alfred Hitchcock) (column) Christian Science Monitor v82, n171 (Tue, July 31, 1990):11, col 4, 20 col in.

Tanner, Louise
"Anthony Perkins." Films in Review XXXVII/8-9, Aug-Sept 86; p.418-421.
Perkins discusses his career and long association with the "Psycho" series.

Taubin, Amy.
"Killing Men." (serial killers in motion pictures) Sight and Sound v1, n1 (May, 1991):14 (6 pages).

Telotte, J.P.
"Faith and Idolatry in the Horror Film." Literature/Film Quarterly VIII/3, 80; p.143-155. illus.
Borrowing from the critical approach of phenomenology, the author examines the audience's perceptual involvement with the horror film, esp. "Psycho".

Tharp, Julie.
"The Transvestite as Monster: Gender Horror in The Silence of the Lambs and Psycho." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 19 no. 3. 1991 Fall. pp: 106-13.
UC users only

Thomson, David
"Salieri, Psycho."Film Comment XXI/1, Jan-Feb 85; p.70-75.
Analyses the character of Salieri in "Amadeus" in comparison with Norman Bates in "Psycho".

Thomas, Deborah
"On being Norman: performance and inner life in Hitchcock's Psycho." Cineaction, 1997, Issue 44, p66-72, 7p
UC users only

Thomas, Deborah
"On being Norman: performance and inner life in Hitchcock's Psycho." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Toles, George.
"'If Thine Eye Offend Thee . . .': Psycho and the Art of Infection." New Literary History: A Journal of Theory and Interpretation, vol. 15 no. 3. 1984 Spring. pp: 631-651.
UC users only

Vanneman, Alan.
"Alfred Hitchock and Psycho: Hitch's - and by now the wholedamn culture's seminal Oedipalnightmare revisited." Bright Lights

Verevis, Constantine
"For Ever Hitchcock: Psycho and its remake." In: After Hitchcock : influence, imitation, and intertextuality
Edited by David Boyd and R. Barton Palmer. 1st ed. Austin, TX : University of Texas Press, 2006.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.A68 2006

Warren, Denise.
"Hitchcock's Psycho: The Spatial Film-Work of Madness." Interdisciplinary Journal for Germanic Linguistics and Semiotic Analysis, 2000 Spring, 5:1, 37-70.

Williams, Linda.
"Discipline and Distraction: Psycho, Visual Culture, and Postmodern Cinema." In: 'Culture' and the Problem of the Disciplines / edited by John Carlos Rowe. pp: 87-120. Series title: Critical Theory Institute Books. New York: Columbia University Press, c1998.
Main Stack HM101.C89554 1998

Williams, Linda.
"Discipline and Fun: Psycho and Postmodern Cinema." In: Reinventing film studies / edited by Christine Gledhill and Linda Williams. pp: 351-78. London: Arnold ; New York: Co-published in the United States of America by Oxford University Press, 2000.
Grad Svcs PN1995.R455 2000
Main Stack PN1995.R455 2000

Williams, Linda.
"Learning to Scream." Sight and Sound v4, n12 (Dec, 1994):14 (4 pages).
UC users only
Alfred Hitchcock's emphasizing that no one be allowed inside the theater after the screening of the movie 'Psycho' started improved discipline among the audience. His promotional trailers, along with his insistence on audience punctuality, enhanced appreciation of his films. Audience reaction to the horror in the film, while revealing the differences in the attitudes of men and women, also confuses gender roles.

Wilshire, Peter.
"Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho and 'The Art of Pure Cinema'." Screen Education, Winter2009, Issue 54, p131-136, 6p
UC users only
The article attempts to examine the film "Psycho," directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It notes that Hitchcock used filmic technique in making this film to manipulate the audience's emotions and expectations. It reviews the film and discusses how Hitchcock created the psychological situation using the camera.

Rear Window

Alfred Hitchcock's Rear window
Edited by John Belton. Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.R353 A43 2000

Allen, Jeanne.
"Looking through 'Rear Window': Hitchcock's Traps and Lures of Heterosexual Romance." In: Female Spectators: Looking at Film and Television / edited by E. Deidre Pribram. pp: 31-44. London; New York: Verso, 1988. Questions for feminism.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.F44 1988
Moffitt PN1995.9.W6.F44 1988

Almansi, Renato J.
"Alfred Hitchcock's disappearing women: A study in scopophilia and object loss." International Review of Psycho-Analysis. 1992 Spr. 19 (1): p. 81-90
"A psychoanalytic investigation of A. Hitchcock's Rear Window shows that this film is essentially grounded in the coalescence of 2 psychic mechanisms: an intense fear of object loss that echoes throughout the film and a sadistically interpreted primal scene. It is suggested that this fusion may have been enhanced by the existence of a psychological link between these mechanisms in the fact that primal scene exposure may activate separation anxiety. The genetic connection between fear of object loss and the development of scopophilic tendencies is discussed, and literature on the topic is presented. The origins and operation of these mechanisms are examined in Hitchcock's films, in his character structure, and in his life history." (French, German & Spanish abstracts) ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

Atkinson, David.
"Hitchcock's Techniques Tell Rear Window Story." American Cinematographer v. 71 (Jan. '90) p. 34-40.

Belton, John.
"The Space of Rear Window." (Alfred Hitchcock) MLN v103, n5 (Dec, 1988):1121 (18 pages).

Benton, Robert J.
"Film As Dream: Alfred Hitchcock's "Rear Window"." Psychoanalytic Review 71:3 (1984:Nov.) 483

Berry, Sarah
"She's Too Everything": Marriage and Masquerade in "Rear Window" and "To Catch a Thief." Hitchcock Annual [2001-2002] 79-107
"Discusses Grace Kelly's characters in Alfred Hitchcock's "Rear Window" and "To Catch a Thief." States that the road to marriage is represented as astruggle for control in which the women find that they must camouflage theirequality in order to win a proposal, arguing that the characters' assertivefemininity reveals tensions in marriage of the 1950s. Highlights the waycostume and color is used to associate femininity with clothing andperformance, emphasizing the performativity of gender and the socialconstruction of identity." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Bertolini, John A.
"Rear window, or the reciprocated glance."In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock annual Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Brand, Dana.
"Rear-View Mirror: Hitchcock, Poe, and the Flaneur in America." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 123-34. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Corber, Robert J.
"Resisting History: Rear Window and the Limits of the Postwar Settlement." In: National Identities and Post-Americanist Narratives / Donald E. Pease, editor. pp: 21-48. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1994. New Americanists
Main Stack PS169.N35.N37 1994
Moffitt PS169.N35.N37 19941

Corber, Robert J.
"Resisting History: Rear Window and the Limits of the Postwar Settlement." Boundary 2: An International Journal of Literature and Culture, vol. 19 no. 1. 1992 Spring. pp: 121-48.

Diski, Jenny
"The Ticking Clock." Sight & Sound I/4, Aug 91; p.35.
The novelist J.D. reflects on irresolution in Hitchcock's films, esp. "Rear window".

Edelman, Lee.
"Rear Window's Glasshole." In: Out Takes: Essays on Queer Theory and Film / edited by Ellis Hanson. pp: 72-96. Durham [N.C.]: Duke University Press, 1999. Series Q
Main Stack PN1995.9.H55.O88 1999

Fawell, John.
"Fashion dreams: Hitchcock, women, and Lisa Fremont." (Alfred Hitchcock and his portrayal of women)(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n4 (Oct, 2000):274 (10 pages).
UC users only
Issues discussed concern Alfred Hitchcock's alleged misogynistic views and his portrayal of women in his films, focusing on the character of Lisa Fremont in 'Rear Window.' Topics addressed include Hitchcock's tendency to dominate his female actresses, his fascination with women's fashion, and how Lisa Fremont's fashion relates to the themes in 'Rear Window.'.

Fawell, John.
Hitchcock's Rear window : the well-made film / John Fawell. Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2001.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.R353 F38 2001
Pacific Film Archive PN1997.R37 F38 2001

Fawell, John.
"A Loneliness amidst a Populace: Hitchcock's Rear Window." North Dakota Quarterly.68(1):107-20. 2001 Winter.

Fawell, John.
"Torturing Women and Mocking Men: Hitchcock's Rear Window." Midwest Quarterly-A Journal ofContemporary Thought. 44(1):88-104. 2002 Autumn
UC users only

Ferrara, Patricia.
"Through Hitchcock's Rear Window Again." New Orleans Review, vol. 12 no. 3. 1985 Fall. pp: 21-30.

Glenn, Kathleen M.
"'Alusion al tiempo' and Hitchcock's Rear Window: Voyeurism and Self-Reflexivity." Monographic Review/Revista Monografica, vol. 4. 1988. pp: 16-24.

Gordon, Paul
"Cast-ration by the Rear window ." In: Dial "M" for mother : a Freudian Hitchcock / Paul Gordon. Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 G67 2008

Harris, Thomas.
"Rear Window and Blow-Up: Hitchcock's Straightforwardness vs. Antonioni's Ambiguity." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 15 no. 1. 1987. pp: 60-63.
Despite variations in narrative execution, Hitchcock and Antonioni share a desire to express themselves in a purely visual manner in "Rear window" and "Blowup".

Howe, Lawrence.
"Through the Looking Glass: Reflexivity, Reciprocality, and Defenestration in Hitchcock's Rear Window." College Literature, Winter2008, Vol. 35 Issue 1, p16-37, 22p UC users only

Jenkins, Steve
"Hitchcock x 2. Refocusing the Spectator."Monthly Film Bulletin LI/601, Feb 84; p.34-36.
Critical reaction to "Rear window" on its re-release, compared to the original reviews.

Lee, S.H.
"Escape and Commitment in Hitchcock's Rear Window." Post Script VII/2, Winter 88; p.18-28.
The voyeurism of the James Stewart character in "Rear Window" is indicative of his refusal of commitment.

Mason, Carol.
"Rear Window's Lisa Freemont: Masochistic Female Spectator or Post-War Socioeconomic Threat?" In: Social and Political Change in Literature and Film: selected papers from the Sixteenth Annual Florida State University. pp: 109-21. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, c1994
Main Stack PN51.F54 1991

Miller, Gabriel
"Beyond the Frame: Hitchcock, Art, and the Ideal." Post Script V/2, Winter 86; p.31-46.
On the meanings implicit in A.H.'s use of multiple frame devices, esp. in "Rear Window" and "Vertigo".

Minissale, Gregory
"Beyond Internalism and Externalism: Husserl and Sartre's Image Consciousness in Hitchcock and Buñuel." Film-Philosophy, Vol 14, No 1 (2010)

Nichols, Mary P. and Schaeffer, Denise
"Art and Liberalism in Hitchcock's Rear Window." Perspectives on Political Science v28, n3 (Summer, 1999):125.
UC users only
Deals with the dangers of liberal individualism on the human soul as depicted in the motion picture `Rear Window.' Discussion on the attitudes of the main characters of the motion picture; Examination on the plot of the movie; How liberal individualism can be arrested from poisoning the human soul.

Palmer, R. Barton
"The Metafictional Hitchcock: The Experience of Viewing and the Viewing of Experience in Rear Window and Psycho." Cinema Journal v. 25 (Winter '86) p. 4-19.
Discusses how Hitchcock's later films conform to and, at the same time, critique narrative traditions.

