David Cronenberg:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal articles

Articles and Books on Individual films

Books

Badley, Linda
"David Cronenberg's anatomy lessons." In: Film, horror, and the body fantastic / Linda Badley. p. 125-36. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1995. Contributions to the study of popular culture ; no. 48.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.B24 1995
Moffitt PN1995.9.H6.B24 1995
Contents via Google books

Beard, William
The artist as monster: the cinema of David Cronenberg Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2006.
MAIN: PN1998.3.C75 B43 2006
PFA : PN1998.3.C76 B43 2006
UCB Main PN1998.3.C75 B43 2001 [earlier edition]
Contents (via Google Books)

Breskin, David.
"David Cronenberg." In: Inner views : filmmakers in conversation / David Breskin. Expanded ed. New York : Da Capo Press, 1997.
Moffitt PN1998.2.B74 1997

Browning, Mark
David Cronenberg : author or film-maker? Bristol : Intellect Books ; Chicago : Intellect, The University of Chicago Books, 2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
MAIN: PN1998.3.C75 B76 2007

Campbell, Mary B.
"Biological Alchemy and the Films of David Cronenberg." In: Planks of Reason: Essays on the Horror Film / edited by Barry Keith Grant. pp: 307-320. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1984.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.P56 1984
Moffitt PN1995.9.H6.P56 1984

Canova, Gianni.
David Cronenberg / Gianni Canova. Milano : Editrice Il Castoro, 2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C75 C36 2000

Cronenberg, David.
Cronenberg on Cronenberg / edited by Chris Rodley. Rev. ed. London: Faber and Faber, 1997.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C76 A3 1997

Cronenberg, David
Cronenberg on Cronenberg / edited by Chris Rodley. Rev. ed. London: Boston: Faber and Faber, 1993.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C76 A3 1993

Cronenberg, David
David Cronenberg : entretiens avec Serge Grunberg. [Paris] : Cahiers du cinéma, c2000.
MAIN: PN1998.3.C76 A3 2000

De Lauretis, Teresa.
Théorie queer et cultures populaires : de Foucault à Cronenberg Paris : La Dispute, 2007.
MAIN: PN56.F46 D42 2007;

Emery, Robert J.
"The films of David Cronenberg." In: The directors : take four / Robert J. Emery. New York : Allworth Press, c2003.
Main Stack PN1998.2.E496 2003

Freeland, Cynthia A.
"Feminist Frameworks for Horror Films." In: Post-theory: reconstructing film studies / edited by David Bordwell and Noel Carroll. pp: 195-218 Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, c1996. Wisconsin studies in film.
Main Stack PN1994.P6565 1996

Hantke, S.
"Spectacular Optics: The Deployment of Special Effects in David Cronenberg's Films." Film Criticism v. 29 no. 2 (Winter 2004/2005) p. 34-52
UC users only
"The consistencies within David Cronenberg's visual staging of special effects are part of his directorial signature. As one of the outstanding members of the post-1960s generation of horror directors, Cronenberg has made films that are often remembered for their special effects scenes. The representation of what Elizabeth Bronfen calls "the disease of mortality in the register of the body" has been Cronenberg's contribution to a strikingly postmodern concept of the self suspended between dystopian loathing and utopian transcendence of embodiment. Despite this, little attention has been paid to Cronenberg's deployment of the special effects that often constitute the signature scenes or shots of his films--his reputation as an auteurist filmmaker resting more on the consistency of his thematic and narrative preoccupations than on the recognition of a unique and consistent style. The writer goes on to provide a stylistic analysis of a selection of special effects-driven scenes from Cronenberg's films."

Hurley, Kelly
"Reading like an alien: posthuman identity in Ridley Scott's Alien and David Cronenberg's Rabid." In: Posthuman bodies / edited by Judith Halberstam and Ira Livingston. pp. 203-24. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c1995. Series title: Unnatural acts.
UCB Main GT495 .P67 1995

Kauffman, Linda S.
"David Cronenberg's surreal abjection." In: Kauffman, Linda S. Bad girls and sick boys: fantasies in contemporary art and culture / Linda S. Kauffman. p. 115-45. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, c1998.
Main Stack NX650.H74.K38 1998

Mathijs, Ernest.
The cinema of David Cronenberg : from baron of blood to cultural hero / Ernest Mathijs. London ; New York : Wallflower Press, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C75 M38 2008

McLarty, Lianne.
"'Beyond the Veil of the Flesh': Cronenberg and the Disembodiment of Horror." In: The dread of difference: gender and the horror film / edited by Barry Keith Grant. pp: 231-52. 1st ed. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1996. Texas film studies series.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.D74 1996

The modern fantastic: the films of David Cronenberg /
Edited by Michael Grant. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2000.
UCB MainPN1998.3.C75 M63 2000

Oren, Michel
"The grotesque in the films of David Cronenberg." Exposure v. 31 no. 3/4 (1998) p. 5-12
"Part of a special issue on the grotesque in photography. The writer discusses the grotesque as explored in the films of David Cronenberg. He asserts that although various critics have enthused over the gothic qualities of Cronenberg's films, in fact his films participate in many of the cognate categories to which notions of the grotesque are attached, including the abject, the uncanny, and pollution. He discusses a number of Cronenberg's films, noting the boundary or fissure that separates his films from the gothic. He argues that the grotesque explains the peculiar political ambiguity of his somewhat old-fashioned modernist films and that the energy behind the grotesque is a kind of vital or vitalist force, vitalism being the theory that some vital force activates the body. He maintains that the grotesque has been a liminal and transitional category in Cronenberg's films." [Art Index]

Parker, Andrew.
"Grafting David Cronenberg: Monstrosity, AIDS Media, National/Sexual Difference." In: Media spectacles / edited by Marjorie Garber, Jann Matlock & Rebecca L. Walkowitz. pp: 209-31 New York: Routledge, 1993.
Main Stack P92.U5.M444 1993
MoffittP92.U5.M444 1993

Pompon, Géraldine.
David Cronenberg : la beauté du chaos / Géraldine Pompon et Pierre Véronneau. Paris : Éditions du Cerf, 2003. Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C75 P66 2003

Royer, Carl.
"The darkness is not the devil : atheism and "the death of affect" in the films of David Cronenberg." In: The spectacle of isolation in horror films : dark parades New York : Haworth Press, c2005.
Main Stack PN1995.9.H6.R69 2005

Russo, Mary J.
The female grotesque : risk, excess and modernity / Mary Russo. New York : Routledge, c1995.
Main Stack PN56.G7.R87 1995
MoffittPN56.G7.R87 1995

The Shape of rage: the films of David Cronenberg
Edited by Piers Handling]. Toronto, Canada: General Pub. Co.; New York, U.S.A.: New York Zoetrope, 1983.
UCB MainPN1998.A3 C79325 1983
UCB Moffitt PN1998.A3C79325

Shaviro, Steven.
"Bodies of Fear: David Cronenberg." In: The cinematic body / Steven Shaviro. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1993.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .S484 1993)

Sterritt, David.
"David Cronenberg comes of age." In: Guiltless pleasures : a David Sterritt film reader. 1st ed. Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2005.
PFA PN1994.S816 2005

Tirard, Laurent
"Dream weavers. Pedro Almodovar. Tim Burton. David Cronenberg. Jean-Pierre Jeunet. David Lynch." In: Moviemakers' master class : private lessons from the world's foremost directors / Laurent Tirard. 1st ed. New York : Faber and Faber, 2002.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P7.T495 2002
Moffitt PN1995.9.P7.T495 2002

Journal Articles

Beard, William.
"The Canadianness of David Cronenberg." Mosaic 1994 June, 27:2, 113-33.
UC users only
"Filmmaker David Cronenberg has gained an idenity as a prominent Canadian artist through works such as 'Naked Lunch' and 'The Fly.' Cronenberg's films are characterized by a conflict against nature and the sense of omniscnience and control in his protagonists as well as a sense of restraint that differs from the gory depictions that are common in US films. Cronenberg's films also portray isolation, stasis, alienation and powerlessnes using the horror-film genre." [Magazine Index]

Bouruet-Aubertot, Veronique David
"Cronenberg: le prophete du gore." Beaux Arts Magazine no198 Nov 2000. p. 56-9
An interview with filmmaker David Cronenberg on the occasion of a retrospective of his work at the Cinema l'Arlequin, Paris, from November 15 through December 5, 2000. Subjects discussed include his early involvement in the avant-garde scene of the 1960s, his reasons for preferring science-fiction over other genres, and the influence of painter Francis Bacon on his work.

Breskin, David.
"David Cronenberg: the Rolling Stone interview." (Interview)Rolling Stone, n623 (Feb 6, 1992):66 (6 pages).
Director David Cronenberg discusses his films, including 'The Fly,' 'The Brood,' 'The Dead Zone,' and 'Dead Ringers.' He also details work on his latest, the film version of William S. Burroughs's 'Naked Lunch.'.

Bruyn, Olivier De; Ciment, Michel; Vachaud, Laurent
"David Cronenberg." Positif; nr.458 (Apr 1999); p.12-20
Incl. review of the film which marks David Cronenberg's return to the fantasy genre, followed by an interview with the director who talks about the virtual universe created in his film by the characters, the language and the design.

Burdeau, Emmanuel
"La difference entre Cronenberg." Cahiers du Cinema no534 Apr 1999. p. 66
The work of filmmaker David Cronenberg is discussed. Since The Fly, the strange and fantastic in Cronenberg's films are no longer represented as an experience of separations and dysfunctions; they are conveyed through his development of a technique that includes filming head-on something that is askew and taking a direct approach to something that is essentially indirect. Bunuel may be the only other filmmaker who has evoked strangeness in such an obvious, instantaneous, and quietly comical way.

Carroll, Michael Thomas.
"The Bloody Spectacle: Mishima, The Sacred Heart, Hogarth, Cronenberg, and the Entrails of Culture." Studies in Popular Culture, 1993, 15:2, 43-56.

Cazals, Thierry; Tesson, Charles
"Quelque chose qui n'a jamais existe." (interview)Cahiers du Cinema no391 Jan 1987. p. 28-30

Celeste, Reni.
"In the web with David Cronenberg: Spider and the new auteurism.(Cover Story)." CineAction 65 (Wntr 2005): 2(4).

Charney, Mark.
"Creating a New Reality: Cronenberg on Cronenberg." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2, 70-74.

Chaudhuri, Shohini.
"Witnessing Death: Ballard's and Cronenberg's Crash." Strategies: Journal of Theory, Culture & Politics, May2001, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p63-75, 13p
UC users only

Chute, David
"David Cronenberg- he came from within." Film Comment v 16 Mar/Apr 1980. p. 36-9+
Discusses the themes and ideological implications of Canadian writer-director David Cronenberg's films.

