Gangster, Detective, Crime, and Mystery Films:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal Articles
Articles/Books about Serial Killers in the Movies

Articles and Books on Individual films

Bibliography of books and articles on film noir

Books

Abbott, Megan E.
The street was mine : white masculinity in hardboiled fiction and film noir New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.
MAIN: PS374.D4 A23 2002

Baxter, John
The gangster film. London, A. Zwemmer; New York, A. S. Barnes [1970] Screen series
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.B3 1970

British crime cinema
Edited by Steve Chibnall and Robert Murphy. London; New York: Routledge, 1999. British popular cinema.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.B72 1999

Brode, Douglas
Money, women, and guns: crime movies from Bonnie and Clyde to the present / by Douglas Brode. Secaucus, N.J.: Carol Pub. Group, c1995.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.B76 1995

Chadder, Viv.
"The Higher Heel: Women and the Post-War British Crime Film." In: The British cinema book / edited by Robert Murphy. 2nd ed. pp: 66-80 London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1993.5.G7.B66 2001

Chibnall, Steve.
Get Carter London ; New York : I.B. Tauris, c2003.
MAIN: PN1997 .G444 2003

Chibnall, Steve.
"Travels in Ladland: The British Gangster Film Cycle 1998-2001." In: The British cinema book / edited by Robert Murphy. 2nd ed. pp: 281-91. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1993.5.G7.B66 2001

Clarens, Carlos.
Crime movies: from Griffith to the Godfather--and beyond / Carlos Clarens 1st ed New York: Norton, c1980
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.C5 1980
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3.C5 1980

Cocchiarelli, Joseph J.
Screen sleuths: a filmography / Joseph J. Cocchiarelli. New York: Garland Pub., 1992. Series title: Garland filmographies; 3. Series title: Garland reference library of the humanities; vol. 1322.
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.D4 C63 1992

Crime fiction and film in the Southwest: bad boys and bad girls in the badlands
Edited by Steve Glassman and Maurice J. O'Sullivan Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, c2001.

Crime fiction and film in the Sunshine State: Florida noir
Edited by Steve Glassman and Maurice J. O'Sullivan. Bowling Green: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, c1997.
UCB Main PS374.D4 C74 1997

Derry, Charles
The suspense thriller: films in the shadow of Alfred Hitchcock / Charles Derry. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1988.
UCB Main PN1995.9.D4 D47 1988
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.D4 D47 1988

The detective in American fiction, film, and television
Edited by Jerome H. Delamater and Ruth Prigozy. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1998. Series title: Contributions to the study of popular culture no. 63.
UCB Main PS374.D4 D48 1998

The Devil himself : villainy in detective fiction and film
Edited by Stacy Gillis and Philippa Gates. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2002.
MAIN: PR830.D4 D45 2002

Dresner, Lisa M.
The female investigator in literature, film, and popular culture Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2007.
MAIN: PR830.D4 D74 2007
Table of contents only http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0619/2006026596.html

Durgnat, Raymond.
"Some Lines of Inquiry into Post-War British Crimes." In: The British cinema book / edited by Robert Murphy. 2nd ed. pp: 135-45 London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1993.5.G7.B66 2001

Everson, William K.
The bad guys; a pictorial history of the movie villain, by William K. Everson. [1st ed.] New York, Citadel Press [1964]
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.E9
Bancroft F867.M6.E9

Everson, William K.
The detective in film [by] William K. Everson. [1st ed.]. Secaucus,N.J., Citadel Press [c1972].
UCB Main PN1995.9.D4 E91

The gangster film reader
Ddited by Alain Silver and James Ursini. Pompton Plains, N.J. : Limelight, 2007.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 G36 2007

Gardaphe, Fred L.
From wiseguys to wise men : the gangster and Italian American masculinities New York : Routledge, 2006.
MAIN: PS374.G36 G37 2006; MOFF: PS374.G36 G37 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip067/2006001554.html

Gemunden, Gerd
"The gangster film and melodrama of Rainer Werner Fassbinder." In: Framed visions : popular culture, Americanization, and the contemporary German and Austrian imagination. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998.
Main Stack NX550.A1.G385 1998

Guerrero, Ed.
"Black Violence as Cinema: From Cheap Thrills to Historical Agonies." In: Violence and American cinema / edited by J. David Slocum. pp: 212-25. New York : Routledge, 2001. AFI film readers.
Main Stack PN1995.9.V5.V56 2001

Haas, Robert.
"Disney Does Dutch: Billy Bathgate and the Disneyfication of the Gangster Genre." In: From mouse to mermaid : the politics of film, gender, and culture / Elizabeth Bell, Lynda Haas, Laura Sells, editors. pp: 72-85. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c1995.
Electronic location: http://www.netlibrary.com/summary.asp?id=614
Anthropology PN1999.W27.F76 1995
Main Stack PN1999.W27.F76 1995

Haydock, Ron.
Deerstalker!: Holmes and Watson on screen / by Ron Haydock. Metuchen,N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1978.
NRLF B 3 567 964

Hughes, Howard
Crime Wave : The Filmgoers' Guide to the Great Crime Movies I. B. Tauris & Company, Limited, 2006
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]

Karpf, Stephen Louis.
The gangster film: emergence, variation, and decay of a genre, 1930-1940. New York, Arno Press, 1973 [c1970] Arno Press cinema program. Dissertations on film series
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.K35
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3.K35

King, Neal
Heroes in hard times: cop action movies in the U.S. / Neal King. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P57.K56 1999

Kitwana, Bakari.
"Young, don't give a fuck, and Black : Black gangster films." In: The hip hop generation : young Blacks and the crisis in African American culture. 1st ed. New York : Basic Civitas, c2002.
Main Stack E185.86.K58 2002

Lambert, Gavin.
The dangerous edge / Gavin Lambert. London: Barrie & Jenkins, 1975.
UCB Main PN3448.D4L331 1975

Langman, Larry.
A guide to American crime films of the thirties / Larry Langman and Daniel Finn. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1995. Bibliographies and indexes in the performing arts; no. 18
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.L36 1995

Langman, Larry.
A guide to American crime films of the forties and fifties / Larry Langman and Daniel Finn. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1995. Bibliographies and indexes in the performing arts; no. 19
Main Stack PN1995.9.D4.L35 1995

Langman, Larry.
A guide to American silent crime films / Larry Langman and Daniel Finn. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994. Bibliographies and indexes in the performing arts; no. 15
Main Stack PN1995.9.D4.L36 1994

Lee, Raymond.
Gangsters and hoodlums; the Underworld in the cinema, by Raymond Lee and B. C. Van Hecke. With a foreword by Edward G. Robinson. South Brunswick [N.J.]: A. S. Barnes, c1971.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.L41 1971

Leitch, Thomas M.
Crime films Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
UCB Main PN1995.9.D4 L45 2002
Table of contents: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/cam025/2001052965.html

Luhr, William.
Raymond Chandler and film / William Luhr. 2nd ed. Tallahassee: FloridaState University Press; Gainesville, FL: University Presses of Florida[distributor], c1991.
UCB Main PS3505.H3224 Z69 1991
UCB Main PS3505.Ch3224 .Z69.1982 (earlier edition)
UCB Moffitt PS3505.H3224 z69 1982(earlier edition)

Lyden, John.
"Genre and film analyses: Gangster films." In: Film as religion : myths, morals, and rituals / John C. Lyden. New York : New York University Press, c2003.
Main Stack PN1995.5.L89 2003

Maltby, Richard.
"The Spectacle of Criminality." In: Violence and American cinema / edited by J. David Slocum. pp: 115-52. New York : Routledge, 2001. AFI film readers.
Main Stack PN1995.9.V5.V56 2001

Mason, Fran
American gangster cinema : from Little Caesar to Pulp fiction New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 M37 2002

McCarty, John
Bullets over Hollywood : the American gangster picture from the silents to The Sopranos Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 M34 2004
Moffitt: PN1995.9.G3 M34 2004
PFA : PN1995.9.G3 M47 2004

McCarty, John
Hollywood gangland: the movies' love affair with the mob / John McCarty. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1993.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.M33 1993
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3.M33 1993

McDonald, Keiko Iwai.
"The Yakuza Film: An Introduction." In: Reframing Japanese cinema : authorship, genre, history / edited by Arthur Nolletti, Jr. and David Desser. pp: 165-92. Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1992.
Main Stack PN1993.5.J3.R44 1992
Moffitt PN1993.5.J3.R44 1992

Mitchell, Edward
"Apes and essences : some sources of significance in the American gangster film." In: Film genre reader II / edited by Barry Keith Grant. 1st ed. Austin : University of Texas Press, 1995.
Main Stack PN1995.F45792 1995

Mob culture: hidden histories of the American gangster film
Edited by Lee Grieveson, Esther Sonnet, and Peter Stanfield. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.M63 2005
Contents: Gangsters and governance in the silent era / Lee Grieveson -- Why boys go wrong : gangsters, hoodlums, and the natural history of delinquent careers / Richard Maltby -- Gang busters : the Kefauver Crime Committee and the syndicate films of the 1950s / Ronald W. Wilson -- Ladies love brutes : reclaiming female pleasures in the lost history of Hollywood gangster cycles, 1929-1931 / Esther Sonnet -- A gunsel is being beaten : gangster masculinity and the homoerotics of the crime film, 1941-1942 / Gaylyn Studlar -- Mother Barker : film star and Public Enemy No. 1 / Mary Elizabeth Strunk -- "Good evening gentlemen; can I check your hats please?" : masculinity, dress, and the retro gangster cycles of the 1990s / Esther Sonnet and Peter Stanfield -- Waddaya lookin' at? : rereading the gangster film through The Sopranos / Martha P. Nochimson -- Black hands and white hearts : Southern Italian immigrants, crime, and race in early American cinema / Giorgio Bertellini -- "American as chop suey" : invocations of gangsters in Chinatown, 1920-1936 / Peter Stanfield -- The underworld films of Oscar Micheaux and Ralph Cooper : toward a genealogy of the Black screen gangster / Jonathan Munby -- Walking the streets : Black gangsters and the "abandoned city" in the 1970s blaxploitation cycle / Peter Stanfield.

Mowlabocus, Sharif
"Arse Bandits: Exploring Nostalgic representations of queerness in gangster films." In: Queer popular culture : literature, media, film, and television / edited by Thomas Peele. 1st ed. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
Main Stack PN1992.8.H64.Q44 2007

Munby, Jonathan.
Public enemies, public heroes: screening the gangster from Little Caesar to Touch of Evil / Jonathan Munby. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.M86 1999
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3 M86 1999

Neale, Steve
"Westerns and gangster films since the 1970s." In: Genre and contemporary Hollywood / edited by Steve Neale. London : BFI Publishing, 2002.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.G46 2002

Nochimson, Martha.
Dying to belong : gangster movies in Hollywood and Hong Kong Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2007.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 N63 2007; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip079/2007003771.html

Orsitto, Fulvio S.
"Shame of the Nation: The Path of Gangsters and Noir Heroes on the Horizon of the American Nightmare." In: Image of the outsider in literature, media, and society. Pueblo, CO : Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery, 2002.
Main Stacks ON ORDER

Parish, James Robert.
The great cop pictures / by James Robert Parish. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1990.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P57.P37 1990
Moffitt PN1995.9.P57.P37 1990

Pendo, Stephen
Raymond Chandler on screen: his novels into film / by Stephen Pendo. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1976.
NRLF B 3 160 145

Pitts, Michael R. Pitts, Michael R.
Famous movie detectives / Michael R. Pitts. Metuchen, N.J.: ScarecrowPress, 1979.
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.D4 .P5

Pitts, Michael R.
Famous movie detectives II / Michael R. Pitts. Metuchen, N.J.:Scarecrow Press, 1991.
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.D4 P53 1991

Rafter, Nicole Hahn
Shots in the mirror: crime films and society / Nicole Rafter. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.
UCB Main PN1995.9.G3 R34 2000
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.G3 R34 2000

Reid, Mark A.
"The Black Gangster." In: Film genre reader II / edited by Barry Keith Grant. pp: 456-73.1st ed. Austin : University of Texas Press, 1995.
Main Stack PN1995.F45792 1995

Rosow, Eugene.
Born to lose: the gangster film in America / Eugene Rosow New York: Oxford University Press, 1978
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.R6

Rubin, Martin
Thrillers / Martin Rubin. Cambridge, UK; New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Genres in American cinema
Main Stack PN1995.9.S87.R83 1999

Rubin, Rachel.
"Gangster Generation: Crime, Jews and the Problem of Assimilation." Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies. 20 (4): 1-17. 2002 Summer.

Santos, Marlisa
"Leave the Gun, Take the Cannoli: Food and Family in the Modern American Mafia Film." In: Reel food : essays on food and film / edited by Anne L. Bower. New York : Routledge, 2004.
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0413/2004001358.html
Main Stack PN1995.9.F65.R44 2004

Sarris, Andrew.
"Gangster Films." In: "You ain't heard nothin' yet" : the American talking film, history & memory, 1927-1949 / Andrew Sarris. New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
Main Stack PN1995.7.S27 1998
Moffitt PN1995.7.S27 1998

Schilling, Mark.
The yakuza movie book : a guide to Japanese gangster films Berkeley, Calif. : Stone Bridge Press, c2003.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 S33 2003
PFA : PN1993.5.J3 S32 2003

Shadoian, Jack.
Dreams & dead ends : the American gangster film / Jack Shadoian. 2nd ed. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.S5 2003
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3.S5 2003

Shadoian, Jack.
Dreams and dead ends: the American gangster/crime film / Jack Shadoian. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, c1977.
Full text available online [UCB users only]
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.S51
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3.S51

Shadoian, Jack.
Dreams and dead ends: the American gangster/crime film / Jack Shadoian. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 S5 2003
Moffitt: PN1995.9.G3 S5 2003
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.S51 [earlier edition]
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3.S51 [earlier edition]

Skene Melvin, David
Crime, detective, espionage, mystery, and thriller fiction and film: acomprehensive bibliography of critical writing through 1979 / compiled byDavid Skene Melvin and Ann Skene Melvin. Westport, Conn.: GreenwoodPress, c1980.
UCB Main PN3448.D4A12 .S55
UCB Moffitt PN3448.D4A12 .S55

Smith, Jim
Gangster films London : Virgin Books, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 S65 2004
Moffitt: PN1995.9.G3 S65 2004

Soister, John T.
Of Gods and monsters: a critical guide to Universal Studios' sciencefiction, horror, and mystery films, 1929-1939 / by John T. Soister. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1999.
UCB Main PN1999.U57 S65 1999

Steinbrunner, Chris.
The films of Sherlock Holmes / by Chris Steinbrunner and Norman Michaels. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, 1978.
UCB Main PN1995.9.S5 S7 1978

Stephens, Michael L.
Gangster films: a comprehensive, illustrated reference to people, films, and terms / by Michael L. Stephens. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.S84 1996

Sumser, John
Morality and social order in television crime drama / by John Sumser. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c1996.
Main Stack PN1992.8.D48.S86 1996

Tuska, Jon.
The detective in Hollywood / by Jon Tuska. 1st ed. Garden City, N.Y.:Doubleday, 1978.
UCB Main PN1995.9.D4 .T8
UCB Moffitt PN1995.5.D4 T8

Tuska, Jon.
In manors and alleys: a casebook on the American detective film / JonTuska. New York: Greenwood Press, 1988. Series title: Contributions to the study of popular culture no. 17.
UCB Main PN1995.9.D4 T7951 1988
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.D4 T795 1988

White, Jonathan David
"Bisexuals Who Kill: Hollywood's Bisexual Crimewave, 1985-1998." In: Bisexual men in culture and society / Brett Beemyn, Erich Steinman, editors. New York : London : Harrington Park, c2002.
Main Stack HQ74.2.U5.B52 2002

Wilt, David E.
"Hollywood's Detective." In: The Columbia companion to American history on film : how the movies have portrayed the American past / edited by Peter C. Rollins. New York : Columbia University Press, c2003.
Media Center PN1995.9.U64.C65 2003
Doe Refe PN1995.9.U64.C65 2003
Moffitt PN1995.9.U64.C65 2003
PFA PN1995.9.U64.C65 2003

Wires, Richard.
John P. Marquand and Mr. Moto: spy adventures and detective films /Richard Wires. Muncie, Ind.: Ball State University, c1990.
UCB Main PS3525.A6695 Z77 1990

Yaquinto, Marilyn.
Pump 'em full of lead: a look at gangsters on film / Marilyn Yaquinto. New York: Twayne; London: Prentice Hall International, c1998. Twayne's filmmakers series.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.Y37 1998
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3.Y37 1998

Zalcock, Beverley
Renegade sisters London: Creation, 2001.
MAIN: PN1995.9.W6 Z35 2001

Journal Articles

Allen, Jessica; Livingstone, Sonia; Reiner, Robert.
"The changing generic location of crime in film: a content analysis offilm synopses, 1945-1991." Journal of Communication v47, n4 (Autumn, 1997):89 (13 pages).
Public concern over the link between portrayals of crime on film and thecrime rate has persisted since the earliest days of cinema. Whether or notthe number of films containing crime is increasing and, if so, for whichkinds of films they are increasing is investigated in a content analysis ofa sample of synopses or all films released in the UK between 1945 and 1991.The results of the analysis are discussed.