Perlmutter, Ruth
"Rear Window: A 'Construction Story'." Journal of Film and Video Vol. 37, No. 2, SEXUAL DIFFERENCE (Spring 1985), pp. 53-65
UC users only

Rowe, John Carlos
"Caged heat : feminist rebellion in Henry James's In the cage and Alfred Hitchcock's Rear window." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Rosenbaum, Jonathan
"Backyard Ethics: Hitchcock's Rear Window." In: Essential cinema : on the necessity of film canons / Jonathan Rosenbaum. Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1994 .R5684 2004
Moffitt PN1994 .R5684 2004
Pacific Film Archive PN1994 .R63 2004

Rushing, Robert A.
"The Real of Desire: Travel/Detection/Hitchcock/Antonioni." Communication Review, 2003, Vol. 6 Issue 4, p313-326, 14p
UC users only

Sharff, Stefan.
The Art of Looking in Hitchcock's Rear Window / Stefan Sharff. 1st Limelight ed. New York: Limelight Editions, 1997
UCB Main PN1997.R353 S52 1997

Shell, Marc.
"The cast of Rear Window; or, cinema and akinesia." In: Polio and its aftermath : the paralysis of culture / Marc Shell. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2005.
Public Hlth RC181.U5.S53 2005

Smith, Julian.
"The Strange Case of Lars Thorwald: Rounding Up the Usual Suspect in Rear Window." New Orleans Review, vol. 19 no. 2. 1992 Summer. pp: 21-29.

Stam, Robert.
"Hitchcock's Rear Window: Reflexivity and the Critique of Voyeurism." Enclitic, vol. 7 no. 1. 1983 Spring. pp: 136-145.
On the film as a multi-track enquiry concerning the cinematic apparatus, the positioning of the spectator and the sexual, moral and political implications of that positioning.

Stam, Robert; Pearson, Roberta
"Hitchcock's Rear window: reflexivity and the critique of voyeurism." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Strick, P.
"Rear Window." (motion picture review) Films and Filming no350 Nov 1983. p. 38-9

Steffen-Fluhr, Nancy
"Disabled by desire: body doubles in "Rear Window" (1942), Rear Window (1954), and Rear Window (1998)." Post Script Summer 2003 v22 i3 p69(21) (10297 words)
UC users only
"Steffen-Fluhr examines portrayals of a disabled character in three connected texts: the protagonist in Cornell Woolrich's 1942 short story "Rear Window," Alfred Hitchcock's Hollywood thriller "Rear Window," which is loosely based on Woolrich's story, [H]and the 1998 ABC-TV remake of Hitchcock's "Rear Window," directed by Jeff Bleckner [H]and starring Christopher Reeve. Steffan-Fluhr posits that the disabled body is often a repository for feelings of desire, [H]and explores how in each text the wheelchair-bound protagonist is drawn into a mysterious, dangerous, voyeuristic game with his "double," a man he witnesses from his apartment window who is apparently covering up a murder. Steffan-Fluhr offers a reading of the disabled hero's actions as motivated by sexual desire in the first two texts, [H]and assesses the television remake in terms of the actor Reeve's own real-life paralysis fueling the character's desire to escape his body." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Suarez, Juan A.
"The Rear View: Paranoia and Homosocial Desire in Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window." In: Gender, I-Deology: Essays on Theory, Fiction and Film / edited by Chantal Cornut-Gentille D'Arcy and Jose Angel Garcia Landa. pp: 59-69. Amsterdam; Atlanta: Rodopi, 1996. Postmodern Studies; 16
Main Stack PN56.F46.G46 19963

Sullivan, Jack
"Musical Redemption in Hitchcock's 'Rear Window'." Chronicle of Higher Education, vol. 50, no. 39, pp. B18-B19, June 2004.

Toles, George E.
"Alfred Hitchcock's 'Rear Window' as Critical Allegory." Boundary 2 v16, n2-3 (Wntr-Spring, 1989):225 (21 pages).
UC users only

Weinstock, J.
"5 minutes to Alexanderplatz." Camera Obscura 27, Sept 91; p.76-87.
Relates the power of two Berlin exhibitions - Christian Boltanski's 'Missing house' and a collection of vintage photographs entitled 'Bilderlust' - to their focus on spectatorship; likens this to the work of Hitchcock in "Rear Window".

Travers, Peter.
"Rear window." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n834 (Feb 17, 2000):63 (2 pages).

Wood, Robin
"Fear of Spying."American Film IX/2, Nov 83; p.28-35.
Psychoanalytical analysis of "Vertigo" and "Rear window" which seeks to answer feminist charges of misogyny against Hitchcock.

Young, Jane.
"A Continuous Spiral: Boileau-Narcejac's Sueurs froides and Hitchcock's Vertigo." In: Crime scenes: detective narratives in European culture since 1945 / edited by Anne Mullen and Emer O'Beirne. pp: 48-58 Amsterdam; Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 2000. Internationale Forschungen zur allgemeinen und vergleichenden Literaturwissenschaft; 50
Main Stack PN3448.D4.C756 2000

Rebecca

Ardolino, Frank.
"The Iconic Influence of the Dead: Iconoclasm and Idolatry in Hitchcock's Rebecca, Vertigo, and Psycho." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, vol. 12 no. 1-2. 1991 Mar. pp: 130-41

Austin, Andrea
"Hitchcock reads Rebecca." In: Empowerment versus oppression : twenty first century views of popular romance novels / edited by Sally Goade. Newcastle, United Kingdom : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, c2007.
Main Stack PN3448.L67.E57 2007

Berenstein, Rhona J.
Adaptation, Censorship, and Audiences of Questionable Type: Lesbian Sightings in Rebecca (1940) and The Uninvited (1944)." Cinema Journal vol. 37 no. 3. 1998. pp: 16-37.
UC users only

Berenstein, Rhona J.
"Adaptation, Censorship, and Audiences of Questionable Type: Lesbian Sightings in Rebecca (1940) and The Uninvited (1944)." Cinema Journal vol. 37 no. 3. 1998. pp: 16-37.

Berenstein, Rhona J.
"'I'm Not the Sort of Person Men Marry': Monsters, Queers, and Hitchcock's Rebecca." In: Out in Culture: Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Essays on Popular Culture. / edited by Corey K. Creekmur and Alexander Doty. pp: 239-61.. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. Series Q
Main Stack HQ76.2.U5.O98 19952

"Brand-Name Literature: Film Adaptation and Selznick International Pictures' "Rebecca" (1940)." Cinema Journal v. 45 no. 3 (Spring 2006) p. 32-58
"Using the 1940 film Rebecca, this article explores the strategies of literary acquisition and film adaptation employed by Selznick International Pictures in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Key here is the argument that the adaptation and marketing of Rebecca is consistent with a branding strategy that the independent studio instituted to offset industrial disadvantages." [Art Index]

Chow, Rey
"When Whiteness Feminizes...: Some Consequences of aSupplementary Logic." Differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies11, no. 3 (1999/2000 Fall): p. 137-68

Doane, Mary Ann.
"Caught and Rebecca: The Inscription of Femininity as Absence." In: Feminist Film Theory: A Reader / edited by Sue Thornham. pp: 70-82. New York: New York University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.F465 1999

Fletcher, John
"Primal scenes and the female gothic: Rebecca and Gaslight." Screen; Vol.XXXVI nr.4 (Winter 1995); p.341-370
UC users only
"The writer discusses women and psychoanalysis in the cinema, focusing on two melodramas of the 1940s--Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca and George Cukor's Gaslight. His analysis centers on the concept of the primal scene, which he describes as the father's assault on or violent possession of the mother, and which he suggests is at the heart of both psychoanalysis and narrative cinema. Both of these films, he suggests, turn on what might be called primal scenes in an extended sense: They depict an intrusion into a space that has been the scene of an act of desire or murder in the past. He describes the films as examples of the female Gothic, a tradition concerned with the disempowerment of women within patriarchal dynastic structures." [Art Index]

Greenhill, Duke
"Rebecca: how a lesbian-inflected movie got made." (ART MEMO) The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide 14.4 (July-August 2007): p44(2). (1500 words)
UC users only

Harbord, Janet
"Between Identification and Desire: Rereading "Rebecca"." Feminist Review No. 53, Speaking Out: Researching and Representing Women (Summer, 1996), pp. 95-107
UC users only

Harpt, Scott.
"Rebecca Before Her Time." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, vol. 18 no. 3-4. 1997 Aug. pp: 186-90.

Hollinger, Karen.
"The Female Oedipal Drama of Rebecca From Novel to Film" Quarterly Review of Film and Video v. 14 (Aug. '93) p. 17-30.
Explores the message to the female audience of the 'paranoid gothic' genre popular in the 1940's, focusing here on "Rebecca", esp. regarding the position of the woman and her role in marriage.

Light, Alison.
"Rebecca." Sight and Sound, vol. 6 no. 5. 1996 May. pp: 28-31.
" A discussion of Hitchcock's film adaptation of Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca. The writer comments on the tension between producer David O. Selznick and Hitchcock regarding how du Maurier's story was to be presented. She argues that unlike du Maurier, Hitchcock and Selznick could not really identify with the young woman narrator's point of view. She points to the film's inability to deal with female hostility toward men and marriage, the bedrock of du Maurier's novel and the flipside too of du Maurier's delight in the character of Rebecca. She contends that the masculine point of view runs away with the film, finally leaving the heroine literally behind as the men all go up to London to discover the truth about Rebecca." [Art Index]

Modleski, Tania.
"'Never to Be Thirty-Six Years Old': Rebecca as Female Oedipal Drama." Wide Angle, vol. 5 no. 1. 1982. pp: 34-41.

Schantz, Ned
"Hospitality and the Unsettled Viewer: Hitchcock's Shadow Scenes." Camera Obscura: A Journal of Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, vol. 25, no. 73 [1], pp. 1-27, 2010
UCB users only

Turner, George.
"Du Maurier + Selznick + Hitchcock = Rebecca." American Cinematographer v. 78 (July '97) p. 84-88.
"The writer discusses Rebecca (1939), a film produced by David O. Selznick and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The film was an adaptation of Daphne du Maurier's book of the same title, and Selznick demanded that the novel be followed faithfully. It tells the story of a young woman who meets a wealthy English widower while on holiday in Monte Carlo. They marry and return to his estate, which appears to be haunted by memories of his first wife, Rebecca. The casting of the lead roles proved difficult, but eventually it was decided that Laurence Olivier should play the part of the widower, with Joan Fontaine in the role of his second wife. Although both producer and director had misgivings about it, the film was a huge popular, critical, and financial hit. At a cost of $1,288,000, it emerged as a marvelous mix of Selznick opulence and Hitchcock inventiveness." [Art Index]

Waldmah, Diane
""At last I can tell it to Someone!": Feminine Point of View and Subjectivity in the Gothic Romance Film of the 1940s." Cinema Journal; Winter84, Vol. 23 Issue 2, p29-40, 12p
UCB users only

Rope

Belton, John
"Alfred Hitchcock's "Under Capricorn": montage entranced by mise-en-scene." Quarterly Review of Film Studies VI/4, Fall 81; p.365-383. bibliogr.
Analyzes "Rope" and "Under Capricorn", relating their long-take styles to A. H.'s other works.

