Frank Capra:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library











Books
Journal articles

Articles and Books on Individual films
Videos

Books

Alpers, Benjamin L.
Dictators, democracy, and American public culture : envisioning the totalitarian enemy, 1920s-1950s Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2003.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks JC495 .A46 2003

Beach, Christopher.
"The Split-pea soup and the succotash: Frank Capra's 1930s comedies and the subject of class." In: Class, language and American film comedy / Christopher Beach. Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Full-text available online [UCB users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.C55 B43 2002

Bernds, Edward.
Mr. Bernds goes to Hollywood : my early life and career in sound recording at Columbia with Frank Capra and others / Edward Bernds. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 1999.
Main (Gardner) Stacks TK7807.B47 M7 1999
Pacific Film Archive TK7807.B47 M7 1999

Bowman, Barbara.
Master Space: Film Images of Capra, Lubitsch, Sternberg, and Wyler / Barbara Bowman. New York: Greenwood Press, 1992. Series title: Contributions to the study of popular culture no. 31.
UCB Main PN1995.9.P7 B64 1992
PN1995.9.P7 B64 1992

Brass, Tom
"Populist Fiction (s): The Agrarian Utopiates of AV Chayanov, Ignatius Donnelly and Frank Capra." In: Agrarian questions : essays in appreciation of T.J. Byres / edited by Henry Bernstein and Tom Brass. London ; Portland, OR : F. Cass, 1996.
Main Stack HD1521.A33 1996

Brederoo, Nico J.
"Capra's Small Town." In: The Small Town in America: A Multidisciplinary Revisit / editedby Hans Bertens, Theo D'haen. pp: 184-196. Amsterdam: VU University Press, 1995. European contributions to American studies; 32
Environ Dsgn HT431.S62 1995
Contrary to the trend in Hollywood that favors the big city over the small town, or represents the small town as a violent, saloon-lined street in the Western genre, director Frank Capra glorified small-town America and attacked the vices of the big city in his classic films American Madness (1932), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946).

Brown, Stephen
"Optimism, hope, and feelgood movies: the Capra connection." In: Explorations in theology and film: movies and meaning / edited by Clive Marsh and Gaye Ortiz. Oxford, UK ; Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1998.
Main Stack PN1995.5.E96 1998

Capra, Frank
Frank Capra: interviews Jackson: University of Mississippi, c2004.
MAIN: PN1998.3.C36 A3 2004

Capra, Frank
The Name Above the Title: An Autobiography / Frank Capra. 1st Vintage Books ed. New York: Vintage Books, 1985, c1971.
Main Stack PN1998.A3.C26 1971
Moffitt PN1998.A3.C26 1985 (another edition)

Carney, Raymond.
American Vision: the Films of Frank Capra / Raymond Carney. Cambridg[Cambridgeshire]; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 C261451 1986
Contents via Google books

Cavallero, Jonathan J.
Italian/American filmmakers in American motion pictures: The films of Capra, Scorsese, Savoca, Coppola, and Tarantino (Disseration: Indiana University, 2007)
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Denvir, John.
"Capra's Constitution."In: Legal Reelism: Movies as Legal Texts / edited by John Denvir. pp: 118-32. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, c1996.
UCB Law LibKF4298 .L44
UCB Main PN1995.9.J8 L45 1996

Dickstein, Morris
"The People vs. Frank Capra : populism against itself." In: Dancing in the dark : a cultural history of the Great Depression / Morris Dickstein. New York : W.W. Norton, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks E806 .D57 2009

Ehrlich, Matthew C.
"Screwball Comedy and Frank Capra." In: Journalism in the movies / Matthew C. Ehrlich. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2004.
Main Stack PN1995.9.J6.E38 2004

The Films of Frank Capra
Edited by Victor Scherle and William Turner Levy; introd. by William O. Douglas. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, c1977.
UCB Main PN1998 A3 C2621 1977

"Frank Capra." In: Conversations with the great moviemakers of Hollywood's golden age at the American Film Institute / edited and with an introduction by George Stevens, Jr. 1st ed. New York : A. A. Knopf, 2006.
Full text available online [UCB users only]
MAIN: PN1998.2 .A45 2006
PFA : PN1998.2 .A45 2006

"Frank Capra." In: The Hollywood professionals / by Kingsley Canham ... [et al.] London: Tantivy Press; New York: A.S. Barnes, [1973
Main Stack PN1998.A2.H64 1973 Library has: v. 1-7 (1973-1980)