Anker, Roy.
"Badfellas: the rash of mob movies cannot but prod viewers to contemplatethe specter of evil and its proximity to their own dark places." Christianity Today v34, n3 (March 11, 1991):45 (3 pages).

Arthur, Paul.
"Los Angeles as scene of the crime." Film Comment v32, n4 (July-August, 1996):20 (7 pages).
Los Angeles constitutes the very locus, spiritual font, and often the actual site of some of America's most cherished crime-movie fantasies. This is despite the fact that it is a city devoid of the topographical symbols and embedding of the past usually associated with detective narratives, especially film noir detective narratives. The writer examines what detective movies, from the postwar period to present day, have done with the ecology of L.A. and what L.A. has done with and to detective movies.

Broe, Dennis.
"Class, crime, and film noir: labor, the fugitive outsider, and the anti-authoritarian tradition." Social Justice 30.1 (Spring 2003): 22(20).

Brooks, Jodi.
"'Worrying the Note': Mapping Time in the Gangsta Film." Screen. 42(4):363-81. 2001 Winter

Brown, Jeffrey A.
"Bullets, buddies, and bad guys: the "action-cop" genre." Journal of Popular Film and Television v21, n2 (Summer, 1993):79 (9pages).
UC users only
The popular appeal of action-cop movies stems from the recurringhero-villain formula popularized in Hollywood. Such formulas depend onaudience preference and represent ideological conflicts in Americanculture. The action-cop formula is successful because it shows how culturaltensions can be mediated. The evolution of this genre revolves aroundvariations of such hero-villain themes.

Bruzzi, Stella.
"Style and the hood: gangsters, American and French style." Sight & Sound ns5 (Nov. '95) p. 26-7.
Extract: The myth of the gangster was largely built up and embellished in American and French films. Traditionally, French films have tended to fix on a sometimes tortuous realism to rub against the allure of crime, while American films have been preoccupied with the cinematic representation of real crimes. The specificity of this genre resides neither in realism nor actuality, however, but in the establishment of a distinctive iconographic shorthand that reflects a broader stylistic difference between the two traditions. The classic American films are characterized by frenetic action and fast talking. The classic French movies are quiet and exaggeratedly slow. Despite all generic similarities, the French and American films have always diverged on the level of tone. Though the gangster film may come more naturally to Americans, the French do it with more style. Among the films discussed are Raoul Walsh's The Roaring Twenties, Jean-Luc Godard's A bout de souffle, and Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas.

Cawelti, John G.
"The Gunfighter and the Hard-boiled Dick: Some Ruminations on the American Fantasies of Heroism."American Studies 1975 16(2): 49-64.
"Examines some of the myths and realities reflected by American media heroes. Western sheriffs, for example, were rarely men of law. The ambiguous characterizations of American heroes reflect traditional notions of individualism throughout the United States. Mel Brooks' film, "Blazing Saddles," effectively exposes the absurdities inherent in these beliefs. Many similarities and contrasts exist between the western and the detective story. Examines the expression of the American dream in each." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Cieutat, Michel
"La rue du film noir ou le mirage américain." CinémAction; nr.75 (Apr 1995); p.146-152
Contrary to earlier gangster films, the US film noir of the 1940's and 1950's dwells on urbaninteriors, with few scenes on the street.

Cooper, Stephen.
"knowledge/power in the detective genre." Film Quarterly v. 42 (Spring '89) p. 23-31.

Dargis, Manohla.
"Dark side of the dream." (gangsters in American movies) Sight and Sound v6, n8 (August, 1996):16 (4 pages).
The success of Francis Ford Coppola's film 'The Godfather' reveals thatgangsters have become an important part of American cinema. The Americangangster movies centres on the family's struggle to survive the hardships of modern American life, signifying the extant political movement. Thegangster films, a product of Prohibition and Depression, survived thecensor and the indifference of its audience and resurrected with 'TheGodfather.' History of gangster movies, produced by Warner Brothers,Paramount and Monarch studios, are discussed.

Dargis, Manohla
"Gangsters." Sight & Sound; Vol.VI nr.8 (Aug 1996); p.15-19
An analysis of the gangster movie as a central feature of US cinema.

DeFino, Dean.
"Killing Owen Taylor: Cinema, Detective Stories, and the Past." Journal of Narrative Technique. 30(3):313-31. 2000

De Stefano, George.
"Italian-Americans: family lies: Italians as mobsters in American films." Film Comment v. 23 (July/Aug. '87) p. 22-4+.
Includes: Detective and crime films: p. 22-4+; Italians in the United States: p. 22-4+; Discrimination: p. 22-4+. Includes: De Palma, Brian: p. 22; Scorsese, Martin: p. 26.

Don Diego, Catherine.
"Hits, Whacks, and Smokes: The Celluloid Gangster as Horror Icon." Post Script: Essays in Film & the Humanities. 21(3):87-98. 2002 Summer
UC users only

Douglass, Wayne J.
"The Criminal Psychopath as Hollywood Hero." Journal of Popular Film and Television 1981 8(4): 30-39.
UC users only
"The appearance of criminal psychopaths as hero-figures in films during 1947-76 is an expression of a prevalent antipathy in American culture toward modern bureaucratic society; three writings deal with this phenomenon: Robert Warshow, "The Gangster as Tragic Hero," in The Immediate Experience (1971), Norman Mailer, Advertisements for Myself (1959), and Alan Harrington, Psychopaths (1972)." [America: History and Life]

Esposito, Dawn.
"Gloria, Maerose, Irene, and Me: Mafia Women and Abject Spectatorship." MELUS: The Journal of the Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. 28 (3): 91-109. 2003 Fall.
UC users only

Farber, Stephen
"The Outlaws." Sight and Sound, 37:4 (1968:Autumn) p.170
UC users only

Fields, Ingrid Walker
"Family values and feudal codes: the social politics of America's twenty-first century gangster." Journal of Popular Culture May 2004 v37 i4 p611(23) (9593 words)
UC users only
"Despite the steady deterioration of gangster and gangsta life on the street, gangsters' imaginary lives thrive in film, television, fiction, music, and video games. The gangster codes have been so consistently mythologized in late 20th century popular culture that they have become archetypal. The author discusses Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather" as the seminal gangster narrative that has influenced its followers. The HBO series "The Sopranos" and Jim Jarmusch's film "Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai" present significant permutations of gangster mythology. The author discusses the gangster code, particularly as portrayed in the two works." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Fuller, Graham.
"Right villains: a short history of British crime movies." Film Comment v26, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1990):47 (4 pages).

Golden, Daniel.
"The Age Demanded an Image: The Gangster as American." Canadian Review of American Studies 1979 10(1): 71-75.
According to Jack Shadoian in Dreams and Dead Ends: The American Gangster/Crime Film (Cambridge: MIT Pr., 1977), gangster and other crime films mirror US "culture's psyche." These films exploded self-made man myths long before most Americans questioned such notions. [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Grossman, Andrew.
"Homosexual Men (and Lesbian Men) in a Heterosexual Genre: Three Gangster Films from Hong Kong." Journal of Homosexuality. 39(3-4):237-71. 2000.

"Hardboiled Hollywood."Film Comment v. 20 (Sept./Oct. 1984) p. 29-39+
A special section discusses the history of the hard-boiled detective in fiction and film.

Hennelly, Mark M., Jr.
"American Nightmare" Journal of Popular Film 1978 6(3): 240-261.
UC users only
Discusses the meaning of gangster films in American society, outlining the world morality, the duality which illegal life and `decent' life represent, and the significance of violence.

Henry, Clayton R., Jr
"Crime Films And Social Criticism: They Emphasize One of Society's Gravest Defects." Films in Review 2:5 (1951:May) 31

Hickey, Neil and Sorel, Edward.
"The Warner Mob."American Heritage 1983 35(1): 32-39.
"Gangster films helped revive Jack Warner's movie organization in the 1930's. Moffittr Darryl Zanuck's influence, the company produced such movies as Little Caesar, Doorway to Hell, and The Maltese Falcon, which made popular heroes of tough guys like Edward G. Robinson, James Cagney, George Raft, and Humphrey Bogart." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Hoberman, J.
"Believe it or not: J. Hoberman on gangster flicks." Artforum International v. 29 (Jan. 1991) p. 19-20

Leigh, Danny
"Get smarter." Sight & Sound;Vol.X nr.6 (June 2000); p.22-25
On the rise of the new Brit gangster film. Suggests that several of the recent releases in this genre bearno relation to modern crime but instead hark back nostagically to a long-gone 1970s gangsterland.

Lynch, Karen.
"Orientation via Orientalism: Chinatown in Detective Narratives." Popular Culture Review. 11(1):13-29. 2000 Feb.

Lyons, Donald.
"Flaws in the iris: the private eye in the Seventies." (film detectives) Film Comment v29, n4 (July-August, 1993):44 (8 pages).
The role of the private eye greatly expanded in the 1970s. Detective filmexamined include 'The Long Goodbye' and ''Chinatown.' These movies are moreviolent than past films noirs, and the detective is more likely to commitacts of violence.

MacQueen, Scott.
"Alibi: gangsters take on talkies." American Cinematographer v. 72 (Apr. '91) p. 34-40.

Maxfield, James.
"The Moral Ambiguity of Kurosawa's Early Thrillers."Film Criticism. 18(1):20-35. 1993 Fall

Mayer, Andrew C.
"Films from Abroad: Crime Wave." The Quarterly of Film Radio and Television, Vol. 11, No. 2 (Winter, 1956), pp. 167-170
UC users only

McFarlane, Brian.
"Pulp fictions: the British B film and the field of cultural production." Film Criticism v21, n1 (Fall, 1996):48 (22 pages).
British B films, also known as second features, were made to fillparticular economic and industry needs. B movies were cheaply and quicklymade. These films were distributed from 1946-1963 and share severalthematic characteristics. Most of them revolve around a main crime withanother crime to maintain audience interest, committed by individuals organgs and usually not solved by deductive reasoning; the heroes are usuallyrescued by police; and some aspect of romance often accompanies the mainstory.

Mitchell, E..
"Apes and essences: some sources of significance in the American gangster film."Wide Angle Vol I nr 1 (1979); p 18-23.

Munby, Jonathan.
"Manhattan Melodrama's 'Art of the Weak': Telling History from the Other Side in the 1930s Talking Gangster Film." Journal of American Studies. 30(1):101-18. 1996

Peary, Gerald
"Vers une définition du 'film de gangster'." Positif; nr.171-172 (July-Aug 1975); p.3-6
A definition of the gangster film.

Mitchell, E.
"Apes And Essences - Some Sources Of Significance In The American Gangster Film." Wide Angle 1: (1) 22-& 1976

Perez, Gilberto.
"Film in review." (on gangster films) Yale Review v84, n3 (July, 1996):186 (10 pages).
Gangster films portray criminals either as comics, as fulfilledindividuals, or as tragic heroes. Either way, the genre reinvents the myththat the gangsters represent 'success as crime' in the US. Examples of suchfilms include 'Casino,' 'Scarface,' 'The Godfather' and 'Goodfellas.'.

Rimoldi, Oscar.
"The detective movies of the 30s & 40s." Films in Review v44, n5-6 (May-June, 1993):164 (10 pages).
Mystery stories are ideal subjects for films in terms of language,situation and visual images. Hollywood studios produced several such films,but most of these detective films were assigned a B grade and allocatedsmall budgets and tight shooting schedules. These films were well directed,gripping and entertaining. The audiences loved the romanticized images ofdetectives, who were usually mercenaries or high class robbers. The end ofthe Second World War brought a change in the image of the screen sleuth,who was portrayed as a suave and refined paragon of virtue.

Rimoldi, Oscar.
"The detective movies of the 30s & 40s." (part 2) Films in Review v44, n7-8 (July-August, 1993):225 (10 pages).
Fictitious detectives of the 1930s and 40s became screen heroes as theywere portrayed in movies. The most famous was Sherlock Holmes, created by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. The Lone Wolf, Sam Spade and Nancy Drew arethree other detective characters for audiences of varying age-groups. MrMoto, The Saint , Ellery Queen, Michael Shayne, Duncan Maclain and BostonBlackie were other famous fictitious detectives.

Rimoldi, Oscar.
"The detective movies of the 30s & 40s: part 3." Films in Review v44, n9-10 (Sept-Oct, 1993):308 (6 pages).
Detective movies Moffittrwent a radical change in the 1940s as the gentleinvestigator assumed a cynical and ruthless garb. Unusual lighting, vividdialogue and a gloomy overtone in films such as 'The Brasher Doubloon,'produced in 1947, and 'Lady in the Lake,' produced in 1946, rendered themgeneric. The sadist private detective Mike Hammer, portrayed by RobertAldrich in a violent movie, 'Kiss Me Deadly,' influenced the works ofFrench and European directors.

Roulston, Helen H.
"Opera in gangster movies: from Capone to Coppola." (Al Capone, Francis Ford Coppola) Journal of Popular Culture v32, n1 (Summer, 1998):99 (1 page).
UC users only
The stereotypical attitude of Americans towards Italian gangsters, Italian opera and foreigners are depicted in a number of movies. A prime exception to the anti-opera attitude was the popularity of Italian tenor Enrico Caruso who was adored by gangsters such as Big Jim Colosimo and Al Capone. Among the most popular movies dealing with gangsters and the opera are Francis Ford Coppola's 'Godfather' series which used operatic elements such as arias, duets and trios.

Sandell, Jillian
"Reinventing masculinity: the spectacle of male intimacy in the films of John Woo."Film Quarterly Summer 1996 v49 n4 p23(12) (7470 words)
UC users only
"Woo's films feature men who can inflict physical violence and yet not be afraid to show their emotions. Woo shows a bond of friendship and loyalty between his protagonists which is very strong. His gangster films 'A Better Tomorrow' and 'A Better Tomorrow 2' are used to demonstrate his portrayal of men." [Expanded Academic Index]

Sarris, Andrew
"Big funerals: the Hollywood gangster, 1927-1933." Film Comment; Vol.XIII nr.3 (May-June 1977); p.6-9
Descriptions of the primary gangster films of the late silent-early sound period

Schilling, Mark.
"Yakuza films: fading celluloid heroes." (gangster movies of Japan)Japan Quarterly v43, n3 (July-Sep, 1996):30 (13 pages).
Japanese yakuza films are gradually disappearing from theater screens dueto changes initiated by audience choices and market pressures. Thegood-gangster classics of the 1960s have been replaced by action movies inthe modern Hollywood style. The primacy of the small screen and the dearthof actors to carry forward the yakuza tradition have also contributed tothe fading of the yakuza celluloid era. Although the genre has beenrecreated in films such as 'Sonatine,' moviegoers have refused to be lured.Yakuza stars of the classic ninkyo eiga such as Takakura are unlikely torevive the magic of the yakuza.

Schrader, Paul
"Yakuza-eiga: a primer." Film Comment;Vol.X nr.1 (Jan-Feb 1974); p.8-17
Discusses the new Japanese genre 'yakuza-eiga', incl. its history, themes, conventions, stylistics,leading actors, directors, and writers, and its relation to the social structure of modern Japan.

Shadoian, Jack
"America the ugly: Phil Karlson's '99 River Street'." Film Culture; nr.53-54-55 (Spring 1972); p.286-292
Analyses "99 River Street" as a prototype of gangster films and B-films of the 1950's, and its placein the history of the genre.