Dellolio, Peter J.
"Filmic Space and Real Time in Rope." Midwest Quarterly: A Journal of Contemporary Thought, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 87-101, Autumn 2008
UCB users only

Fass, Paula S.
"Making and Remaking an Event: The Leopold and Loeb Case in American Culture." The Journal of American History, Vol. 80, No. 3. (Dec., 1993), pp. 919-951.
UCB users only

Lawrence, Amy.
"American Shame: Rope, James Stewart, and the Postwar Crisis in American Masculinity." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 55-76. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Lawrence, Amy
"Jimmy Stewart is Being Beaten: Rope and the Postwar Crisis in American Masculinity." Quarterly Review of Film and Video XVI/1, July 95; p.41-58.
" The writer discusses the 1948 film Rope, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and featuring James Stewart. Stewart's star-persona was one of the most sympathetic, troubled, and disturbing in Hollywood at the time. In Rope, Stewart's first collaboration with Hitchcock, it is evident that the persistence of unresolved issues in Hitchcock's work led to his need for a "James Stewart" type. In both Rope and Hitchcock's 1944 film Lifeboat, the "excesses" of technical experiment have been considered as an attempt to compensate for narrative/cinematic problems and to distract the audience from problematic questions of theme. As with the U-boat commander in Lifeboat, the audience must focus on Stewart's character Rupert in Rope as it is uncertain whether he is essentially good or evil. Through Stewart, Hitchcock condenses the moment of revelation in the film--a climax that Lifeboat avoids--into the focus on a star. The writer goes on to discuss Stewart's identity in his postwar films, the questions of masculinity and heterosexuality that are the root of his displays of anxiety and uncertainty, the significance of Stewart's displays of suffering, and the importance of the war in his persona." [Art Index]

Matthews, Kristin L.
"Reading, Guidance, and Cold War Consensus in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope." Journal of Popular Culture, Aug2010, Vol. 43 Issue 4, p738-760, 23p
UC users only

Miller, D. A.
"Anal Rope." In: Inside/Out: Lesbian Theories, Gay Theories / edited by Diana Fuss. New York: Routledge, 1991.
Main Stack HQ76.25.I58 1991
Moffitt HQ76.25.I58 1991119-41.

Miller, D. A.
"Anal Rope." Representations, No. 32. (Autumn, 1990), pp. 114-133.
UCB users only

Morris, Christopher D.
"Ro/pe." Film Criticism v 24 no2 Winter 1999/2000. p. 17-40
UCB users only
"The writer discusses Rope, a film by Alfred Hitchcock, as a narrative about narrative. A part of Paul de Man's thesis of the "allegory of reading," which included his belief that storytelling exposed the failure of its own act of representation, is most conspicuous in the film's title and central metaphor of rope, which has been recently analyzed as a recurrent trope of and for narrative itself. Throughout the main narrative, there is a challenge to the claims to reference of verbal exchanges that undermine narrative closure by casting doubt on what meaning, if any, has been transferred between characters. The echoing discourses of Rope, like the film's irony (which is pervasive and obvious in relation to homosexuality and the murder), distinguish narrative in general and film narrative in particular as that which both is and is not itself--a narrative line that is uncut and cut, a "rope."" [Art Index]

Pulleine, Tim,
"Rope." (motion picture review)reviewerFilms and Filming v [no361] Oct 1984. p. 46

Salamon, Linda Bradley
"Screening evil in history : Rope, Compulsion, Scarface, Richard III." In: The changing face of evil in film and television / edited by Martin F. Norden. Amsterdam ; New York, NY : Rodopi, 2007.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main Stack PN1995.9.E93.C43 2007

Schantz, Ned
"Hospitality and the Unsettled Viewer: Hitchcock's Shadow Scenes." Camera Obscura: A Journal of Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, vol. 25, no. 73 [1], pp. 1-27, 2010
UCB users only

Turner, G.E.
"Rope - Something Different." American Cinematographer LXVI/2, Feb 85; p.34-40.
Discusses Hitchcock's staging of continuous takes in order to shoot the film in real time.

Wallace, L.
"Continuous sex: the editing of homosexuality in Bound and Rope." Screen (London, England) v. 41 no. 4 (Winter 2000) p. 369-87
UC users only
"In its approach to homosexuality, Larry and Andy Wachowski's 1996 sexual thriller Bound recalls and inverts a representational effect in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope. Rope reveals a homophobic hermeneutic that raises the possibility of homosexuality in its story, only to deny it. Though Rope was approved by the Hays Office as nowhere disclosing the presence of sex perversion, its dialog and mise-en-scene repeatedly connote a homosexuality that is not present in the film. In an inversion of this, Bound's narrative tackles lesbianism head on, but its method of securing homosexual closure is formally oblique, marked more by pictorial displacement and visual excess than avowal and disclosure. With a cinematic sleight of hand for which Hitchcock's thrillers are also known, Bound repeatedly substitutes graphic meaning for a psychological depth for which it is then mistaken. Viewers are convinced they see what is nowhere in evidence, but the cinematic sleight goes unnoticed, perhaps, because of their viewerly investments in narrative outcome and closure." [Art Index]

Waugh, Thomas
"Hauling an old corpse out of Hitchcock's trunk: Rope." In: The fruit machine : twenty years of writings on queer cinema / Thomas Waugh ; foreword by John Greyson. p. 148-50. Durham, NC : Duke University Press, 2000.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H55.W38 2000

Wheatley, Kim
"Gender Politics and the Gothic in Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca." Gothic Studies Volume 4 Issue 2, November 2002, pp 133-144
UC users only
"Examining Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca in terms of the Gothic convention of non-realist doubled and split characters, this essay argues that the slippage of desire between characters, male as well as female, complicates the containment of the dead Rebecca and whatever she represents. Although the splitting of the female protagonist into the unnamed heroine, the ghostly Rebecca and her surrogate Mrs Danvers has been extensively discussed, the use of this strategy as it concerns the male characters has been less often noticed. The replication of the male protagonist, Maxim, by two other male characters at once deepens him psychologically and contaminates him with ghostliness. These two conflicting manoeuvres strengthen his connection with both his wives, the dead as much as the living. But even while the treatment of Maxim empowers Rebecca and her successor, the movie's depiction of male bonding invites a questioning of the extent of female agency."

Wollen, Peter
"Rope: Three Hypotheses." In: Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays / edited by Richard Allen and S. Ishii-Gonzales. pp: 75-85 London: British Film Institute, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.A43 1999

Zizek, Slavoj.
"Enjoy your symptom! : Jacques Lacan in Hollywood and out." New York : Routledge, 1992.
Educ/Psych BF109.L28.Z59 1992
(From the cover) In "Enjoy Your Symptom!" Slavoj Zizek argues for the accessibility and ultimate simplicity of Lacanian theory by linking it with popular Hollywood films. "Enjoy Your Symptom!" is divided into five chapters, each elucidating some fundamental Lacanian notion or theoretical complex--letter, woman, repetition, phallus, father--through a reference to Hollywood and the popular culture which forms the background of our common experience. Each chapter is then divided into two parts. In the first part, Lacan is "in Hollywood," i.e. the notion or complex in question is explained by way of examples from Hollywood or popular culture in general. In the second division, we are out of "Hollywood," i.e. the same notion is elaborated as it is in its inherent content. The "Why . . ." in the title of each chapter suggests the naivete of a child's question: Why Does a Letter Always Arrive at its Destination? Find out with the help of "City Lights," "Now Voyager" and "Letter From an Unknown Woman." Why is Woman a Symptom of Man? See with the help of Roberto Rossellini and Hitchcock's "Rope." Why is every act a repetition? Discover with Chandler's "Playback," "Sophie's Choice," and "The Deerhunter." Why Does the Phallus Appear? Listen to "The Phantom of the Opera" and "The Elephant Man" and to the mother's voice in Hitchcock's films. Why are There Always Two Fathers? You'll only find out in "Twin Peaks," Hammett's "The Glass Key," and other film noir. "Enjoy Your Symptom!" will interest not only those who are intrigued by Jacques Lacan, but also those who enjoy popular culture and 'postmodern' theory.

Sabotage (based on Joseph Conrad's Secret Agent)

Anderegg, Michael A.
"Conrad and Hitchcock: The Secret Agent Inspires Sabotage." Literature Film Quarterly, Summer75, Vol. 3 Issue 3, p215, 11p
UC users only

Cohen, Paula Marantz.
"The Ideological Transformation of Conrad's 'The Secret Agent' Into Hitchcock's 'Sabotage.'" (Alfred Hitchcock, Joseph Conrad) Literature-Film Quarterly v22, n3 (July, 1994):199 (11 pages).
UC users only
Alfred Hitchcock's movie 'Sabotage' made use of Joseph Conrad's novel 'The Secret Agent' with an ideological transformation. The movie uses the plot and characters from the book, but Conrad's cynical view of society was not adopted. Conrad showed the suspicions and troubles of anarchists and spies, indicating the confusion of politics. In the movie, the confusion of human affairs provides suspense within a framework of moral idealism.

Fleishman, Avrom.
" The Secret Agent Sabotaged?" In: Conrad on Film / edited by Gene M. Moore. pp: 48-60. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Main Stack PR6005.O4.Z581165 1997

Fleishman, Avrom.
"The Secret Agent Sabotaged?" Conrad on Film. Cambridge, England. 1997. xvi, 262 pp. pp: 48-60.

GoGwilt, Christopher
The Fiction of Geopolitics: Afterimages of Culture,from Wilkie Collins to Alfred Hitchcock. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000.
Main PR878.P6 G64 2000

Halliwell, Martin
Images of idiocy : the idiot figure in modern fiction and film.Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2004.
Main Stack PN3426.P46.H35 2004
Includes discussion of Secret Agent/Sabotage

Hemmeter, Thomas.
"Adaptation, History, and Textual Suppression: Literary Sources of Hitchcock's Sabotage." In: Literature and Film in the Historical Dimension: selected papers from the Fifteenth Annual Florida State University. pp: 149-61. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, c1994.
Main Stack PN50.F57 1990

Ingersoll, Earl G.
"Conrad and Film: The Secret Agent and Hitchcock's Sabotage." Conradiana, vol. 29 no. 2. 1997 Summer. pp: 134-49.

Leitch, Thomas M.
"Murderous Victims in The Secret Agent and Sabotage." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 1. 1986. pp: 64-68.
In "Sabotage", Hitchcock's adaptation of Joseph Conrad's 'The Secret Agent', he focuses on the problematic relation between action and identity.

Osteen, Mark.
""It doesn't pay to antagonize the public": 'Sabotoage' and Hitchcock's audience." (filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock)(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n4 (Oct, 2000):259 (10 pages).
UC users only
Issues discussed concerns the relationship between filmmaker direction and audience response in Alfred Hitchcock's 1936 film, 'Sabotage.' This article examines violence and spectatorship, as well as the audience's relationship to Mr. Verloc, the protagonist of the film.

Roth, Marty.
"Hitchcock's Secret Agency." Camera Obscura, vol. 30. 1992 May. pp: 35-48.

UC users only

Schneider, Lissa.
"The Woman Alone in Conrad and Hitchcock." In: Conrad on Film / edited by Gene M. Moore. pp: 61-77. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Main Stack PR6005.O4.Z581165 1997

Speidel, Suzanne
"Time of Death in Joseph Conrad The Secret Agent and Alfred Hitchcock's Sabotage" In:The Classic Novel: From Page to Screen / edited by Robert Giddings and Erica Sheen. pp: 131-46 Manchester: Manchester University Press, c2000.
Main StackPN1995.3.C53 2000

Wollaeger, Mark A.
"Killing Stevie: Modernity, Modernism, and Mastery in Conrad and Hitchcock." Modern Language Quarterly, vol. 58 no. 3. 1997 Sept. pp: 323-50.
"Novelist Joseph Conrad and Alfred Hitchcock are not onlyrelated by the latter's adaptation of the former's 'The Secret Agent' infilm 'Sabotage' but by their common goals of achieving mastery in theirrespective crafts. They intended to translate this mastery bycommanding an attentiveness among their audience through theirdepictions of subdued violence. This intention is evident in the deathportrayal of character Stevie, where shock effects have attempted toredeem the spectators' evasive tendencies by exacting mastery over theartistic works." [Expanded Academic Index]

Saboteur

"Alfred Hitchcock's 'Saboteur'." Theatre Arts 26:5 (1942:May) 319

Deutelbaum, Marshall.
"Seeing in Saboteur." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 12 no. 1. 1984. pp: 58-64.
UC users only
On "Saboteur" as a text which foregrounds questions of perception.

