Todd Haynes:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual films

Books/Videos

Andrew, Geoff.
"Todd Haynes." In: Stranger than paradise : maverick film-makers in recent American cinema New York : Limelight Editions, 1999.
Main Stack PN1998.2 .A65 1999;
"In the chapter on Todd Haynes, Andrews includes a superb reading of the director's banned (allegedly due to uncleared music rights) Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story, a puppet play about politics, social breakdown, and anorexia played by Barbie and Ken dolls. He's equally good on Haynes's rarely screened short satire of America in the 1950s, Dottie Gets Spanked: "Even more unusually, the sexual aspect of the six-year-old's obsession [with a 1950s I Love Lucy type star] is explicit: his fears of being spanked by his father find an echo in his fantasies about spanking and being spanked by Dottie. At the same time, it's characteristic of Haynes that he presents the boy's obsession and fantasies as natural, rather than problematic. When he buries his drawings [of Dottie] in the garden, the impression is not that he is acting out of shame, but that he is beginning to find his voice, standing his ground, storing up his true needs and desires until he is old enough to reveal them to a world that doesn't understand them." [Google Books]

The cinema of Todd Haynes : all that heaven allows
Ddited by James Morrison. London ; New York : Wallflower, 2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.H388 C56 2007

DeAngelis, Michael
"The characteristics of new queer filmmaking : case study - Todd Haynes." In: New queer cinema : a critical reader / edited by Michele Aaron. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, 2004.
Grad Svcs PN1995.9.H55.N48 2004 Non-circulating; may be used only in Graduate Services
Main Stack PN1995.9.H55.N48 2004

DeAngelis, Michael
"Todd Haynes and queer authorship." In: Auteurs and authorship : a film reader / edited by Barry Keith Grant. Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell Pub., 2008.
Moffitt PN1995.9.A837.A98 2008

Gorfinkel, Elena
"Todd Haynes and the Magnificent Andersons." In: Cinephilia : movies, love and memory / edited by Marijke de Valck and Malte Hagener. Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, c2005.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1994 .C5325 2005

Hawkins, Joan
"The sleazy pedigree of Todd Haynes." In: Sleaze artists : cinema at the margins of taste, style, and politics / Jeffrey Sconce, ed. Durham : Duke University Press, 2007.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S284.S64 2007

Levy, Emanuel
"The New Gay and Lesbian Cinema." In: Cinema of outsiders : the rise of American independent film / Emanuel Levy. New York : New York University Press, c1999.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main Stack PN1995.9.E96 L43 1999
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.E96 L43 1999

Journal Articles

Burdette, K.
"Queer Readings/Queer Cinema: An Examination of the Early Work of Todd Haynes." Velvet Light Trap, vol. 41, pp. 68-80, Spring 1998.
UC users only

Landy, Marcia
"'The Dream of the Gesture': The Body of/in Todd Haynes's Films." Boundary 2: An International Journal of Literature and Culture, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 123-40, Fall 2003.

MacDonald, Scott
"From Underground to Multiplex" An Interview with Todd Haynes." Film Quarterly, Spring2009, Vol. 62 Issue 3, p54-64, 11p;
UC users only

MacLean, Alison
"Todd Haynes." BOMB, vol. 52, pp. 48-51, Summer 1995.

Pick, Anat
"'No Callous Shell': The Fate of Selfhood from Walt Whitman to Todd Haynes." Film and Philosophy, vol. 7, pp. 1-21, 2003.

"Todd Haynes: A Magnificent Obsession." [Special issue]. Camera Obscura no. 57 (2004) p. insert3, 1-219

Uhlich, Keith
"Todd Haynes" (Great Directors - A Critical Database) Senses of Cinema

Wyatt, Justin.
"Cinematic/Sexual Transgression: An Interview with Todd Haynes." Film Quarterly, vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 2-8, Spring 1993.
UC users only
"Director Todd Haynes, best known for his short film Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story and his prizewinning feature Poison, is one of the major proponents of the "New Queer Cinema." Filmed with a cast of Barbie and Ken dolls, Superstar tells the tragic tale of Karen Carpenter's rise to fame and her eventual death from anorexia. Poison is a dramatically and aesthetically complex assemblage of 3 developing stories: a quasi-documentary about patricide, a horror/science-fiction parody, and an elaborate prison homage to Jean Genet. In an interview, Haynes discusses his education, Superstar, Poison, narrative, representation, filmic experimentation, AIDS, and his status as a gay filmmaker." [Art Index]

Wyatt, Justin
"'Masochism Knows the Story Inside and Out': An Interview with Todd Haynes by Justin Wyatt." Strategies: A Journal of Theory, Culture and Politics, vol. 8, pp. 5-19, Winter 1995.