Collins, Michael J.
"Medicine, Surrealism, Lust, Anger, and Death: Three Early Films by David Cronenberg." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2, 62-69.

"Cronenberg, David." (director and filmmaker) Current Biography v53, n5 (May, 1992):17 (5 pages).
David Cronenberg has established a name in the horror and science fiction genres of motion picture. Cronenberg, born in Canada on May 15, 1943, was honored by the National Association of Film Critics for his work on 'Naked Lunch.' His other works include 'Scanners' and 'Dead Ringers.'.

Genosko, Gary
"Monster mash." Border Crossings v 20 no2 May 2001. p. 18-19
"A review of "Hommage a David Cronenberg," an exhibition at the Centre Culturel Canadien in Paris, from November 2000 to January 2001. Intended as a tribute to film director David Cronenberg, this show raises questions that touch on the general problem of how to represent film in plastic form without making static its basic temporality and movement. Stills and posters make up the bulk of the show's meager offering of largely incidental material. The truly gruesome objects from his films, such as the gynecological implements from Dead Ringers and the teleporter from The Fly, are not included." [Art Abstracts]

Grace, Dominick M.
"From Videodrome to Virtual Light: David Cronenberg and William Gibson." Extrapolation: A Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy. 44 (3): 344-55. 2003 Fall.
UC users only

Haas, Robert (ed.)
"David Cronenberg." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2.
"The films of David Cronenberg are approached by critics from many angles, each focusing on a different aspect of the director. The article, an introduction to a special issue on D.C., explores the wide range of themes in his work: a postmodernist depiction of the monster, a fascination with the idea of the cyborg, eclectic literary allusions, and the philosophical concept of a mind-body split (exemplified by his remake of "The fly")." [FIAF]

Haas, Robert
"Introduction: The Cronenberg Monster: Literature, Science, and Psychology in the Cinema Of Horror." Post Script, Winter/Spring96, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p3-10, 9p

Haas, Robert .
"David Cronenberg Filmography." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2, 75-78.

Haas, Robert
"Introduction: The Cronenberg Monster: Literature, Science and Psychology in the Cinema of Horror." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2, 3-10.

Hantke, Steffen.
"Spectacular optics: the deployment of special effects in David Cronenberg's films.(Critical Essay)." Film Criticism 29.2 (Winter 2004): 34(19).
UC users only

Heldreth, Leonard-G.
"Festering in Thebes: Elements of Tragedy and Myth in Cronenberg's Films." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2, 46-61.
"Draws attention to the often neglected elements in the work of David Cronenberg which are inspired by classical myth and tragedy; focuses on "Scanners", "Videodrome", "The fly" and "Dead ringers"." [FIAF]

Hickenlooper, George.
"The Primal Energies of the Horror Film: An Interview with David Cronenberg."Cineaste 1989, 17:2, 4-7.

"Insides Out: David Cronenberg's dark parables of flesh and fantasy have made him Canada's most original, notorious filmmaker." (The Arts/Cinema) Time International v153, n15 (April 19, 1999):52+ (1 page).
"Movie director David Cronenberg lives in Toronto, Canada, and he also insists on making his films there. Cronenberg's films concentrate on the human body and the many facets and aspects of the human body. Cronenberg's movies, when looked at as a totality, have a coherent vision, although the gore of his films can make the vision hard to see." [Magazine Index]

Hill, Logan
"Influences."New York. New York: Oct 3, 2005. Vol. 38, Iss. 34; p. 78 (1 page)

Johnson, Brian D.
"A director's obsession." (profile of filmmaker David Cronenberg) (Special Report)Maclean's v106, n37 (Sept 13, 1993):38 (4 pages).
Cronenberg, a successful Canadian film director, has just released his latest film 'M. Butterfly' at the Montreal World Film Festival. Cronenberg likes to explore unusual or aberrant behavior in his films. He directed the films 'The Fly' and 'Naked Lunch.'.

Johnson, Brian D.
"Directing on the edge." (profile of Canadian film director David Cronenberg) World Press Review Nov 1993 v40 n11 p49(1)
"Cronenberg attracted a cult following for some of his previous films such as 'The Fly' and 'Naked Lunch,' and he is known for depicting alternative realities and strange or macabre themes. His new film 'M. Butterfly' explores the ambiguity of sexual identity." [Expanded Academic Index]

Joyard, Olivier; Tesson, Charles
"L'aventure interieure: entretien avec David Cronenberg." [Interview] Cahiers du Cinema no534 Apr 1999. p. 67-71+
An interview with American filmmaker David Cronenberg on the occasion of the release of his latest film, eXistenZ. Topics discussed include the reception given to the film at the Berlin film festival, the process of writing the screenplay, the use of special effects in the film, and the acting qualities of the principal actors, Jude Law and Jennifer Jason Leigh.

Kermode, Mark
"David Cronenberg: interview and filmography." Sight and Sound v 1 Mar 1992. p. 11-13

Livingston, Ira.
"The Traffic in Leeches: David Cronenberg's Rabid and the Semiotics of Parasitism." American-Imago 1993 Winter, 50:4, 515-33.

Loredo,, Jose-Carlos, Jorge Castro, Belen Jimenez, and Ivan Sanchez.
""New Flesh" and psychology: The example of Cronenberg' cinema." Estudios de Psicología 26.2 (June 2005): 271(13).
"A psychological analysis of David Cronenberg's films is undertaken in the paper. Two different points of view are adopted: a) conceptual, in which we consider that it is possible to define psychology within a specific category system, and that it may incorporate into its statements the results of analysing different types of artistic or cultural phenomena; and b) thematic: in which "new flesh" (referring to an aesthetic expression based on the transformation of the human body that normally occurs from fusing organism and matter ?in most cases, technologically?) is the central concept in Cronenberg's films. More specifically, we have approached Cronenberg's theory of the subject through his concepts of 'body' and 'new flesh', taken as a psycho-physiological way of overcoming the classic idea of subjectivity ?the dualist structure that distinguishes between mind and body." [Expanded Academic Index]

Lowenstein, Adam
"Canadian horror made flesh: contextualizing David Cronenberg." Post Script; Vol.XVIII nr.2 (Winter-Spring 1999); p.37-51
Critical analysis of the work of Cronenberg.
UC users only

Lucas, Timothy R.
"David Cronenberg: A Postscript." The Vladimir Nabokov Research Newsletter, 1981 Fall, 7, 10-15.

Mathijs, Ernest.
"AIDS References in the Critical Reception of David Cronenberg: 'It May Not Be Such a Bad Disease after All'." Cinema Journal. 42(4):29-45. 2003
UC users only

O'Pray, Michael
"Fatal knowledge: damaged men are at the heart of David Cronenberg's films." Sight and Sound v 1 Mar 1992. p. 10-11

Oren, Michel
"The grotesque in the films of David Cronenberg Exposure v 31 no3/4 1998. p. 5-12
"Part of a special issue on the grotesque in photography. The writer discusses the grotesque as explored in the films of David Cronenberg. He asserts that although various critics have enthused over the gothic qualities of Cronenberg's films, in fact his films participate in many of the cognate categories to which notions of the grotesque are attached, including the abject, the uncanny, and pollution. He discusses a number of Cronenberg's films, noting the boundary or fissure that separates his films from the gothic. He argues that the grotesque explains the peculiar political ambiguity of his somewhat old-fashioned modernist films and that the energy behind the grotesque is a kind of vital or vitalist force, vitalism being the theory that some vital force activates the body. He maintains that the grotesque has been a liminal and transitional category in Cronenberg's films." [Art Abstracts]

Peck, Agnès
"L'aube malade du cinéma." Positif; nr.371 (Jan 1992); p.56-58
Investigates the strain of interior horror in the films of Lynch and Cronenberg

Pharr, Mary; Haas, Lynda.
"Somatic Ideas: Cronenberg and the Feminine." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2, 29-39.
"The authors consider whether David Cronenberg's treatment of women could be counted as feminist or misogynist, focusing on four films: "Videodrome", "The fly", "Dead ringers" and "Naked lunch"."

Porton, Richard.
"The Film Director as Philosopher: An Interview with David Cronenberg." Cineaste 1999, 24:4, 4-9.
UC users only
"In an interview, film director David Cronenberg discusses his work. Cronenberg's viscerally aggressive films investigate irrationality and often stomach-churning violence with calm and rational detachment. They emphasize what is often called "body horror," with the heroes and villains representing the inner demons spawned by sexual anxiety and modern technology. His latest film, eXistenZ, recapitulates many of his favorite themes. Cronenberg discusses several topics in the interview, including the relationship of eXistenZ to the Salman Rushdie affair; the film's very self-conscious, playful humor; its use of tangible props instead of the usual blue screen used for sci-fi special effects; and the continuation in eXistenZ of some themes concerning technology and the body developed in his earlier films. He also comments on the controversy that surrounded the reception of his previous film Crash in England and the U.S." [Art Abstracts]

Ramasse, François; Ciment, Michel; Eyquem, Olivier
"La chair dans l'âme. Entretien avec David Cronenberg. Filmographie de David Cronenberg." Positif; nr.337 (Mar 1989); p.28-47
D.C. speaks of his early work, as well as his most recent film "Dead ringers".

Ramsay, Christine.
"Dead queers: one legacy of the trope of "mind over matter" in the films of David Cronenberg." Canadian Journal of Film Studies, 1999, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p45-62, 18p

Roche, David.
"David Cronenberg's having to make the word be flesh." Post Script 23.2 (Wntr-Spring 2004): 72(16).
UC users only

Rouyer, Philippe; Garsault, Alain
"Incubation: les premiers films de Cronenberg. Corps: substance solide et palpable." Positif; nr.359 (Jan 1991); p.21-30
Reappraisal of the early films by David Cronenberg, plus an examination of his treatment of the body.

Sausset, Damien
"L'oeil de David Cronenberg: un cineaste en quete d'identite." L'Oeil (Lausanne, Switzerland) no524 Mar 2001. p. 8-9
An interview with Canadian filmmaker David Cronenberg. Subjects discussed include Canadian culture, the idea of reality, metamorphosis and the human body, underground filmmaking, European cinema, Hollywood studios, and the Internet.

Sharrett, Christopher.
"Myth and ritual in the post-industrial landscape: the horror films of David Cronenberg." Persistence of Vision; SO: nr.3-4 (Summer 1986); p.111-130
Examines the elements of myth and apocalypse in his films.