Moore, Nathan
"Get Stupid: Film and Law via Wim Wenders and Others." Cardozo Law Review; Mar2010, Vol. 31 Issue 4, p1195-1216, 22p
UC users only
The article focuses on the problems of the 1942 film "Saboteur," by Alfred Hitchcock. It states that the film features gun play between its protagonists, in which the audience does not distinguish between the film they are watching and the commotion actually occurring around them. It notes that the film is showing something that is difficult to think within the normal frames of reference. It explores the difference between the filmic reality and another encompassing reality of the real world. It provides an overview of the structure of stupidity.

Smith, Susan
"Disruption, Destruction, Denial: Hitchcock as Saboteur Alfred." In: Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays / edited by Richard Allen and S. Ishii-Gonzales. pp: 45-57 London: British Film Institute, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.A43 1999

Turner, George
"Saboteur: Hitchcock Set Free." American Cinematographer LXXIV/11, Nov 93; p.67-72.
Production history; part one.

Turner, George
"Saboteur: Hitchcock Set Free." (Article). American Cinematographer LXXIV/12, Dec 93; p.88-93.
Part two of the production history.

Secret Agent

Roth, M.
"Hitchcock's Secret Agency." Camera Obscura , /30, May 93; p.34-49.
Reveals the homosexual subtext in Hitchcock's "The secret agent", based on W. Somerset Maugham's short story collection 'Ashenden', and the relationship between the spy thriller genre and homosexuality.

Shadow of a Doubt

Blank, Martin.
"Wilder, Hitchcock, and Shadow of a Doubt." In: Thornton Wilder: New Essays / edited by Martin Blank, Dalma Hunyadi Brunauer, David Garrett Izzo. pp: 409-16. West Cornwall, CT: Locust Hill Press, 1999. Locust Hill literary studies; no. 26
Main Stack PS3545.I345.Z954 1999

Byers, Thomas B.
"Shadows of modernity : What Maisie knew and Shadow of a Doubt ." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Crogan, Patrick
"Between Heads: Thoughts on the Merry Widow Tune in Shadow of a Doubt." Senses of Cinema Issue No. 6, May 2000

Duncan, Paul
"Shadow of a Doubt." In: Film Noir Pocket Essentials, 2000
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]

French, Tony
""Your father's method of relaxation": (Alfred) Hitchcock's Shadow of a doubt." CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p43-5. Word UC users only

Gordon, P.
"Sometimes a Cigar is not Just a Cigar: a Freudian Analysis of Uncle Charles in Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt." Literature/Film Quarterly XIX/4, Oct 91; p.267-276.
The character of Uncle Charles in Hitchcock's 'Shadow of a Doubt' is driven by Oedipal desires he tries to suppress through violence against mother figures. Young Charlie, the film's protagonist, is also engaged in Oedipal conflict, but serves as a moral counterbalance to her murderous uncle. Many reviewers have posited incorrectly that young Charlie is as evil as her Uncle Charles.

Gordon, Paul
"Sometimes a cigar is not just a cigar : Shadow of a doubt." In: Dial "M" for mother : a Freudian Hitchcock / Paul Gordon. Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 G67 2008

Hemmeter, Thomas
"Hitchcock the feminist: rereading Shadow of a doubt."In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock annual Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Hughes, Rowland.
"Shadows and Doubts: Hitchcock, Genre and Villainy." In: The Devil himself : villainy in detective fiction and film / edited by Stacy Gillis and Philippa Gates. pp: 107-19. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2002. Contributions to the study of popular culture ; no. 73
Main StackPR830.D4.D45 2002

McLaughlin, J.B.
"All in the Family." Wide Angle IV/1, 80; p.12-19. illus.
On the family in "Shadow of a doubt" as its central horror, breeding ferocious fantasies of women's emancipation.

McLaughlin, James
"All in the family: Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a doubt." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Michie, Elsie B.
"Unveiling Maternal Desires: Hitchcock and American Domesticity." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 29-53. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Turner, George
"Hitchcock's Mastery is Beyond Doubt." in Shadow. American Cinematographer LXXIV/5, May 93; p.62-67.
Detailed production history.

Spellbound

Bigwood, James.
"Solving a Spellbound Puzzle." American Cinematographer v. 72 (June '91) p. 34-40.
Production background to the filming of the Salvador Dali-designed dream sequence in Hitchcock's "Spellbound".

Boyd, David
"The Parted Eye: Spellbound and Psychoanalysis." Senses of Cinema Issue No. 6, May 2000

Britton, Andrew.
"Hitchcock's Spellbound: Text and Counter-Text." Cineaction, Winter86, Issue 3/4, p72-90, 19p

Freedman, Jonathan.
"From Spellbound to Vertigo: Alfred Hitchcock and Therapeutic Culture in America." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 77-98. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Hyde, Thomas
"The moral universe of Hitchcock's Spellbound." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Kaplan, E. Ann.
"Melodrama and Trauma: Displacement in Hitchcock's Spellbound." In: Trauma culture : the politics of terror and loss in media and literature. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.T46.K37 2005

Krohn, Bill
"Hitchcock-Dali, le reve mutile." Cahiers du Cinéma no559 July/Aug 2001. p. 71
In 1944, Alfred Hitchcock asked Salvador Dali to design a dream sequence for his film Spellbound. Disappointed with the final product, the producer of the film, David Selznick, hired someone else to design a new sequence, which only retained two shots from Dali and Hitchcock's original. When Dali heard that his first contribution to Hollywood film was being remade without him, he tried to intervene, but it was too late. The new dream sequence, hacked to ribbons in editing, was indecipherable.

Pomerance, Murray.
"A bromide for Ballantine: Spellbound, psychoanalysis, light." In: An eye for Hitchcock / Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P66 2004

Potgieter, Z.
"Lacan's three orders, the graphe complet and music in film: the case of Hitchcock's Spellbound." Communicare, Jun2007, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p1-26, 26p

Van Wert, William F.
"Compositional Psychoanalysis: Circles and Straight Lines in "Spellbound"." Film Criticism, Spring79, Vol. 3 Issue 3, p41-47,
UC users only

Stage Fright

Abel, Richard
"Stage Fright: The Knowing Performance."Film Criticism IX/2, Winter 84-85; p.41-50.
Examines the narrative structure of "Stage fright" as a quest for knowledge.

Fawell, John
"Stage fright: Alfred Hitchcock's fear of acting." Film Criticism, Fall 2001 v26 i1 p25(18)

Orr, John
"Hitchcock and Hume Revisited: Fear, Confusion and Stage Fright." Film-Philosophy Journal, Vol 11, No 1 (2007)

Strangers on a Train

Barton, Sabrina.
"'Crisscross': Paranoia and Projection in Strangers on a Train." Camera Obscura, vol. 25-26. 1991 Jan-May. pp: 75-100.
The use of doubling and the theme of paranoid male identity in "Strangers on a train".

Barton, Sabrina.
"'Crisscross': Paranoia and Projection in Strangers on a Train." In: Out in Culture: Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Essays on Popular Culture. / edited by Corey K. Creekmur and Alexander Doty. pp: 216-38. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. Series Q
Main Stack HQ76.2.U5.O98 19952

Corber, Robert J.
"Hitchcock's Washington: Spectatorship, Ideology, and the 'Homosexual Menace' in Strangers on a Train." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 99-121. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Dellolio, Peter J.
"Hitchcock and Kafka: expressionist themes in Strangers on a Train." The Midwest Quarterly, Spring 2004 v45 i3 p240(16) (Critical Essay)
UC users only

Dellolio, Peter J.
"Expressionist Themes in Strangers on a Train." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2003. Vol. 31, Iss. 4; pg. 260
UC users only

Desowitz, Bill.
"Strangers on Which Train?" (Alfred Hitchcock's 'Strangers on a Train') Film Comment v28, n3 (May-June, 1992):4 (2 pages).
Hitchcock released two versions of his film 'Strangers on a Train.' The US release excised some lines between the two protagonists when they meet on the train and included an epilogue. The UK version retained the lines, but did not include the epilogue. Hitchcock should have kept the film complete.

Edwards, Brian T.
"Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock after the American century : circulation and non-return in The American scene and Strangers on a train." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Mahoney, MaryKay.
"A Train Running on Two Sets of Tracks: Highsmith's and Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train." In: It's a Print!: Detective Fiction from Page to Screen/ edited by William Reynolds, Elizabeth A. Trembley. pp: 103-14. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, c1994.
Main Stack PN1995.3.R4 1994

Morrisson, Ian.
"The Art of Murder." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture Issue 9
Examines The Art of Murder in Strangers On a Train, Dial M For Murder, Blackmail, and Psycho.

Palmer, James.
"Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train and Leconte's Man on a Train: Denying and Befriending the Shadow." Psychological Perspectives, Dec2008, Vol. 51 Issue 2, p266-286, 21p
UC users only

Petrie, Graham
"Transfer of Guilt." Sight and Sound, vol. 19, no. 7, pp. 46-49, July 2009
UC users only
Petrie examines Alfred Hitchcock's 1951 film "Strangers on a Train," which was an adaptation from Patricia Highsmith's classic English mystery novel, and briefly discusses the ways in which Hitchcock's film differs from the novel.

Plater, E.M.V.
"American Friends and Strangers on Rrains. The Temptation of Jonathan Zimmerman: Wim Wenders' The American Friend." Literature/Film Quarterly XVI/3, July 88; p.181-200.
Notes the unavoidable influence of Hollywood on the work of younger European filmmakers, focusing on Wim Wenders' "Der amerikanische Freund" and the influence of Alfred Hitchcock's "Strangers on a Train" - both adaptations from novels by Patricia Highsmith.

Toles, George
"The Forgotten Lighter and Other Moral Accidents in Strangers on a Train." Raritan, Spring2009, Vol. 28 Issue 4, p111-137, 27p
UC users only

Wood, Robin
"Strangers on a Train." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Yellowlees Douglas, J.
"American Friends and Strangers on Trains." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 16 no. 3. 1988. pp: 181-190.

Suspicion

Abele, Elizabeth
"The Glory of Cary Grant and Other Girlish Delights." Images

Blegvad, Peter.
"Phosphorescent milk." (luminous glass of milk in Alfred Hitchcock's film 'Suspicion') Sight and Sound v3, n4 (April, 1993):33.
In Hitchcock's 'Suspicion,' Cary Grant carries a luminous glass of milk up a dark staircase. Hitchcock put a light in the glass of milk to make it glow. The white color of milk associates it with purity and innocence on one hand, and with corruption and vacuity on the other hand. The glass of milk in 'Suspicion' can be read as a symbol of the unified psyche that combines conscious and unconscious thoughts.

Krohn, Bill.
"Ambivalence (Suspicion)." Hitchcock Annual 2002-2003. pgs. 67-116

Miller, Mark Crispin.
"Hitchcock's Suspicions and Suspicion." MLN, vol. 98 no. 5. 1983 Dec. pp: 1143-1186.

Pressler, Michael
"Hitchcock's Suspicion: Reading between the Lines." Studies in the Humanities, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 99-104, June 2004.