Articles and Books on Individual films

Far From Heaven

Cooper, Rand Richards.
"Art deco: `Far from Heaven' & `Frida'. (Screen).(Movie Review)." Commonweal 130.1 (Jan 17, 2003): 20.
UC users only

DeFalco, Amelia.
"A Double-Edged Longing: Nostalgia, Melodrama, and Todd Haynes's Far from Heaven." Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 5, pp. 26-39, Fall 2004.

Dines, Martin
Gay suburban narratives in American and British culture : homecoming queens / Martin Dines. Basingstoke, UK ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS153.G38 D56 2010

Doane, Mary Ann.
"Pathos and pathology: the cinema of Todd Haynes." Camera Obscura 57 (Sept 2004): 1(22).
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on the work of filmmaker Todd Haynes. The writer discusses the pathos and pathology that are rampant in Haynes's cinema. Pathos saturates Haynes's films, in which it is not so much used as a tactic as it is signified, without cynicism. Moreover, clearly evident across his films is the semiotic slippage among intense affect, suffering, and disease indicated by the etymological affinity of pathos and pathology. While the pathological does not necessarily evoke pathos, both address marginality; for Haynes, this site is either the woman--who becomes the placeholder of the most intense social contradictions, the indicator of the convention's paralysis--or the queer, embodying aberration, exemplary of the impossibility of "being oneself." This focus on the pathological is not just an elaboration of the processes of social marginalization, however, but a challenge to the persistent denial of the inextricability of the sensible and the intelligible." [Art Index]

Falcon, Richard.
"Magnificent obsession.(director Todd Haynes and his new film 'Far From Heaven')." Sight and Sound 13.3 (March 2003): 12(4).
UC users only
"A special issue on the work of filmmaker Todd Haynes. The issue features articles on the pathos and pathology that are rampant in Haynes's cinema; the construction of Haynes's directorial authority as resistant to the norms of conventional cinematic representation and spectatorial identification through an examination of Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story; the bootleg aesthetics of Superstar; Haynes's treatment of the abject in Poison and Safe; the treatment of narrative space in Safe ; the representation of a postmodern relationship to history in contemporary cinema, with particular reference toVelvet Goldmine; and how Far from Heaven demonstrates how media critique can arise with and through media immersion." [Art Index]

Harvey, J.
"Made in Heaven." Film Comment v. 39 no. 2 (March/April 2003) p. 52, 54-5
UC users only
"Todd Haynes's warmest film, Far from Heaven, closely mimics 1955's All That Heaven Allows, the coldest film by director Douglas Sirk. The Haynes version reproduces the crane shots and slow fades of the Sirk film as well as its Populuxe interiors, its golden-leaved garden belonging to the heroine with two children, and its central tale of a woman plagued by the prejudices of her upscale suburban town and involved in a near-scandalous love affair. In Haynes's version, the romantic object of desire is African-American, and the heroine's husband is homosexual, although battling with it. Throughout, it is these issues that give Haynes's movie a feeling of substance and social reality lacking in the Sirk piece, in which the heroine's difficulty was that her lover was a gardener and that her children and the town were snobs about it. All That Heaven Allows is not a major Sirk movie, and Haynes improves upon it." [Art Index]

Holleran, Andrew.
"Weepers. (Arts).(Talk to Her)(Far From Heaven)(The Hours)(Movie Review)." The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide 10.3 (May-June 2003): 48(2).
UC users only

James, Nick.
"Todd Haynes.(Interview)(Interview)." Sight and Sound 13.3 (March 2003): 14(2).
UC users only
In an interview, filmmaker Todd Haynes discusses his latest work, Far From Heaven. Topics addressed include the acting style used throughout the film, Haynes's relationship with irony, and the film's treatment of such themes as racial prejudice and homosexuality.

Joyrich, Lynne.
"Written on the screen: mediation and immersion in Far from Heaven." Camera Obscura 57 (Sept 2004): 187(33).
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on the work of filmmaker Todd Haynes. Haynes's 2002 film Far from Heaven demonstrates how media critique can arise with and through media immersion. In its articulation of social issues in and through domestic, romantic, and media entanglements, the film represents a kind of homage to, or reworking of, the melodramas of director Douglas Sirk. Haynes has reworked Sirk's reworking of melodrama's reworking of classical Hollywood film and the social and personal issues it deals with, thereby enacting a complex attitude toward, and position within, mediated culture. This immersion indicates a profound involvement with mass culture, but one that is simultaneously--and precisely because it is so involved--analytical. The writer discusses how film, television, telephony, painting, photography, print, and performance are used as focal points for the film's diegesis even as they also help to focus the film's form and structure." [Art Index]

Lally, Kevin.
"Far from Hollywood: Todd Haynes Breaks Convention with Sirk-Inspired Melodrama." Film Journal International, vol. 105, no. 11, pp. 12-14, November 2002.