Sharrett, Christopher.
"The Shape of Rage: The Films of David Cronenberg." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 1984 Winter, 11:4, 172-174.

Sausset, Damien
"L'oeil de David Cronenberg: un cineaste en quete d'identite." L'Oeil (Lausanne, Switzerland) no524 Mar 2001. p. 8-9
"An interview with Canadian filmmaker David Cronenberg. Subjects discussed include Canadian culture, the idea of reality, metamorphosis and the human body, underground filmmaking, European cinema, Hollywood studios, and the Internet."

Shaviro, Steven.
"Bodies of Fear: David Cronenberg." In: The cinematic body Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1993.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
GRDS: PN1995 .S484 1993; Non-circulating; may be used only in Graduate Services.
MAIN: PN1995 .S484 1993

Simon, Adam.
"The existential deal: an interview with David Cronenberg." Critical Quarterly Autumn 2001 v43 i3 p34(23)
UC users only
David Cronenberg feels images in horror films demonstrate the principle that reality is a construct, and that censors mistake fantasy for reality. He resists political meanings being drawn from his films but makes them disturbing and revolutionary.

Stanbrook, Alan.
"Cronenberg's creative cancers." (Alan Stanbrook on a theory of evolutionary illness in the horror films of David Cronenberg) Sight and Sound v58, n1 (Winter, 1988):54 (3 pages).

Sutton, Martin Schlock! Horror!
"The films of David Cronenberg." Films and Filming no337 Oct 1982. p. 15-21

Testa, Bart.
"Technology's Body: Cronenberg, Genre, and the Canadian Ethos."Post-Script 1995 Fall, 15:1, 38-56.
"By conveniently pigeonholing David Cronenberg as a director of horror films, critics are able to avoid discussing the specifically Canadian content of his work." [FIAF]

Books and Articles About Individual Films

Crash

Alleva, Richard.
"Crash."(movie reviews)Commonweal v124, n8 (April 25, 1997):19 (2 pages).
UC users only

Barker, Martin.
"Crash, theatre audiences, and the idea of 'liveness'." Studies in Theatre & Performance, 2003, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p21-39, 19p

Barker, Martin.
"Crashing Out." Screen, Spring2002, Vol. 43 Issue 1, p74-78, 5p
UC users only

Battestini, Paul-Marie.
Pensée d'un corps, pense d'une peau-- : Crash de David Cronenberg Paris : Dreamland editeur, c2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.C75 B38 2002

Botting, Fred; Wilson, Scott.
"Automatic Lover." Screen, 1998 Summer, 39:2, 186-92.
UC users only
"The writer discusses David Cronenberg's film Crash. Based on J. G. Ballard's novel and set in Canada, the film deals with the injunction to and extinction of sexual desire in which the car serves as a sex aid. However, the film refuses to elicit or simulate the sensational and spectacular effects that the viewer would expect of a film that draws a parallel between sex and car crashes: Driving, work, sex, and pleasure have become hyperhomogenized into the same productive-consumptive economy." [Art Abstracts]

Bouquet, Stephane
"Crash." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinéma no504 July/Aug 1996. p. 24-5

Boyne, Roy.
"Crash Theory: the ubiquity of the fetish at the end of time." Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Sep99, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p41, 12p
UC users only

Brottman, Mikita; Sharrett, Christopher.
"The End of the Road David Cronenberg's Crash and the Fading of the West." Literature Film Quarterly, 2002, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p126, 7p
UC users only

Camblor, Manuel.
"Death Drive's Joy Ride: David Cronenberg's Crash." Other Voices: A Journal of Critical Thought (no pagination)

Chaudhuri, Shohini.
"Witnessing Death: Ballard's and Cronenberg's Crash." Strategies: Journal of Theory, Culture & Politics, May2001, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p63-75, 13p
UC users only

"Cleared: David Cronenberg."(the British Board of Film Classification ruled that Cronenberg's film 'Crash' is disturbing but not obscene)(Passages)(Brief Article)Maclean's v110, n13 (March 31, 1997):15 (1 page).

Corliss, Richard.
"Crash." (movie reviews) Time v149, n12 (March 24, 1997):88 (1 page).
UC users only

Cornea, Christine.
"David Cronenberg's Crash and Performing Cyborgs." Velvet Light Trap. 52:4-14. 2003 Fall
UC users only

Craven, Roberta Jill.
"Ironic Empathy in Cronenberg's Crash: The Psychodynamics of Postmodern Displacement from a Tenuous Reality." Quarterly Review of Film and-Video, 2000 Oct, 17:3, 187-209.
UC users only
"Crash, a film directed by David Cronenberg, explores the problematic relation of humans to technology and the media. The film presents viewers with a technologically intense, fast-paced urban environment in which a television-commercial director, who has experienced a head-on collision, is drawn into a group of people, who are sexually obsessed with car crashes and their visible effects on the body. In Crash, however, all interactions, even the most private, have been preprogrammed already by the media: Significantly, the characters re-create crashes that have become legendary through their connection to the media. The film adopts a removed, observational, ironic stance that establishes a parallel between the audience and characters, who both experience the frigidity of their intimate exclusion amidst a swell of humanity. Indeed, it is because of their inability to identify with the characters that viewers grasp the general emotional trauma of the characters's ituations through their own viewing experience." [Art Abstracts]

Creed, Barbara.
"The Crash Debate: Anal Wounds, Metallic Kisses." Screen, 8QQ, Scotland (Screen). 1998 Summer, 39:2, 175-79.
UC users only
"The writer discusses David Cronenberg's 1996 film Crash. Based on the novel by J. G. Ballard, Crash powerfully and with conviction explores the link established between desire, sex, and accidental death, death coming from a sudden, out-of-control crash in which all systems suffer meltdown. It features a range of sex scenes, including a scene depicting two crash victims copulating in a car, and also presents two homosexual encounters: The male encounter develops logically from previous events, but the lesbian encounter occurs gratuitously. In this film, woman's desires mingle with those of the man/car, but the opposite is not the case; there is no corresponding scene in which man takes the place of woman for another woman. The film therefore speaks male--not female--desire; its subject matter is confrontational, but its sexual politics are phallocentric." [Art Abstracts]

Denby, David.
"Crash." (motion picture review) New York v30, n12 (March 31, 1997):81 (2 pages).

Dick, Leslie
"Crash." (motion picture review) Sight and Sound ns7 June 1997. p. 48-9
"David Cronenberg's Crash, adapted from J. G. Ballard's novel of the same name, takes a cool, detached look at sexual obsession. The film's subject is the intersection of bodies, technology, and medicine, with the cars standing in for modern society, becoming sheer representations of the death drive. It is witty, disturbing, and dispassionate work." [Art Abstracts]

Golfman, Noreen.
"Crash." (movie reviews) Canadian Forum v75, n855 (Dec, 1996):27 (2 pages).

Grant, Michael.
"Crimes of the Future." Screen 1998 Summer, 39:2, 180-85.
"The writer discusses David Cronenberg's film Crash. He maintains that what is crucial to Crash is the effort of imagination involved in apprehending it, an effort that is inseparable from what the viewer will almost certainly experience as an inexorable movement toward failure and death. He contends that modernist poetry has a complex duration and explains that in Cronenberg, this sense of complex duration is inseparable from his sense of mortality and the transformation of the body, resulting, in the case of Crash, in a narrative that explores the limits of what causes it. He concludes that in no other film has the integrity of Cronenberg's vision been so totally sustained or his cinematic authority so absolutely accomplished." [Art Abstracts]

Grant, Michael.
"Crimes of the Future." Screen, 1998, Vol. 39 Issue 2, p180-185, 6p
UC users only

Grant, Michael.
"An image of cinema: style and extremity in David Cronenberg's crash." International Journal of Canadian Studies 29 (Spring 2004): 161(19).

Gray, John
"Crash: David Cronenberg's Post Mortem on J G Ballard's "Trajectory of Fate." (Review) New Statesman (1996) May 10, 1999 v128 i4435 p41(2)
UC users only

Grunberg, Serge
"Crash." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no504 July/Aug 1996. p. 22-3

Grunberg, Serge
"Entretien avec David Cronenberg." Cahiers du Cinema no504 July/Aug 1996. p. 26-30

Grunberg, Serge
"Rencontre avec James G. Ballard." (Augmented title: author of Crash, novel adapted by film director David Cronenberg; interview) Cahiers du Cinema no504 July/Aug 1996. p. 31-2

Gundman, Roy.
"Plight of the Crash Fest Mummies: David Cronenberg's Crash."Cineaste 1997, 22:4, 24-27.
UC users only
"The writer discusses David Cronenberg's film Crash. An adaptation of a book by J.G. Ballard, Crash is a film that portrays a subculture of crash survivors obsessed with cars and collisions. The film, like the book, is concerned with the outer limits of sex, technology, and human existence. The film would seem to strengthen the book's broader view of experimentation and validate its search for new sexual frontiers. However, in its portrayal of a sexual encounter between two male characters, the film is less explicit than in its depiction of a sexual encounter between two female characters, a scene that is not in the book and is treated in such a way as to cater for straight male fantasy. Despite the film industry's labeling of the film as "morally reprehensible," it does pander to conventional male phallicism: Both in the book and the film, the central male protagonist is always the penetrator and never the penetrated." [Art Abstracts]

Harpold, Terry. ,
"Dry leatherette: Cronenberg's Crash." Postmodern Culture - Volume 7, Issue 3 1997 - Review
UC Users Only

Holt, Linda.
"Crash."(movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4916 (June 20, 1997):21 (1 page).

Huisman, Mark J.
"Crash."(movie reviews) Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), n730 (April 1, 1997):72 (1 page).
UC users only

Hultkrans, Andrew
"Body work." (Augmented title: interview with J. G. Ballard and David Cronenberg) Artforum International v 35 Mar 1997. p. 76-81+
"In an interview, J. G. Ballard and David Cronenberg discuss Crash, the novel and the film. Among other topics, Ballard discusses the continuing influence of his two years of medical training on his fiction, his childhood in Shanghai and experiences during the war, and the controversy the film caused when shown in Britain. Topics Cronenberg discusses include his reasons for wanting to film Ballard's novel, his own relationship with cars as an amateur racing driver, and his response to the sometimes hostile reaction the film generated in Britain." [Art Abstracts]

Johnson, Brian D.
"Crash." (movie reviews)Maclean's v109, n41 (Oct 7, 1996):74 (1 page).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Auto eroticism: Cronenberg's sex-driven "Crash" shakes up the film festival." (David Cronenberg; Cannes film festival)(Films) Maclean's v109, n22 (May 27, 1996):50 (3 pages).
UC users only
'Crash' made its debut at the 1996 Cannes Film Festival and caused a great deal of controversy. Some of the audience thought it was innovative and challenging, while others thought it bordered on pornography and they booed the film.