Sharrett, Christopher.
"The crime film as American parable." (column) USA Today (Magazine) v119, n2552 (May, 1991):67 (1 page)

Sinclair, Iain.
"Smart guys." Sight & Sound ns6 (Aug. '96) p. 22-4.
Part of a special section on gangster movies. The writer discusses the crossover points between the worlds of show business and crime in London, focusing on Ronnie and Reggie Kray and their associates. He highlights the confusions between "personalities" with a fancy for the lowlife and lowlifers who dressed and behaved like celluloid princes. He describes how the Krays used their connections with film and television stars as assertions of their own power, their dominance over every aspect of life in London.

Smith-Shomade, Beretta E.
"'Rock-A-Bye, Baby!': Black Women Disrupting Gangs and Constructing Hip-Hop Gangsta Films." Cinema Journal. 42 (2): 25-40. 2003 Winter

Springhall, John.
"Censoring Hollywood: youth, moral panic and crime/gangster movies of the 1930s."Journal of Popular Culture (Winter, 1998):135 (1 page).
UC users only
"'Moral panic' is a term used to describe excessive public concern which mayfocus on behavior, or on aspects of culture seen as likely to promotemisbehavior. Gangster movies were seen as endangering children's morals inthe 1930s, and some young men who were already criminally inclined may haveused gangster movies as one source for behavioral cues. This does not meanthat the movies did more that suggest what form such crimes might take.Entertainment that is popular among young people has, throughout history,aroused social concern, and this includes modern computer games." [Expanded Academic Index]

Telotte, J. P.
"The Detective as dreamer."Journal of Popular Film and Television v. 12 (Spring '84) p. 4-15.

Wiley, Bess.
"Lethal weapon: new look for old theme" cop film." American Cinematographer v. 68 (Apr. '87) p. 52-4+.

Wilson, David Title:
"Inside observations."Screen (London, England) v. 34 (Spring '93) p. 76-9.

Winokur, Mark.
"Eating children is wrong: the ethnic family in gangster films of the 80's and 90's."Sight & Sound v. 1 (Nov. '91) p. 10-13.
Examines the way ethnicity is used in US gangster films. Four main themes of nostalgia, fratricide,incest and power are studied within a family setting, with the use of many film references.

Winokur, Mark.
"Marginal Marginalia: The African-American Voice in the Nouvelle Gangster." Film Velvet Light Trap. 35:19-32. 1995 Spring.

Young, Nerys.
"'We May Be Rats, Crooks and Murderers, but We're Americans': Controlling the Hollywood Gangster Protagonist during Early World War II." Irish Journal of American Studies. 9:112-28. 2000

Reviews/Articles About Individual Films in the MRC Collection

Alphaville

Bad Lieutenant

Cohn, Lawrence.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews) Variety v347, n3 (May 4, 1992):284 (2 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews) Time v140, n20 (Nov 16, 1992):95 (3 pages).

Dargis, Manohla
"Malice toward nuns." (motion picture director Abel Ferrara) (Interview) Artforum International, March 1993 v31 n7 p71(4)
"Motion picture director Abel Ferrara has directed seven feature films in 13 years, with 'Bad Lieutenant' done in 1992. The movie focuses on the worst kind of policeman who has a return of faith in the end and is redeemed. Ferrara considers himself a moral filmmaker who attempts to convey the potential of forgiveness in the film. He says making movies is about asking questions and is a changing process." [Expanded Academic Index]

Kermode, Mark.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v3, n2 (Feb, 1993):40 (1 page).

Lehman, Peter.
"The Male Body within the Excesses of Exploitation and Art: Abel Ferrara's Ms. 45, Cat Chaser, and Bad Lieutenant." The Velvet Light Trap, 1993, 32, 23-29.

Lyons, Donald.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews) Film Comment v28, n6 (Nov-Dec, 1992):6 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews) New York Times v142 (Fri, Nov 20, 1992):B2(N), C15(L), col 1, 16 col in.

Pettersson, Ron.
"Bad Lieutenant (1992): Everyday Christ."Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 22: (no pagination). 2002 Sept-Oct.

Powers, John.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews)New York v26, n5 (Feb 1, 1993):54 (1 page).

Rich, B. Ruby.
"Art house killers."(violence in 1990s cinema) Sight and Sound, Dec 1992 v2 n8 p5(2)
"US, British and European films have shifted focus in the 1990s from sex to violence as is evident in films such as Quentin Tarantino's 'Reservoir Dogs,' John Woo's 'Hard Boiled' and Abel Ferrara's 'The Bad Lieutenant.' This trend seems to reflect the wave of interracial violence generated around the world by the end of the Cold War. These violent movies, aswith sexy movies of the 1960s, offer viewers cathartic release for the frustrations they encounter in real life. They probably do not instigate real life violence. On the other hand, on-screen violence is probably not what some viewers want." [Expanded Academic Index]

Romeny, Jonathan.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v6, n240 (Feb 19, 1993):34 (2 pages).

Salamon, Julie.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews)Wall Street Journal (Thu, Feb 4, 1993):A16(W), A16(E), col 2, 9 col in.

Smith, Gavin; Kermode, Mark
"The gambler./ Bad lieutenant."Sight & Sound Vol III nr 2 (Feb 1993); p 20-23,40
"Abel Ferrara has directed several critically acclaimed films, and he has just completed the film 'Bad Lieutenant.' He talks about the aesthetic decisions that went into making 'Bad Lieutenant' and his other films such as 'China Girl,' 'Ms. 45' and 'The Bodysnatchers.' Ferrara says he tries to portray the gritty reality of life, but he filters that through his own experiences and imagination. He often explores violent and brutal themes in his work because they reflect reality and offer insights into compelling human drama." [Expanded Academic Index]

Taylor, Simon J.
"'It All Happens Here': Locating Salvation in Abel Ferrara's Bad Lieutenant." Journal of Religion and Film. 7 (1): 15 paragraphs. 2003 Apr.

Travers, Peter.
"Bad Lieutenant." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n644 (Nov 26, 1992):77 (2 pages).

West, Rebecca.
"From Lapsed to Lost: Scorsese's Boy and Ferrara's Man." In: Beyond the margin : readings in Italian Americana / edited by Paolo A. Giordano and Anthony Julian Tamburri. pp: 198-222 Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c1998.
Main Stack PS153.I8.B495 1998

Badlands

Bignell, Jonathan.
"From Detail to Meaning: Badlands and Cinematic Articulation." In: Style and meaning : studies in the detailed analysis of film / edited by John Gibbs and Douglas Pye. Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2005.
Main Stack PN1995.S778 2005

Brickman, Barbara Jane.
"Coming of Age in the 1970s: Revision, Fantasy, and Rage in the Teen-Girl Badlands." Camera Obscura. 2007. p. 25
UC users only

Campbell, N.
"The Highway Kind: Badlands, Youth, Space and the Road." In: The cinema of Terrence Malick : poetic visions of America / edited by Hannah Patterson.
Main Stack PN1998.3.M3388.C56 2003

Combs, Richard
"Badlands." Sight and Sound 44:1 (1974/1975:Winter) p.53
UC users only

Corrigan, Timothy
"Genre, gender, and hysteria: the road movie in outer space." In: A cinema without walls : movies and culture after Vietnam / Timothy Corrigan. New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press, c1991.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 C64 1991
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6 C64 1991

Creekmur, Corey K.
"On the run and on the road : fame and the outlaw couple in American cinema." In: The road movie book / edited by Steven Cohan and Ina Rae Hark. London ; New York : Routledge, 1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.R63.R63 1997

Danks, Adrian.
"Death Comes as an End: Temporality, Domesticity and Photography in Terrence Malick's Badlands." Senses of Cinema

Henderson, Brian
"Exploring Badlands." Wide Angle 1983, 5:4, 38-51.

Johnson, William.
"Badlands." Film Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Spring, 1974), pp. 43-46
UC users only

Marsha Kinder
"The Return of the Outlaw Couple." Film Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 4 (Summer, 1974), pp. 2-10
UC users only

McGettigan, Joan.
"Interpreting a man's world: female voices in 'Badlands' and 'Days of Heaven'." Journal of Film and Video v52, n4 (Wntr, 2001):33 (11 pages).
UC users only

Morrison, James.
The films of Terrence Malick (MAIN: PN1998.3.M3388 M67 2003)

Patterson, H.
"Two Characters in Search of a Direction: Motivation and the Construction of Identity in Badlands." In: The cinema of Terrence Malick : poetic visions of America / edited by Hannah Patterson.
Main Stack PN1998.3.M3388.C56 2003

Basic Instinct

Andrews, David
"Sex Is Dangerous, So Satisfy Your Wife: The Softcore Thriller in Its Contexts." Cinema Journal 45.3 (2006) 59-89
UC users only

Austin, Thomas
"'Desperate to See It': Straight Men Watching Basic Instinct." In: Identifying Hollywood's audiences : cultural identity and the movies / edited by Melvyn Stokes and Richard Maltby. London : British Film Institute, 1999.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U65.I34 1999
PFA PN1995.9.A8.I33 1999

Battistini, Robert.
"Basic Instinct: Revisionist Hard-On, Hollywood Trash, or Feminist Hope?" Cinefocus vol. 2 no. 2. 1992 Spring.pp: 38-43.

Boozer, Jack
"The Lethal Femme Fatale in the Noir Tradition." Journal of Film and Video Vol. 51, No. 3/4, dedicated to Nina Leibman (Fall/Winter 1999/2000), pp. 20-35
UC users only

Bowman, James.
"To die in bed." (the sex-death complex in motion pictures) American Spectator v25, n6 (June, 1992):47 (3 pages).
Hollywood's preoccupation with sex and death is analyzed in the motionpictures 'Basic Instinct' and 'Sea of Love.' The themes of narcissism,hatred and sexual love as depicted in other motion pictures are analyzed.

"Censors on the street." (gay activists protest against "Basic Instinct") Time v137, n19 (May 13, 1991):70 (1 page).

Cohen, Alain J. J.
"Stochastics of sex and death in "Basic (filmic) Instinct."" Semiotica, 1996, Vol. 112 Issue 1/2, p109-121, 13p

Creed, Barbara
"Abject Desire and Basic Instinct: A Tale of Cynical Romance." In: Fatal attractions : re-scripting romance in contemporary literature and film / edited by Lynne Pearce and Gina Wisker. London ; Sterling, VA : Pluto Press, c1998.
Main (Gardner) Stacks NX650.L68 F38 1998

Danziger, Marie.
"Basic Instinct: Grappling for Post-Modern Mind Control." Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 22 no. 1.1994. pp: 7-10.
UC users only
The movies 'Basic Instinct' and 'The Player' portray struggles for controlover the narrative as a conflict fueled by evil writers. 'The Player' has amovie executive hoMoffittd by screenwriters he has rejected, killing one ofthem but remaining in danger from another. 'Basic Instinct' has a copagainst a female writer of murder mysteries, with the narrative threatenedby a manipulative psychologist who usurps the writer's villainy. These twomovies reflect a trend of distrust of writers.

Deleyto, Celestino.
"The margins of pleasure: female monstrosity and male paranoia in 'Basic Instinct.'" Film Criticism v21, n3 (Spring, 1997):20 (23 pages).
UC users only
The "monstrous" female protagonist in erotic thrillers reflects maleparanoia about gender relationships. 'Basic Instinct,' one of the mostpopular films of this genre, portrays women as a source of violence andpsychosis. The duplicitous ending of the film demonstrates its inability toacknowledge changes in female sexuality in the latter part of the 20thcentury, and portrays women as sexual and behavioral monsters.

The writer argues that the representation of female monstrosity in the motion picture Basic Instinct is the product of a paranoia related to gender relationships in contemporary society. He analyzes the central "monstrous" female protagonist and the gender and sexual relationships constructed around the femme fatale in the film. He notes that the film moves uneasily between an adamant defense of the existence of an incomprehensible feminine essence and an equally insistent affirmation of the instability of cultural forms of gender difference. Drawing on Freud's account of paranoia as a defense against homosexuality, he explains the crisis of masculinity that dominates the film. In addition, he argues that the specific dimensions of this male paranoia must be contextualized within the historical moment in which the movie is produced.

Finlay, Sara-Jane; Fenton, Natalie.
"'If You've Got a Vagina and an Attitude, that's a Deadly Combination': Sex and Heterosexuality in Basic Instinct, Body of Evidence and Disclosure." Sexualities, Feb2005, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p49-74, 26p
UC users only

Freiberger, Erich-D.
"In the Beginning Was the Act: Basic Instinct as the Cinematic Image of Freud's Death Drive." Literature and Psychology, 2000, 46:4, 1-25.
UC users only

Galvin, Angela
"Basic Instinct: Damming Dykes." In: The good, the bad and the gorgeous : popular culture's romance with lesbianism / edited by Diane Hamer and Belinda Budge. London : Pandora, 1994.
Main Stack HQ75.5.G66 1994

Hoberman, J.
"Fantastic projections." (criticism of director Paul Verhoeven's movie'Basic Instinct') Sight and Sound v2, n1 (May, 1992):4 (1 page).

Holmlund, Chris.
"Cruisin' for a Bruisin': Hollywood's Deadly (Lesbian) Dolls." Cinema Journal vol. 34 no. 1. 1994 Fall. pp: 31-51.
UC users only

Johnson, Brian D.
"Killer movies." (violence in motion pictures) (Cover Story) Maclean's v105, n13 (March 30, 1992):48 (4 pages).
The motion picture 'Basic Instinct' is the latest in a line of moviesportraying violence and killing in a graphic way. These movies are tappingthe popular fascination with brutal violence and sexual menace.

Kamaluddin, Sabiha.
"Basic Instinct and American Culture." Indian Journal of American Studies 1995 Summer, 25:2, 113-16.

Kauffman, L.A.
"Queer guerrillas in Tinseltown." (protesting movie portrayals of gays and lesbians) Progressive v56, n7 (July, 1992):36 (2 pages).
Militant protesters sought to mar the opening of 'Basic Instinct,' claimingthat its murderous lesbian character caters to public homophobia andincites gay-bashing. Well-planned protests grab excellent media coveragefor the gay movement, but the issue of portrayals is not a solid long-termorganizing issue.

Leitch, Thomas M.
"Basic Instinct and the Erotic Thriller." In: Crime films Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
UCB Main PN1995.9.D4 L45 2002 SRC="http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/diamond.gif" width="10" height="10" border=0> Table of contents: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/cam025/2001052965.html

Leo, John.
"The politics of intimidation." U.S. News & World Report v112, n13 (April 6, 1992):24 (1 page).
Both the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power and Queer Nation have charged thatthe film 'Basic Instinct' is antihomosexual. Vandalism and intimidationwere used in an effort to disrupt the filming. Other acts of vandalism andharassment by the organizations are discussed.

McKenna, Andrew J.
"Public Execution." In: Legal Reelism: Movies as Legal Texts / edited by John Denvir. pp: 225-43. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, c1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.J8.L45 1996
Moffitt PN1995.9.J8.L45 1996

Picardie, Ruth.
"Mad, bad and dangerous." (gay film makers and gay opposition to the film'Basic Instinct') New Statesman & Society v5, n200 (May 1, 1992):36 (1 page).
Gays have come out in opposition to the mainstream Hollywood film 'BasicInstinct' because its main character is a bisexual murderess. However, thecutting edge of gay cinema highlights the connection between sex andviolence. The gay community should abandon such a double standard whenjudging film.

Roberts, Vaughan S.
"Too Much is not Enough: Paul Verhoeven, Rene Girard & the Femme (Fa)tale." Journal of Contemporary Religion, May2000, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p233, 13p
UC users only

Sharrett, Christopher.
"Hollywood homophobia." (Column)USA Today (Magazine) v121, n2566 (July, 1992):93 (1 page).
An anti-gay themes are found both in serious films and in exploitative junkmovies. The homophobic images of 'Basic Instinct,' 'The Silence of the Lambs' and 'JFK' are explored.