"Frank Capra." In: The moviemakers / Alice Fleming New York: St. Martin's Press, 1973
Main Stack PN1998.A2.F538

Frank Capra: Authorship and the Studio System
Edited by Robert Sklar and Vito Zagarrio. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998. Series title: Culture and the moving image.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C36 F73 1998

"Frank Capra. A director of genius."
In: Great film directors: a critical anthology / edited by Leo Braudy and Morris Dickstein. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978
Main Stack PN1998.A2.G74

Frank Capra: The Man and His Films
Edited by Richard Glatzer and John Raeburn. 1st ed. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1975. Series title: Ann Arbor paperbacks AA195.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .C2631
PN1998.A3 .C2631

Frank Capra's American dream
Go behind the scenes into Hollywood legend Frank Capra's professional and family life with rare footage, stills and sequences from many of his films and an exclusive look into his personal home movie collection.
Media Resources Center DVD 3000

Gehring, Wes D.
Populism and the Capra Legacy / Wes D. Gehring; foreword by Steve Bell. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1995. Contributions to the study of popular culture; no. 44
Main Stack PN1995.9.P64.G44 1995
"Sets the comedy films of Frank Capra (1897-1991) firmly in the populist tradition of Will Rogers during the 1930s and 1950s, shows how populism came under attack during the McCarthy era, explores a film movement that built on Capra's legacy in the 1970s and 1990s, and profiles Ron Howard as a contemporary example of pushing Capra's principles into new areas."

Gilbert, James Burkhart.
""Almost a Message from God Himself" In: Redeeming culture : American religion in an age of science / James Gilbert. Chicago, IL : University of Chicago Press, c1997.
Discusses Capra's documentary work for Bell Telephone Labs
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Anthropology BL245 .G55 1997
Main (Gardner) Stacks BL245 .G55 1997

Girgus, Sam B.
"Frank Capra and James Stewart: Time, Transcendence, and The Other." In: Levinas and the cinema of redemption: time, ethics, and the feminine / Sam B. Girgus. New York : Columbia University Press, 2010.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Girgus, Sam B.
Hollywood Renaissance: The Cinema of Democracy in the Era of Ford,Capra, and Kazan / Sam B. Girgus. Cambridge, UK; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.G497 1998

Lourdeaux, Lee.
Italian and Irish Filmmakers in America: Ford, Capra, Coppola, andScorsese / Lee Lourdeaux. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990.
UCB Main PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990
PN1995.9.C35 L68 1990

Maland, Charles J.
American Visions, The Films of Chaplin, Ford, Capra, and Welles, 1936-1941 / Charles J. Maland. New York: Arno Press, 1977. Series title: Dissertations on film series.Series title: The Arno Press cinema program.
UCB Main PN1993.5.U6 M229 1977

Maland, Charles J.
Frank Capra / Charles J. Maland. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1980. Series title: Twayne's theatrical arts series.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .C265
PN1998.A3 .C265

Maland, Charles J.
"Frank Capra at Columbia: necessity and invention." In: Columbia Pictures: Portrait of a Studio / Bernard F. Dick, editor. pp:70-88. Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky, c1992.
UCB Main PN1999.C57 C64 1991
PN1999.C57 C64 1992

McBride, Joseph.
Frank Capra: The Catastrophe of Success / by Joseph McBride. New York: Simon & Schuster, c1992.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C36 M344 1992
PN1998.3.C36 M344 1992

Neve, Brian.
"Populism, Romanticism, and Frank Capra." In: Film and politics in America : a social tradition London ; New York : Routledge, 1992.
MAIN: PN1995.9.S6 N46 1992
MOFF: PN1995.9.S6 N46 1992

Poague, Leland A.
Another Frank Capra / Leland Poague. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Series title: Cambridge studies in film.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C36 P63 1994
PN1998.3.C36 P63 1994
Contents (via Google Books)

Poague, Leland A.
The Cinema of Frank Capra: An Approach to Film Comedy / Leland A. Poague. South Brunswick: A. S. Barnes, [1975].
UCB Main PN1998.A3 .C266
PN1998.A3 .C266

Quart, Leonard
"Frank Capra and the Popular Front." In: American Media and Mass Culture: Left Perspectives / edited by Donald Lazere Berkeley : University of California Press, c1987
Available online (UCB users only)