Johnson-Eilola, Johndan.
"Fucking in the Wreckage: After Postmodernism." JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Spring2002, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p433-439, 7p

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Crash."(movie reviews)New Republic v216, n16 (April 21, 1997):26 (2 pages).
UC users only

Kelly, Brendan.
"'Crash' makes splash." (controversial film by David Cronenberg)(Mifed '96) Variety v364, n12 (Oct 21, 1996):M10 (2 pages).
Cronenberg's latest movie, 'Crash,' has managed to become a popular sell to foreign independent film distributors, despite the film's controversial nature. Films that are of a sexually explicit nature are usually difficult to sell to foreign markets, but 'Crash' has defied such conventions.

Kermode, Mark; Petley, Julian.
"Road Rage." Sight and Sound, 1997 June, 7:6, 16-18.
"A discussion of the British press campaign to ban David Cronenberg's new film, Crash. Based on the J. G. Ballard novel of the same name, the film delves into an autoerotic subculture in which the cult of the car crash reigns supreme. The press campaign against the film began with a review of the film by Alexander Walker in the Evening Standard of June 3, 1996. Later in the year, the Daily Mail attacked the BBFC who had passed the film and lobbied individual councils to ban the film. Regardless of the BBFC's decision to pass the film uncut, it remains unclear how many local councils will allow the film to be shown within their jurisdiction." [Art Abstracts]

Kermode, Mark; Petley, Julian.
"'Crash' course." Sight & Sound; Vol.VII nr.9 (Sept 1997); p.64 A continuation of the debate surrounding the publication of 'Road rage' ('Sight and Sound' June 1997) by M.K. and J.P., on David Cronenberg's "Crash". Both authors reply to Alexander Walker's criticisms. AT: Correspondence

Klawans, Stuart.
"Crash." (movie reviews)Nation v264, n14 (April 14, 1997):36 (1 page).<

Kroll, Jack.
"Crash." (movie reviews)Newsweek v129, n12 (March 24, 1997):79 (1 page).
UC users only

Kuhn, Annette.
"Crash and Film Censorship in the UK."Screen, 1999 Winter, 40:4, 446-50.
UC users only
A chronology of, and commentary upon, the controversy over David Cronenberg's "Crash" which was at its most intense between May 1996 and June 1997.

Lane, Anthony.
"Crash."movie reviews) New Yorker v73, n6 (March 31, 1997):106 (2 pages).

Lapointe, Julien
"Crash." (motion picture review) Films in Review v 48 Jan/Feb 1997. p. 70
A review of the motion picture Crash, written and directed by David Cronenberg. The film's main characters spend their time practicing sodomy with each other and anyone else they meet, and, on meeting a psychopath who stages car wrecks and is sexually aroused by the sight of bloodied corpses and scarred flesh, they become even more depraved. Single-minded and blatantly provocative, the film is so self-conscious that the viewer feels repelled.

Lowenstein, Adam.
"Canadian Horror Made Flesh: Contextualizing David Cronenberg." Post-Script 1999 Winter-Spring, 18:2, 37-51.

Malater, Evan.
"David Cronenberg'S Benevolent Pathology: Technology, Trauma, and the Perverse Social Link in Crash." Psychoanalytic Review, Dec2007, Vol. 94 Issue 6, p887-902, 16p
UC users only

Martin, Adrian.
"Disquiet: The Sound of Two Cars Crashing." Senses of Cinema 2000 July-Aug, 8, (no pagination)
UC Users Only

Maslin, Janet.
"Cannes finally gets a noisy controversy." (Cannes Film Festival; director David Cronenberg's 'Crash') (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v145 (Mon, May 20, 1996):B1(N), C11(L), col 1, 29 col in.

Maslin, Janet.
"Crash." (movie review) (movie reviews) New York Times v146 (Fri, March 21, 1997):B3(N), C3(L), col 1, 17 col in.

McCosker, Anthony.
"A Vision of Masochism in the Affective Pain of Crash." Sexualities, Feb2005, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p30-48, 19p
UC users only

Pizzello, Stephen
"Driver's side."(David Cronenberg on his film Crash; interview) American Cinematographer v 78 Apr 1997. p. 43-7
In an interview, director David Cronenberg discusses his latest film Crash, a psychological futurescape populated by characters who engage in fetishistic sex and bizarre car-crash rituals; he also discusses his collaboration with director of photography Peter Suschitzky.

Rabey, Ian.
"Staging Crash: the sexualising of language in action." Studies in Theatre & Performance, 2003, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p41-54, 14p
UC users only

Rodley, Chris.
"Crash." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound, 1996 June, 6:6, 7-11.
"David Cronenberg believes that his instincts guided him in transforming an original techno-sex novel 'Crash' by J.G. Ballard into an effective psychological movie. The movie, shot against the backdrop of Toronto, shows a realignment of human minds, bodies, and sexuality to a dominant technology. The shooting script is kept very short to provide minute details. Cronenberg praises the lead actor and actress for their courage to act in unusual roles." [Magazine Index]

Rouyer, Philippe; Tobin, Yann
"Crash./ 'Qu'est-ce qu'ils entendent par pornographie?'" Positif; nr.425-426 (July-Aug 1996); p.86-94
"David Cronenberg speaks of his latest film "Crash": his discovery and adaptation of the J.G. Ballard novel; the need for art to confront taboos; audience response to the film; and the contribution of cinematographer Peter Suschitzky and composer Howard Shore." [FIAF]

Simon, John.
"Crash." (movie reviews) National Review v49, n9 (May 5, 1997):57 (1 page).
UC users only

Smith, Gavin
"Cronenberg: mind over matter." Film Comment
UC users only
"David Cronenberg's film of J. G. Ballard's lurid, feverish novel Crash exemplifies cool, hieratic austerity. The plot follows a film producer who, after a near-fatal head-on collision, slips into a dark underworld of car accident survivors who seek cathartic-erotic release in the aesthetic details of studying, reenacting, and staging death crashes. This exquisitely somber film, maintaining a tone of dreamlike repetition and attenuation, plays with the notions of enervation and entropy. In an interview, Cronenberg discusses, among other topics, the themes, concepts, and styles employed in his films." [Art Abstracts]

Smith, Marg.
"Wound Envy: Touching Cronenberg's Crash." Screen, 1999 Summer, 40:2, 193-202. dd>UC users only
"The writer discusses the eroticism of the car crash in David Cronenberg's 1996 film Crash. Crash attempts to play with the idea of touching as fore-pleasure; in the film, sexual contact takes the form of an offer of both explicit and discreet instances of touching between human and extrahuman bodies, body parts, things, and surfaces. At its worst, the film draws attention to the inability of escape from a crude, contrived Freudianesque model of sexuality, but, at its best, it offers countless touching opportunities and encounters. Some of these instances present a different manner of sexuality, whereas others imply a nonsexual intimacy: The touching is most often an encouragement to genital and anal sexuality, but at times it is no more than simply touching; its aim is to produce pleasure and it can still be sexual, but it veers away from the compulsion that is the futile finality of hydraulic sexuality for Freud. This touching can be viewed as a fore-pleasure leading to nowhere." [Art Abstracts]

Spence, Sean
"Crash." (movie reviews) British Medical Journal June 14, 1997 v314 n7096 p1771(1)

Springer, Claudia.
"The Seduction of the Surface: From Alice to Crash." Feminist Media Studies, Jul2001, Vol. 1 Issue 2, p197-213, 17p
UC users only

Tylim, Isaac.
""Crash": sex and death at the millennium." Psychoanalytic Review, 1997, Vol. 84 Issue 6, p947-952, 6p

Varga, Darrell.
"The Deleuzean Experience of Cronenberg's Crash and Wenders' The End of Violence." In: Screening the city
Edited by Mark Shiel and Tony Fitzmaurice. pp: 262-83. London ; New York : Verso, 2003.
Environ Dsgn PN1995.9.C513.S37 2003
Main Stack PN1995.9.C513.S37 2003

Walker, Alexander
"Teaching tolerance." Sight & Sound; Vol.VII nr.8 (Aug 1997); p.64
Film critic A.W. takes issue with the article 'Road rage' written by Mark Kermode and Julian Petley published in 'Sight and Sound' June 1997.

Dead Ringers

Ansen, David.
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) Newsweek v112, n14 (Oct 3, 1988):58 (1 page).

Beard, William.
"Lost and Gone Forever: Cronenberg's Dead Ringers." Post-Script 1996 Winter-Spring, 15:2, 11-28.
"Despite its lack of science fiction or horror content, "Dead ringers" announces itself as a characteristic Cronenberg film due to its deep sense of melancholy." [FIAF]

Carroll, Michael Thomas.
"The Bloody Spectacle: Mishima, The Sacred Heart, Hogarth, Cronenberg, and the Entrails of Culture." Studies in Popular-Culture, 1993, 15:2, 43-56.

Chute, David
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) Film Comment v 24 Nov/Dec 1988. p. 64

Creed, Barbara.
"Phallic Panic: Male Hysteria and Dead Ringers."Screen, 1990 Summer, 31:2, 125-146.
"David Cronenberg's treatment of the female in "Dead ringers" and its parallels with the fear of women in mythology. Discusses the psychoanalytic basis of the male hysteria in the film, the obsession with the inside of the body and the twins' fear of separation." [FIAF]

Corliss, Richard.
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review)Time v132, n13 (Sept 26, 1988):84 (1 page).

Denby, David.
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) New York v21, n39 (Oct 3, 1988):60 (2 pages).

Frank, Marcie.
"The Camera and the Speculum: David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers." PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, 1991 May, 106:3, 459-70.
UC users only

Garcia, Marcia
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) Films in Review v 40 Jan 1989. p. 37-8

Gleiberman, Owen.
"Cronenberg's double meanings." (David Cronenberg discusses his new movie, Dead Ringers) American Film v14, n1 (Oct, 1988):38 (6 pages).

Gomel, Elana; Weninger, Stephen.
"Cronenberg, Greenaway and the Ideologies of Twinship." Body & Society, Sep2003, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p19-35, 17p
UC users only

Jaehne, Karen
"Cronenberg's chronic case: double trouble." Film Comment v 24 Sept/Oct 1988. p. 20-1+
Relates "Dead ringers" to themes in director David Cronenberg's earlier work. Actor Jeremy Irons discusses his work in the film.

Jaehne, Karen.
"Visit to the doctor." (Jeremy Irons on his portrayal of twin gynecologists in "Dead Ringers") (interview) Film Comment v24, n5 (Sept-Oct, 1988):26 (2 pages).