Sherwin, Miranda.
"Deconstructing the Male: Masochism, Female Spectatorship, and the Femme Fatale in Fatal Attraction, Body of Evidence, and Basic Instinct." Journal of Popular Film & Television, Winter2008, Vol. 35 Issue 4, p174-182, 9p
UC users only

Siegel, Carol.
"Compulsory Heterophobia: The Aesthetics of Seriousness and the Production of Homophobia." In: Forming and Reforming Identity / edited by Carol Siegel and Ann Kibbey. pp: 319-38. New York: New York University Press, c1995. Genders; 21
Main Stack HQ1075.F674 1995
Moffitt HQ1075.F674 1995

Simpson, Janice C.
"Out of the celluloid closet: gay activists are on a rampage againstnegative stereotyping and other acts of homophobia in Hollywood." Time v139, n14 (April 6, 1992):65 (1 page).
Gays and lesbians are becoming more strident in their insistence thatmainstream movies portray them more honestly. They complain that movieslike 'Basic Instinct' perpetuate negative stereotypes, and havedemonstrated at its opening. Hollywood responds that realistic movies havenever made enough money.

Sutherland, Katherine.
"Beauty and the Beast, Basic Instinct and Barton Fink: The Pursuit of Textual Satisfaction." Textual Studies in Canada-Etudes Textuelles au Canada 1994, 4, 81-91.
UC users only

Villarejo, Amy
"1992: Movies and the Politics of Authorship." In: American cinema of the 1990s: themes and variations / edited by Chris Holmlund. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2008.
Full text available online (UCB users only)

White, Jonathan David.
"Bisexuals Who Kill: Hollywood's Bisexual Crimewave, 1985-1998." Journal of Bisexuality, 2002, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p39, 16p

White, Jonathan David.
"Bisexuals Who Kill: Hollywood's Bisexual Crimewave, 1985-1998." In: Bisexual men in culture and society / Brett Beemyn, Erich Steinman, editors. New York : London : Harrington Park, c2002.
Main (Gardner) Stacks HQ74.2.U5 B52 2002

Wood, Robert E.
"Somebody Has to Die: Basic Instinct as White Noir." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities ISSUE: vol. 12 no. 3. 1993 Summer. pp: 44-51.

A Better Tomorrow

Blackmail

Blood Simple

Attanasio, Paul.
"Blood Simple." (moving-picture reviews)Washington Post v108 (Fri, Feb 8, 1985):C1, col 1, 30 col in.

Attanasio, Paul.Attanasio, Paul.
"Brothers in film noir; the complicated joys of making 'Blood Simple'."(Joel and Ethan Coen) Washington Post v108 (Sun, Feb 3, 1985):F1, col 3, 66 col in.

Grimes, Larry E.
"Shall These Bones Live? The Problem of Bodies in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho and Joel Coen's Blood Simple." In: Screening the sacred: religion, myth, and ideology in popular American film / edited by Joel W. Martin, Conrad E. Ostwalt, Jr. pp: 19-29 Boulder: Westview Press, 1995.
Main Stack PN1995.5.S36 1995

Klemesrud, Judy.
"The brothers Coen bow in with 'Blood Simple'." New York Times v134, sec2 (Sun, Jan 20, 1985):H17, col 1, 54 col in.

Lidz, Franz.
"Brothers who practice the art of the put-on."(re-release of director's cut of 'Blood Simple' by Ethan and Joel Coen) New York Times (Sun, July 2, 2000):AR9(N), AR9(L), col 1, 25 col in.

Maslin, Janet.
"Blood Simple." (moving-picture reviews)New York Times v134 (Fri, Jan 18, 1985):14(N), C4(L), col 2, 7 col in.; v134 (Fri, Oct 12, 1984):22(N), C10(L), col 3, 10 col in.

Salamon, Julie.
"Tongue-in-chic horror." (making of the film 'Blood Simple') Wall Street Journal (Thu, Jan 17, 1985):22(W), 24(E), col 5, 14 col in.

Thomas, Kevin.
"Blood Simple." (moving-picture reviews) Los Angeles Times v104, secVI (Thu, Feb 28, 1985):1, col 4, 14 col in.

Boiling Point

Bonnie and Clyde

Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde
Edited by Lester D. Friedman. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Cambridge film handbooks series
Main Stack PN1997.B6797 2000

Bernstein, Matthew.
"Perfecting the New Gangster: Writing Bonnie and Clyde." Film Quarterly, 2000 Summer, 53:4, 16-31.
UCB users only
"Bonnie and Clyde integrates Hollywood and French new wave filmmaking like no other movie. The writing and production of the film indicate Hollywood's postwar affinity for film noir and the rural gangster couple subgenre, along with the phenomenological aesthetic and existential ethos of the French new wave. Screenwriters David Newman and Robert Benton and director Arthur Penn all intensely admired the French new wave, and this is evidenced in the film's early 1964 treatment and various script drafts. Surprisingly, Newman and Benton's spiritual and stylistic mentor, Francois Truffaut, encouraged the movement toward traditional Hollywood dramaturgy. Meanwhile, Penn pushed the movie closer to the French new wave aesthetic, and ultimately, Bonnie and Clyde became a New Hollywood film." [Art Abstracts]

Biskind, Peter.
Easy riders, raging bulls: how the sex-drugs-and-rock-'n'-roll generation saved Hollywood / Peter Biskind. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, c1998.
UCB Bancroft PN1998.2 .B56 1998
UCB Main PN1998.2 .B56 1998
UCB Moffitt PN1998.2 .B56 1998

"Bonnie and Clyde." In:Past imperfect : history according to the movies / general editor, Mark C. Carnes ; edited by Ted Mico, John... 1st ed. New York : H. Holt, 1995. Henry Holt reference book.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H5.P37 1995
Moffitt PN1995.9.H5.P37 1995

Brode, Douglas
Money, women, and guns: crime movies from Bonnie and Clyde to the present / by Douglas Brode. Secaucus, N.J.: Carol Pub. Group, c1995.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.B76 1995

Cardullo, Bert
"Look Back in Bemusement: The New American Cinema, 1965-1970." Cambridge Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 375-386, 2008
UC users only

Coles, Robert.
"Bonnie And Clyde" And "The Graduate": Hollywood's New Social Criticism.Trans-action 1968 5(5): 15-21.
"In reviewing these two films, the author states that Hollywood has developed a new dimension in social criticism. Until Bonnie and Clyde, Hollywood pictured the criminal as a good guy gone bad, a safe form of social criticism. But Bonnie and Clyde illustrates an antisocial, anarchistic point of view that no system, Right or Left, can tolerate. They signify that the life of crime can give some individuals a more positive social outlook, even if only to their own kind. The Graduate portrays the basic thinness of our affluent and sensual world. It explores the right of the individual to rebel against his society. Its struggle of the individual trying to find himself is not much different from what the author discovered among Negroes in Mississippi. The characterization is believable and the symbolism is heavy. It is concluded that the movie director has as much right as the novelist to engage in such "realism, surrealism, and social satire."" [America History and Life]

Cook, Jim
"Bonnie and Clyde." Screen, 1969; 10: 101 - 114.
UC users only

Corrigan, Timothy
"Genre, gender, and hysteria: the road movie in outer space." In: A cinema without walls : movies and culture after Vietnam / Timothy Corrigan. New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press, c1991.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 C64 1991
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6 C64 1991

Creekmur, Corey K.
"On the run and on the road : fame and the outlaw couple in American cinema." In: The road movie book / edited by Steven Cohan and Ina Rae Hark. London ; New York : Routledge, 1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.R63.R63 1997

Deer, Harriet A.
"The Popular Arts: Suicide and Society in the Sixties." In: Youth Suicide Prevention: Lessons from Literature / edited by Lagretta T. Lenker, Sara Munson Deats. pp: 191-204. New York, N.Y.: Plenum Press, [1989]
Educ/Psych PS169.S85.Y68 1989
Moffitt PS169.S85.Y68 1989

Farber, Stephen
"Bonnie and Clyde." (review) Sight and Sound v 37 no4 Autumn 1968. p. 174-5

Free, William J.
"Aesthetic and moral value in Bonnie and Clyde." Quarterly Journal of Speech, Volume 54, Issue 3 October 1968 , pages 220 - 225
UC users only

French, Phillip
Incitement Against Violence, Sight and Sound, 37:1 (1967/1968:Winter) p.2

Friedman, Lester D.
Bonnie and Clyde. London : British Film Institute, 2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.B6797 F75 2000
Contents via Google books

Geduld, Carolyn
"Bonnie and Clyde." In: Renaissance of the film. Edited and with an introd. and headnotes by Julius Bellone. [New York] Collier Books [1970]
Moffitt PN1993.5 A1.B45 1970

Gutfeld, Arnon.
"Nostalgia, Protest and Tradition in the 1960s: History as Reflected by "Bonnie and Clyde"." Journal of the American Studies Association of Texas, Nov2009, Vol. 40, p5-34, 30p
UC users only

Harris, Mark
Pictures at a revolution : five movies and the birth of the new Hollywood / Mark Harris. New York : Penguin Press, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 H37 2008
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6 H37 2008
Explores the epic human drama behind the making of the five movies nominated for Best Picture in 1967-Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, The Graduate, In the Heat of the Night, Doctor Doolittle, and Bonnie and Clyde-and through them, the larger story of the cultural revolution that transformed Hollywood, and America, forever.--From publisher description.

Hoberman, J.
"'A Test for the Individual Viewer': Bonnie and Clyde's Violent Reception." In: Why we watch : the attractions of violent entertainment / edited by Jeffrey Goldstein. New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
Full-text available online (UCB users only_
Main (Gardner) Stacks P96.V52 U68 1998

Hughes, Howard.
"'We ain't heading nowhere, we're just running from' - Bonnie and Clyde (1967)." In: Crime wave: the filmgoers' guide to the great crime movies / Howard Hughes. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York : Distributed by Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full text available online [UCB users only]

Johnson, A.
"Bonnie and Clyde." (review)Film Quarterly v 21 no2 Winter 1967/1968. p. 45-8

Kael, Pauline.
"Bonnie and Clyde." (review) In: Kiss kiss bang bang. [1st ed.] Boston, Little, Brown [1968]
Main Stack PN1995.K24

Kinder, Marsha
"The Return of the Outlaw Couple." Film Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 4 (Summer, 1974), pp. 2-10
UC users only

Krämer, Peter
The new Hollywood : from Bonnie and Clyde to Star Wars / Peter Krämer. London ; New York : Wallflower, 2005. .
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 K73 2005 .
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6 K73 2005

Lawson, John H.
"Our Film and Theirs: Grapes of Wrath and Bonnie and Clyde." American Dialog, 1968-69, 5:2, 30-33.

Leggett, B. J.
"Convergence and Divergence in the Movie Review: "Bonnie and Clyde" Film Criticism 30:2 (Winter 2005-2006) p. 1-23
UC users only

Lennon, Elaine
"Riding the New Wave: The Case of Bonnie and Clyde." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema, vol. 38, pp. (no pagination), Jan 2006
UC users only

Leong, Ian; Mike Sell; and Kelly Thomas
"Mad love, mobile homes, and dysfunctional dicks: on the road with Bonnie and Clyde." In: The road movie book / edited by Steven Cohan and Ina Rae Hark. London ; New York : Routledge, 1997.
Main Stack PN1995.9.R63.R63 1997

LoBrutto, Vincent
"The period film as mirror for the present: Bonnie and Clyde." In: Becoming film literate : the art and craft of motion pictures / Vincent LoBrutto ; foreword by Jan Harlan. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, c2005.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1994 .L595 2005
Moffitt PN1994 .L595 2005
Pacific Film Archive PN1994 .L595 2005

Lunstad, Jana Kay.
"But You Wouldn't Have the Gumption to Use It": Bonnie and Clyde and the Sexual Revolution." Left History [Canada] 1999 6(1): 7-29.
"Uses the gangster genre of films, particularly Bonnie and Clyde (1967), to reveal that female characters within the genre illuminate not only the ideological and formal structure of these films but the social changes they reflect, from 1930 to 1995. The film addresses male and female issues of sexuality and depicts Bonnie Parker in a key role openly expressing her sexuality and intellectual desires, reflecting a new concept and role for women as the women's movement swept the nation in the 1960's." [America History & Life]

Macnab, Geoffrey.
"Song of the open road." (film director Arthur Penn)Sight and Sound v9, n8 (August, 1999):58 (2 pages).
Arthur Penn's 'Bonnie and Clyde' is being released as part of the MaverickDirectors III Collection from Warner Home Video. The film starred FayeDunaway and Warren Beatty as the ill-fated couple Bonnie Parker and ClydeBarrow, while cinematography was handled by Bernie Guffey. Penn wasapproached with the 'Bonnie and Clyde' project whilst taking time out withhis family after completing 'The Chase'.

Man, Glenn
"1967-1968, the wonder year, part I : Bonnie and Clyde."In: Radical visions : American film renaissance, 1967-1976 / Glenn Man. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1994. Contributions to the study of popular culture ; no. 41
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.M247 1994
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6.M247 1994

Miller, D. A.
"Bonnie and Pierrot." Film Quarterly v. 61 no. 4 (Summer 2008) p. 74-9
UC users only
"Recently released on DVD, the films Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and Pierrot le fou (1965) are curiously related. The writers of Bonnie, David Newman and Robert Benton, wanted to emulate the sensibility of French New Wave films, and their screenplay proved so kindred to the sources of its inspiration that an admiring Francois Truffaut passed it on to an amenable Jean-Luc Godard, who began talks to film it. A year after the negotiations fell through, Godard made Pierrot le fou, a film about another couple on the run. This film is, according to some people, the moment where Godard "goes bad." To other people, it is where his style, whose distinctive characteristics had emerged long before, achieves its first entirely rigorous statement." [Art Index]LoBrutto, V. The period film as mirror for the present: Bonnie and Clyde. In: LoBrutto, Vincent. Becoming film literate. Praeger, 2005

Miller, Joyce.
"From Bonnie and Clyde to Thelma and Louise: The Struggle for Justice in the Cinematic South."Studies in Popular Culture, 1996 Oct, 19:2, 277-86.

Milne, T.
"Bonnie and Clyde." (review) Sight and Sound v 36 no4 Autumn 1967. p. 203-4
UC users only

Morgenstern, Joe
"The thin red line." In: Screening violence / edited and with an introduction by Stephen Prince. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.V5 S395 2000
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.9.V5 S395 2000

Moriel, Liora.
"Erasure and Taboo: A Queer Reading of Bonnie and Clyde." In: Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde / edited by Lester D. Friedman. pp: 148-76 Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Cambridge film handbooks series
Main Stack PN1997.B6797 2000

The moviemaker: a profile of Arthur Penn.[videorecording]
Media Resources Center VIDEO/C 2311

Murray, Edward.
"Bonnie and Clyde." In: Ten film classics : a re-viewing / Edward Murray New York : F. Ungar Pub. Co., c1978 (Series: Ungar film library)
Main Stack PN1995.M844

Nemecek, Maureen.
"From Aesthesia to Anesthesia: Three Decades of Violence in Film." Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery. Conference (5th: 1995: Colorado Springs, Co.) pp: 168-73 Pueblo, Co.: The Society, 1995.
Main Stack P96.V5.S66 1995

Peebles, Stacey.
"Gunning for a New Slow Motion: The 45-Degree Shutter and the Representation of Violence." Journal of Film & Video, Summer2004, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p45-54, 10p
UC users only
The article focuses on the motion picture "Bonnie and Clyde," directed by Arthur Penn. Actors Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty as Bonnie and Clyde rolled and jerked in gory slow motion as a multitude of bullets sprayed their bodies, and American film gained a new and lasting phrase for its lexicon of violent cinematic death. This is perhaps the impetus for more recent films' interesting use of another technique that works as a vivid addition to, if not a replacement for, the somewhat stale trick of slow motion.

Penn, Arthur
Arthur Penn : interviews / edited by Michael Chaiken and Paul Cronin. Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2008.
Moffitt PN1998.3.P4525 A3 2008

Penn, Arthur
"Song of the open road." Sight & Sound v. ns9 no. 8 (August 1999) p. 58-9
UC users only
The writer reminisces about his direction of the film Bonnie and Clyde, staring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. He explains that when he made this quintessentially American film he did not realize it was the start an era of liberation from the studios in terms of both content and the kinds of films that could be made. He notes that they were able to shoot almost the whole film in Texas, away from the studios.

Pym, John.
"Black hat, yellow hat." (from 'Bonnie & Clyde' to 'Dick Tracy')Sight and Sound v59, n4 (Autumn, 1990):264 (2 pages).