Waldmah, Diane
""At last I can tell it to Someone!": Feminine Point of View and Subjectivity in the Gothic Romance Film of the 1940s." Cinema Journal; Winter84, Vol. 23 Issue 2, p29-40, 12p
UCB users only

Worland,
"Rick. Before and After the Fact: Writing and Reading Hitchcock's Suspicion." Cinema Journal. 41(4):3-26.2002
UC users only
"The writer presents a historical investigation and critical analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's 1941 film Suspicion. This film has been long undervalued. Among other things, it has normally been assigned to the second rank of the master's work by auteurist-oriented critics who, in view of its unbelievable happy ending, accept Hitchcock's own expressed dissatisfaction with it. Noting that the critical disinterest in the film largely derived from unexamined assumptions about the circumstances of its production, the writer charts its scripting, production, and reception by two preview audiences in June 1941 in the Los Angeles area, both of whom saw a different ending to the one that is known today. He then considers particular ways of reading the film in the light of its textual features both in relation to and apart from aspects of its production history, arguing that the film's rocky production process, juxtaposed with its sophisticated visuals and ideological fissures, shows it to be within the main currents of Hitchcock's best and most characteristic work." [Art Index]

Yanal, Robert J.
"The end of suspicion : Hitchcock, Descartes, and Joan Fontaine." In: Film and knowledge : essays on the integration of images and ideas / edited by Kevin L. Stoehr. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2002.
Electronic location: Table of contents

Thirty-nine Steps

Austin-Smith, Brenda
"Secrets, lies, and virtuous attachments : The ambassadors and The 39 steps." In: The men who knew too much : Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock
Edited by Susan M. Griffin and Alan Nadel. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PS2124 .M46 2012

Camp, J.
"John Buchan and Alfred Hitchcock." Literature/Film Quarterly VI/3, Summer 78; p.230-240. illus.
A consideration of J.B.'s novel and the use made of its plot, structure and theme in A.H.'s "The Thirty-nine Steps" and "North by Northwest".

Devas, Angela.
"How to be a Hero: Space, Place and Masculinity in The 39 Steps." pp. 45-54 Journal of Gender Studies. Vol 14(1), Mar 2005
UC users only
"This paper explores the representation of the hero in the 1935 Hitchcock classic The 39 Steps. The film, while drawing on the original adventure story of The Thirty Nine Steps, adopts a modernist sensibility in its cinematic depiction of technology and its representation of a bantering heterosexual couple. However, this does not displace the gendered, classed and racialised role of the hero. I examine the construction of the hero via discourses of masculinity, linked to the notion of the fl?neur, that is, the right of the male hero to wander, gaze and appropriate different space and place for his own use. Hannay, as the hero, also has the correct credentials of class and 'race'. This permits him a particular imperialist position which allows him the right of disguise and dissimulation. This freedom assures him a final bourgeois romantic union, consolidating his position as the hero. The role of the hero is one that is not available to women, who are either punished or only permitted to take up the role of heroine, the complementary and lesser partner to the hero." [PsycINFO]

Glancy, H. Mark.
The 39 Steps London : I. B. Tauris, 2003.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
MAIN: PN1997.T45 G53 2003

Miller, Toby
"39 Steps to 'The Borders of the Possible': Alfred Hitchcock, Amaterur Observer and the New Cultural History." In: Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays / edited by Richard Allen and S. Ishii-Gonzales. pp: 301-14 London: British Film Institute, 1999.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 A43 1999

Miller, Toby.
"Thirty-nine steps to 'the borders of the possible' by Alfred Hitchcock, amateur observer." In: Spyscreen: espionage on film and TV from the 1930s to the 1960s Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S68.M55 2003

Hark, Ina Rae
"Keeping your Amateur Standing: Audience Participation and Good Citizenship in Hitchcock's Political Films." Cinema Journal XXIX/2, Winter 90; p.8-22. bibliogr.
"The Man Who Knew Too Much" and "The Thirty-nine Steps" chosen as representative of Hitchcock's theme of the innocent thrown into the world of espionage; also shows how his move from political passivity to action

McDougal, Stuart Y.
"Mirth, Sexuality and Suspense: Alfred Hitchcock's Adaptation of 'The Thirty-Nine Steps'." Literature/Film Quarterly 3:3 (1975:Summer) 232
UC users only

Phillips, Louis.
"The Hitchcock Universe: Thirty-nine Steps and Then Some." Films in Review v46, n3-4 (March-April, 1995):22 (6 pages).
'The Thirty-Nine Steps,' Alfred Hitchcock's film based on a novel of the same name by John Buchan, is a true example of the Hitchcockian style. The elements of romanticism, melodrama, suspense, sex are echoes from his previous movies. The plot is fast-moving and cathartic. However, Hitchcock seems to have deviated from the original story by improvising on a few scenes, incidents and dialogues. The constraints of having to work within a time-frame is one of the limitations of a film director.

Ryall, Tom.
"One Hundred and Seventeen Steps toward Masculinity." In: You Tarzan: Masculinity, Movies and Men / edited by Pat Kirkham and Janet Thumim. pp: 153-66. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1993.
Main Stack PN1995.9.M46.Y68 1993
Moffitt PN1995.9.M46.Y68 1993

Silet, Charles L.P.
"Through a woman's eyes: sexuality and memory in The 39 steps." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

To Catch A Thief

Cohen, Tom.
"Beyond 'The Gaze': Zizek, Hitchcock, and the American Sublime." AMLH vol. 7 no. 2. 1995 Summer. pp: 350-78.
UC users only

Dassanowsky, Robert von.
"A Caper of One's Own: Fantasy Female Liberation in 1960s Crime Comedy Film." Journal of Popular Film & Television 35:3 (Fall 2007) p. 107-118
UC users only

Kindem, G.A.
"Peirce's Semiotic Phenomenalism and Film." Quarterly Review of Film Studies IV/1, Winter 79; p.61-69.
Describes an aspect of the theory of US philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce, a founder of semiotic analysis, and applies it to an analysis of the first seven minutes of "To Catch a Thief".

Martin, Carey
"The Master of Suspense and the Acrobat of the Drawing Room: How the Relationship of Cary Grant and Alfred Hitchcock Shaped Their Collaborations in Suspicion , Notorious, To Catch a Thief and North by Northwest." Film Journal, Issue 12 April 2005

Topaz

Busch, Justin E.A.
"The centre cannot hold: betrayals in Alfred Hitchcock's Topaz." (Critical Essay). CineAction 66 (Spring 2005): p29(13). (10716 words)
UC users only

Walker, Michael "Topaz" and Cold War Politics Hitchcock Annual 13 (2004-2005) p. 127-153
UC users only

Torn Curtain

Mitchell, R.
"Bernard Herrmann's rejected score for Alfred Hitchcock's Torn curtain." Films in Review v 29 Mar 1978. p. 189-90

Morris, Christopher D.
"Torn Curtain's Futile Talk." Cinema Journal vol. 39 no. 1. 1999 Fall. pp: 54-73.
UC users only
"Alfred Hitchcock's film Torn Curtain is discussed. While most commentaries conclude that the film lacks the unquestioned genius of Hitchcock's "peak" masterpieces, a consideration of the film as another of his MacGuffin films, such as The Thirty-Nine Steps, reveals that it, too, narrates a compulsion to discover and appropriate an "object" that seems paradoxically both arbitrary and significant. In the film, reading, speech, and language are allegorized as torn curtains, these activities assuming belief in distinctions that prove to be untenable or in apparent walls that are actually porous. The writer examines the film's title, credits, springboard situation, circular structure, and deployment of foreign languages to show that reading is portrayed either as an illusory coming together or an illusory distinction, and that language in the film anticipates the work of La Carte Postale (The Post-Card) by Jacques Derrida, in which he argues that the arbitrary nature of signs stops them from ever reaching their intended destinations." [from Art Index]

Vest, James M
"The Controller Controlled: Hitchcock's Cameo in "Torn Curtain"." Hitchcock Annual [1998-1999] 3-19
"Comments on Alfred Hitchcock's appearance in his film "Torn Curtain" (196), in which he shares the limelight with a baby. Notes this scene is the only one of Hitchcock's big-screen appearances that is accompanied by the theme music from his television show and argues that this "mini-drama...invites scrutiny both in terms of thematic parallels within the film and in regard to Hitchcock's often repeated commentaries on children and control." Discusses the scene, noting the musical theme emphasizes Hitchcock's "seemingly facetious tomfoolery during this twelve-second scene with the leaky-diapered child." Comments that the scene effectively suggests "awkward connections within the context of both human intimacy and international maneuverings." States Hitchcock's persistent sense of discomfort with children was closely related to his "obsession with control," noting he felt children were "major difficulties in filmmaking," as they resist direction and provoke unexpected reactions." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Trouble With Harry

Lightning, Robert K.
"Domestic trilogy (The man who knew too much; The trouble with Harry; /The wrong man). CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p32-42.
UC users only

Taylor, John-Russell
" The Trouble with Harry." (motion picture review) Films and Filming no[357] June 1984. p. 40-1

Wootton, Adrian
"Hitchcock and Chandler: "Strangers on a Train": Raymond Chandler: Trouble Is My Business." Sight and Sound 19:7 (July 2009) p. 48-49,2
UC users only

Zizek, Slavoj
"The Trouble with Harry: the corpse that wouldn't die; The Birds: the maternal superego." October (Cambridge, Mass) no38 Fall 1986. p. 99-111

Under Capricorn

Belton, John.
"Alfred Hitchcock's 'Under Capricon': Montage Entranced by Mise-en-Scène Quarterly Review of Film Studies 6:4 (1981:Fall) 365
Analyzes "Rope" and "Under Capricorn", relating their long-take styles to A. H.'s other works.

Vertigo

Abele, Elizabeth.
"The Feminine Gaze." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture Issue 9
"Though the privileging of the male spectator and gaze may exist in Vertigo and Rear Window, Hitchcock's use of the gaze is generally more complicated. Though a male gaze perspective may be present, the controlling gaze in several films is actually female. In these films, Hitchcock's female gaze may be as objectifying and controlling of the man as a male gaze is to a woman, while in other cases it exists as a knowing, patient and protective gaze. To examine Hitchcock's use of a secondary, non-male gaze, I will discuss two films from his Selznick period (1940-49): Notorious (1946) and The Paradine Case (1947). Hitchcock's use of the feminine gaze gives his female characters power, agency and depth--despite Hitchcock's self--cultivated reputation as a misogynist."

Ardolino, Frank.
"The Iconic Influence of the Dead: Iconoclasm and Idolatry in Hitchcock's Rebecca, Vertigo, and Psycho." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, vol. 12 no. 1-2. 1991 Mar. pp: 130-41.

Baird, Robert.
"Vertigo: Love, Desire, the Image, and the Grave." Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture
Vertigo is devoted to the dream of reanimating the dead. This desire is fed through the supernatural possibility of reincarnation of Carlotta through the possession of Madeleine, but this is later exposed as merely a conceit of an elaborate murder plan. One manner of preservation that is never discredited, however, is the power of dreams, words, stories, and images to preserve--even bring to life--the beloved dead. Madeleine/Judy, for example, studies Carlotta's portrait in order to bring Carlotta to life."