Javors, Irene.
"Scenes from the stirrups." Lambda Book Report. Washington: Feb 1998. Vol. 6, Iss. 7; p. 9 (2 pages)
UC users only

Johnson, Brian D.
"A fatal obsession." (David Cronenberg's movie 'Dead Ringers') Maclean's v101, n39 (Sept 19, 1988):50 (4 pages).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Dead Ringers." (movie reviews) Maclean's v101, n39 (Sept 19, 1988):52 (1 page).

Kapsalis, Terri.
Public privates : performing gynecology from both ends of the speculum / by Terri Kapsalis. Durham : Duke University Press, 1997.
Main Stack RG103.K37 1997

Katsahnias, Iannis
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no416 Feb 1989. p. 4-7

Klevan, Andrew.
"The Mysterious Disappearance of Style: Some Critical Notes about the Writing on Dead Ringers." In: The modern fantastic: the films of David Cronenberg / edited by Michael Grant. pp: 148-67 Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2000.
Main Stack PN1998.3.C75.M63 2000

Klawans, Stuart.
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) Nation v247, n12 (Oct 31, 1988):431 (2 pages).

Maher, Janemaree
"We don't do babies': Reproduction in David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers." Journal of Gender Studies. Vol 11(2), Jul 2002, pp. 119-128
UC users only

McGillivray, David
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) Films & Filming; nr.412 (Feb 1989); p.32-33

Maslin, Janet.
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) New York Times v138, sec2 (Sun, Oct 2, 1988):H21(N), H21(L), col 5, 13 col in.; v138 (Fri, Sept 23, 1988):18(N), C10(L), col 4, 15 col in

O'Brien, Geoffrey.
"Dead Ringers." (movie reviews) New York Review of Books v40, n8 (April 22, 1993):63 (6 pages).

Oster, Corinne
"Dead Ringers: A case of psychosis in twins." American Imago. 1999 Sum. 56 (2): p. 181-202
UC Users Only

Penman, Ian,
"Film reviews: blimps, pimps, crims and croppers." In: Vital signs: music, movies and other manias / Ian Penman. p. 272-94. London; [New York]: Serpent's Tail, c1998.
Main Stack ML3534.P46 1998

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Dead Ringers." (movie reviews) New Yorker v64, n33 (Oct 3, 1988):92 (3 pages).

Robbins, Helen W.
"'More Human than I am Alone': Womb Envy in David Cronenberg's The Fly and Dead Ringers." In: Screening the Male: Exploring Masculinities in Hollywood Cinema / edited by Steven Cohan and Ina Rae Hark. pp: 134-47. London; New York: Routledge, c1993.
Main Stack PN1995.9.M46.S36 1993
MoffittPN1995.9.M46.S36 1993

Stanbrook, Alan
"Cronenberg's creative cancers."Sight & Sound; Vol.LVIII nr.1 (Winter 1988-89); p.54-56
On the horror films of D.C., esp. "Dead ringers".

Tesson, Charles; Katsahnias, Iannis
"Entretien avec David Cronenberg." (a propos de Dead ringers) Cahiers du Cinema no416 Feb 1989. p. 12-13+

Tesson, Charles
"Dead ringers." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no416 Feb 1989. p. 9-11

Vogel, Judy.
"Deadly Narcissism in Cronenberg's Dead Ringers." Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis. Fall 2003. Vol. 11, Iss. 2; p. 507 (16 pages)
UC users only

Dead Zone

Beard, William.
"An anatomy of melancholy: Cronenberg's Dead Zone." (film director David Cronenberg; book) Journal of Canadian Studies v27, n4 (Wntr, 1993):169 (11 pages).
Author Abstract: On the surface a commercial, Hollywood adaptation of a bestseller, The Dead Zone is a work highly characteristic of its director, David Cronenberg. The fate of its protagonist, emerging from a coma with unusual psychic powers, may be read as a metaphor for a largely self-generated sense of passivity and exclusion. These qualities are also to be found in the film's visual realization. The work as a whole sustains a mood of unusual bleakness and melancholy, qualities as typical of Cronenberg's work as they are unusual in mainstream cinema. COPYRIGHT Trent University (Canada) 1993.

Browning, Mark.
"The Dead Zone." In: Stephen King on the big screen / Mark Browning. Bristol, UK ; Chicago, USA : Intellect, 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3561.I483 Z56 2009

Chase, Donald.
"The dead zone." (moving-picture reviews) Los Angeles Times v102, secC (Sun, March 13, 1983):20, col 1, 27 col in.

The films of Stephen King : from Carrie to Secret window
Edited by Tony Magistrale. New York ; Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, c2008.
MAIN PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008
PFA: PS3561.I483 Z6555 2008

Garsault, Alain
"Dead zone. Un fantastique à visage humain." Positif; nr.279 (May 1984); p.56-57

Magistrale, Tom
"Cronenberg's 'only really human movie': The Dead Zone." Post Script; Vol.XV nr.2 (Winter-Spring 1996); p.40-45
Considers the relevance of Edgar Allan Poe's poem 'The raven' in "The dead zone" and notes the differing tone of the film to Cronenberg's earlier work, due to its being adapted from a novel by Stephen King.

Magistrale, Tom
Hollywood's Stephen King New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Full-text available online [UCB users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS3561.I483 Z758 2003)

Maslin, Janet.
"The dead zone." (moving-picture reviews) New York Times v133 (Fri, Oct 21, 1983):20(N), C8(L), col 1, 13 col in.

Thomas, Kevin.
"The dead zone." (moving-picture reviews) Los Angeles Times v102, secVI (Fri, Oct 21, 1983):2, col 1, 12 col in.

Williams, Tony.
"The King Adaptations." In: Hearths of darkness: the family in the American horror film / Tony Williams. Madison [New Jersey]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c1996.
UCB Main and Moffitt PN1995.9.H6 W46 1996

Eastern Promises

Fisher, Mark.
"Eastern Promises." Sight & Sound, Nov2007, Vol. 17 Issue 11, p57-58, 2p

Gilbey, Ryan
"Guaranteed to give you shivers." New Statesman; 10/22/2007, Vol. 137 Issue 4867, p45-45
UC users only

Lane, Anthony.
"Space Cases." New Yorker; 9/17/2007, Vol. 83 Issue 27, p100-101, 2p
UC users only

Taubin. Amy.
"Foreign Affairs." Film Comment. Sep/Oct 2007. Vol. 43, Iss. 5; pg. 52, 4 pgs
UC users only

eXistenZ

Badiou, Alain.
"Dialectics of the fable." Science Fiction Film & Television, 2008, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p15-23, 9
UC users only

Baumbach, Jonathan.
"Making dreamscapes seem shockingly real."(David Cronenberg, director of 'The Fly' and, most recently, 'Existenz') New York Times, sec2 (Sun, May 9, 1999):AR19(N), AR19(L), col 3, 25 col in.

Bowler, Alexia L.
"eXistenZ and the spectre of gender in the cyber-generation." New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film, 2007, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p99-114, 16p
UC users only

Browning, Mark.
"Thou, the player of the game, art God": Nabokovian game-playing in Cronenberg's eXistenZ." Canadian Journal of Film Studies/Revue Canadienne D'Etudes Cinematographiques. 12 (1): 57-69. 2003 Spring.
UC users only

Calhoun, John
"Ick of the litter." Interiors (New York, NY) v 158 no6 June 1999. p. 127-8
"David Cronenberg's eXistenZ, a film about virtual reality, sets itself apart from other films with its pared-down set and queasy effects. Carol Spier was responsible for its production design, which contrasts settings of antiseptic banality with nausea-inducing elements that include quivering man-made orifices and mutated amphibians. Few clues as to time and place are offered by the sets, which blur the distinctions between virtual and "actual" planes of existence, and the film's sterile, bare-boned landscape lingers on in viewers' memories." [Art Abstracts]

Calvin, Ritch.
"The Real eXistenZ: TransCendz the Irreal." Extrapolation: A Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy. 45 (3): 276-93. 2004 Fall.
UC users only

Corliss, Richard.
"eXistenZ: Directed by David Cronenberg." (Review)Time v153, n17 (May 3, 1999):78[B] (1 page).
UC users only

de Lauretis, Teresa.
"Becoming Inorganic." Critical Inquiry. 29(4):547-70. 2003 Summer

Dillon, Mark
"Existence, or eXistenZ?" American Cinematographer v 80 no5 May 1999. p. 56-7
"Toybox, the Toronto-based special-effects division of Command Post, used digital wizardry to help add some eerie details to the bizarre world of David Cronenberg's film eXistenZ. These include the creation of a two-headed, 18-inch creature that seems to be frog, salamander, and lizard in equal parts; the digital lizard had to be nothing less than photorealistic. Using an unpainted plastic-cast version of the creature, Toybox used Houdini to begin digitizing and refining the model toward an exact computer-generated rendition to which a scaly epidermis was later added. Toybox is particularly proud of a shot that cuts from a computer-enhanced puppet to a fully computer-generated creature and then back to the puppet." [Art Index]

Dreibrodt, Thomas J.
Lang lebe das neue Fleisch : die Filme von David Cronenberg : von Shivers bis eXistenZ / Thomas J. Dreibrodt Bochum [Germany] : Paragon, 2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C76 D74 2000

Fiander, Robert.
"At the Movies: The Interpenetration of Cinema and Virtual Reality." Antigonish Review. 120:43-52. 2000 Winter

Fisher, Mark
"Work and Play in Existenz" Film Quarterly , Vol. 65, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 70-73
UC users only

Hoggard, Liz
"eXistenZ." (motion picture review) Blueprint no161 May 1999. p. 69
A review of David Cronenberg's movie eXistenZ. Set in the near future in a world dominated by computer games, the movie focuses on a superstar games designer hunted down by "realist" fundamentalists. With a labyrinthine plot and a breathtakingly weird landscape, it argues that the gaming experience is as emotionally and intellectually engaging as any work of high art.

Hotchkiss, Lia M.
"'Still in the Game': Cyberstransformations of the 'New Flesh' in David Cronenberg's eXistenZ." Velvet Light Trap. 52:15-32. 2003 Fall
UC users only

Jackson, Kevin
"eXistenZ." (motion picture review)Sight and Sound ns9 no5 May 1999. p. 46
"Despite its showstopping metaphysical somersaults between Chinese-boxed levels of reality, eXistenZ is in many ways an unexpectedly conventional entertainment. In many other ways, it is something of a resume of just about every other Cronenberg film there is. Jennifer Jason Leigh manages to make her heroine into a sympathetic and very nearly plausible character, the only fleshed-out human being in a range of ciphers and caricatures." [Art Abstracts]

Johnson, Brian D.
"Virtual director: David Cronenberg returns to his science-fiction roots." (Interview)Maclean's (April 26, 1999):62 (1 page).