Rittger, Guy C.
"The Regime of the Exploding Body and the Erotics of Film Violence: Penn, Peckinpah, Tarantino, and Beyond ..." Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery. Conference (5th: 1995: Colorado Springs, Co.) pp: 357-62. Pueblo, Co.: The Society, 1995.
Main Stack P96.V5.S66 1995

Samuels, Charles Thomas
"Bonnie and Clyde." The Hudson Review, Vol. 21, No. 1, 20th Anniversary Issue (Spring, 1968), pp. 10-22
UC users only

Samuels, Charles Thomas
"Bonnie and Clyde." In: Mastering the film and other essays / by Charles Thomas Samuels ; edited by Lawrence Graver. 1st ed. Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c1977.
Main Stack PN1994.S334 1977

Sobchack, Vivian C., The Violent Dance: A Personal Memoir Of Death In The Movies, Journal Of Popular Film, 3:1 (1974:Winter) P.2
UC users only

Steele, Robert.
"The Good-Bad And The Bad-Good In Movies: "Bonnie and Clyde" And "In Cold Blood.""Catholic World 1968 207(1238): 76-80.

Toplin, Robert Brent
"Bonnie and Clyde : "violence of a most grisly sort." In: History by Hollywood : the use and abuse of the American past / Robert Brent Toplin. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c1996.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H5.T66 1996

Van Gelder, Peter
"Bonnie and Clyde." In: That's Hollywood : a behind-the-scenes look at 60 of the greatest films ever made / Peter van Gelder. New York, NY : HarperPerennial, c1990.
Pacific Film Archive PN1998 .V8 1990

Vanneman, AlanD
"Bonnie and Clyde: Together Again." Bright Lights Film Journal, vol. 43, pp. (no pagination), Feb 2004

Wake, Sandra.
The Bonnie & Clyde book; compiled & edited by Sandra Wake & Nicola Hayden New York, Simon & Schuster [1972]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.B6797 .W3

Walkosz, Barbara J.
"The Cold War, cinema, and civility: the top films of 1967." In: War and film in America : historical and critical essays / edited by Marilyn J. Matelski and Nancy Lynch Street. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2003.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.W3 W35 2003

Williams, F. D.
"The Morality of Bonnie and Clyde." Journal of Popular Culture 1970 4(1): 299-307.
UC users only
Interprets Bonnie and Clyde as a highly moralistic summary of the experience of the Depression, and "a revealing critique of American life," with serious comments on law and order, the abuses of government, and man's duty to his fellow men.

Wilmington, Mike; Peary, Gerald.
"Interview with Warren Beatty." Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television, Winter72/73, Issue 7, p32-36, 5p

Wollheim, Peter
"The Case of Bonnie and Clyde." Journal of Popular Culture 7:3 (1973:Winter) p.602
UC users only

Zuker, Joel Stewart.
Arthur Penn: A Guide to References and Resources / Joel S. Zuker Boston: G. K. Hall, c1980 Reference publication in film.
Main Stack PN1998.A3.P4389 NRLF #: B 3 569 709
Moffitt PN1998.A3.P4389

Bound

Bullets Over Broadway

Bullets Over Broadway

Chinatown

Cotton Club

Criss Cross

Dick Tracy

Alleva, Richard.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) Commonweal v117, n14 (August 10, 1990):456 (2 pages).

Ansen, David.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) Newsweek v115, n26 (June 25, 1990):48 (1 page).

Blake, Richard A.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) America v163, n2 (July 14, 1990):42 (1 page).

Canby, Vincent.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) (Living Arts Pages)New York Times v139 (Fri, June 15, 1990):B1(N), C1(L), col 3, 28 col in.

Corliss, Richard.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) Time v135, n25 (June 18, 1990):74 (1 page).

Corliss, Richard.
"Extra! Tracy is tops; Warren Beatty creates the best comic-strip movieyet." (making of "Dick Tracy") Time v135, n25 (June 18, 1990):74 (3 pages).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews)Maclean's v103, n25 (June 18, 1990):51 (1 page).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) New Republic v203, n2-3 (July 9, 1990):32 (1 page).

Pym, John.
"Black hat, yellow hat." (from 'Bonnie & Clyde' to 'Dick Tracy')Sight and Sound v59, n4 (Autumn, 1990):264 (2 pages).

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) New Yorker v115, n20 (July 2, 1990):56 (1 page).

Salamon, Julie.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, June 14, 1990):A12(W), A12(E), col 1, 23 col in.

Shipman, David.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) Contemporary Review v258, n1503 (April, 1991):215 (1 page).

Simon, John.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) National Review v42, n14 (July 23, 1990):48 (3 pages).

Travers, Peter.
"Dick Tracy." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n582-83 (July 12, 1990):41 (1 page).

Dirty Harry Series

Allison, Deborah.
"Courting the critics/assuring the audiences: The modulation of Dirty Harry in a changing cultural climate." Film International, 2007, Vol. 5 Issue 5, p17-29, 13p,
UC users only

Baker, Brian
"Rogue Cops I: San Francisco." In: Masculinity in fiction and film : representing men in popular genres 1945-2000 / Brian Baker. Baker, Brian. London ; New York : Continuum, c2006.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN56.M316 B35 2006

Bogdanovich, Peter.
"Don Siegel." In: Who the devil made it New York : Alfred A. Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 1997
Main Stack PN1995.9.P7.B58 1997;
Moffitt PN1995.9.P7.B58 1997

Cobley, Paul
""Thank God for the Rain...": Revenge From Dirty Harry to The Exterminator" In: The American thriller : generic innovation and social change in the 1970s / Paul Cobley. New York : Palgrave, 2000.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS374.D4 C57 2000

Combs, Richard.
"8 degrees of separation." Film Comment. New York: Jul/Aug 2002. Vol. 38, Iss. 4; pg. 50, 4 pgs
UC users only

Hughes, Howard.
"'Do I feel lucky?' - Dirty Harry (1971)." In: Crime wave: the filmgoers' guide to the great crime movies / Howard Hughes. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York : Distributed by Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full text available online [UCB users only]

Lovell, Alan.
Don Siegel : American cinema London : British Film Institute, 1975.
MAIN: PN1998.A3 S542 1975
PFA : PN1998.3.S54 L69 1975

Sarris, Andrew.
"Don Siegel: The Pro." Film Comment. New York: Sep 1991. Vol. 27, Iss. 5; p. 34 (4 pages)
UC users only

Sheehan, Henry.
"Dark worlds." Sight & Sound; Jun91, Vol. 1 Issue 2, p28-30, 2p

Thompson, Rick.
"Dirty Harry." Senses of Cinema.

Dressed to Kill

Fargo

See Coen Brothers bibliography

French Connection

Berliner, Todd.
"The Genre Film as Booby Trap: 1970s Genre Bending and The French Connection." Cinema Journal. 40(3):25-46. 2001.
UC users only

Clagett, Thomas D., 1956-
William Friedkin: films of aberration, obsession, and reality / by Thomas D. Clagett. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, c1990.
UCB Main PN1998.3.F75 C4 1990

"Dialogue on film. William Friedkin." (Interview).American Film XV/15, Dec 1990; p.18-20,22-23. Illustration(s).
Director W.F. discusses his work, esp. "Sorcerer" and "The French connection", and the state of current filmmaking.

Gow, Gordon
"The French Connection." (Review).Films & Filming XVIII/6, Mar 1972; p.50. Illustration(s).

Kermode, Mark .
"Chasing down the R.E.A.L." (filming the car chase in 'French Connection') Sight and Sound Jan 2000 v10 i1 p28(2)
"The memorable car chase from the Oscar winning 'French Connection' was shot along a very narrow road Moffittr the elevated railway in New York. Parts of the chase were actually shot at 90 miles per hour through city traffic with stunt driver Bill Hickman at the wheel, after director William Friedkin challenged him to produce more exciting footage. A documentary on the film by Russell Leven entitled 'Poughkeepsie Shuffle' is to be shown on BBC2 during January 2000." [Expanded Academic Index]

"Photographing 'The French Connection'."American Cinematographer LIII/2, Feb 1972; p.158-161,184-185,211,213-219.
Discusses the problems of lighting and photographing the film. Incl. interview with Owen Roizman, director of photography.

Kermode, Mark.
"Chasing down the R.E.A.L." (filming the car chase in 'French Connection')Sight and Sound v10, n1 (Jan, 2000):28 (2 pages).

Segaloff, Nat.
Hurricane Billy: the stormy life and films of William Friedkin / Nat Segaloff. 1st ed. New York: Morrow, 1990.
UCB Main PN1998.3.F75 S4 1990

Shedlin, M.
"Police Oscar: 'The French Connection'." (Article+Interview).Film Quarterly XXV/4, Summer 1972; p.2-9. Illustration(s).
UC users only
An analysis of the "The French connection"', followed by an interview with its director W.F.

Spotnitz, Frank.
"William Friedkin: blessed by the angel that watches over movies." (motion picture director) (interview)American Film v15, n15 (Dec, 1990):18 (5 pages).

The Godfather

Goodfellas

Klute

Gledhill, Christine.
"Klute 1: A Contemporary Film Noir and Feminist Criticism; 2: Feminism and Klute." In: Women in film noir / edited by E. Ann Kaplan. pp: 6-21; 112-128. Rev. ed. London: BFI Publishing, 1980.
UCB Main PN1995.9.W6 W66 1980
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.W6 W66 1980

Gustafson, J.
"The whore with the heart of gold: a second look at Klute and McCae and Mrs. Miller." Cineaste XI/2, 1981; p.14-17. Illustration(s).
Untraditional treatment of heroines in A. Pakula's "Klute" and R. Altman's "McCabe and Mrs. Miller".

Mask, Mia
"Women Take Center Stage: Klute and McCabe and Mrs. Miller." In: American cinema of the 1970s : themes and variations / edited by Lester D. Friedman. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 A8577 2007

Wood, Robin
"Klute." (Article).Film Comment VIII/1, Spring 1972; p.32-37. Illustration(s).
Analysis of the film's style, structure, theme.

Lukas, Karli.
"Klute." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 13: (no pagination). 2001 Apr-May

The Night of the Hunter

Agee, James.
"Night of the Hunter." In: Film writing and selected journalism / James Agee. New York : Library of America : Distributed in the U.S. by Penguin Putnam, c2005. The library of America ; 160
Main Stack PS3501.G35.A6 2005b
Grad Svcs XMAC.A265.F55

Bauer, Stephen F.
"Oedipus again: A critical study of Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter." Psychoanalytic Quarterly. Vol 68(4), Oct 1999, pp. 611-636

Cull, Lara; Bachmann, Goetz.
"In the name of love." Contemporary, no. 59, 2004, pp. 48-9,

Folks, Jeffrey J.
"James Agee's Filmscript for The Night of the Hunter." The Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South, vol. 33, no. 2-3, pp. 151-60, Winter 1995.

Gow, Gordon
"The cult movies: The night of the hunter." Films & Filming Vol XXI nr 5 (Feb 1975); p 48-53
Analysis of the theme of conflict between good and evil, and the techniques and methods used to convey the conflict in this film.

Gross, Larry
"Baby, I don't care." Sight & Sound Vol VII nr 9 (Sept 1997); p 6-9
An analysis of Robert Mitchum's acting career focusing on "Out of the past", "The lusty men", "The night of the hunter" and "Cape Fear".

Hammond, Paul
"Melmoth in Norman Rockwell land... on 'The night of the hunter'." Sight & Sound Vol XLVIII nr 2 (Spring 1979); p 105-109
Analysis and background to making the film.

Jones, Preston Neal
"Heaven and hell to play with : the filming of the Night of the hunter." In: Performing arts : motion pictures / [editor, Iris Newsom]. Washington : Library of Congress : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., 1998.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.P47 1998

Mills, Moylan C.
"Charles Laughton's Adaptation of The Night of the Hunter." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 49-57, 1988.
Assesses the extent of James Agee's involvement with the script of Charles Laughton's adaptation of the Davis Grubb novel 'The night of the hunter'.

Moorhouse, Jocelyn
"Enduring." Sight & Sound Vol V nr 4 (April 1995); p 61
Jocelyn Moorhouse gives her private view on the experience of watching Charles Laughton's "The night of the hunter".

Thomson, David.
"A child's demon: The magic of Charles Laughton's Southern gothic one-off 'The Night of the Hunter' may be in Robert Mitchum's willing flamboyance." Sight and Sound (April 1999): 20(3).
An analysis of Charles Laughton's "The night of the hunter" which looks at its connections to the Davis Grubb novel from which it is adapted.

Williams, Evan Calder
"Sunset with Chainsaw" Film Quarterly Vol. 64, No. 4 (Summer 2011), pp. 28-33
UC users only
Looking back at three films (The Night of the Hunter, House, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre), this essay proposes a new way to read horror politically, moving away from allegories of “horrible content” in favor of an attention to the horrors of form and how “secondary” background details assert themselves.

Little Caesar

Bouchard, Norma
"Ethnicity and the classical gangster film : Mervyn LeRoy's Little Caesar and Howard Hawks' Scarface." In: Mafia movies : a reader / edited by Dana Renga. Toronto ; Buffalo [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.M23 M34 2011

Brill, Lesley.
"Growing Up Gangster: Little Caesar, The Public Enemy, and the American Dream." In: Hollywood : réflexions sur l'écran / textes recueillis et presentes par Daniel Royot ; Groupe de recherche et d'études nord-americaines. Aix-en-Provence : Publications, Universite de Provence ; Marseille : Diffusion, J. Laffitte, 1984.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.H5921 1984

Faragoh, Francis Edwards.
Little Caesar / edited with an introd. by Gerald Peary. Madison, Wis. : Published for the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research by the University of Wisconsin Press, 1981 Wisconsin/Warner Bros. screenplay series
"Screenplay by Francis Edwards Faragoh from the novel by W. R. Burnett."
Main Stack PN1997.L589

Gansberg, Alan L.
Little Caesar : a biography of Edward G. Robinson / Alan L. Gansberg. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2004.
PFA PN2287.R7.G36 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0412/2003027041.html

Kaminsky, S.M..
"Little Caesar and its role in the gangster film genre." Journal of Popular Film and Television; Vol.I nr.3 (Summer 1972); p.209-227
UC users only
Discusses characteristics of "Little Caesar" and their incorporation into other films in the gangstergenre.

Mason, Fran
American gangster cinema : from Little Caesar to Pulp fiction New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 M37 2002
PFA : PN1995.9.G3 M37 2002;

Munby, Jonathan.
"The Enemy Goes Public: Voicing the Cultural Other in the Early 1930s Talking Gangster Film." Public enemies, public heroes: screening the gangster from Little Caesar to Touch of Evil / Jonathan Munby. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.M86 1999
Moffitt PN1995.9.G3 M86 1999

Peary, Gerald, Peary.
"Rico Rising: Little Caesar Takes Over the Screen." In: The Classic American novel and the movies / edited by Gerald Peary and Robert Shatzkin. New York : F. Ungar Pub. Co., c1977.
Main Stack PN1997.85.C55

Miller's Crossing

See Coen Brothers bibliography

Dr. Mabuse Series

Natural Born Killers

Musketeers of Pig Alley

Peeping Tom

Prizzi's Honor

The Public Enemy

Reservoir Dogs

See Quentin Tarantino bibliography

Scarface

Howard Hawks, 1932 SEE Hawks Bibliography

Brian De Palma, 1983 SEE De Palma Bibliography

Se7en (Seven)

Allen, Valerie
"Se7en: Medieval Justice, Modern Justice." Journal of Popular Culture, vol. 43, no. 6, pp. 1150-1172, 2010 Dec
UC users only

Brown, Royal S.
"Seven." Cineaste 22.n3 (Summer 1996): 44(3).
UC users only

Dyer, Richard.
"Kill and kill again. (portrayal of serial killers in film and television)." Sight and Sound 7.n9 (Sept 1997): 14(4).

Fahy, Thomas
"Killer Culture: Classical Music and the Art of Killing in "Silence of the Lambs" and "Se7en" Journal of Popular Culture 37:1 (August 2003) Issue p. 28-42
UC users only

Fleck, Patrice
"Looking in the Wrong Direction: Displacement and Literacy in the Hollywood Serial Killer Drama." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 35-43, Winter 1997.
The US 'serial killer' films of the 1990's are seen as a response to political conservatism and related solutions proposed for the crime problem; dwells on Se7en and The silence of the lambs.