Saltzman, Joe
Frank Capra and the image of the journalist in American film / <2002> Los Angeles, CA: The Norman Lear Center, The Annenberg School for Communication, c2002.
MAIN: PN1995.9.J6 S25 2002

Sarris, Andrew.
"Frank Capra." In: "You ain't heard nothin' yet": the American talking film, history & memory, 1927-1949 / Andrew Sarris. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
Main Stack PN1995.7.S27 1998
Moffitt PN1995.7.S27 1998

Schickel, Richard
"Frank Capra: one man, many films" In:Matinee idylls: reflections on the movies / Richard Schickel. p. 61-78 Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1999.
Main Stack PN1994.S3495 1999

Scott, Ian
"Populism, pragmatism, and political reinvention : the presidential motif in the films of Frank Capra." In: Hollywood's White House : the American presidency in film and history / edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2003.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
MAIN: PN1995.9.U64 H65 2003
PFA PN1995.9.U64.H65 2005

Serpico, J. Richards
"Frank Capra and the cinema of populism." In: Movies and methods: an anthology / edited by Bill Nichols. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1976
Main Stack PN1994.M71 Library has: v.1-2 (1976-1985)

Sklar, Robert.
"Making of cultural myths: Walt Disney and Frank Capra." In: Movie-made America: a social history of American movies / Robert Sklar. 1st ed. New York: Random House, [1975]
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6.S53
Grad Svcs PN1993.5.U6.S531 Non-circulating; may be used only in Graduate Services.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.S531

Smoodin, Eric Loren.
Regarding Frank Capra : audience, celebrity, and American film studies, 1930-1960 / Eric Smoodin. Durham : Duke University Press, 2004.
Main Stack PN1998.3.C36.S66 2004
PFA PN1998.3.C36.S66 2004
Contents (via Google Books)

Thomas, Tony
A Wonderful Life: The Films and Career of James Stewart / by Tony Thomas. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, c1988.
UCB Main PN2287.S68 T47 1988

Tratner, Michael
"Credit as faith: normalizing debt in the movies of Frank Capra." In: Deficits and desires: economics and sexuality in twentieth-century literature / Michael Tratner. p. 197-214 Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2001.
Main Stack PS228.C65.T73 2001

Wolfe, Charles
Frank Capra: A Guide to References and resources / Charles Wolfe. Boston, Mass.: G.K. Hall, c1987. Series title: A Reference publication in film.
UCB Main PN1998.A3 C26831 1987

Wood, Robin.
"Ideology, Genre, Auteur." In: Film theory and criticism: introductory readings / edited by Leo Braudy, Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Main Stack PN1994.M364 1999

Journal Articles

Acuña, Beatriz Peña.
"Social Encounters between Frank Capra and Steven Spielberg." Journal of Alternative Perspectives in the Social Sciences, May2009, Vol. 1 Issue 2, p382-399, 18p
UC users only

Affron, Charles
"Finding America's Voice: The Early Sound Films of Frank Capra." MoMA, No. 47 (Spring, 1988), p. 4
UC users only

Aldgate, Tony
"Mr Capra Goes to War: Frank Capra, the British Army Film Unit, and Anglo-American travails in the production of 'Tunisian Victory'." Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, 11:1, 1991. pp 21 ó 39
UC users only

Arnold, Gary.
"Though more than 60 years old, films of Frank Capra stay fresh." Insight on the News v14, n5 (Feb 9, 1998):38 (2 pages).
"Capra established a rapport with movie audiences of the 1930s that remains the object of envy and emulation for filmmakers today. His movies strove to portray social remedies to popular issues still relevant today with spiritual redemption." [Expanded Academic Index]

Baker, Russell.
"Capra beats the game." (film director Frank Capra) (column) New York Times v140 (Tue, Sept 10, 1991):A15(N), A19(L), col 1, 17 col in.

Barnes, Bart.
"Director Frank Capra dies; won 3 Oscars." (obituary) Washington Post v114 (Wed, Sept 4, 1991):D4, col 1, 41 col in.