Krebs, Josef.
"eXistenZ." (motion picture review) Stereo Review's Sound & Vision v65, n1 (Jan, 2000):146.

Lalanne, Jean Marc
"eXistenZ." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no534 Apr 1999. p. 62-5
A review of eXistenZ, a film by David Cronenberg. The story centers on Allegra Geller, the star and creator of a new kind of video game, and Ted Pikul, her occasional bodyguard. Geller brings Pikul into a virtual world via GamePod, a strange animal-machine that produces images. Borrowing the structure of the most traditional video games, the characters leap from one challenge to the next in a virtual world that has the same feel as the real world. With this film, Cronenberg picks up on the playful pleasure of stories that have no ending and makes references to practically all of his previous films.

Lane, Anthony.
"Changelings." (Review) New Yorker v75, n10 (May 10, 1999):104 (2 pages).

Lavery, David.
"From Cinespace to Cyberspace: Zionists and Agents, Realists and Gamers in The Matrix and eXistenZ." Journal of Popular Film and Television, 2001 Winter, 28:4, 150-57.
"Part of a special issue on film and technology. The writer explores Andre Bazin's belief that film would eventually come to act centrifugally, directing the human imagination outward and back into the world. He compares this idea with the concept of virtual reality, which he suggests is a more sinister and less human project. He analyzes two movies that have virtual reality as themes, The Matrix and eXistenZ. He contrasts the conclusions that these films reach after playing out the relationship between humanity and the technology that has produced a virtual world. He contends that The Matrix proves faithful to Bazin's "myth of total cinema" by representing the real world and telling a heroic tale of its recovery. He suggests that eXistenZ, by contrast, imagines heroic realists battling against illusion but posits no escape from the ever-recursive game in which this takes place." [Art Index]

Lopate, Phillip
"eXistenZ." (motion picture review) Film Comment v 35 no3 May/June 1999. p. 82
"David Cronenberg's eXistenZ is a conceptual-horror B movie that keeps moving well. The futuristic premise concerns a new electronic game, eXistenZ, that can be plugged directly into the human body. What makes the film so intriguing is that the audience is invited to follow a core of self in the two main characters, a continuity of personality that the audience can imagine they still see, in and around the character changes brought on by the game." [Art Index]

Matisons, Michelle Renee.
"The Cyber-Genius/Hysterical Mother and the Techno-Virgin/Man's Man: Thoughts On Cronenberg's Existenz." Femspec. San Francisco: Dec 31, 2004. Vol. 5, Iss. 1; p. 151
UC users only

Morice, Jacques
"eXistenZ." (motion picture review)Beaux Arts Magazine no179 Apr 1999. p. 24
"A review of David Cronenberg's latest film, eXistenZ. The story centers on an adored creator of virtual video games who has received death threats and flees to the countryside with her young assistant. There, they spend their days playing a virtual game that involves a bizarre and absurd journey through a factory for plucking chickens. This great, imaginative madness proves once again that Cronenberg is unbeatable when it comes to organic machines and metamorphosed bodies." [Art Index]

Morris, Kelly
"It's only a game." (Review) The Lancet May 29, 1999 v353 i9167 p1892
UC users only

Parys, Thomas van. Jansen, Lien. Vanhoutte, Elisabeth.
"eXistenZ, a Different Novelisation?" Image (&) Narrative. 9: (no pagination). 2004.

Pomerance, Murray.
"Neither Here nor There: ExistenZ as 'Elevator Film'." Quarterly Review of Film & Video. 20(1):1-14. 2003 Jan-Mar
UC users only
"The writer explains why David Cronenberg's eXistenZ (1999) can be considered to be an elevator film. He defines an elevator film as one that recounts a story of easy dimension-shifting or reality substitution. He contends that in such a film, characters travel through some highly technologized gateway from a present warehouse to some distinct and unearthly other world." [Art Index]

Rodley, Chris
"Game boy." Sight and Sound ns9 no4 Apr 1999. p. 8-10
"eXistenZ is the first wholly original creation from filmmaker David Cronenberg since Videodrome in 1982. The movie is one in which the interactive self invades the cinema, and it is set in a futuristic world where the inventors of virtual-reality games have become cultural megastars. In the film, Cronenberg fuses all the elements of cinema--storytelling, acting, production design, sound, images, music--to play with the audience while simultaneously representing the game to them. What makes the film potentially dangerous is its philosophical basis: its assumption that all reality is virtual, invented, and collaborative." [Art Abstracts]

Rudolph, Eric
"Flesh for fantasy." American Cinematographer v 80 no5 May 1999. p. 48-50+
"The work of cinematographer Peter Suschitzky on David Cronenberg's film eXistenZ is discussed. The film is set at an undetermined point in the near future, when computer gaming devices have been replaced by living game servers; powerful game software is downloaded directly into the spinal cords of the players, and the resulting game experience is driven by their mental energy and directed by their emotions, fears, and fantasy lives. The use of a single lens, Panavision's 27mm T1.9 Primo, throughout the film gave it a visual unity and a slightly odd feeling, and the framing is kept off-kilter to lend an edgier feel to the scenes. One of the most compelling aspects of Suschitzky's photography in the film, however, is his artful modeling of soft light; the film is characterized by a richly contrasted and shadowy look emphasized by pools of light. According to Cronenberg, this modeling adds tremendous texture and depth and an almost three-dimensional quality, helpin g convey the complex world of eXistenZ with a minimal amount of verbal exposition." [Art Abstracts]

Sardar, Ziauddin.
"EXistenZ."(Review) New Statesman (1996) v128, n4433 (April 26, 1999):35 (2 pages).
UC users only

Stratton, David.
"EXistenZ."(Review) Variety v374, n1 (Feb 22, 1999):56 (1 page).

The Fly

Breskin, David.
"David Cronenberg: the Rolling Stone interview." (Interview) Rolling Stone, n623 (Feb 6, 1992):66 (6 pages).
Director David Cronenberg discusses his films, including 'The Fly,' 'The Brood,' 'The Dead Zone,' and 'Dead Ringers.' He also details work on his latest, the film version of William S. Burroughs's 'Naked Lunch.'

Cazals, Thierry
"The Fly." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no391 Jan 1987. p. 31-2

Collins, Michael J.
"Medicine, Surrealism, Lust, Anger, and Death: Three Early Films by David Cronenberg."Post-Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, Winter-Spring, 15:2, 62-69.

"Dialogue on Film: Stuart Cornfeld." (Interview).
American Film, XII/6, Apr 87; p.11-13. Producer Stuart Cornfeld discusses his career, focusing on David Cronenberg's remake of "The fly".

Doherty, Thomas.
"The Fly." (Review).Film Quarterly, XL/3, Spring 87; p.38-41.

Freeland, Cynthia A.
"Feminist Frameworks for Horror Films." In: Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies / edited by David Bordwell and Noel Carroll. pp: 195-218. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, c1996. Wisconsin studies in film
Main Stack PN1994.P6565 1996

Grant, Edmond,
"The Fly II" (motion picture review) Films in Review v 40 May 1989. p. 301-2

Guerrero, Ed.
"AIDS as Monster in Science Fiction and Horror Cinema." Journal of Popular Film and Television, XVIII/3, Fall 90; p.86-93.
In the last decade, films such as The Thing (1982), Life Force (1985), and The Fly (1986) have used metaphors for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) as their agents of terror. Communism replaced by AIDS as the allegorical threat in US horror and science-fiction films of the 1980's; focuses esp. on remakes of "The fly" and "The thing".

Haas, Robert.
"The Cronenberg Monster: Literature, Science, and Psychology in the Cinema of Horror."Post Script, XV/2, Winter-Spring 96; p.3-10.
The films of David Cronenberg are approached by critics from many angles, each focusing on a different aspect of the director. The article, an introduction to a special issue on D.C., explores the wide range of themes

Heldreth, Leonard G.
"Festering in Thebes: Elements of tragedy and Myth in Cronenberg's Films."Post Script, XV/2, Winter-Spring 96; p.46-61.
Draws attention to the often neglected elements in the work of David Cronenberg which are inspired by classical myth and tragedy; focuses on "Scanners", "Videodrome", "The Fly" and "Dead Ringers".

Hendershot, Cyndy.
"The Cold War Horror Film: Taboo and Transgression in The Bad Seed, The Fly, and Psycho." Journal of Popular Film and Television v29, n1 (Spring, 2001):21.

James, Caryn.
"The fly." (movie reviews)New York Times v135 (Fri, Aug 15, 1986):16(N), C18(L), col 1, 10 col in.

Knee, A.
"The Metamorphosis of the Fly." Wide Angle, XIV/1, Jan 92; p.20-34.
Compares "The Fly" (1958) with its 1986 remake, showing how the portrayal of central concerns such as gender and science have altered.

Lewis, Brent.
"Nightmare Man." (Interview).Films & Filming, /389, Feb 87; p.17-19.
Cronenberg talks about his film "The Fly" and his earlier work.

Littau, Karin.
"Adaptation, Teleportation and Mutation from Langelaan s to Cronenberg s The Fly ." In: Alien identities: exploring difference in film and fiction / edited by Deborah Cartmell ... [et al.]. London ; Sterling, Va. : Pluto Press, 1999.
Full text available online (UCB users only)

Lucas, Tim and Magid, Ron.
"The Fly - New Buzz on an Old Theme./ More About The Fly." American Cinematographer, LXVII/9, Sept 86; p.60-70,72,74,76. Cinematographer Mark Irwin discusses his work with Canadian director David Cronenberg, most recently on "The Fly", plus comments from Hoyt Yeatman on his special effects work for that film.

Pharr, Mary, and Haas, Lynda.
"Somatic Ideas: Cronenberg and the Feminine."Post Script, XV/2, Winter-Spring 96; p.29-39. The authors consider whether David Cronenberg's treatment of women could be counted as feminist or misogynist, focusing on four films: "Videodrome", "The Fly", "Dead Ringers" and "Naked Lunch".

Pharr, Mary Ferguson.
"From Pathos to Tragedy: The Two Versions of The Fly."Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, vol. 2 no. 1. 1989 Spring. pp: 37-46.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Letter from New York: Out of the Blue. "Sight & Sound, LVI/1, Winter 86-87; p.30-33. Discussion of the ways in which much of current US filmmaking has grown out of the B-picture or low-budget genre film tradition, esp. "Aliens" and the remake of "The Fly".