Landy, M.
"The Dream of the Gesture'': The Body of / in Todd Haynes's Films." boundary 2 30.3 (Sept 1, 2003): 123(18).
UC users only

Luciano, Dana.
"Coming Around Again." GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian & Gay Studies, 2007, Vol. 13 Issue 2/3, p249-272
UC users only
The article analyzes director Todd Haynes' 2002 motion picture "Far from Heaven" from a queer theory perspective. The article explains that the motion picture is inspired from mid-20th century motion picture melodramas.

Mulvey, Laura.
"Far From Heaven.(Reviews)(Movie Review)." Sight and Sound 13.3 (March 2003): 40(2).
UC users only

O'Brien, Geoffrey.
"Past perfect.(Todd Haynes's Far from Heaven)(Interview)." Artforum Internationall 41.3 (Nov 2002): 152(7).
UC users only
"Director Todd Haynes is profiled and his new film "Far from Heaven" is examined. The film is a precise pastiche of a movie Douglas Sirk might have made in 1958--if, that is, Universal Studios had been prepared to release a movie bearing on homosexuality, interracial romance and civil rights." [ProQuest]

Scherr, Rebecca.
"(Not) queering "white vision" in Far from Heaven and Transamerica." Jump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media, Spring2008, Issue 50, p9-9, 1p

Schickel, Richard.
"A heaven of magnificent obsessions." Time. Nov 18, 2002. Vol. 160, Iss. 21; p. 132
UC users only

Silberg, J.
"A Scandal in Suburbia" [Interview with Todd Haynes and Edward Lachman]. American Cinematographer v. 83 no. 12 (December 2002) p. 54-6, 58, 60, 62-5
UC users only
"Far from Heaven, a film directed by Todd Haynes, gradually, yet consistently, effects a certain displacement of difference. Haynes's film is a drama of marital impasse between Cathy, who engages in a scandalous relationship with her black gardener, Raymond, and her husband, Frank, who struggles with the escalating unmanageability of his homosexual impulses. It transfers and articulates the "invisible" vice of Frank's homosexual desire onto the transgressive scandal of "visible" difference in the interracial couple. While all the sexuality and desire coalesce within the homosexual sphere, the interracial couple is drained of erotics. In the end, the film disappoints its own logic as its structural analogy between racism and homophobia fails due to its very visual organization. It cannot transcend the boundaries it has established for Cathy in terms of racialized geography and spaces, and it cannot grant Raymond the independence it allows Frank, as it has not endowed him with a perspective." [Art Index]

Simmons, Gary.
"Paradise lost: far from heaven.(FILM AS TEXT: 1931-2005)." Australian Screen Education 40 (Autumn 2005): 103(5)

Skvirsky, Salomé Aguilera.
"The Price of Heaven: Remaking Politics in All that Heaven Allows, All: Fear Eats the Soul, and Far from Heaven." Cinema Journal, Spring2008, Vol. 47 Issue 3, p90-121, 32p

Sklar, R.
"Far From Heaven." Cineaste v. 28 no. 2 (Spring 2003) p. 38-9
UC users only

Taubin, Amy
"In every dream home." Film Comment v. 38 no. 5 (September/October 2002) p. 22-4, 26
"Todd Haynes's latest movie, Far From Heaven, is a reworking of Douglas Sirk's 1955 picture All That Heaven Allows. In Sirk's movie, an upper-middle-class widow, played by Jane Wyman, falls in love with her gardener, played by Rock Hudson. Shunned by her children and her friends, she ends the relationship only to realize, perhaps too late, that she made the wrong decision. Haynes's film adds the complication of homosexuality to the destabilizing force of interracial intimacy that was also a feature of another remake of the Sirk movie, Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1971). Haynes is worried about how his movie's combination of extreme aestheticism and emotional sincerity will be received. He says he learned from the test screenings that the movie "does exactly the opposite of what audiences want today." [Art Index]

Thomson, Clifford.
"Todd Haynes, filmmaker.(Biography)." Current Biography 64.7 (July 2003): 32(5).