Basinger, Jeanine
"America's love affair with Frank Capra." American Film v 7 Mar 1982. p. 46-51+

Basinger, Jeanine
"Meet Frank Capra." American Film v 13 Dec 1987. p. 59-62

Blake, Richard A.
"The Catholic imagination of Frank Capra." (obituary)America v165, n7 (Sept 21, 1991):169.
Filmmaker Frank Capra's sentimental style revealed a very Catholic viewpoint, despite the absence of explicit religious imagery. His characters' relation to evil, and their repentance, made his films quite beloved.

Brass T.
"Popular culture, populist fiction(s): The agrarian Utopiates of A.V. Chayanov, Ignatius Donnelly and Frank Capra."(vol 24, pg 153, 1997) Journal of Peasant Studies 24: (3) U3-U3 APR 1997
UC users only
"Given the current resurgence, amid the capitalist crisis, of attempts by non-Marxist social theorists to construct an "a-political" concept of "community," this article examines previous attempts - also in the context of capitalist crisis - to construct an "imaginary" alternative to capitalism and socialism, as projected in the "community" constructed by agrarian populism. Caesar's Column (1890), a novel by American author Ignatius Donnelly; The Journey of My Brother Alexei to the Land of Peasant Utopia (1920), by Russian author Aleksandr V. Chayanov; and Lost Horizon, Englishman James Hilton's 1933 novel that was made into a 1937 film directed by Frank Capra all share a common utopic/dystopic vision based on a series of symptomatic oppositions. Agrarian populism identifies the dystopic (or absence of community) as dark, unnatural, and western, where large-scale technified production controlled by finance capital in an urban setting is linked discursively to the threat of socialism and chaos. On the other hand, it identifies utopia (community) as a realm of light that is harmonious, natural and orientalist, in which neither finance capital nor proletariat exists, and which consists instead of small-scale artisan and peasant producers." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Brauer, Ralph A.
"When The Lights Went Out: Hollywood, the Depression and the Thirties." Journal of Popular Film & Television 1981 8(4): 18-29 12p.
UC users only
The films of 1930-40 reflect various cinematic responses to both the Depression and the New Deal - responses ranging from the cynical anarchy of the Marx Brothers to the good-natured optimism of Frank Capra - a variety that reflects conflicting popular attitudes.

Brown, Stephen J.
"Theological optimism in the films of Frank Capra."Theology v101, n804 (Nov-Dec, 1998):437 (8 pages).
Frank Capra's films contain strong elements of theological optimism, the most clear example of which is 'It's a Wonderful Life.' This film examines intersections between God and culture, the presence of glory in ordinary events, and the powerlessness of people that causes them to seek God. Capra's view of God was a rescuer of the humble and meek who allows children to grow through making mistakes.

"Capra: The Voice Behind the Name Above the Title: "Frank Capra interviewed by Neil Hurley" New Orleans Review 8:1 (1981:Winter) 64

"Capra's America." (Frank Capra, movie director) Migration World Magazine v20, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1992):42.
Frank Capra, the noted film director, died on Jan 6, 1991. He immigrated toAmerica in 1903 from Italy as a child. He directed movies that depictedordinary citizens who triumph over difficult circumstances and who remain true to their ideals. His movies are a nostalgic journey into the past when Americans embraced simple virtues as honesty, love for family and country, and the work ethic.

Carreras-Kuntz, Maria Elena de las
"The Catholic vision in Hollywood: Ford, Capra, Borzage and Hitchcock." Film History Vol XIV nr 2 (2002); p 121-135
UC users only
Deals in detail with a particularly Catholic vision of four well-known Hollywood directors: Ford, Capra, Borzage and Hitchcock.

Cavallero, Jonathan J.
"Frank Capra's 1920s Immigrant Trilogy: Immigration, Assimilation, and the American Dream." MELUS: The Journal of the Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. 29 (2): 27-53. 2004 Summer.
Discusses the treatment of immigrant experience in the Capra films American dream, The Strong Man [1926], For the Love of Mike [1927], and The Younger Generation [1929]
UC users only

Chell, Samuel
"Frank Capra's Two Voices." Cresset 47:3 (1984:Jan.) 12

Ching, Barbara.
"From Screwballs to Cheeseballs: Comic Narrative and Ideology in Capra andReiner."New Orleans Review vol. 17 no. 3. 1990 Fall. pp: 52-59.

"Columbia's Gem," Time August 8, 1938.

"Conversation With Film Director Frank Capra." US News and World Report 89:8 (1980:Aug. 25) 66

Dickstein, Morris.
"The People vs. Frank Capra: Populism in Popular Culture." CUNY English Forum, Vol. 1. New York. 1985. xvi, 379 pp. pp: 23-44.