Gormley, Paul.
"Se7en and the Contagion and Knowledge of Blackness." In: The new-brutality film : race and affect in contemporary Hollywood cinema / Paul Gormley. Bristol, UK ; Portland, OR, USA : Intellect, 2005.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.V5 G67 2005

Hantke, Steffen.
"Authorship in Serial Killer Narratives: David Fincher's Se7en." Sun Yat-sen Journal of Humanities, vol. 12, pp. 75-95, Spring 2001.

Hibbs, Thomas S.
"Defense against the dark arts : from Se7en to the Dark knight and Harry Potter." In: Shows about nothing : nihilism in popular culture / Thomas S. Hibbs. Waco, Tex. : Baylor University Press, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN1995.9.N55 H53 2012

Hill, Shona
"Getting Medieval: Bodies of Fear, Serial Killers and Se7en." In: The domination of fear / edited by Mikko Canini. Amsterdam : Editions Rodopi, 2010.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Humphries, Reynold
'On the road again: rehearsing the death drive in modern realist horror cinema." Post Script XXII:2 (Winter-Spring 2003)
UC users only
Argues that repetitive murder as portrayed in several films signifies the killer's psychological and social alienation.

Kermode, Mark
"Se7en." Sight and Sound 6:7 (July 1996) Go to Journal Issue p. 56,3
UC users only

Piazza, Roberta.
"Pragmatic Deviance in Realist Horror Films: A Look at Films by Argento and Fincher." In: Telecinematic discourse : approaches to the language of films and television series / edited by Roberta Piazza, Monika Bednarek, Fabio Rossi. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia : John Benjamins Pub. Company, 2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.L35 T43 2011

Rombes, Nicholas.
"A through s(Se7en): a racial taxonomy of serial killer cinema." Post Script 22.2 (Wntr-Spring 2003): 81(11).
UC users only
" Rombes discusses the depiction of African-American detectives in three serial killer films: two performed by Morgan Freeman in "Kiss the Girls" and "Seven," and one by Denzel Washington in "Fallen." Believing that much of contemporary film theory and criticism is impenetrable and irrelevant, Rombes approaches the films in a less structured and formal manner; he analyzes them in terms of their conformity to long-held American racial stereotypes and provides alternate readings of several of the films' plot elements. Rombes believes that any potentially challenging ideas about American race relations are subverted by the films' generic conventions and by the overall whitewashing of racial issues in Hollywood." [IIPA]

Summer, Edward.
"Seven." Films in Review v. 47 (January/February 1996) p. 66-7 Publication Year: 1996
A review of David Fincher's motion picture Seven. A reasonably conventional noir murder mystery, this commercially successful thriller has a look and a relatively suggestive sensibility that has been lacking in mainstream cinema for many years, strongly echoing the genius of the 1940s film noir. It is an extraordinary example of a proper use of the Color Correction Enhancement process and a reinvention of a long-lost aesthetic.

Williams, David E.
"The sins of a serial killer: The filming of Seven." American Cinematographer v. 76 (October 1995) p. 34-40+
"Director David Fincher and cinematographer Darius Khondji's work on the film Seven is discussed. The film tells the story of two detectives on the trail of a serial killer who is seeking revenge for society's ills and who bases his crimes on the Seven Deadly Sins. Possessed by the story for Seven, which he related to as a horror fan, Khondji found inspiration while walking the nighttime streets of Manhattan. Working closely with Fincher, he felt that Seven "should be scary, but very modern," inspiring the duo to seek out visual examples of the look they wanted. While the film has a distinctive overall noir texture, Fincher and Khondji carefully created different looks for each of the crime scenes that the detectives come across." [Art Index]

Wrathall, John.
"Seven." Sight & Sound v. ns6 (January 1996) p. 49-50
UC users only
"Seven, directed by David Fincher, is a complex and disturbing example of the serial killer genre. Fincher has created the most authentically hellish screen metropolis since Gotham City, a nameless warren of damp corridors, subterranean sex joints, and dilapidated tenements, where it rains all the time. The film is packed with visual details that are plausible in terms of the plot but carry a powerful abstract or symbolic charge." [Art Index]

Sherlock Holmes Films

Haydock, Ron.
Deerstalker!: Holmes and Watson on screen by by Ron Haydock. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1978.
NRLF B 3 567 964

Hinson, Hal
"TV's damaged detectives are Sherlock's children." (new TV detective shows borrow from Sherlock Holmes) The New York Times Oct 13, 2002 pAR27(N) pAR27(L) col 1 (25 col in)

Rimoldi, Oscar.
"The detective movies of the 30s & 40s." (part 2) Films in Review v44, n7-8 (July-August, 1993):225 (10 pages).
Fictitious detectives of the 1930s and 40s became screen heroes as theywere portrayed in movies. The most famous was Sherlock Holmes, created by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. The Lone Wolf, Sam Spade and Nancy Drew arethree other detective characters for audiences of varying age-groups. MrMoto, The Saint , Ellery Queen, Michael Shayne, Duncan Maclain and BostonBlackie were other famous fictitious detectives.

Rimoldi, Oscar.
"The detective movies of the 30s & 40s: part 3." Films in Review v44, n9-10 (Sept-Oct, 1993):308 (6 pages).

Steinbrunner, Chris.
The films of Sherlock Holmes / by Chris Steinbrunner and Norman Michaels. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, 1978.
UCB Main PN1995.9.S5 S7 1978

Sonatine

The Sopranos

Auster, Albert
"The Sopranos: the gangster redux. "Television Quarterly, Wntr 2001 v31 i4 p34(5)
The cable television show 'The Sopranos' has reshaped the popular conception of hoodlums. The characters on this program exist largely in suburbia, face middle-class pressures, and portray people who are vulnerable as well as killers.

Bondanella, Peter E.
Hollywood Italians : dagos, palookas, romeos, wise guys, and Sopranos New York : Continuum, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.I73 B66 2004
MOFF: PN1995.9.I73 B66 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip049/2003020663.html

Bowman, James.
"Decline of the Honor Culture." Policy Review; Aug/Sep2009, Issue 156, p27-39, 13p
UC users only
"The article uses examples from various forms of American media to reference a culture of honor that has declined within the U.S. due to the prevalence of social mobility. The author contrasts the code of honor that exists within members of the fictional Corleone mafia family from the film “The Godfather” with the code of honor that exists in the fictional Soprano family from the television series “The Sopranos.” Writing from Danielle Allen of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University is cited to elucidate a statistical pattern pertaining to military enrollment, particularly in New Jersey. The film “The Sands of Iwo Jima” is also referenced." [Ebsco]

Bowman, James.
"Superior Soap Opera." New Criterion. 18 (5): 58-62. 2000 Jan.

Cavallero, Jonathan J.
"Gangsters, Fessos, Tricksters, and Sopranos: The Historical Roots of Italian American Stereotype Anxiety." Journal of Popular Film and Television. 32 (2): 50-63. 2004 Summer.
UC users only
"Throughout the 1930s, Italian characters challenged American ideals while simultaneously being blamed for their failure. Filmmakers and audiences were thus allowed to ponder the subversive challenges such characters posed while distancing themselves from similar thought patterns. Today, understanding the rhetorical use of these characters is essential when evaluating contemporary Italian American visions." [Expanded Academic Index]

Creeber, Glen
"Serial killers: murder, masculinity and the reinvention of the crime genre." In: Serial television : big drama on the small screen / Glen Creeber. London : BFI Publishing, 2004.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.S4 C74 2004 DUE 07-01-10
Moffitt PN1992.8.S4 C74 2004

Davis, J. Madison
"It's Over When the Soprano Eats Onion Rings." World Literature Today; Jan/Feb2008, Vol. 82 Issue 1, p9-11, 3p
UC users only
The author focuses on the last episode of the television program "The Sopranos." According to the author, the ending of "The Sopranos" was completely unexpected by television viewers, much like the ending of the program "Newhart." The author discusses writer David Chase, offers an analysis of scenes in the episode, and comments on storytelling and television audiences.

DeFino, Dean.
"The Prince of North Jersey." Journal of Popular Film and Television. 32 (2): 83-89. 2004 Summer.
UC users only
"Although many critics consider Tony Soprano from HBO's mob series The Sopranos a troubled Everyman, an emblem of the human need for redemption, the program reveals a postmodern politician more concerned with his leadership skills than his humanity. Caught between the Machiavellian poles of the humane prince and the beastly dictator, Tony is compelled to more and more beastly deeds in a struggle to achieve and maintain power among the ruins of a dying mob culture. Tony's desperate brutality, read against our surprisingly resilient empathy for him, compels us to ask the very question his therapist. Dr. Melfi, poses to herself: Are we being conned by a sociopath?" [Expanded Academic Index]

De Stefano, George.
"The Sopranos rewrites the genre." In: An offer we can't refuse : the Mafia in the mind of America / George De Stefano. 1st ed. New York : Faber and Faber, 2006.
Main Stack HV6446.D43 2006
PFA HV6446.D43 2006

De Stefano, George.
"Ungood Fellas." (the Mafia and Italian-American - as seen in popular entertainment) The Nation Feb 7, 2000 v270 i5 p31 (2029 words)

Domini, John
"Dinosaur in the train station: four years of the Sopranos phenomenon." (Critical Essay) . The North American Review March-April 2003 v288 i2 p38(6)
UC users only

Fields, Ingrid Walker
"Family values and feudal codes: the social politics of America's twenty-first century gangster." Journal of Popular Culture May 2004 v37 i4 p611(23) (9593 words)
UC users only
"Despite the steady deterioration of gangster and gangsta life on the street, gangsters' imaginary lives thrive in film, television, fiction, music, and video games. The gangster codes have been so consistently mythologized in late 20th century popular culture that they have become archetypal. The author discusses Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather" as the seminal gangster narrative that has influenced its followers. The HBO series "The Sopranos" and Jim Jarmusch's film "Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai" present significant permutations of gangster mythology. The author discusses the gangster code, particularly as portrayed in the two works." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Franklin, Nancy
"Shock Treatment." ('The Sopranos')(Television Program Review)The New Yorker Dec 16, 2002 v78 i39 p095

Gabrielson, Teena.
"The End of New Beginnings: Nature and the American Dream in The Sopranos, Weeds, and Lost." Theory & Event, 2009, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p5-5, 1p
UC users only

Gorton, Kristyn.
"'Why I Love Carmela Soprano': Ambivalence, the Domestic and Televisual Therapy." Feminism & Psychology, Feb2009, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p128-131, 4p
UC users only
"The article explores the implications of domestic femininities. It draws on the television series "The Sopranos" and examines the complex character of Carmela Soprano who is in a powerless position as a Mafia wife, using all her abilities to create a life for herself and her family. According to the article, watching other people's fictional lives developed on screen provides a viewer a chance to reflect, to experience things indirectly, to talk to a partner and enter a conversation on domestic arrangements. It is stated that it opens a space that allows people to think differently regarding gender and identity." [Ebsco]

Hendin, Josephine Gattuso.
"Tony and Meadow: The Sopranos as Father-Daughter Drama." Lit: Literature Interpretation Theory. 14 (1): 63-67. 2003 Jan-Mar.
"The Sopranos opens up the injuries of class differences within a stratified Italian American world. Tony Soprano and Meadow Soprano share a father-daughter relationship that serves as a baseline for measuring the Italian American codes of family solidarity, silence, and sacrifice. The relationship between them is actually a competition between the opposing needs and interests of two strong- willed persons." [Expanded Academic Index]

Henneberger, Melinda
"The Last Chapter: Saying Goodbye to Tony and Harry." Commonweal, vol. 134, no. 13, pp. 7, July 2007
UC users only

Hipsky, Martin.
"Post-Cold War Paranoia in The Corrections and The Sopranos." Postmodern Culture, Jan2006, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p5-5, 1p
UC users only
"Focuses on the cultural and social paranoia in the U.S. as depicted in the book "The Corrections" and television program "The Sopranos." Depiction of the decline of and generational divides within the family; Cause of domestic anxiety and the production of the middle-class family; Violence in "The Sopranos.""

Jaramillo, Deborah L.
"The Family Racket: AOL Time Warner, Hbo, The Sopranos, and the Construction of a Quality Brand." Journal of Communication Inquiry 2002 26(1): 59-75.
UC users only
"Examines Home Box Office's (HBO) The Sopranos during 1999-2001 in the context of several industrial factors, beginning with the series' generic inscription. As a gangster program, The Sopranos came in the form of a pedigreed presold product, a television text of esteemed cinematic lineage. This leads to the examination of branding. In order to corral The Sopranos into the slogan "It's Not TV, It's HBO," HBO sought to differentiate its product from the lowest common denominator of broadcast fare. The separation resulted in the construction of the "quality" brand, a problematic concept academics linked to demographics. HBO's branding strategy also intensified the claim of competition between pay cable and broadcast television in popular discourse. This claim was undermined by the ratings-gathering methodology of A. C. Nielsen and by AOL Time Warner's tiering strategies. An examination of the aforementioned strategies uncovers the materialist - rather than auteurist - foundations of The Sopranos." [America: History and Life]

Johnson, Lisa.
"The stripper as resisting reader: stripper iconography and sex worker feminism on the Sopranos." Scholar & Feminist Online; Fall, 2004, Vol. 3 Issue 1

Johnson, Merri Lisa
"Gangster feminism: the feminist cultural work of HBO's The Sopranos." In: Third wave feminism and television : Jane puts it in a box / edited by Merri Lisa Johnson. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York : Distributed in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.W65 T48 2007

Kaveny, Cathleen
"Salvation & The Sopranos: Redemption in New Jersey?" Commonweal, vol. 134, no. 3, pp. 10-14, Feb 2007

Keeton, P.
"The Sopranos and genre transformation: ideological negotiation in the gangster film." New Jersey Journal of Communication, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 131-148, Fall 2002
"The Sopranos is a major reworking of the gangster genre, which conceals and exposes capitalist contradictions in reexamining the cultural myths on which the genre is based. Although The Sopranos incorporates many elements of the traditional gangster genre, it also transforms that genre in response to major social changes occurring in American society in the late 1980s and 1990s: pervasive corporate corruption and political scandal, loss of faith in national business and political leaders, widening income gap between the wealthiest and poorest Americans, decline in the patriarchal authority of the father, growing concern about childhood abuse and dysfunction in the family, reliance on drugs and psychotherapy to treat deviant social behavior, and increase and normalization of violence in society. This article argues that an ideological negotiation occurs in The Sopranos between the new social and political realities of American work and family life that are represented in the series and the traditional conventions of the gangster genre and the family melodrama. This interaction gives rise to alternative and contradictory readings of the narrative." [Communication Abstracts]

Kelly, Robert J.
"Sopranoland: Looking Down on Society From Below in TV Soaps." Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless; Mar 2007, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p49, 17p

Kocela, Christopher
"Unmade Men: The Sopranos After Whiteness." Postmodern Culture, Volume 15, Number 2, January 2005
UC users only

LeBesco, Kathleen.
"Disability, Gender and Difference on The Sopranos." Women's Studies in Communication, Spring2006, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p39-58, 20p

Lee, Katherine Hyunmi.
"The ghost of Gary Cooper: masculinity, homosocial bonding, and the Sopranos." Scholar & Feminist Online; Fall, 2004, Vol. 3 Issue 1

Leebron, Elizabeth J.; Dominique G. Ruggieri.
"How TV portrays Jewish and Italian-American women." Television Quarterly Spring-Summer 2004 v34 i3-4 p34-41
"Television has the power to influence the audience and the potential to shape opinions and distort reality. It is said that the TV has weakened the image of the Italian-American and Jewish women by portraying them as ethnic female characters linked with various positive and negative traits damaging stereotypes." [Expanded Academic Index]

Little, William G.
The waste fix : seizures of the sacred from Upton Sinclair to the Sopranos New York: Routledge, 2002.
MAIN: PS374.W36 L58 2002

Lombardi, Giancarlo
"'Don't stop believin', don't stop- ' : (de)structuring expectations in the final season of The sopranos." In: Mafia movies : a reader / edited by Dana Renga. Toronto ; Buffalo [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.M23 M34 2011

Lowe, Shannon.
"MADDness and Psychoanalysis in the Space of Literature: The Sopranos." Journal for Cultural Research, Oct2008, Vol. 12 Issue 4, p365-388, 24p

Mattessi, Peter Mattessi
"The strong, silent type: psychoanalysis in The Sopranos." (TV: views from the couch) Metro Magazine Fall 2003 i138 p136(3) (1337 words)
UC users only

McCabe, Janet; Akass, Kim
"Married to the Mob: Separation and Divorce in The Sopranos." In: After intimacy : the culture of divorce in the West since 1789 / Karl Leydecker and Nicholas White ( Oxford ; New York : Peter Lang, c2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3592.D7 A47 2007

McCarty, John
Bullets over Hollywood : the American gangster picture from the silents to The Sopranos Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, 2004.
MAIN: PN1995.9.G3 M34 2004
Moffitt: PN1995.9.G3 M34 2004
PFA : PN1995.9.G3 M47 2004

Nochimson, Martha P.
"The Sopranos." In: Mob culture : hidden histories of the American gangster film / edited by Lee Grieveson, Esther Sonnet, and Peter Stanfield. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.M63 2005

Nochimson, Martha P.
"Tony's Options: The Sopranos and the Televisuality of the Gangster Genre." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 29: (no pagination). 2003 Nov-Dec.
UC users only

Nochimson, Martha P.
"Waddaya Lookin' At? Re-Reading the Gangster Genre Through 'The Sopranos'." Film Quarterly. 56(2):2-13. 2002-2003 Winter
UC users only
The Sopranos, which is considered as media's hyper masculine series is discussed. The pleasures of action, violence, macho aggressiveness and vulnerabilities are highlighted.