Willis, Sharon.
"The politics of disappointment: Todd Haynes rewrites Douglas Sirk." Camera Obscura 54 (Dec 2003): 131(46).
UC users only
"Far from Heaven, a film directed by Todd Haynes, gradually, yet consistently, effects a certain displacement of difference. Haynes's film is a drama of marital impasse between Cathy, who engages in a scandalous relationship with her black gardener, Raymond, and her husband, Frank, who struggles with the escalating unmanageability of his homosexual impulses. It transfers and articulates the "invisible" vice of Frank's homosexual desire onto the transgressive scandal of "visible" difference in the interracial couple. While all the sexuality and desire coalesce within the homosexual sphere, the interracial couple is drained of erotics. In the end, the film disappoints its own logic as its structural analogy between racism and homophobia fails due to its very visual organization. It cannot transcend the boundaries it has established for Cathy in terms of racialized geography and spaces, and it cannot grant Raymond the independence it allows Frank, as it has not endowed him with a perspective." [Art Index]

I'm Not There

Asava, Zelie.
"Multiculturalism and Morphing in I'm Not There." Wide Screen, 2010, Vol. 1 Issue 2, p1-15, 15p
UC users only

Clover, Joshua
"The End." Film Quarterly; Spring2008, Vol. 61 Issue 3, p6-7, 2p, 2 bw
UC users only

Decurtis, Anthony.
"6 Characters in Search of an Artist." Chronicle of Higher Education, 11/23/2007, Vol. 54 Issue 13, pB14-B15, 2p
UC users only

Garwood, Ian.
"Great art on a jukebox: the Romantic(ized) voice of Bob Dylan in I'm Not There." Film International , Dec2009, Vol. 7 Issue 6, p6-22, 17p
UC users only

Giamo, Benedict
"I'm Not There." Journal of American History; Jun2008, Vol. 95 Issue 1, p285-286, 2p
UC users only

Gray, M.
"It ain't me babe." Sight & Sound v. ns18 no. 1 (January 2008) p. 18-20, 22-4
UC users only

Gross, Larry
"The Lives of Others." Film Comment v. 43 no. 5 (September/October 2007) p. 40-5
UC users only

Johnson, Brian D.
"Why six Dylans are better than one." Maclean's, 12/3/2007, Vol. 120 Issue 47, p69-69
UC users only

Jones, Kent
"Chaos, Clocks, Juxtapositions." Nation; 12/24/2007, Vol. 285 Issue 21, p35, 3p
UC users only

Lane, Anthony.
"Tangled Up." New Yorker, 11/26/2007, Vol. 83 Issue 37, p173-175, 3p
UC users only

Marcus, Greil.
"Dylan Times Six." Rolling Stone, 11/29/2007 Issue 1040, p73-77, 5p
UC users only

Porton, R.
"I'm Not There" [Cover story]. Cineaste v. 33 no. 1 (Winter 2007) p. 56-7
UC users only

Porton, R.
"The Many Faces of Bob Dylan: An Interview with Todd Haynes." Cineaste v. 33 no. 1 (Winter 2007) p. 20-3
UC users only

Romney, Jonathan
"Interview: Todd Haynes." Sight & Sound v. ns18 no. 1 (January 2008) p. 21
UC users only

Silberg, J.
"Deconstructing Bob Dylan." American Cinematographer v. 88 no. 11 (November 2007) p. 38-44, 46-51
UC users only

Sinker, M.
"I'm Not There." Sight & Sound v. ns18 no. 1 (January 2008) p. 74-5
UC users only

Smith, David L.
"True, valid death off a movie screen: Todd Haynes' I'm not there." Journal of Religion and Film, 12 no 2 O 2008
UC users only

Smith, Jacob
"A town called Riddle: excavating Todd Haynes's I'm Not There." Screen 2010 51: 71-78
UC users only

Spirou, Penny.
"I'm Not There: The Future of the Musical Biopic." Metro, Jun2010, Issue 165, p116-121, 6p
UC users only

Tanvir, Kuhu.
"I'm Not There." Wide Screen, 2009, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p1-2, 2p
UC users only

Taubin, Amy.
Southland Tales/I'm Not There." Film Comment, Jan/Feb2008, Vol. 44 Issue 1, p39-40, 2p

Poison

Berger, Maurice.
"Todd Haynes' 'Poison.' (Troubleshooters) (Column)." Artforum International 30.n2 (Oct 1991): 17(3).

Bryson, Norman
"Todd Haynes's Poison and Queer Cinema." Invisible Culture - An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture Issue 1, Winter 1999.