Edgerton, Gary.
"Capra and Altman: Mythmaker and Mythologist" Literature Film Quarterly no.1,1983.
UC users only
"In the first level system, the signifier (the celluloid image of Gary Cooper's flesh and bones) and the signified (a tall, silent, working-class American who is down on his luck and out of work) together merge and form a sign (John Willoughby). "Capracorn" was an attempt to make sense of several of Depression America's more pressing problems, and a conscious effort was made by both Capra and Riskin to offer either resistance or solutions to these dilemmas, no matter how simple and superficial their solutions might have been." [ProQuest]

Edgerton, Gary.
"'The Germans Wore Gray, You Wore Blue', Frank Capra, Casablanca, and the Colorization Controversy of the 1980s." Journal of Popular Film and Television,2000Winter, 27:4, 24-32.
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on Casablanca. The writer discusses the colorization of Casablanca and the differences this made to the film. Work done on the film to colorize it was more detailed and expensive in comparison to other films. Turner Entertainment Company was granted a new copyright for the color version of the film, and it was debuted on television in November 1988. However, audience reaction was not great, and it did not make it into the top-ten rated programs for the week. While the film represented an improvement in colorizing, it was visually less dramatic than the original version." [Art Index]

Flint, Peter B.
"Frank Capra, whose films helped America keep faith in itself, is dead at 94." (obituary) New York Times v140 (Wed, Sept 4, 1991):B9(N), B10(L), col 1, 32 col in.

"Frank Capra." (obituary) Variety v344, n9 (Sept 9, 1991):101.
Director Frank Capra's films embrace 'the triumph of the little man over the system.' He won three best-director Oscars in a four-year stretch in the 1930's, but his work is sometimes criticized as overly sentimental.

"Frank Capra dies; directed 'Wonderful Life'." (It's a Wonderful Life) (obituary) Los Angeles Times v110 (Wed, Sept 4, 1991):A1, col 3, 73 col in.

"Frank Capra, R I P." (motion picture director) (editorial) National Review v43, n18 (Oct 7, 1991):14.
UC users only
The late motion picture director Frank Capra will be remembered for his films which were tributes to American democratic principles. The concept of neighbor and neighborly support was important to him. Part of Capra's work was myth but America felt better because of him.

"Frank Capra's America." Journal for Multimedia History vol. 2 1999
UC users only
Articles by Robert Brent Toplin, Lawrence Levineand Dan T. Carter from a symposium on Capra held by the Popular Culture Association and the American Historical Association (AHA, Washington DC, January 9, 1999 ("Frank Capra's Populism: Timebound or Timeless?")

Gehring, Wes D.
"Field of Dreams: In Search of Capra's America." Thalia: Studies in Literary Humorvol. 13 no. 1-2. 1993. pp: 34-49.

Gehring, Wes D.
"Frank Capra - In The Tradition Of Will Rogers and Other Cracker-Barrel Yankees." Indiana Social Studies Quarterly 1981 34(2): 49-56.
Discusses Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), You Can't Take It with You (1938), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and Meet John Doe (1941), which were "in the tradition of American humor's capable crackerbarrel Yankee"; the films concerned politics.

Gehring, Wes D.
"McCarey Vs. Capra: A Guide To American Film Comedy Of The '30's." Journal of Popular Film and Television 1978 7(1): 67-84.
UC users only
Discusses two popular forms of comedic heroes in films in the 1930's: the antihero created by Leo McCarey and the backwoods Yankee created by Frank Capra.

Gehring, Wes D.
"Pushing the Capra Envelope: Hero." Journal of Popular Film and Television vol. 23 no. 1. 1995 Spring. pp: 36-43.
UC users only
"Stephen Frears's Hero (1992) has obvious ties to Frank Capra and populism. Meet John Doe is the Capra film that Hero most resembles. In both films, a false hero is created by the media and, in each case, the false hero proves to be heroic. Both films play on America's ongoing, insatiable appetite for flesh-and-blood idols. For all of its connections to Capra, however, Hero does take the populist film in important new directions. The key variations are an ambitious examination of heroism's growing ambiguities, a new perspective on the genre's media heroine, and a softer, more self-consciously comic ending." [Art Abstracts]