Nochimson, Martha P.
"Waddaya Lookin' At? Re-Reading the Gangster Genre Through 'The Sopranos'." In: Mob culture: hidden histories of the American gangster film
Edited by Lee Grieveson, Esther Sonnet, and Peter Stanfield. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.G3.M63 2005

Orban, Clara.
"Stereotyping in The Sopranos." VIA: Voices in Italian Americana. 12 (1): 35-56. 2001 Spring.

Quinn, Roseanne Giannini
"Mothers, molls, and misogynists: resisting Italian American womanhood in The Sopranos." Journal of American Culture June 2004 v27 i2 p166(9) (5922 words)
UC users only

Reading the Sopranos : hit TV from HBO
Edited by David Lavery. London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York : Distributed in the United States and Canada by Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full-text of this book available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PN1992.77.S66.R43 2006

Ricci , Franco
"When words can kill : David Chase's The sopranos." In: Mafia movies : a reader / edited by Dana Renga. Toronto ; Buffalo [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.M23 M34 2011

Schoene, Berthold
"The Wounded Woman and the Parrot: Post-Feminist Girlhood in Alan Warner's The Sopranos and Bella Bathurst's Special." Journal of Gender Studies, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 133-44, July 2006
UC users only

Schroth, Raymond A.
"Sopranos." (Television program about Mob family raises questions about stereotypes)(Critical Essay) National Catholic Reporter June 29, 2001 v37 i33 p19

Schulman, Alex
"The Sopranos: An American Existentialism?" The Cambridge Quarterly, Volume 39, Number 1, 2010, pp. 23-38 (Article)
UC users only

Siegel, Lee.
"Sundays with The Sopranos." In: Falling upwards : essays in defense of the imagination / Lee Siegel. New York : Basic Books, c2006.
Main (Gardner) Stacks

Simon, David
Tony Soprano's America : the criminal side of the American dream Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 2002.
MAIN: HN59.2 .S576 2002

The Sopranos and philosophy : I kill therefore I am
Edited by Richard Greene and Peter Vernezze. Chicago : Open Court, c2004.
MAIN: PN1992.77.S66 S67 2004; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0414/2004002571.html

Staines, Deborah
"Therapy culture and TV : The Sopranos as a depression narrative." In: Depression and narrative : telling the dark / edited by Hilary Clark. Albany : SUNY Press, c2008. DD>Main (Gardner) Stacks PN56.M4 D47 2008

Stoehr, Kevin L.
Nihilism in film and television : a critical overview, Citizen Kane to The Sopranos / Kevin L. Stoeh Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2006.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.N55 S76 2006

Stoehr, Kevin L.
"The Sopranos, film noir, and nihilism." In: The philosophy of TV noir / edited by Steven M. Sanders and Aeon J. Skoble. Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.8.D48 P45 2008

This thing of ours : investigating The Sopranos
Edited by David Lavery. New York : Columbia University Press ; London : Wallflower, 2002.
Moffitt PN1992.77.S66.T49 2002

Thorburn, David
"The Sopranos." In: The essential HBO reader / edited by Gary R. Edgerton and Jeffrey P. Jones. Lexington. : University Press of Kentucky, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.92.H66 E87 2008

Vincent, Christopher J.
Paying respect to The Sopranos : a psychosocial analysis / Christopher J. Vincent. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.77.S66 V56 2008

Waddell, Terrie.
"Incest by goomah/daughter proxy : The Sopranos." In: Mis/takes : archetype, myth and identity in screen fiction / Terrie Waddell. London ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .W27 2006

Wynn, Neil A.
"Counselling The Mafia: The Sopranos." Journal of American Studies [Great Britain]
"Reviews nine books published during 2000-02 on the Home Box Office television series The Sopranos. The reviewer surveys diverse topics related to the show, including the portrayal of psychotherapy, aspects of Italian American culture such as food and gender relations, the complex relationship the program has with the history of filmic representations of Italian American gangsters, and Italian American viewers' ambivalent reception of the show." [America: History and Life]

"Why the Sopranos Sing: Nothing else on TV can touch HBO's Mob hit--and that's got the network suits watching their backs. Will 'The Sopranos' change the face of television?" (Arts & Entertainment) Newsweek April 2, 2001 p48

Willis, Ellen.
"Our Mobsters, Ourselves : Why The Sopranos is therapeutic TV." (Review) The Nation April 2, 2001 v272 i13 p26

Wynn, Neil A.
"Counselling the Mafia: The Sopranos." Journal of American Studies. 38 (1): 127-32. 2004 Apr

Yacowar, Maurice.
"The Sopranos and the American Dream." (Critical Essay). Queen's Quarterly 112.3 (Fall 2005): p382(12). (2764 words)

Yacowar, Maurice.
The Sopranos on the couch : analyzing television's greatest series New York : Continuum, 2003.
MAIN: PN1992.77.S66 Y33 2003

True Romance

Alleva, Richard.
"True Romance."Commonweal v120, n18 (Oct 22, 1993):22 (3 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"True Romance." (movie reviews) Time v142, n11 (Sept 13, 1993):78 (2 pages).

Denby, David.
"True Romance." (movie reviews)New York v26, n37 (Sept 20, 1993):65 (1 page).

Francke, Lizzie.
"True Romance." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v3, n11 (Nov, 1993):56 (1 page).

James, Caryn.
"True Romance." (movie reviews) New York Times v143, sec2 (Sun, Sept 19, 1993):H15(N), H15(L), col 1, 18 col in.

Klady, Leonard.
"True Romance." (movie reviews)Variety v352, n4 (Sept 6, 1993):27 (1 page).

Maslin, Janet.
"True Romance." (movie reviews) New York Times v142 (Fri, Sept 10, 1993):B7(N), C5(L), col 1, 19 col in.

Pawelczak, Andy.
"True Romance." (movie reviews) Films in Review v44, n11-12 (Nov-Dec, 1993):416 (3 pages).

Romeny, Jonathan.
"True Romance." (movie reviews)New Statesman & Society v6, n275 (Oct 22, 1993):33 (2 pages).

The Untouchables

Violent Cop

The Wire (TV series)

Atlas, John; Dreier, Peter.
"Is The Wire Too Cynical?F" Dissent , Summer2008, Vol. 55 Issue 3, p79-82, 4p
UC users only
"In this article the authors discuss aspects of "The Wire," a television crime drama that was widely praised for its depiction of inner city life in Baltimore, Maryland. The authors suggest that the portrait of the community contained in the program was inaccurate, citing instances in the actual life of the city that contradicted the presentation on screen. While praising some of the artistry of "The Wire," the authors fault the creator of the show, David Simon, with confirming the popularly held notion that inner city life is rife with drug crime and that African Americans are helpless victims of economic inequality." [EBSCP]

Brock, Andre
"Life on the Wire: Deconstructing Race on the Internet" Information, Communication & Society, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 344-363, 2009
UC users only

Chaddha, Anmol; Wilson, William Julius; Venkatesh, Sudhir A.
"In Defense of The Wire." Dissent (00123846), Summer2008, Vol. 55 Issue 3, p83-86, 4p
UC users only
In this article the authors respond to criticism, published elsewhere in the magazine, of the television crime drama "The Wire." The critical piece complained that the program presented an unrealistic and entirely negative depiction of Baltimore, Maryland, the city in which "The Wire" takes place. The authors defend the program, noting that it is a fictional portrayal of an inner city community and should not be held to the same standards applied to documentary television productions. They cite the original intentions of the creator of the show, David Simon.

Comier, Harvey
"Bringing Omar Back to Life." Journal of Speculative Philosophy; 2008, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p205-213, 9p
UC users only
The article presents the author's comments on television character and philosophical stickup artist Omar Little. According to the author, the character featured in the TV program "The Wire," running on the HBO cable channel in 2002. The author says that Omar is a superhero and a fantasy figure who carefully shoots only drug dealers and never citizens.

Dreier, Peter; Atlas, John.
"The Wire – Bush-Era Fable about America's Urban Poor?" City & Community, Sep2009, Vol. 8 Issue 3, p329-340, 12p
UC users only

Hanson, Christopher.
"Some Last Words On The Wire." Film Quarterly, Winter2008/2009, Vol. 62 Issue 2, P66-67, 2p
UC users only

James, Nick
"Dealing Dope and Death." Sight and Sound, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 36-40, Dec 2007
UC users only

Jones, Kent
"Down in the Hole." Sight and Sound, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 22-26, May 2008
UC users only

Kinder, Marsha
"Re-Wiring Baltimore: The Emotive Power Of Systemics, Seriality, and the City." Film Quarterly; Winter2008/2009, Vol. 62 Issue 2, p50-57, 8p
UC users only

Kraniauskas, John.
"Elasticity of demand: Reflections on The Wire." Radical Philosophy, Mar/Apr2009, Issue 154, p25-34, 10p

Mittell, Jason.
"Narrative Complexity in Contemporary American Television." The Velvet Light Trap 58.1 (2006) 29-40
UC users only

Mittell, Jason.
"The wire, serial storytelling and procedural logic." In: Third person : authoring and exploring vast narratives / edited by Pat Harrigan and Noah Wardrip-Fruin. Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2009.
UC users only Main (Gardner) Stacks GV1469.15 .T48 2009

Quinn, Kelly.
"Dispatches - - The Heart of the City: A Conversation about The Wire." Places, 21(1), 90. (2009)

Rose, Brian T.
"The Wire." In: The essential HBO reader / edited by Gary R. Edgerton and Jeffrey P. Jones. Lexington. : University Press of Kentucky, c2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1992.92.H66 E87 2008

Sheehan, Helena; Sweeney, Sheamus
"The Wire and the world: narrative and metanarrative." Jump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media; Spring2009, Issue 51, p4-4, 1p
UC users only

Twyford-Moore, Sam.
"It Ain't Beirut: Baltimore On The Wire." Meanjin, 2009, Vol. 68 Issue 3, p10-12, 3p

Tyree, J. M.
"The Wire: The Complete Fourth Season." Film Quarterly, Spring2008, Vol. 61 Issue 3, p32-38, 7p
UC users only

Walters, Ben
"The Wire For Tourists?" Film Quarterly; Winter2008/2009, Vol. 62 Issue 2, p64-65, 2p
UC users only

Williams, James S.
"The Lost Boys Of Baltimore: Beauty And Desire In The Hood." Film Quarterly, Winter2008/2009, Vol. 62 Issue 2, P58-63, 6p
UC users only

Wormser, Baron.
"The Wire and The Waste Land." Manhattan Review, Fall2009/Winter2010, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p149-159, 11p

Serial Killers in the Movies

Horror film bibliography (for writing about slasher films)

Bibliographies on

Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (separate page)
American Psycho
Silence of the Lambs (separate page)
Se7en

The American nightmare [videorecording]
Knife-weilding murderers, buxom teens fleeing for their lives, the undead limping across streets. These images are synonymous with horror movies. Go behind-the-scenes with filmmaker greats as they reveal their inspirations for some of the most disturbingly gruesome films that have emerged on screen. Includes excerpts from classic horror films. DVD 2417

Blennerhassett, Richard
"The serial killer in film: An archetype for our time." Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine. Vol 10(2), Jun 1993, pp. 101-104
"Presents a Jungian perspective on the cinematic portrayal of the evolution of the serial killer, focusing on mythic aspects of the serial killer and representation of the archetype of the shadow. Films discussed include F. Lang's "M," A. Hitchcock's "Psycho," and J. Demme's "The Silence of the Lambs." It is suggested that the popularity of the serial killer genre reflects the need of the individual to find new images for the old concepts of good and evil."

Cettl, Robert
Serial killer cinema : an analytical filmography with an introduction Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2003.
MAIN: PN1995.9.S297 C48 2003

Conrath, Robert
"The Guys Who Shoot to Thrill: Serial Killers and the American Popular Unconscious." Revue Francaise d'Etudes Americaines, vol. 16, no. 60, pp. 143-52, May 1994.

Dyer, Richard.
"Kill and kill again. (portrayal of serial killers in film and television)." Sight and Sound 7.n9 (Sept 1997): 14(4).
'Millennium' by Chris Carter is one of the most recent television releases on serial killers. Motion pictures have consistently portrayed the serial killer in films such as 'M', 'The Silence of the Lambs' and 'Psycho'. More recent releases have focused on the identification of the pattern in serial killing, notably 'Se7en' and 'Copycat'. The role of women in the serial killer movie is discussed, along with the portrayal of police detection.
Also in:
Action/spectacle cinema : a Sight and sound reader London : British Film Institute, 2000.
MAIN: PN1995 .A259 2000

Fleck, Patrice
"Looking in the Wrong Direction: Displacement and Literacy in the Hollywood Serial Killer Drama." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 35-43, Winter 1997.
The US 'serial killer' films of the 1990's are seen as a response to political conservatism and related solutions proposed for the crime problem; dwells on Se7en and The silence of the lambs.

Freccero, Carla
"Serial killers and the question of representation." In: Popular culture : an introduction New York : New York University Press, c1999.
Moffitt E169.12.F717 1999

Gates, Philippa.
"Manhunting: the female detective in the serial killer film." Post Script 24.1 (Fall 2004): 42(20).
UC users only
"Gates analyzes several American films within hitthe hitserial hitkiller genre from hitthe 1990s and early 2000s that feature hitfemale protagonists. During this era, more hitserial hitkiller films depicted hitfemale detectives assigned to track male criminals as hitthe genre began to accommodate changing cultural mores regarding gender roles. However, Gates argues that hitthe hitfemale protagonists hitin contemporary hitserial hitkiller films are still encumbered by hitthe genre's focus on masculine strength and feminine weakness. hitThe hitfemale body - of hitthe hitdetective as well as hitthe victims - thus functions as a site of hitthe working through of masculine anxieties incited by a hitfemale presence hitin a traditionally male profession. Films examined include: "Hidden," "Kiss hitthe Girls," "Murder by Numbers," and "Taking Lives"; 2003's "Monster," starring Charlize Theron as real-life hitserial hitkiller Aileen Wuornos, is also situated hitin Gates' theoretical framework." [IIPA]

Goldberg, Carl, and Virginia Crespo.
"A psychological examination of serial killer cinema: The case of copycat." Post Script 22.2 (Wntr-Spring 2003): 55(9).
UC users only
"Goldberg and Crespo assess the portrayal hitof hitserial killers in films from the late 20th and early 21st century and determine that they present a dishonest and morally unacceptable depiction hitof the crimes perpetrated by hitserial killers in reality. Goldberg and Crespo believe that hitcinema has a moral function in terms hitof representing and exploring social problems, and believe that hitserial hitkiller movies such as 1995's "Copycat" abdicate this responsibility by presenting their villains as incomprehensible monsters lacking in any apparent hitpsychological complexity or motivation. Audience members are therefore disinclined to identify with cinematic hitserial killers in any remote way, which means that the real-life problem hitof random murder in society remains unexplored in the films. This simplistic portrayal hitof criminality is contrasted with the psychologically complex, and, according to the authors, morally sound, portrayal hitof the protagonist in Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel "Crime and Punishment."" [IIPA]

Hantke, Steffen.
"'The kingdom of the unimaginable': the construction of social space and the fantasy of privacy in serial killer narratives." Literature/Film Quarterly XXVI:3 (July 1998)
UC users only
Many serial killer narratives ignore the knowledge that experts have gained in their search to explain the behavior patterns of these killers. Society is fascinated with the space where the serial kill operates. Disappointment audiences reveal the fascination and curiosity with serial killers and the assumptions about their lives.