Burdette, K.
"Queer Readings/Queer Cinema: An Examination Of The Early Work Of Todd Haynes." Velvet Light Trap 1998 (41): 68-80.
"Two films by director Todd Haynes, Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (1987) and Poison (1991), exemplify the narrative strategies employed in the "queer cinema" films that emerged in the late 1980's and early 1990's. Queer cinema deconstructed classic Hollywood images of heterosexuality and the formal structures and myths that naturalize opposite-sex attraction." [America: History and Life]

Canby, Vincent.
"Poison." (movie reviews) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v140 (Fri, April 5, 1991):B2(N), C8(L), col 4, 18 col in.

Christian, Laura.
"Of housewives and saints: abjection, transgression, and impossible mourning in Poison and safe." Camera Obscura 57 (Sept 2004): 93(32).
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on the work of filmmaker Todd Haynes. The writer discusses Haynes's treatment of the abject in his films Poison and Safe. Noting that Haynes's films have maintained a consistent focus on the theme of abjection, she examines two key problematics that each approach the issue of abjection from a different angle: one concerning the performative resources provided by the condition of abjection or rejection by the social order at large, and the other the psychosomatic consequences of a too-forceful repudiation of the abject, or of the constitutive exclusions that are a precondition for the attainment of normative femininity. The writer examine these issues as they appear in Poison and Safe respectively, arguing, among other things, that the relationship between these major problematics does not so much suggest an analogical relation between the condition of femininity and that of male subjectivity "at the margins," but rather delineates their interfaces and the foreclosures on which each is based." [Art Index]

Corliss, Richard.
"Poison." (movie reviews) Time v137, n19 (May 13, 1991):69.

Jenkins, Nicholas.
"Poison." TLS. Times Literary Supplement n4624 (Nov 15, 1991 n4624): 19(1).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Poison." (movie reviews) Nation v252, n15 (April 22, 1991):535.

Laskawy, Michael
"Poison at the Box Office: An Interview with Todd Haynes." Cineaste: America's Leading Magazine on the Art and Politics of the Cinema, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 38-39, 1991.
UC users only

Nichols, Peter M.
"Poison." (movie reviews)(Living Arts Pages) New York Times v141 (Thu, May 28, 1992):B5(N), C22(L), col 1, 9 col in.

Picardie, Ruth.
"Poison." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v4, n172 (Oct 11, 1991):21 (2 pages).

Romney, Jonathan.
"Poison." Sight and Sound 1.n6 (Oct 1991): 56(2).

Savage, Jon.
"Tasteful tales. (new film concerned with AIDS)." Sight and Sound 1.n6 (Oct 1991): 15(5).
Todd Haynes, a graduate from Brown University, directed and co-edited 'Poison,' a film on Aids that focuses on male homosexuality. The film deals with the effect of Aids on society and the way gays feel at the prospect of being excluded from society. This movie focuses on the hostile attitude towards queers.

Safe

Bouchard, Danielle; Desai, Jigna.
''There's Nothing More Debilitating Than Travel:' Locating U.S. Empire in Todd Haynes' Safe." Quarterly Review of Film and Video, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 359-70, Fall 2005.
UC users only
"The writers examine how Todd Haynes' 1995 film Safe implicates the mysterious illness of its protagonist, the upper middle-class white housewife Carol, with the privileges that come to certain subjects, specifically within US empire. They consider what happens to our view of Carol's illness and what it suggests about the social milieu presented in the film when the illness is viewed as an aspect of subjectivity within US empire. Given that Safe is most often discussed as a Queer film, they explore how the critical rubric of Queer cinema in this case needs to be joined with a postcolonial analysis. They then discuss the complex and sometimes contradictory ways in which Carol's illness signifies, not only within a national context of racism and white privilege but within a global order shaped by US hegemony." [Art Index]

Burke, Andrew.
""Do you smell fumes?": Health, Hygiene, and Suburban Life." English Studies in Canada, Winter2006, Vol. 32 Issue 4, p147-168, 22p
UC users only

Christian, Laura.
"Of housewives and saints: abjection, transgression, and impossible mourning in Poison and safe." Camera Obscura 57 (Sept 2004): 93(32).
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on the work of filmmaker Todd Haynes. The writer discusses Haynes's treatment of the abject in his films Poison and Safe. Noting that Haynes's films have maintained a consistent focus on the theme of abjection, she examines two key problematics that each approach the issue of abjection from a different angle: one concerning the performative resources provided by the condition of abjection or rejection by the social order at large, and the other the psychosomatic consequences of a too-forceful repudiation of the abject, or of the constitutive exclusions that are a precondition for the attainment of normative femininity. The writer examine these issues as they appear in Poison and Safe respectively, arguing, among other things, that the relationship between these major problematics does not so much suggest an analogical relation between the condition of femininity and that of male subjectivity "at the margins," but rather delineates their interfaces and the foreclosures on which each is based." [Art Index]