Robbins, Helen W.
"'More Human than I am Alone': Womb Envy in David Cronenberg's The Fly and Dead Ringers." In: Screening the Male: Exploring Masculinities in Hollywood Cinema / edited by Steven Cohan and Ina Rae Hark. pp: 134-47. London; New York: Routledge, c1993.
Main Stack PN1995.9.M46.S36 1993
MoffittPN1995.9.M46.S36 1993

Roth, Marty.
"Twice Two: The Fly and Invasion of the Body Snatchers."Discourse 2000 Winter, 22:1, 103-16.

Sawyer, Charles
"The Fly." (motion picture review) Films in Review v 37 Nov 1986. p. 548-9

Snowden, Lynn.
"Which Is the Fly and Which Is the Human? Cronenberg/Burroughs Interview." In: Conversations with William S. Burroughs / edited by Allen Hibbard. pp: 209-19 Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, c1999. Literary conversations series.
Main Stack PS3552.U75.Z465 1999

Tesson, Charles
"The Fly." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no391 Jan 1987. p. 25-7

Wicke, Jennifer.
"Fin de Siecle and the Technological Sublime." In: Centuries' ends, narrative means / edited by Robert D. Newman; contributors, Kathy Acker ... [et al.].pp: 302-15 Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1996.
Main Stack PN761.C46 1996

A History of Violence

Alleva, Richard.
"Public enemy: "A History of Violence".(Screen)(Movie Review)." Commonweal 132.18 (Oct 21, 2005): 25(2).
UC users only

Falcon, Richard.
"A History of Violence.(Movie Review)." Sight and Sound 15.10 (Oct 2005): 64(1).

Fuller, Graham
"Good Guy, Bad Guy."Sight and Sound, vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 12-16, Fall 2005.

Heyraud, Joyce King.
"A History of Violence." Psychological Perspectives, Jun2006, Vol. 49 Issue 1, p156-158, 3p
UC users only

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"On Films - Dickens and Devolution." The New Republic (Oct 17, 2005): 26.
UC users only

Klawans, Stuart.
"A History of Violence.(Good Night, and Good Luck)(Movie review)." The Nation 281.13 (Oct 24, 2005): 48(3).

Lowenstein, Adam.
"Promises of Violence: David Cronenberg on Globalized Geopolitics."
 boundary 2
, Summer2009, Vol. 36 Issue 2, p199-208, 10p
UC users only

Steyn, Mark.
"Urban revenge.(Cinema)(Movie Review)." Spectator 299.9243 (Oct 1, 2005): 58(2).

Taubin, Amy.
"Model citizens." Film Comment. Sep/Oct 2005. Vol. 41, Iss. 5; pg. 24, 5 pgs
UC users only

M Butterfly

Corliss, Richard.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews)Time v142, n14 (Oct 4, 1993):85 (1 page).

Grist, Leighton.
""It's Only a Piece of Meat": Gender Ambiguity, Sexuality, and Politics in The Crying Game and M. Butterfly." Cinema Journal, Summer2003, Vol. 42 Issue 4, p3-28, 26p
UC users only

Harkness, J.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v4, n5 (May, 1994):44 (2 pages).
"David Cronenberg's M. Butterfly, based on Henry David Hwang's hit play, is the director's most perverse gesture toward the mainstream. The film falls into the broad genre of award-winning filmmaking--an impeccably literary subject adapted by the original author using an exotic location and starring award-winning actors. The major problem with the film is Cronenberg's cryogenic direction. His problem with audiences derives from the clinical detachment of his style and his fondness for emotionally remote actors." [Art Abstracts]

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) New Republic v209, n18 (Nov 1, 1993):26 (2 pages).
UC users only

Maslin, Janet.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) New York Times v143 (Fri, Oct 1, 1993):B3(N), BC3(L), col 4, 22 col in.

McCarthy, Todd.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) Variety v352, n6 (Sept 20, 1993):26.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) New Yorker v69, n33 (Oct 11, 1993):123.

Rouyer, Philippe
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) Positif; nr.399 (May 1994); p.37-38

Simon, John.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) National Review v45, n21 (Nov 1, 1993):72.

Sterritt, David.
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) Christian Science Monitor v85, n215 (Fri, Oct 1, 1993):12, col 1, 4 col in.

Strauss, Frederic
"M. Butterfly." (movie reviews) Cahiers du Cinéma no478 Apr 1994. p. 58-9
A review of David Cronenberg's film M. Butterfly. Set in Beijing in 1964 and starring Jeremy Irons and John Lone, this film tells the true story of a man who falls for a Chinese singer whom he later discovers is a man. This is a film that addresses the issue of our enslavement to imagery and has as its theme the denial of reality.

Articles/Books

Burgwinkle, William
"Negotiating Masculinity: Gendering within Sex." In: Gender and culture in literature and film East and West : issues of perception and interpretation : selected conference papers / edited by Nitaya Masavisut, George Simson, Larry E. Smith. Honolulu, HI : College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature, University of Hawaii : East-West Center, c1994.
Asian American Studies PN1995.9.A8 G46
Main (Gardner) Stacks

Cody G.
"David Hwang, 'M. Butterfly', Perpetuating The Misogynist Myth."Theater, 1989 Spring-Summer, V20 N2:24-27.

de Lauretis, Teresa.
"Popular Culture, Public and Private Fantasies: Femininity and Fetishism in David Cronenberg's M. Butterfly." Signs v24, n2 (Wntr, 1999):303 (1 page).
UC users only
"David Cronenberg's motion picture 'M. Butterfly' centers on the loneliness generated by denial of one's identity rather than one's sexuality. The fantasy enacted by the female impersonator incites desire through the performance, but not the actuality, of gender. Although sexuality is engaged between the two characters, the rejection of the self as separate from desire is the film's focus." [Magazine Index]

Digaetani J.; Hwang D.
"M. Butterfly', An Interview with David,Henry Hwang."TDR-The Drama Review-A Journal Of Performance Studies, 1989 Fall, V33 N3:141-153.

Eng D. L.
"In The Shadows Of A Diva, Committing Homosexuality In David Hwang's M. Butterfly." Amerasia Journal, 1994, V20 N1:93-116.

Eng D. L.
"In The Shadows Of A Diva, Committing Homosexuality In David Hwang's M. Butterfly." Amerasia Journal, 1994, V20 N1:93-116.

Grant, Michael
"Cronenberg and the Poetics of Time." In: The modern fantastic : the films of David Cronenberg / edited by Michael Grant. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C75 M63 2000 AVAILABLE
Pacific Film Archive PN1998.3.C76 M63 2000

Grist, Leighton
"'It's Only a Piece of Meat': Gender Ambiguity, Sexuality, and Politics in The Crying Game and M. Butterfly." Cinema Journal, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 3-28, Summer 2003
UC users only

Hanawa Y.
"The 'World Of Suzie Wong' And 'M Butterfly' - Race And Gender In Asian-American." Radical History Review, 1996 Winter, N64:12-18.

Johnson, Brian D.
"A director's obsession." (profile of filmmaker David Cronenberg) (Special Report) Maclean's v106, n37 (Sept 13, 1993):38 (4 pages).
Cronenberg, a successful Canadian film director, has just released his latest film 'M. Butterfly' at the Montreal World Film Festival. Cronenberg likes to explore unusual or aberrant behavior in his films. He directed the films 'The Fly' and 'Naked Lunch.'.

Kondo D. K.
"M. Butterfly - Tony-Award Winning Play By David Henry Hwang - Orientalism, Gender, And A Critique Of Essentialist Identity."Cultural Critique, 1990 Fall, N16:5-29.

Levin, Charles
"Sexuality as Masquerade: Reflections on David Cronenberg's M. Butterfly." Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis. Spring 2004. Vol. 12, Iss. 1; p. 115 (14 pages)
UC users only

Morris, Rosalind
"M. Butterfly: Transvestism and Cultural Cross Dressing in the Critique of Empire." In: Gender and culture in literature and film East and West : issues of perception and interpretation : selected conference papers / edited by Nitaya Masavisut, George Simson, Larry E. Smith. Honolulu, HI : College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature, University of Hawaii : East-West Center, c1994.
Asian American Studies PN1995.9.A8 G46
Main (Gardner) Stacks

Moy J. S.
"David Henry Hwang - 'M. Butterfly' and Philip Kan Gotanda, 'Yankee Dawg You Die - Repositioning Chinese American Marginality On The American Stage."Theatre Journal, 1990 Mar, V42 N1:48-56.

Pao A.
"The Critic And The Butterfly, Sociocultural Contexts And The Reception Of David Henry Hwang's 'M.Butterfly'."Amerasia Journal, 1992, V18 N3:1-16.

Sheppard, W. Anthony
"Cinematic Realism, Reflexivity and the American 'Madame Butterfly' Narratives." Cambridge Opera Journal, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 59-93
UC users only

Shimakawa K.
"Whos-To-Say - Or, Making Space For Gender And Ethnicity In "M. Butterfly." Theatre Journal, 1993 Oct, V45 N3:349-362.

Shin, Andrew
"Projected Bodies in David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly and Golden Gate." MELUS: The Journal of the Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 177-97, Spring 2002
UC users only

Skloot R.
"Breaking The Butterfly - The Politics Of Henry David Hwang." Modern Drama, 1990 Mar, V33 N1:59-66

Suner, Asuman
"Postmodern double cross: reading David Cronenberg's M. Butterfly as a horror story." Cinema Journal v 37 Winter 1998. p. 49-64
UC users only
"The writer argues that M. Butterfly, directed by David Cronenberg, is a horror story within the same genre conventions as his earlier style of horror film. He explains that the film is a "political melodrama" set in postrevolutionary China, telling the story of a French junior diplomat driven to spying during an 18-year-long affair with a Chinese transvestite whom he never realizes is actually a man, the emphasis being on the blatant banality of the Western sexual/colonial fantasy. He proposes that the work is indeed a horror story, since it is about the undoing of that fantasy--one of the main sites of the modernist discourse--in which the horror arises from the violation of the boundaries of the male body and male subjectivity. Moreover, he continues, as in other Cronenberg films such as The Fly, the impossible male fantasy of omnipotence eventually leads to the psychic and physical destruction of the male subject. He goes on to demonstrate how this is achieved! through the narrative strategies of the film and the nature of the film's subversive potential." [Art Abstracts]

A vision of the Orient : texts, intertexts, and contexts of Madame Butterfly
Edited by Jonathan Wisenthal ... [et al.]. Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2006.
Music NX652.M23 V57 2006

Wiegmann, Mira.
The staging and transformation of gender archetypes in A midsummer night's dream, M. Butterfly, and Kiss of the Spider Woman Lewiston, N.Y. : Edwin Mellen Press, c2003.
MAIN: PN56.S52 W54 2003;

Naked Lunch

Baldwin, Douglas G.
"'Word begets image and image is virus': undermining language and film in the works of William S. Burroughs." College Literature (27:1) [Winter 2000] , p.63-83.