Hantke, Steffen.
"Monstrosity without a body: representational strategies in the popular serial killer film." Post Script 22.2 (Wntr-Spring 2003): 34(21).
UC users only

Humphries, Reynold
'On the road again: rehearsing the death drive in modern realist horror cinema." Post Script XXII:2 (Winter-Spring 2003)
UC users only
" Humphries extensively analyzes several horror films that depict serial killers and focuses hiton what he terms hitthe presence of an unquenchable "hitdeath hitdrive" that exists within each serial killer character and is enacted hitin each film. Drawing hitthe concept of hitthe "hitdeath hitdrive" from Sigmund Freud's psychoanalysis, Humphries also applies Jacques Lacan's concept of "jouissance" - hitthe human's need for greater and greater amounts of pleasure - and hitthe notion of an entity that represents a human's object of desire. Examining serial killer films such as "The Hitcher," "Seven," and "Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer," Humphries illustrates how hitthe murderers hitin each film fuse their incessant hitdrive towards gruesome carnage with a search for hitthe ultimate object of their wrath; such a quest, he argues, is hitin actuality hitthe serial killer's quest for his own hitdeath." [IIPA]

Hutchings, Peter
"Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond." In: The horror film / Peter Hutchings. Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2004.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.H837 2004
Moffitt PN1995.9.H6.H837 2004

Hutchings, Peter
"Tearing Your Soul Apart: Horror's New Monsters." In: Modern gothic : a reader / edited by Victor Sage & Allan Lloyd Smith. Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press : Distributed in the USA by St. Martin's Press, 1996.
Main Stack PR888.T3.M63 1996
Contents: Postmodernism/gothicism / Allan Lloyd Smith -- The politics of petrifaction: culture, religion, history in the fiction of Iain Banks and John Banville / Victor Sage -- The pre-Oedipal father: the gothicism of Blue Velvet / Laura Mulvey -- Wild nights and buried letters: the gothic "unconscious" of feminist criticism / Ros Ballaster -- Postmodern feminine horror fictions / Susanne Becker -- Isak Dinesen and the fiction of gothic gravity / Helen Stoddart -- Tearing your soul apart: horror's new monsters / Peter Hutchings -- Gothic spaces: the political aesthetics of Toni Morrison's Beloved / Liliane Weissberg -- Problems of recollection and construction: Stephen King / David Punter -- Postmodern gothic: desire and reality in Angela Carter's writing / Beate Neumeier -- Alien invasion by body snatchers and related creatures / David Seed -- Postcolonial gothic: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala and the Sobhraj case / Julie Newman -- Gothic convention and modernity in John Ramsay Campbell's short fiction / Giles Menegaldo.

Lafond, Frank.
"The life and crimes of ben; or when a serial killer meets a film crew in man bites dog.(Critical Essay)." Post Script 22.2 (Wntr-Spring 2003): 92(11).
UC users only
"Lafond analyzes the Belgian film "C'est arrivé près de chez vous" ("Man Bites Dog"), released in 1992, directed by Remy Belvaux, André Bonzel, and Benoît Poelvoorde, and starring Poelvoorde as a charismatic serial killer who is followed by a documentary film crew as he goes on a violent rampage. Lafond reviews the film's controversial release and its success as a cult film that aroused controversy over its mixture hitof realistic cinematography and black humor. The film's implication hitof the audience in the killer's hitcrimes, accentuated by a rape scene in which the cameraman partakes in the brutality, is examined and compared with the similarly amoral approach hitof the 1986 American film "Henry: Portrait hitof a Serial Killer."" [IIPA]

Lefebvre, Martin.
"Conspicuous Consumption: The Figure of the Serial Killer as Cannibal in the Age of Capitalism." Theory, Culture & Society, Jun2005, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p43-62, 20p
UC users only

Nixon, Nicola
"Making Monsters, or Serializing Killers." In: American gothic : new interventions in a national narrative / edited by Robert K. Martin & Eric Savoy. Iowa City [Iowa] : University of Iowa Press, c1998.
Main PS374.G68 A83 1998

Olesen, Anne Marie
"Film as Metaphor: Cannibalism and the Serial Killer as Metaphors for Transgression." p.o.v: A Danish Journal of Film Studies, vol. 4, pp. 135-49, December 1997.

Rehling, Nicola
"Everyman and no man: white, heterosexual masculinity in contemporary serial killer movies." Jump Cut, No. 49, spring 2007

Schmid, David (David Frank)
Natural born celebrities : serial killers in American culture Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2005.
The Victorian killer as media star : Jack the Ripper and H.H. Holmes -- Defining the enemy within : the FBI and serial murder -- Natural born celebrities : serial killers and the Hollywood star system -- Out of this world : aliens, devils, and serial killers in television crime drama -- Next door monsters : the dialectic of normality and monstrosity in true-crime narratives -- The unbearable straightness of violence : queering serial murder in true crime.

Schneider, Steven Jay.
"Introduction, Pt. II: serial killer film and television." Post Script 22.2 (Wntr-Spring 2003): 3(4).
UC users only

Schneider, Steven Jay.
"Realist Horror Cinema, Part II: Serial Killers." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 1-127, 2003 Winter-Spring
UC users only

Seltzer, Mark
"The Serial Killer as a Type of Person (Extract)." In: The horror reader / edited by Ken Gelder. London ; New York : Routledge, 2000
Main Stack PN3435.H69 2000

Seltzer, Mark
"Serial Killers (II): The Pathological Public Sphere." Critical Inquiry Vol. 22, No. 1 (Autumn, 1995), pp. 122-149
UC users only

Simpson, Philip L.
"Copycat, Serial Murder, and the (De)Terministic Screen Narrative." In: The terministic screen : rhetorical perspectives on film / edited by David Blakesley. Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2003.
Main Stack PN1994.T47 2003

Simpson, Philip L.
"America's Scariest Home Videos: Serial Killers and Reality Television." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 103-23, Winter 2003.
UC users only
" Simpson extensively reviews and analyzes the proliferation of reality-based true-crime television programs that report on the crimes of serial killers, a genre that has grown in popularity during the 1990s and early 2000s. He compares the popularity of these programs to the traditions of folk legend, where a monster, often endowed with supernatural powers, threatens the social order and brings forth a collective moral response. While Simpson acknowledges that programs such as "Geraldo," "Unsolved Mysteries," and "American Justice" overstate the actual threat of serial killers to the public and also elevate the necessity for law enforcement, he believes that the popularity of real-life serial killers' stories as portrayed on television is due to their function as a compelling cultural narrative, one that draws from folk legend to bring viewers together in the face of a demonic threat to their existence." [IIPA]

Simpson, Philip L.
Psycho paths : tracking the serial killer through contemporary American film and fiction Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2000.
Main Stack PN1995.9.S297.S56 2000

Spiteri, Charles
"Isolation and Subjugation: The Telephone in the Slasher Film." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema, vol. 32, pp. (no pagination), Summer 2004

Tietchen, Todd F.
"Samplers and copycats: the cultural implications of the postmodern slasher in contemporary American film." Journal of Popular Film and Television v. 26 no. 3 (Fall 1998) p. 98-107
UC users only
"A discussion of the cinematic trend in the 1990s to depict murderers as semiotically informed bricoleurs who follow the outline of a preestablished narrative manifest in a shared literature of images and process their artistically arranged corpses through another layer of reportorial and/or electronic discourse. The images of murderer as artist suggest American cinema's response to an increasingly violent society that raises its mass murderers onto pedestals of celebrity. Much of our terror while watching these films stems from the knowledge that the film killers are operating in fields of representation that enable them to aestheticize what are otherwise horrible acts. Furthermore, it is obvious that the representational practices they are involved in are on the whole reflective of the serial killer's status in contemporary media culture. The films discussed are Seven, Copycat, Scream, and Scream 2." [Art Index]

Tuck, Greg
"Of Monsters, Masturbators and Markets: Autoerotic Desire, Sexual Exchange and the Cinematic Serial Killer." In: Monsters and the monstrous : myths and metaphors of enduring evil / edited by Niall Scott. Amsterdam ; New York, NY : Rodopi, 2007.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks GR825 .M676 2007

Wilson, Wayne
The psychopath in film / Wayne Wilson. Lanham, Md. : University Press of America, c1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P785.W56 1999

American Psycho

Baelo Allué, Sonia
"The Aesthetics of Serial Killing: Working against Ethics in The Silence of the Lambs (1988) and American Psycho." Atlantis: Revista de la Asociación Española de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 7-24, December 2002.

Bernstein, Richard
"American Psycho': is going so far going too far." (controversy over graphic descriptions of murder and sadism in Bret Easton Ellis' novel) (Living Arts Pages) The New York Times Dec 10, 1990 v140 pB1(N) pC13(L) col 1 (29 col in)

Cardwell, Sarah.
"American Psycho: Serial Killer Film?" Film Studies: An International Review, vol. 3, pp. 73-84, Spring 2002

Cooper, Rand Richards.
"COMMITTED : 'American Psycho' & 'High Fidelity'.(Review)." Commonweal 127.10 (May 19, 2000): 21.

Dupre, Anne P.
"Violence, Depravity, and the Movies: The Lure of Deviancy." USA Today (Magazine) Jan 1999 v127 i2644 p54(1) (1748 words)
"Violence and depravity in motion pictures have a dangerous ability to inspire copycat crimes. Movies are protected as free speech by the First Amendment, but a film version of the book 'American Psycho' would test this protection. Audiences must make moral choices regarding their decisions to view violent films and TV shows." [Expanded Academic Index]

Eldridge, David
"The Generic American Psycho." Journal of American Studies; Apr2008, Vol. 42 Issue 1, p19-33, 15p
UC users only

Ferenz, Volker.
"Fight Clubs, American Psychos, and Mementos." New Review of Film & Television Studies, Nov2005, Vol. 3 Issue 2, p133-159, 27p
UC users only

Freccero, Carla.
"Historical Violence, Censorship, and the Serial Killer: The Case of American Psycho." Diacritics 27.2 (1997) 44-58
UC users only
UC users only
Bret Easton Ellis's "American Psycho" has been condemned for both lacking depth and lacking a moral framework. The book provides no explanation for why the main character is a serial killer and therefore provides no cause of evil. Americans' fascination with serial killers allows them to address violence in an individual instead of being overwhelmed with the violence in American society. Therefore, the lack of an explanation for Ellis's character does not fill the fascination and just returns the reader to the violence in society.

Harron, Mary Harron; Sipe, Jeff Sipe
"Blood symbol." ('American Psycho', Sight and Sound July 1999 v9 i7 p8(3)
UC users only
"'American Psycho' is to go on general release in the US in winter 1999. The film is based on Brett Easton Ellis' book of the same name, focusing on the humour and satire and avoiding much of its violence. Torture scenes and the inappropriate use of dead bodies portrayed in the book have been omitted. Mary Harron directs the film and Christian Bale stars as the misogynist murderer." [Expanded Academic Index]

Harron, Mary
"The risky territory of 'American Pscho.'" (director of the new film discusses the controversy surrounding Bret Easton Ellis's book, and the film) The New York Times April 9, 2000 pAR13(N) pAR13(L) col 1 (20 col in)

Holden, Stephen
"Murderer! Fiend! (But well dressed)." (Review) The New York Times April 14, 2000 pB1(L) pE1 col 1 (35 col in)

James, Caryn
"Now starring, killers for the chiller 90's." (serial killers depicted in film, theater, fiction) The New York Times March 10, 1991 v140 s2 pH1(N) pH1(L) col 1 (57 col in)

James, Nick
"Sick city boy." ('American Psycho,' motion picture) Sight and Sound May 2000 v10 i5 p22(3)
UC users only

James, Nick
"Sick City Boy." In: Film/literature/heritage / edited by Ginette Vincendeau. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
Main Stack PN1995.3.F54 2001
PFA PN1995.3.F44 2001

Kauffman, Linda S.
"American Psycho.(Review)." Film Quarterly 54.2 (Winter 2000): 41.

Kelly, Alison M.
"I'm Nobody! Who Are You?': Horror through Anonymity in American Psycho." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, vol. 22, no. 1-2, pp. 28-33, March 2002.

Kilbourn, Russell J. A.
"American Frankenstein: Modernity's Monstrous Progeny" Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 167-84, September 2005.

Knight, Deborah and McKnight, George
"American psycho: horror, satire, aesthetics, and identification." In: Dark thoughts: philosophic reflections on cinematic horror
Edited by Steven Jay Schneider, Daniel Shaw. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 2003.
MAIN: PN1995.9.H6 D27 2003

Kooijman, Jaap; Laine, Tarja
"American Psycho: A Double Portrait of Serial Yuppie Patrick Bateman." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 46-56, Summer 2003.
UC users only
"Kooijman and Laine analyze Mary Harron's "hitAmerican hitPsycho," a 2000 film adaptation of the 1980s satirical novel by Bret Easton Ellis in which Patrick Bateman, a narcissistic Wall Street young urban professional ("yuppie"), assumes an alternate identity as a serial killer. The authors examine the double personas of the Bateman character and in particular focus on how the film's depiction of Bateman reveals that his identity as a serial killer is a hallucinatory construction, which therefore suggests that his identity as a yuppie is a construction as well. Several scenes from "hitAmerican hitPsycho" are dissected, and psychoanalytic theory is applied to scenes where the schizophrenic Bateman character responds to his mirror image as a unifying force." [IIPA]

Lane, Anthony
"American Psycho." (movie review) The New Yorker April 17, 2000 v76 i8 p124(2)

Lee, Charles Jason
"Wall Street Jekyll: Identity and Meaningless Pleasure in American Psycho(s)." Film International, vol. 5, no. 17, pp. 22-27, 2005.
UC users only

Porton, Richard
"American Psycho." (movie review) Cineaste Summer 2000 v25 i3 p43 (1802 words)
UC users only

Rayns, Tony.
"American Psycho.(Review)." Sight and Sound 10.5 (May 2000): 42(1).

Robinson, David.
"The unattainable narrative: identity, consumerism and the slasher film in Mary Harron's American Psycho." CineAction 68 (Wntr 2006): 26(10).
UC users only

Rogers, Martin.
"Video Nasties and the Monstrous Bodies of American Psycho." Literature Film Quarterly, 2011, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p231-244, 14p
UC users only

Romney, Jonathan
"Retro psycho." (Review)_(movie review) New Statesman (1996) April 24, 2000 v129 i4483 p46 (917 words)

Schneider, Steven Jay
"I Guess I'm a Pretty Sick Guy': Reconciling Remorse in Thérèse Raquin and American Psycho." Excavatio: Emile Zola and Naturalism, vol. 17, no. 1-2, pp. 421-32, 2002.

Sipe, Jeff.
"Blood symbol.('American Psycho', Mary Harron)." Sight and Sound 9.7 (July 1999): 8(3).
"'American Psycho' is to go on general release in the US in winter 1999. The film is based on Brett Easton Ellis' book of the same name, focusing on the humour and satire and avoiding much of its violence. Torture scenes and the inappropriate use of dead bodies portrayed in the book have been omitted. Mary Harron directs the film and Christian Bale stars as the misogynist murderer." [Expanded Academic Index]

Smith, Gavin
"American psycho." Film Comment XXXVI:2 (Mar-Apr 2000)
UC users only

Spence, Sean A.
"American Psycho.(Review)." British Medical Journal 320.7245 (May 13, 2000): 1347.
UC users only

Stuart, Jan
"The chic and the dead." (movie review)_(movie review) The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) April 25, 2000 p69 (621 words)
UC users only

Tylim, Issac
"American Psycho: Malignant narcissism on the screen." Psychoanalytic Psychology. Vol 18(4), Fal 2001, pp. 737-742

Weber, Bruce
"Digging out the humor in a serial killer's tale." (on the set with "American Psycho") The New York Times April 4, 1999 s2 pAR11(N) pAR11(L) col 1 (14 col in)


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