Davis, Glyn
"Health and Safety in the Home: Todd Haynes's Clinical White World." In: Territories of desire in queer culture : refiguring contemporary boundaries / edited by David Alderson and Linda Anderson. Manchester, U.K. ; New York : Manchester University Press : Distributed exclusively in the USA by St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack HQ76.25.T477 2000

Gandy, Matthew
"Allergy and Allegory in Todd Haynes' [Safe]." In: Screening the city / edited by Mark Shiel and Tony Fitzmaurice. London ; New York : Verso, 2003.
Environ Dsgn PN1995.9.C513.S37 2003
Main Stack PN1995.9.C513.S37 2003
PFA PN1995.9.C513.S37 2003

Grossman, Julie.
"The Trouble with Carol: The Costs of Feeling Good in Todd Haynes's [Safe] and the American Cultural Landscape." Other Voices: The (e) Journal of Cultural Criticism, 2007, Vol. 3 Issue 2, p10-10, 1p
UC users only
The author discusses the character of Carol White in the film "[Safe]" directed by Todd Haynes. She describes the character of White. She explains how reading "[Safe]" in juxtaposition to "The Yellow Wallpaper" helps illuminate the feminist spirit of the film. She believes Haynes is the ultimate Foucauldian social problem film director.

Grundmann, R.
"How clean was my valley: Todd Haynes's Safe." Cineaste v. 21 no. 4 (1995) p. 22-5
"Todd Haynes's motion picture Safe is discussed. Set in 1987, the movie focuses on Carol, an upper-middle-class housewife who lives in a luxury home in the San Fernando Valley in isolation and emptiness. Carol becomes environmentally ill and eventually retreats to what turns out to be a fraudulent recovery camp in the hills of the New Mexico desert, where she ultimately becomes more isolated. Rather than pathologizing Carol, the movie uses her symptoms to comment on discourses that have traditionally pathologized women medically and psychologically; her failure to account for her illness turns her more into the accused than the victim. Although it is brilliant in depicting Carol's world as a sign of the times, the movie is marred in its depiction of the woman as, ultimately, a victim of her own ignorance." [Art Index]

Haynes, Todd; Moore, Julianne; Vachon, Christine
"...and all is well in our world- making Safe." In: Film-makers on film-making / edited by John Boorman and Walter Donohue. London : Faber and Faber, 1996.
Main Stack PN1994.F43912 1996

Kollin, Susan
"Toxic Subjectivity: Gender and the Ecologies of Whiteness in Todd Haynes's Safe." Isle: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 121-39, Winter 2002.

Lynch, L.
"The Epidemiology of "Regrettable Kinship": Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes Safe and Richard Powers Gain." Journal of Medical Humanities 23.3 (Annual 2002): 203(17).
UC users only
"In "The Epidemiology of Regrettable Kinship: Gender, Epidemic, and Community", in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain,? the author analyzes two contemporary cultural texts about women and environmentally-linked illnesses to rethink commonplace understandings of the relationship between gender, disease, and community formation. By reading these narratives side by side, Lynch is able to address difficult issues about gendered subjectivity and the fragile construction of collective political identity. While the female protagonists in the texts Lynch examines relate differently to their illnesses, both portray the ways in which women negotiate the potential and limitations of illness communities." [Expanded Academic Index]

McQuain, Christopher
"Safe Man: Are Todd Haynes' Films Gay Enough?" Film Journal, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. [no pagination], 2002.

Naismith, Gaye
"Tales from the Crypt: Contamination and Quarantine in Todd Haynes's Safe." In: The visible woman : imaging technologies, gender, and science / edited by Paula A. Treichler, Lisa Cartwright, and Constance Penley. New York : New York University Press, c1998.
Anthropology RA778.V53 1998

Potter, Susan.
"Dangerous spaces: Safe." Camera Obscura 57 (Sept 2004): 125(32).
UC users only

Rayns, Tony.
"Safe." Sight and Sound 6.n5 (May 1996): 59(2).