Baxter, B.
"Vertigo." (motion picture review) Films and Filming no 354 Mar 1984. p. 46

Berman, Emanuel
"Hitchcock's Vertigo: The collapse of a rescue fantasy." International Journal of Psycho-Analysis. Vol 78(5), Oct 1997, pp. 975-996
"Presents an interpretation of Hitchcock's "Vertigo", focusing on the way in which its protagonist's drama resonates with the analyst's struggle with deep unconscious identifications, with the impossibility of maintaining detached objectivity or guaranteeing one's role as a reparative good object and with the dangers of grandiosity, omniscience, and illusory control. The protagonist's "countertransference love" crystallizes around a rescue fantasy in which he is Orpheus striving to bring Eurydice back from Hades, or a Knight determined to behead an obscure Dragon endangering Beauty. Initially these key roles are sharply differentiated, through splitting and disavowal, which deprive the participants of their conflictual 3-dimensionality. Eventually the valiant Knight turns out to be as helpless and lonely as his Beauty, and in the final scene as ruthless and lethal as the Dragon. This interpretation is compared to numerous other views of the film offered in the literature. Interpretations can be seen as unavoidably colored by the (counter) transference of viewers. It is suggested that a film has no hidden true meaning, and a new individual significance emerges in the transitional space opened up by each viewer's encounter with the emotional universe of the film." [PsychInfo]

Blennerhassett, Richard.
"Vertigo: Out of the Past." Psychological Perspectives, Jan2011, Vol. 54 Issue 1, p54-65, 12p
UC users only
2008 marked the 50th anniversary of the release of Vertigo, Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece of doomed romanticism. Its reception on its original release was a disappointment to Hitchcock, but over the years it has rec-eived one of acclaim. Vertigo is Hitchcock's most personal film and, like a fairy tale, attracts many meanings. In it he gives us a glimpse of his soul, and, via the archetype of anima, we see reflected our own desires and longing for a lost paradise. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Bronfen, Elisabeth.
"Risky Resemblances: On Repetition, Mourning, and Representation." In: Death & Representation / edited by Sarah Webster Goodwin and Elisabeth Bronfen. pp: 103-29. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, c1993. Parallax (Baltimore, Md.)
Main Stack PN56.D4.D43 1993 Series title: Parallax: Re-visions of Culture.

Brown, Royal S.
"Back from among the dead: the restoration of Alfred Hitchcock's 'Vertigo.'" (film) Cineaste v23, n1 (Wntr, 1997):4 (6 pages).
" The restoration of Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 film Vertigo is discussed. The writer describes the background to the restoration process, which was carried out by Robert A. Harris and James C. Katz. He outlines some of the problems faced by the restorers, which included the lack of original surviving elements for a flashback scene that solves the film's mystery long before the film's climax. He then considers some of the reasons why Universal was willing to spend over one million dollars on restoring the film, tracing its critical reception from an initially unfavorable one to the realization that the film possesses layers of complexity that have little to do with the solving of the mystery of the plot. He goes on to discuss some of these elements, such as the film's links with the symbolic code of the Orpheus myth and the manner in which it incorporates the active involvement of the viewer. He concludes by briefly reviewing the VHS video and the laserdisc versions." [Art Index]

Brown, Royal S.
"Vertigo as Orphic Tragedy." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 1. 1986. pp: 32-43.

Calabrese, John A.
"Romanticism in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo: Conflicts and Dark Reversals." Lamar Journal of the Humanities, vol. 18 no. 2. 1992 Fall. pp: 51-65.

Chumo, Peter N., II.
"'The Crying Game,' Hitchcockian Romance, and the Quest for Identity." Literature-Film Quarterly v23, n4 (Oct, 1995):247 (7 pages).
UC users only

Chumo, Peter N.
"The Crying Game and Vertigo." The quest for identity. (Article). Bright Lights /11, Fall 93; p.26-29.
Finds parallels with the blurring of identity, esp. sexual, in "The crying game" with the work of Hitchcock, notably "Vertigo".

Coe, Jonathan.
"Vertigo." (film) (movie reviews) New Statesman (1996) v126, n4331 (April 25, 1997):43 (2 pages).

Cohen, Paula Marantz.
"Hitchcock's Revised American Visions: The Wrong Man and Vertigo." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 155-72. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Corber, Robert J.
"'You Wanna Check My Thumbprints?': Vertigo, the Trope of Invisibility and Cold War Nationalism." In: Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays / edited by Richard Allen and S. Ishii-Gonzales. pp: 301-14 London: British Film Institute, 1999.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 A43 1999

Conomos, John
"The Vertigo of Time." Senses of Cinema Issue No. 6, May 2000

Cooper, David
Bernard Herrmann's Vertigo : a film score handbook Westport, CT : Greenwood Press, 2001.
MUSI: ML410.H562 C66 2001

Cunningham, Douglas
"'It's all there, it's no dream': Vertigo and the redemptive pleasures of the cinephilic pilgrimage." Screen, Summer 2008; 49: 123 - 141.

de Mijolla-Mellor, Sophie.
"Hitchcock, the terror of fiction."Topique: Revue Freudienne. L' Esprit du Temps 1994. 24 (53): p. 231-251
Suggests that motion picture director Alfred Hitchcock based is creation of images on the primal experience of vertigo, which was the source of the power they exerted on the viewer. The metaphysical idea (the result of an authentic childhood incident) is communicated through a silent accumulation of effects and transmitted through the film characters. The themes of incommunicability and false guilt reflect the vertigo of being neither attached nor heard anywhere. Hitchcock's solution consists of mobilizing the residues of infantile sexual theories where the primal scene appears as murder, and organizing them into a scenario that allows the viewer to share an illusory world where terror can be a source of pleasure."(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved)

Deutelbaum, Marshall.
"Logical Dream/Illogical Space: Set Design as Narration in a Key Sequence in Vertigo." Hitchcock Annual2002-2003. pgs. 204-12

Ede, François
"Hitchcock experimentateur." Cahiers du Cinéma no511 Mar 1997. p. 27
"Part of a special section on Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo on the occasion of the release in France of the restored version. Vertigo provided Hitchcock with the opportunity for experimentation and a range of technical innovations. These include the effects that were used to pass James Stewart's sensation of vertigo to the audience and the evocative use of color throughout. The problems these and other techniques posed for the restorers are discussed." [Art Index]

Ede, François
"Sueurs froides pour une restauration." Cahiers du Cinéma no511 Mar 1997. p. 22-3
"Part of a special section on Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo on the occasion of the release in France of the restored version. The restoration of the film is discussed. Filmed in VistaVision on standard 35-millimeter stock, Vertigo was restored on 70-millimeter film with a stereophonic soundtrack. Having overcome many difficulties, Robert Harris and Jim Katz, who were responsible for the work, believe that Hitchcock would have been happy with the result." [Art Index]

Fabe, Marilyn
"Mourning Vertigo." American Imago: Psychoanalysis and The Human, vol. 66, no. 3, pp. 343-367, Fall 2009
UC users only
This paper sheds light on the psychological underpinnings of the enduring popularity of Vertigo location tours, and, more generally, on what people may be hoping to find or experience by visiting the literal remains of filmed fantasies. Those who desire to return to the places where Vertigo was filmed, it is argued, replicate the actions of its hero in the second half of the film. Scottie embarks on a futile quest to restore an unreal woman, an empty façade, an illusion created by Gavin Elster, trying to make a fictional image 'real.' Madeleine resembles what is described by Christian Metz as an 'imaginary signifier' that is infinitely desirable but never possessible. Vertigo's convoluted plot plays out and replays a perverse scenario that brilliantly depicts the experience of melancholia, as theorized by Giorgio Agamben as a state in which 'the libido stages a simulation where what cannot be lost because it has never been possessed appears as lost' (1979, 20). Scottie's behavior is likened to that of a child who has suffered an insecure attachment to a 'dead' (depressed and therefore inattentive) mother and, as a result, never develops the capacity to love truly or mourn successfully. By leaving the viewer in a painful state of unresolved suspense about Scottie's fate at the end of the film, Hitchcock reveals his inability to resolve his own issues around fear of loss and aggression toward desirable women. Those who seek out the locations of Vertigo continue Scottie's doomed quest to make a fantasy real, to diminish the gap between representation and reality, and thereby cling to an illusory means by which to overcome loss.

Freedman, Jonathan.
"From Spellbound to Vertigo: Alfred Hitchcock and Therapeutic Culture in America." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 77-98. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Gabbard, Glen O.
"Vertigo: Female objectification, male desire, and object loss." Psychoanalytic Inquiry. 1998. 18 (2): p. 161-167
"Discusses the 3 interwoven themes of female objectification, male desire, and object loss, in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo. It is argued that the objectification and idealization of female beauty depicted in the film is most heuristically conceptualized not as a fetishization to defend against castration anxiety. Rather, it resonates with the earliest loss the male child experiences, that of the blissful relationship with a mother who has no autonomy or otherness but exists only to serve the baby's needs. The author concludes that Hitchcock's choice of a career as an auteur and director who could paint his fantasies on the canvas of the great silver screen served as an adaptive compromise formation in his lifelong obsession with beautiful but unattainable women." [PsycINFO]

Gallafent, Ed
"The Dandy and the Magdalen: Interpreting the Long Take in Hitchcock's Under Capricorn." In: Style and meaning : studies in the detailed analysis of film / edited by John Gibbs and Douglas Pye. Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2005.
Main Stack PN1995.S778 2005

Gilbert, Francis.
"Vertigo." (Review) New Statesman (1996) v128, n4421 (Jan 29, 1999):46 (2 pages).

Goodkin, Richard E.
"Film and Fiction: Hitchcock's Vertigo and Proust's 'Vertigo'." MLN, vol. 102 no. 5. 1987 Dec. pp: 1171-1181.
UC users only

Gordon, Paul
"NTILEVER : Vertigo." In: Dial "M" for mother : a Freudian Hitchcock / Paul Gordon. Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 G67 2008

Harvey, James
"Vertigo." In: Movie love in the fifties / James Harvey. 1st ed. New York: Alfred A. Knopf: Distributed by Random House, 2001.
Main Stack PN1995.9.L6.H37 2001
PFA PN1995.9.L6.H37 2001 Pacific Film Archive collection
Contents via Google books

Hinton, Laura.
"A "Woman's" View: the Vertigo Frame-up." Film Criticism v. 19 (Winter '94/'95) p. 2-22.
UC users only
"The writer examines the way in which readings of ambiguity and indeterminacy in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo erode the possibility of a feminist critique. She notes that these readings, promoted by the film's abyssal structure, invite but subsequently frustrate female agency. She examines the "look" described for the male protagonist in Vertigo by feminist critic Laura Mulvey, emphasizing the contribution that male scopophilia makes to the larger theme of contradiction and the spectatorial hoax. She also analyzes the camera's cutting "look," primarily through the misogynistic connotations of castration. In conclusion, she demonstrates that the film persuades the viewer to take a "woman's" view but only as a symptom of the lack of view accorded women themselves." [Art Index]

Hopfl, Heather
"Hitchcock's Vertigo and the tragic sublime." Journal of Organizational Change Management. Vol 15(1), 2002, pp. 21-34
"This is a paper about the cinematic as spectacle and the construction of the sublime. It is concerned with gendered constructions of desire and construes the object of desire in this case as a sublime object. At the same time, the paper is about decadence and falling, falling away. Therefore, this piece of writing attempts to deal with some thoughts on the relationship between decadence and mortification. So this paper is also about distance and about movement, about kinenia (Greek movement) and the distance that is described by falling from the constructed sublime and its associated melancholy. These ideas are explored via an examination of one of Alfred Hitchcock's most powerful films, Vertigo (1958), and a notion of the tragic sublime. Taken together, the concept of the sublime and the narrative of the film provide insights into the melancholy of commodified representations in the obsessive-compulsive pursuit of organisational idealisation." [PsycINFO]