Billson, Anne.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v5, n199 (April 24, 1992):34 (2 pages).

Blagrave, Mark.
"The Oblique Addict and His Recharge Connection: Two for Naked Lunch." Wascana Review. 36(1):42-58. 2001 Spring

Beard, William.
"Insect Poetics: Cronenberg's Naked Lunch." Canadian Review of Comparative Literature-Revue Canadienne de Litterature Comparee, 1996 Sept, 23:3, 823-52.

Burn, Gordon.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4647 (April 24, 1992):17 (1 page).

Corliss, Richard.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) Time v138, n26 (Dec 30, 1991):72 (1 page).

Dellamora, Richard
"Framing William Burroughs: From Frank Kermode to David Cronenberg." In: Apocalyptic overtures : sexual politics and the sense of an ending / Richard Dellamora. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c1994.
Main Stack PR120.G39.D45 1994

Dellamora, Richard
"Framing William Burroughs: from Frank Kermode to David Cronenberg." In: Apocalyptic overtures: sexual politics and the sense of an ending / Richard Dellamora. p. 101-28. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c1994.
Main Stack PR120.G39.D45 1994

Downing, David L; Kerbis, Kim
"Exterminate all rational thought: David Cronenberg's filmic vision of William S. Burroughs's Naked Lunch." Psychoanalytic Review. Vol 85(5), Oct 1998, pp. 775-792

Ehrenstein, David.
"Don't look for sexual explicitness in David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch." The Advocate. Los Angeles: Feb 12, 1991. p. 75

Ehrenstein, David.
"Talking Pictures -- Naked Lunch directed by David Cronenberg."The Advocate. Los Angeles: Dec 31, 1991. p. 73

Everything is permitted: the making of Naked lunch
Edited by Ira Silverberg. 1st ed. New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1992.
UCB Bancroft pf PN1997.N32453 E93 1992

"Fish gotta swim...: David Cronenberg by way of William Burroughs."
Monthly Film Bulletin 51:600/611 (1984) June

Grunberg, Serge
"David Cronenberg: on his Naked lunch;" interview Cahiers du Cinema no453 Mar 1992. p. 15-25
Dedicated to "Naked lunch": incl. review; an interview with director D.C. in which he states his life-long empathy with the images of Burroughs and defends the writer against frequent charges of misogyny; plus an article on the director's presentation of the leading men in his films.

Grunberg, Serge
"Naked lunch." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no453 Mar 1992. p. 12-14

Grunberg, Serge
"Sur les terres de Cronenberg (Naked lunch and other films) Cahiers du Cinema no446 July/Aug 1991. p. 34-42

Jaehne, Karen.
"David Cronenberg on William Burroughs: Dead Ringers Do Naked Lunch." Film Quarterly, 1992 Spring, 45:3, 2-6.
UC users only
The movie 'Naked Lunch' was strongly influenced by novelist William Burroughs' life and work. Director David Cronenberg toned down Burroughs' homosexuality to concentrate on addictive behavior and the process of creation.

James, Caryn.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) New York Times v141, sec2 (Sun, Jan 5, 1992):H13(N), H13(L), col 1, 40 col in.

Johnson, Brian D.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) Maclean's v105, n3 (Jan 20, 1992):49 (2 pages).

Katsahnias, Iannis
"En attendant Le festin nu" Cahiers du Cinéma; nr.438 (Dec 1990); p.7
David Cronenberg explains the additions made to his adaptation of William Burroughs' 'The naked lunch'.

Klawans, Stuart.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews)Nation v254, n2 (Jan 20, 1992):62 (3 pages).

Levin, Charles
"The Body of the Imagination in David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch." Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis. Fall 2003. Vol. 11, Iss. 2; p. 523 (15 pages)
UC users only

Lyons, Donald.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) Film Comment v28, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1992):15 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v141 (Fri, Dec 27, 1991):B1(N), C1(L), col 4, 24 col in.

Palmer, Robert
"The novelist, the director and the mugwumps." American Film v 17 Jan/Feb 1992. p. 30-1+
David Cronenberg is directing the film version of William Burroughs strange psychosexual novel 'Naked Lunch.' A day on the set, including an encounter with Burroughs, is described.

Peck, Agnès; Rouyer, Philippe; Jaehne, Karen
"David Cronenberg./ Machines molles et machines folles." Positif; nr.373 (Mar 1992); p.4-17
"Devoted to two recent films inspired by literature: "Kafka" and "Naked lunch"; incl. a comparison of the two works, followed by a review of the latter and an interview with its director David Cronenberg on the personal elements he introduced to his film of the William Burroughs novel." [FIAF]

Powers, John.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews)New York v25, n3 (Jan 20, 1992):56 (2 pages).

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) New Yorker v67, n51 (Feb 10, 1992):81 (2 pages).

Rosenbaum, Jonathan
"Two forms of adaptation: Housekeeping and Naked lunch." In: Film adaptation / edited and with an introduction by James Naremore. p. 206-20. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c2000. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F55 2000

Simon, John.
"Naked Lunch." (movie reviews) National Review v44, n4 (March 2, 1992):56 (2 pages).

Sinclair, Iain
"The Naked diners club." Sight and Sound v 2 May 1992. p. 6

Snowden, Lynn.
"Which is the fly and which is the human?" (novelist William Burroughs and film director David Cronenberg)Esquire v117, n2 (Feb, 1992):112 (5 pages).
"David Cronenberg, who created the film version of William Burroughs's 'Naked Lunch,' spends an afternoon with Burroughs. The two discuss insects, Burroughs's shooting of his wife Joan in 1951, drug use, reality, fear of female genitalia, and misanthropy." [Magazine Index]

Strauss, Frederic
"Naked lunch." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no453 Mar 1992. p. 26-7

Taubin, Amy
"The Wrong body." Sight and Sound v 1 Mar 1992. p. 8-10
"Notes on the portrayal of hetero- and homoerotic sex in "Naked lunch", and the importance of woman in driving the narrative; plus an article on the theme of 'damaged men' in the films of David Cronenberg; and an interview with the director on his fascination with the work of William S. Burroughs." [FIAF]

Thompson, David
"Naked lunch." (motion picture review) Sight and Sound v 2 May 1992. p. 56-7

Toubiana, Serge
"L'Homme tout bete." (film adaptations by Cronenberg and Chabrol) Cahiers du Cinema no453 Mar 1992. p. 8-9

Travers, Peter.
"Naked lunch." (motion picture review) Rolling Stone, n623 (Feb 6, 1992):87 (2 pages).

Vice, Sue.
"Hallucinatory Reality in David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch." Dionysos: The Literature and Addiction TriQuarterly, 1993 Winter, 4:3, 43-47.

Zurbrugg, Nicholas.
"Will Hollywood Never Learn? David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch." In: Adaptations: from text to screen, screen to text / edited by Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan. pp: 98-112 London; New York: Routledge, 1999.
Main Stack PN1997.85.A32 1999

Shivers

Doran, Ann.
"John Waters on David Cronenberg. (discussion of Cronenberg film "Shivers")(Paranoia)(Interview) Grand Street v15, n4 (Spring, 1997):58 (4 pages).

Dreibrodt, Thomas J.
Lang lebe das neue Fleisch : die Filme von David Cronenberg : von Shivers bis eXistenZ / Thomas J. Dreibrodt Bochum [Germany] : Paragon, 2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C76 D74 2000

Sanjek, David
"Dr. Hobbes's Parasites: Victims, Victimization, and Gender in David Cronenberg's "Shivers"."Cinema Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1. (Autumn, 1996), pp. 55-74.
UC users only
"The victimization process in David Cronenberg's Shivers (1975) is discussed. The writer notes that the film, in which a series of women are turned into sexually rapacious and murderous figures by venereal parasites concocted by a male doctor, contains some of the director's most viscerally disturbing imagery and ideas to date. He argues that in his narrative, Cronenberg implicitly endorses the abandonment of both social mores and psychological control by both the women and all the other characters. He pursues a textual examination of how five female characters are in turn victims and victimizers and considers the ways in which their monstrosity is portrayed through the use of slow-motion photography. He contends that Cronenberg's films and the carnage that they depict are proof that some subjects are so sensitive and offensive that they must be explored." [Art Abstracts]

Videodrome

Arnold, Gary.
"Videodrome." (motion picture review) Washington Post v106 (Wed, Feb 9, 1983):F11, col 3, 20 col in.

Chute, D.
"Videodrome." (motion picture review) Film Comment v 18 Jan/Feb 1982. p. 2+

Grace, Dominick M.
"From Videodrome to Virtual Light: David Cronenberg and William Gibson." Extrapolation Fall 2003 v44 i3 p344(12) (5321 words)
UC users only

Ham, Martin.
"Excess and Resistance in Feminised Bodies: David Cronenberg's Videodrome and Jean Baudrillard's Seduction." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 30: (no pagination). 2004 Jan-Feb

Hampton, Howard
"When in Videodrome: travels in the new flesh." Artforum International v 31 Feb 1993. p. 70-3+
"The movie 'Videodrome' is replete with murder, sadism and sex for an important reason. David Cronenberg, the film's director, has psychosexual change as a favorite theme. 'Videodrome' brings out another of Cronenberg's themes: the parasitic interaction between malignant systems such as viruses, establishments and the government to the body. In this movie, Cronenberg depicts television as the culprit that acts as a cancerous growth on the minds of viewers." [Expanded Academic Index]

Latham, Robert A
"Screening desire: posthuman couplings in Atom Egoyan's Speaking parts and David Cronenberg's Videodrome." In: Trajectories of the fantastic : selected essays from the Fourteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. p. 171-79. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1997. Contributions to the study of science fiction and fantasy ; no. 70
Main Stack NX650.F36.T7 1997

Garsault, Alain
"Videodrome." (motion picture review) Positif; nr.281-282 (July-Aug 1984); p.110-111)

Pulleine, T.
"Videodrome." (motion picture review) Films and Filming no350 Nov 1983. p. 42-3

Thomas, Kevin.
"Videodrome." (motion picture review) Los Angeles Times v102, secVI (Fri, Feb 4, 1983):1, col 1, 20 col in.

Young, Suzie Sau-Fong.
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