Reid, Roddey
"Unsafe at Any Distance: Todd Haynes' Visual Culture of Health and Risk." Film Quarterly, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 32-44, Spring 1998.
UC users only
"The distance Todd Haynes puts between the audience and the heroine in Safe is very different to what many commentators have perceived. After its appearance in 1995, critics and film scholars had much to say about the way the film's cinematographic techniques--few close-ups and many long takes--distanced the audience from the predicament of the protagonist as she battles with the increasingly horrifying symptoms of environmental illness, making it difficult, if not virtually impossible, to sympathize with her. A more careful consideration of the film's cinematography reveals, however, that Haynes is trying to draw on the audience's willingness to be fascinated by and to identify with even the most contrived, artificial, or flat characters and environments while denying viewers the privilege of ever understanding them." [Art Index]

Schorr, Collier.
"Diary of a sad housewife. (interview with filmmaker Todd Haynes)(Interview)." Artforum International 33.n10 (Summer 1995): 86(4).
"An interview with Todd Haynes, director of the motion picture Safe. Through the story of the illness of a suburban housewife, Haynes casts the heterosexual utopian locale of the suburban home as a wife-killing entity. Haynes discusses his film in the aftermath of its success at the Sundance Film Festival. Topics discussed include the comparisons between Safe and Haynes's film Poison, Haynes's interest in female illness, the film's relation to AIDS, and the significance of the film's title." [Art Index]

Stephens, C.
"Gentlemen prefer Haynes: of dolls, dioramas, and disease: Todd Haynes' Safe passage." [interview]. Film Comment v. 31 (July/August 1995) p. 76-9+
UC users only
"The films of Todd Haynes thrive on contradiction. The 45-minute Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (1987) uses a cast of dolls to dramatize the life of the pop singer, who succumbed to anorexia at age 32. Due to the intervention of Richard Carpenter and A&M Records, the film has been barred from circulation since 1989. Haynes's feature-length Poison (1990) interweaves three stylistically divergent episodes, each set in a world "dying of panicky fright." The film's subtext is AIDS, but it never actually mentions the disease, and this silent meditation on the climate of crisis and sexual fear prompted by the AIDS epidemic may be Poison's most enduring quality. Haynes's first foray into television, the hourlong Dottie Gets Spanked (1993), utilizes the most conventional of forms--early-Sixties sitcoms--to unearth the sadomasochistic yearnings of a prepubescent boy. His latest film, Safe, is an emotionally devastating examination of "environmental illness."" [Art Index]

Stuber, Dorian
"Patient Zero? Illness and Vulnerability in Todd Haynes's [Safe]." Parallax Volume 11, Number 2 / April-June 2005
UC users only

Taubin, Amy.
"Nowhere to hide.(director Todd Haynes)(Interview)." Sight and Sound 6.n5 (May 1996): 35(3).
"Compared to his three earlier films, Todd Haynes's {Safe} appears almost conventional. It has linear narrative, is shot in 35mm, has a name actress in the lead role, and has the glistening look and sound of films 10 times its $1 million production cost. It is also the most subversive of the director's films, a subtle match of radical form and radical political content. Above all, it is a critique of a passive society in which people ignore the ecological disaster that surrounds them or wait helplessly for someone else to tell them what to do about it. In an interview, Haynes discusses his work, commenting on a range of topics, including his desire to make films about end-of-the-20th-century diseases, his belief that illness is the best thing that happens to the central character in {Safe}, and his desire to frustrate the viewer's narrative expectations.." [ [Art Index]

Velvet Goldmine

Bennett, Chad
"Flaming the Fans: Shame and the Aesthetics of Queer Fandom in Todd Haynes's Velvet Goldmine." Cinema Journal, 49, Number 2, Winter 2010, pp. 17-39
UC users only

Brooks, Xan.
"Velvet Goldmine.(Review)." Sight and Sound 8.11 (Nov 1998): 63(2).
"This febrile and flamboyant film does not so much steer a course through 1970s glam as wallow exuberantly in the movement's chaotic lack of structure. A dense, layered, sometimes frustrating, and frequently fabulous work, it brilliantly exposes the ideals of youth culture: its celebration of difference, its clumsy questing for the intangible, and the potential it offers for individual expression." [Art Index]

Bullock, Marcus.
"Treasures of the earth and screen: Todd Haynes's film Velvet Goldmine.(Critical Essay)." Discourse 24.3 (Fall 2002): 3(25).
UC users only

doCarmo, Stephen N.
"Beyond good and evil: mass culture theorized in Todd Haynes' Velvet Goldmine." Journal of American & Comparative Cultures (Fall-Winter 2002): 395(4).
UC users only