Keane, Marian
"A closer look at scopophilia: Mulvey, Hitchcock and Vertigo." In: A Hitchcock reader
Edited by Marshall Deutelbaum and Leland Poague. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.H58 H574 2009

Kilcoyne, Sean Patrick.
"You Shouldn't Have Been That Sentimental: Film Restoration Ethics in Hitchcock's Vertigo." Journal of Information Ethics, Spring2010, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p57-73, 17p
UC users only

Kirkham, Pat.
"The Jeweller's Eye."Sight & Sound ns7 (Apr. '97) p. 18-19.
"A discussion of Saul Bass's remarkable title sequence for Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo. Bass pioneered a new type of title sequence that was a mood-setting opening and that acted in the same way as a musical overture might. He died in April 1996, and it is fitting that the first anniversary of his death is marked by the release in Britain of a newly restored print of Vertigo." [Art Index]

Krohn, Bill
"L'autre fin de Vertigo." [Art Index]Cahiers du Cinéma no511 Mar 1997. p. 26-7
"Part of a special section on Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo on the occasion of the release in France of the restored version. The original and the alternative endings to the film are discussed. Hitchcock was forced to film an alternative ending due to pressure by distributors in countries where there was a legal obligation to show films in which only the villains received retribution. The restored version has remained true to Hitchcock's original ending." [Art Index]

Leonard, Garry M.
"A fall from grace: The fragmentation of masculine subjectivity and the impossibility of femininity in Hitchcock's Vertigo." American Imago. 1990 Fal-Win. 47 (3-4): p.271-291
UC users only
"Uses Lacanian theory and T. Modleski's (1988) work on female subjectivity to elaborate the way in which A. Hitchcock's Vertigo (while avowedly told from "the viewpoint of a man who's in an emotional crisis") also outlines the impossibility of a woman occupying the space culturally designated as feminine. Much of the terror that male protagonists face in Hitchcock films is brought about by their slipping into a femininized space as the result of incertitude about their masculine subjectivity. Hitchcock's belief that cultural myths about masculinity and femininity can shift unexpectedly under one's feet is the cornerstone of suspense in his films." [PsychInfo]

Linderman, D.
"The Mise-en-Scene in Hitchcock's Vertigo." Cinema Journal XXX/4, Summer 91; p.51-74.
Theoretical reappraisal of the film.

Lyons, Donald.
"Notes while falling." (restoration of the film 'Vertigo') Film Comment v32, n6 (Nov-Dec, 1996):64.
" Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo has been restored by producer James C. Katz, the Universal Classics executive who reissued five long-unseen Hitchcocks in the 1980s, and Robert A. Harris, a talented techno-wizard. Harris spent two years constructing an essentially new 65 mm negative of Vertigo, having found the original recording of the Bernard Herrmann score. The new version, in Super VistaVision 70 and DTS digital stereo for the first time, astounds with its beautiful amplitude. The film's big, long-held images are rich with space and air and light and color, and its mystery has a freshly epic hugeness. The writer ponders various aspects of Vertigo's original reception, plot, and relationship to other films, both by Hitchcock and by others." [Art Index]

Magistrale, Tony.
"The terror of Hitchcock: : Vertigo, Psycho, The birds." In: Abject terrors : surveying the modern and postmodern horror film / Tony Magistrale. New York : Peter Lang, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.M248 2005
Moffitt PN1995.9.H6.M248 2005
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip059/2005007036.html

Maxfield, James F.
"A Dreamer and His Dream." Film Criticism XIV/3, Spring 90; p.3-13.
Analyses dream representation in "Vertigo".
UC users only

McCourt, James
"Vertigo : Alfred Hichcock's vision of the fall of man." In: Performing arts : motion pictures / [editor, Iris Newsom]. Washington : Library of Congress : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., 1998.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.P47 1998

Miller, D.A.
"Vertigo." Film Quarterly, Winter2008/2009, Vol. 62 Issue 2, p12-18, 7p
UC users only
The article analyzes the film "Vertigo," directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The author details his experiences first watching the film during its original release period in 1958, when he found the plot to be too slow-moving and too nonsensical. Even though the author is now much older than when he first saw the film, he complains that he still does not really know what it is about. The author discusses his efforts to make sense of the plot and see the film as a masterpiece, as well as his obsession with the city of San Francisco, California because of the work.

Miller, Gabriel
"Beyond the Frame: Hitchcock, Art, and the Ideal." Post Script V/2, Winter 86; p.31-46. illus.
On the meanings implicit in A.H.'s use of multiple frame devices, esp. in "Rear Window" and "Vertigo".

Modleski, Tania
"Femininity by Design: Vertigo." In: Post-war cinema and modernity : a film reader / edited by John Orr and Olga Taxidou. New York, NY : New York University Press, 2001.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1994 .P6567 2001
Pacific Film Archive PN1994 .P6567 2001

Mott, George
"Vertigo." Psychoanalytic Review. Vol 84(4), Aug 1997, pp. 631-635
"Presents a psychoanalytic analysis of Hitchcock's film Vertigo. This film deals with a form of subjectivity best described as "pathological narcissism" and the story is bounded by two representatives of the maternal superego." [PsychInfo]

Nochimson, Martha P.
"Amnesia 'R' Us: The Retold Melodrama, Soap Opera, and the Representation of Reality." Film Quarterly vol. 50 no. 3. 1997 Spring. pp: 27-38.
Compares the treatment of the 'amnesia' storyline in film melodrama and tv soap opera (respectively, "Vertigo" and 'One life to live'), showing how tricks are played with the viewer's expectations of 'reality'.

Odahashian, Barbara
"Portrait of an Artist: Hitchcock's "Vertigo"."Hitchcock Annual [1999-2000] 93-99
"Examines Alfred Hitchcock's cameo appearance in his 1958 film "Vertigo," suggesting that the character of Scottie Ferguson is the filmmaker's alter ego. Informs that this theory can then apply to Gavin Elster who can be seen as Hitchcock's "Doppelganger." States that Hitchcock makes references to his art in the film. Indicates that Hitchcock's instinctual narrative need is to tell the story of filmmaking. Concludes that above and beyond all the portraits and mirrored images in "Vertigo" there is the self-portrait of Alfred Hitchcock, the filmmaker, at work." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

O'Brien, Geoffrey.
"Magnificent Obsession." New York Review of Books, vol. 43 no. 20. 1996 Dec. pp: 54-56, 58, 60.

Peek, Wendy Chapman.
"Cherchez la Femme: The Searchers, Vertigo, and Masculinity in Post-Kinsey America." Journal of American Culture vol. 21 no. 2. 1998 Summer. pp: 73-87.

Perry, Dennis R.
"Imps of the Perverse: Discovering the Poe/Hitchcock Connection." Literature/Film Quarterly XXIV/4, Oct 96; p.393-399. bibliogr.
UC users only
Alfred Hitchcock openly admits to the influence of Edgar Allen Poe's life and work on his films, and Poe's obsession with irrationality and commitment to the audience is evident in Hitchcock's "Vertigo." Poe's stories demonstrated a commitment to audience response in creating suspenseful situations that induced fear. The protagonist in "Vertigo" suffers from acrophobia, heightening the tension of many scenes, and his sanity comes into question. Hitchcock used his work, more effectively than Poe, to address the demons that haunted him.

Perry, Dennis R.
"Romantic obsession: return to transcendence: "The fall of the house of Usher" and Vertigo." In: Hitchcock and Poe : the legacy of delight and terror / Dennis R. Perry. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2003. Filmmakers series.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P46 2003

Petit, Chris.
"Insane Memory." (Chris Marker's reference to Hitchcock's 'Vertigo') Sight and Sound v4, n7 (July, 1994):13.
Chris Marker's films seek to capture the complexity of mind and memory, a major focus of Alfred Hitchcock's 'Vertigo,' which Marker held in high esteem. Marker's consistent reference to 'Vertigo' in his works reveal his curiosity to the working of the human mind. Marker's films portray the dichotomy between the observed world and the inner world, revealing the influence of Hitchcock's films.

Pisters, Patricia
"New Subjectivity in Cinema: The Vertigo of Strange Days." In: Subjectivity / editors: Willem van Reijen, Willem G. Weststeijn. pp: 283-314. Amsterdam; Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 2000
Main PN695 .A927 2000

Poague, Leland
"Engendering Vertigo." In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock Annual
Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Pomerance, Murray.
"Gabriel's horn: Vertigo and the golden passage." In: An eye for Hitchcock / Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.P66 2004

Potts, Neill
"Character Interiority: Space, Point of View, and Performance in Hitchcock's Vertigo." In: Style and meaning : studies in the detailed analysis of film / edited by John Gibbs and Douglas Pye. Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2005.
Main Stack PN1995.S778 2005

Poznar, Walter.
"Orpheus Descending: Love in Vertigo." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 17 no. 1. 1989. pp: 59-65.
Examines the complexity of the Scottie/Madeleine-Judy relationship in "Vertigo" and rejects the idea of Scottie's desires as necrophilic.

Preminger, Aner.
"François Truffaut rewrites Alfred Hitchcock: a Pygmalion trilogy."(Critical essay). Literature-Film Quarterly 35.3 (July 2007): p170(11). (6992 words)
UC users only
"This paper examines the influence of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo (1958) on two of François Truffaut's films, Tirez Sur le Pianiste (1960) and Jules et Jim (1961). (Of course the influence exceeds these works by far.) On his way toward defining his own voice (as well as shaping the modern cinema of the early sixties) Truffaut both absorbed from Hitchcock and rebelled against him. Such a case study should prove particularly rewarding because Vertigo holds a special position within Hitchcock's oeuvre, and it is intensely reflexive in that it is consciously concerned with the artistic act of filmmaking." [Expanded Academic Index]

Quinodoz, Danielle
"Hitchcock's Vertigo: The collapse of a rescue fantasy": International Journal of Psycho-Analysis. 1998 Apr. 79 (2): p. 391-393
Comments on E. Berman's interpretation of Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo. The author offers her own reflections on the film, incorporating insights gained in her earlier study of the psychic meanings of vertigo presented by several patients in psychoanalysis. Of key interest are the links between vertiginous anxiety and incompatibility of tendencies, which appear in several forms in the film Vertigo. [PsycINFO]

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Vertigo." (movie reviews) New Yorker v72, n35 (Nov 18, 1996):123 (3 pages).