Feaster, F.
"Velvet goldmine." Film Quarterly v. 53 no. 1 (Fall 1999) p. 42-4
"Todd Haynes's Velvet Goldmine traces the history of British homosexual flamboyance from Oscar Wilde to the 70s gender-bending phenomenon of glam rock. Using the rise of glitter rock stars such as David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Brian Ferry, and the New York Dolls as a backdrop, the film focuses on the efforts of reporter Arthur Stuart, played by Christian Bale, to return to his vanished, charmed, glam-obsessed youth, when his teenage sexual identity was expressed by performers Brian Slade (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers) and Curt Wild (Ewan McGregor), based on Bowie and Pop. Using Citizen Kane's detective-story framing device, Velvet Goldmine sees Stuart investigating the mock assassination of Slade. This allegory of youth's end is a tribute to the giddy transportive power of filmmaking language, a tribute reassembled into a theoretical treatise on gender as a performance and pop culture as transformative." [Art Index]

Frueh, J.
"Tarts, stars, jewels, and fairies." [Velvet goldmine]. Art Journal v. 58 no. 4 (Winter 1999) p. 88-9
UC users only
The writer confesses her aesthetic and erotic obsession with Todd Haynes's movie Velvet Goldmine, which is set in the glam rock era of the early 1970s.

Horspool, David.
"Velvet Goldmine." TLS. Times Literary Supplement n4988 (Nov 6, 1998 n4988): 31(1).

James, Nick.
"American voyeur. (Film Director Todd Haynes)(Interview)." Sight and Sound 8.n9 (Sept 1998): 8(6).
"Filmmaker Todd Haynes discusses his film 'Velvet Goldmine.' He explains how he, as an American, became aware of the film's subject, the British glam rock scene of the early 1970s, and he gives his own opinion about glam rock. He describes some of the techniques he used in the making of the film, he notes the influence of other films, including Scorsese's 'The Last Waltz', and he discusses his feelings on completion of the film."

O'Neill, Edward R.
"Traumatic postmodern histories: Velvet Goldmine's phantasmatic testimonies." Camera Obscura 57 (Sept 2004): 157(30).
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on the work of filmmaker Todd Haynes. The writer discusses the representation of a postmodern relationship to history in contemporary cinema, with particular reference to Haynes's 1998 film Velvet Goldmine. The difficulty of balancing the demands of forgetting and remembering Western history is a postmodern historical predicament that, it is to be hoped, cinema can address, if not resolve. At least some works of contemporary popular culture use an epistemology of trauma and testimony to put the audience in a different relation to history and to help them consider media culture's status in mediating past and present, collective and individual trauma. These works thus aid an understanding of a postmodern aesthetic as mediating among disparate identity groups that would otherwise be at risk of being pitted against each other in a balkanized political landscape. The writer goes on to discuss this phenomenon with particular reference to Velvet Goldmine." [Art Index]

Pizzello, C.
"Glitter gulch." American Cinematographer v. 79 no. 11 (November 1998) p. 30-4+
UC users only
"In Todd Haynes's film Velvet Goldmine, Haynes and cinematographer Maryse Alberti chart the rise and fall of a glam-rock enigma. The film tells the story of the once-legendary glam-rock superstar Brian Slade, as remembered by his ex-wife, manager, and artistic muse in the 1980s, when Slade has faded into obscurity. Aiming to make the film look as if it had been made in the 1970s, the filmmakers drew liberally from the glam-rock aesthetic established by real-life stars such as David Bowie. They also looked at specific films from the 1970s, as well as other sources such as music videos for glam-rock acts. The many 1970s concert scenes are flamboyant in their expressive, deeply saturated colors, whereas the 1980s scenes are quite stark. Zooms were used extensively to create a more voyeuristic visual style." [Art Index]

Seligman, Craig.
"Velvet Goldmine." Artforum International 37.n2 (Oct 1998): 102(4).
UC users only view of Todd Haynes's movie Velvet Goldmine. The movie focuses on a reporter who sets out to discover what happened to a vanished pop star. The director does a wonderful job of making glam rock fresh, capturing the intensity of the effect it had on its fans, particularly gay kids. It is characterized by great music, funny period recreations, and superb acting, but it falls apart in the second half. Its excess of cultural references eventually makes it suffer from bloat." [Art Index]

Sinker, M.
"Here's looking at you kid." Sight & Sound v. ns8 no. 9 (September 1998) p. 10-13
"Focusing on Todd Haynes's Velvet Goldmine, the writer discusses the emergence of glam rock in the 1970s. He notes how the period's songs, styles, looks, and sounds of David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, the Dolls, Brian Ferry and Roxy Music, Mar Bolan and T Rex are knowingly redistributed among Haynes's characters. He finds Haynes's film to be a deliriously queer reading of the glam-rock years and a tale of the rise and fall of a composite glam figure drawn from David Bowie as much as anyone." [Art Index]




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