Ravetto-Biagioli, Kriss
"Vertigo and the Vertiginous History of Film Theory." Camera Obscura 25(3 75): 101-141 (2011);
UC users only

Rothman, William.
"The River Vertigo: the unknown woman in Hitchcock. "In: The "I" of the camera : essays in film criticism, history, and aesthetics / William Rothman. Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press,1988. Cambridge studies in film.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main StackPN1995.R681 1988
MoffittPN1995.R68 1988

Saada, Nicolas
"Vertige de la musique." Cahiers du Cinéma no511 Mar 1997. p. 25
"Part of a special section on Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo on the occasion of the release in France of the restored version. Bernard Herrmann's music soundtrack is discussed. Inspired by Wagner's Tristan and Isolde, the work is one of cinema's best-known soundtracks and has often been imitated. It plunges the listener into a never-ending pit with a sophisticated melodic construction that refuses to come to a climax. The soundtrack of the restored version is enhanced by the inclusion of a number of sections that had been edited out of the original." [Art Index]

Saada, Nicolas Saada, Nicolas; Toubiana, Serge
"Vertigo ou l'amour a mort" Cahiers du Cinéma no511 Mar 1997. p. 20-1
"Part of a special section on Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo on the occasion of the release in France of the restored version. Vertigo has achieved cult status and, even after almost 40 years, is as enigmatic and disturbing as ever. Vertigo is one of the founding films of the modern cinema, inspiring directors from Antonioni to De Palma." [Art Index]

Saito, Ayako
"Hitchcock's Trilogy: A Logic of mise en Scene." In: Endless Night: Cinema and Psychoanalysis, Parallel Histories / edited by Janet Bergstrom. pp: 200-248 Berkeley: University of California Press, c1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P783.E53 1999
"Introduction Challenges the way Lacanian theory, as construed within film theory, has narrowed the field of possibilities of psychoanalytic approaches to cinema. Specifically, the question of affect is focused on, and how it may be traced through textual analysis. The author argues that affect has attracted little attention within psychoanalytic film theory because of the strong emphasis on the Lacanian psychoanalytic model, which revolves around the question of language and the gaze. Drawing on the writings of Andre Green, Nicolas, Abraham and Maria Torok as well as Raymond Bellour and Lacan, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho as components of a single filmic system in the light of 3 psychical structures: melancholia, mania and paranoia/schizophrenia, the degree to which the narrative, visual style and dominant affectivity of each film are interrelated and determined by each other is demonstrated." [abstract from PsychInfo]

Samuels, Robert
"Vertigo: Sexual distorientation and the engendering of the real." Gender & Psychoanalysis. Vol 5(1), Win 2000, pp. 81-97
"In the book Hitchcock's Bi-Textuality: Lacan, Feminisms, and Queer Theory, the author stresses the different ways that the masculine control of vision and language is undermined by the Presence of bisexual desires and identifications. This focus on the failures of masculine mastery contradicts many of the claims of recent feminist film theory that depend on the binary opposition between masculine visual control and the objectified-female body. The author has not tried to deny that men attempt to visually master females; rather, the author has shown how many of these attempts at control often fail. Furthermore, the failure to master the representation of the female subject presents a form of masculine loss that motivates the male subject to find new ways to convert lack into a form of representational plentitude." [PsychInfo]

"San Francisco: chasing visions of vertigo." The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) (March 1, 2005): S60(10).
UC users only

TThe San Francisco of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo : place, pilgrimage, and commemoration
Edited by Douglas A. Cunningham. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.V479 S35 2012
Contents: Introduction / Douglas A. Cunningham -- Vertigo and the weight of history. Whose grave?: Hitchcock's Vertigo and the sad specters of the Mission Dolores Cemetery / Joshua Kitching -- "Baroque Vertigo" / Roland Greene -- "Souvenirs of a killing": Vertigo, empire, and the California Mission Revival / Martin Kevorkian and Stanley Orr -- VistaVision and the cinematic landscape of Vertigo / Ana Salzberg -- Vertigo's wanderers: on seeking the cinematic sacred. Alfred Hitchcock's San Francisco / Lynda Myles and Michael Oliver-Goodwin -- It's all there, it's no dream: Vertigo and the redemptive pleasures of the cinephilic pilgrimage / Douglas A. Cunningham -- The frustration of reality/illusion: searching for Vertigo on the cinephilic pilgrimage / L. Lelaine Bonine -- Travelogue as traumalogue: space, place, and memory in Vertigo / Diane Borden -- Beyond location: Vertigo and the capacity for wonder / Henrik Gustafsson -- In the gallery of the gaze: the museum in Hitchcock's Vertigo / Steven Jacobs -- Marking Vertigo: validations in time and space. Proposed locations: on postmodern tributes to Vertigo and place / Cindy Bernard in conversation with Douglas A. Cunningham -- The vestiges of Vertigo in contemporary art: Cindy Bernard, David Reed and Douglas Gordon / Christine Sprengler -- Only one is a wanderer: guiding tours of Vertigo sites / Miguel Pendás -- Vertigo: the heart of San Francisco / Jeff Kraft and Aaron Leventhal -- Mapping/marking cinephilia: the case for a Vertigo heritage trail / Douglas A. Cunningham.

San Francisco thrillers: true crimes and dark mysteries from the City by the Bay / edited by John Miller and Tim Smith ; ... San Francisco, CA : Chronicle Books, c1995.
Bancroft PS648.D4.S26 1995 Non-circulating; may be used only in The Bancroft Library. Note: Bound in black paper wrappers.

Schneider, Kirk J.
"Hitchcock's Vertigo: An existential view of spirituality." Journal of Humanistic Psychology. 1993 Spr. 33 (2): p.91-100
UC users only
"Recently, we have witnessed an explosion of interest in the transcendental dimension of human experience. Leading psychological theorists, however, have become polarized on this matter. Whereas emphatic rationalists (such as Albert Ellis) perceive little value in the transcendental, ardent transpersonalists (such as Ken Wilber) stress its most expansive implications. This article explores a third alternative to these positions-what I term existential spirituality or wonderment. To illustrate the richness of this perspective, I discuss and consider the implications of Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 film Vertigo.We burn with desire to find a steadfast place and an ultimate fixed basis whereon we may build a tower to reach the infinite. But our whole foundation breaks up, and earth opens to the abysses.-Blaise Pascal (1654)" [PsychInfo]

Schwartz, Ronald
"Vertigo." In: Noir, now and then : film noir originals and remakes, (1944-1999) / Ronald Schwartz. Westport, CT : Greenwood Press, 2001.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.F54 S39 2001

Skoller, D.
"Aspects of Cinematic Consciousness." Film Comment VIII/3, Sept-Oct 72; p.41-51. States of consciousness reflected in Hitchcock's "Vertigo", Resnais' "Last Year at Marienbad", and Snow's "Wavelength", and the way in which each is a suspense film.

Turner, George.
"Hitchcock's Acrophobic Vision." American Cinematographer v. 77 (Nov. '96) p. 86-91.
"Alfred J. Hitchcock's 1959 motion picture, Vertigo, is discussed. Based on Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac's novel, D'entre les Morts, the movie tells the story of a man on the edge of sanity and his encounter with a mysterious blonde whom he believes has been possessed by the spirit of her suicidal great-grandmother. Set in San Francisco because of its hilly streets, unusual architecture, and evident atmosphere of mystery, the film was photographed in the VistaVision process developed at Paramount Studios as an alternative to such anamorphic formats as CinemaScope. The bravura of its leading actors, its realistic atmosphere, the crisp editing, the inspired musical score, and the imaginative cinematography brought the filmmaker's fears and hopes to life. A major restoration effort on the movie has been recently launched by Universal Studios." [Art Index]

Vest, James M.
"Alfred Hitchcock's Cameo in "Vertigo"." Hitchcock Annual [1999-2000] 84-92
"Examines Alfred Hitchcock's cameo in his 1958 film "Vertigo." Compares this brief appearance before the camera to his other cameos. Indicates that Hitchcock momentarily becomes a figure within the drama, subjecting himself to the physical and fictive restraints of the filmic reality. Informs that "Vertigo" is the only one of Hitchcock's five VistaVision features in which he crosses the entire width of the filmed image. States the cameo scene itself serves as the first half of a narrative bracket in conjunction with what was to have been the film's final scene." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Vest, James M.
"Echoes of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, The birds, and Frenzy in François Truffaut's Story of Adale H." In: Framing Hitchcock : selected essays from the Hitchcock Annual
Detroit : Wayne State University Press, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H58 F73 2002

Vest, James M.
"Reflections of Ophelia (and of Hamlet) in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo." The Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association, vol. 22 no. 1. 1989 Spring. pp: 1-9.

Vieth, Lynne S.
"Restored to Color: Ghosts of Art Past in Hitchcock's Vertigo." Stanford Humanities Review vol. 7 no. 2 pp: 137-49 (1999 Winter)

Wexman, Virginia Wright.
"The Critic as Consumer: Film Study in the University, Vertigo, and the Film Canon." Film Quarterly v. 39 (Spring '86) p. 32-41.
UC users only
A discussion of criticism as being grounded in history and politics, using "Vertigo" as an example.

White, Susan.
"Allegory and Referentiality: 'Vertigo' and Feminist Criticism." MLN v106, n5 (Dec, 1991):910 (23 pages).

White, Susan
"Vertigo and the Problems of Knowledge in Feminist Film Theory." In: Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays / edited by Richard Allen and S. Ishii-Gonzales. pp: 279-98 London: British Film Institute, 1999.
UCB Main PN1998.3.H58 A43 1999

Williams, Anthony
"Vertigo: authorship as transformation." CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p56-9. UC users only

Wollen, Peter.
"Compulsion." (film director Alfred Hitchcock's 'Vertigo') Sight and Sound v7, n4 (April, 1997):14 (5 pages).
Alfred Hitchcock's film masterpiece 'Vertigo' provides ample evidence that the celebrated film director was a closet Surrealist. Just like in his other works, the re-released 1958 opus presents a dreamworld within the cinema not only through the presentation of dream sequences and fog filters but through the logic or anti-logic of filmic narration itself. Hitchcock was able to re-replicate the haunting world of cinema within his films by recasting it within the confines of their own shadow-plays.

Wood, Michael.
"No Second Chances: Fiction and Adultery in Vertigo." In: Scarlet Letters: Fictions of Adultery from Antiquity to the 1990s / Nicholas White and Naomi Segal. pp: 189-98. Houndsmills, Great Britain: Macmillan Press Ltd.; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1997.
Main Stack PN3352.A38.S29 1997

Wood, Robin
"Fear of Spying."American Film IX/2, Nov 83; p.28-35.
Psychoanalytical analysis of "Vertigo" and "Rear Window" which seeks to answer feminist charges of misogyny against Hitchcock.

Zizek, Slavoj.
Looking awry : an introduction to Jacques Lacan through popular culture Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c1991.
Grad Svcs BF175.4.C84.Z59 1991 Non-circulating; may be used only in Graduate Services
Main Stack BF175.4.C84.Z59 1991
(From the jacket) In this book Slavoj Zizek, a leading intellectual in the new social movements that are sweeping Eastern Europe, provides a virtuoso reading of Jacques Lacan. Zizek inverts current pedagogical strategies to explain the difficult philosophical underpinnings of the French theoretician and practician who revolutionized our view of psychoanalysis. He approaches Lacan through the motifs and works of contemporary popular culture, from Hitchcock's "Vertigo" to Stephen King's "Pet Sematary," from McCullough's "An Indecent Obsession" to Romero's "Night of the Living Dead"--a strategy of "looking awry" that recalls the exhilarating and vital experience of Lacan. Zizek discovers fundamental Lacanian categories--the triad Imaginary/Symbolic/Real, the object small a, the opposition of drive and desire, the split subject--at work in horror fiction, in detective thrillers, in romances, in the mass media's perception of ecological crisis, and, above all, in Alfred Hitchcock's films. The playfulness of Zizek's text, however, is entirely different from that associated with the deconstructive approach made famous by Jacques Derrida. By clarifying what Lacan is saying as well as what he is not saying, Zizek is uniquely able to distinguish Lacan from the poststructuralists who so often claim him.

The Wrong Man

Cavallero, Jonathan J.
"Hitchcock and Race: Is the Wrong Man a White Man?" Journal of Film and Video 62:4 (Winter 2010) p. 3-14
UC users only

Cohen, Paula Marantz.
"Hitchcock's Revised American Visions: The Wrong Man and Vertigo." In: Hitchcock's America / edited by Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington. pp: 155-72. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.3.H58.H575 1999

Lightning, Robert K.
"Domestic trilogy (The man who knew too much; The trouble with Harry;`/The wrong man). CineAction. 50 (Annual 1999) p32-42.
UC users only

Young and Innocent

Dyer, Peter John
"Young and Innocent." Sight and Sound v 30 no2 Spring 1961. p. 80-3
UC users only


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