Gilbert, James.
"'Our Mr. Sun': religion and science in 50s America." History Today v45, n2 (Feb, 1995):33 (7 pages).
UC users only
"Film director Frank Capra made four movies for Bell Telephone Television in which he tried to justify scientific advancements within the orthodox religious framework that characterized much of the US during the 1950s. The films included 'Our Mr. Sun,' 'Meteora,' and 'Hemo the Magnificent.'" [Expanded Academic Index]

Gehring, Wes D.
"Populism Goes Multicultural." USA Today Magazine; Jan2008, Vol. 136 Issue 2752, p69-69, 1p
UC users only
"The author discusses some thoughts on populism. The feel-good genre of populism, often associated with such Frank Capra film classics as "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," 1939, and "It's a Wonderful Life," 1946, always has had some naysayers. The classic knock among cynics is populism's underdog victories are too sweet, viewers could get sugar diabetes watching these movies. Even in Capra's heyday, some critics gently mocked him and his oeuvre by calling it Capra-com." [Ebsco]

Gewen, Barry.
"It wasn't such a wonderful life." (the demise of motion picture director Frank Capra's career as seen in Joseph McBride's book 'Frank Capra: The Catastrophe of Success') New York Times Book Review (Sun, May 3, 1992):3, col 1, 32 col in.

Hargrave, Harry A.
"Interview with Frank Capra." Literature/Film Quarterly 9:3 (1981) 189

UC users only

Harvey, Brian Daniel
"In The Stables Of Hollywood: Frank Capra's Treatment For MGM's 'Soviet' (1932)." Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television; Mar2008, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p37-53, 17p
UC users only
"The article analyzes Frank Capra's treatment for the 1932 film "Soviet." Screenwriter Boris Pil'niak was noted for having written the first Soviet Russian production novel of the Soviet First-Year Plan called "The Volga Flows Into the Caspian Sea." His fictionalized depiction of the Dneprostroi dam construction project is especially significant to his employment as a scenarist for MGM later project "Soviet," which in its final version of 1934 was about the construction of the world's largest dam and was to have been filmed on location at the Hoover Dam at Boulder, Colorado, with American photographer Margaret Bourke-White acting as an advisor." [Ebsco]

Hicks, Jimmie.
"Frank Capra (Part 1)." Films in Review v43, n9-10 (Sept-Oct, 1992):290 (12 pages).
Frank Capra was one of Hollywood's three great film geniuses during the 1930s along with Charlie Chaplin and Walt Disney. Capra's craftmanship in directing motion pictures arose from his ability to emphatize with the material, his audience and the medium. Born on May 19, 1897, in a Sicilian village, Capra and his family emigrated to the US in 1903. Through hard work and determination, Capra was able to get an education and talked his way into directing his first movie. The film 'The Donovan Affair' released in Apr 1929 marked a turning point in his career.

Hicks, Jimmie.
"Frank Capra (Part 2)." Films in Review v44, n1-2 (Jan-Feb, 1993):8 (16 pages).
Hollywood director Frank Capra's teamwork with Robert Riskin on the film It Happened One Night, with Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert in the lead roles, marked one of Capra's biggest successes. The film received good reviews and establishing Capra as one of the most innovative, spontaneous and insightful directors of the 1930s. He continued to make good films such as Mr Deeds Goes to Town, You Can't Take It With You, Broadway Bill, Lost Horizon, When You're in Love, Mr Smith Goes to Washington, and Meet John Doe.

Hicks, Jimmie.
"Frank Capra, part 3." Films in Review v44, n3-4 (March-April, 1993):114 (9 pages).
Ex-army serviceman, Frank Capra, directed motion pictures such as 'Pocketful of Miracles' and 'It's a Wonderful Life,' which received belated appreciation. He lost approximately half a million dollars in the movie 'It's a Wonderful Life, ' which was a popular contestant for the 1946 Academy Awards. However, after his retirement from film-making, his works gained popularity, and in 1982, he received the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award.

Hofler, Robert
"Cohn Meets His Match in Capra: After 26 Features and Several Oscar Wins, Whose Studio Was It, Anyway?" Variety [January 1999] 43
"Informs that the 1934 Frank Capra film "It Happened One Night" transformed Columbia Pictures into one of the major studios when the Clark Gable-Claudette Colbert feature won the five principal Academy Awards that year. Comments on the professional relationship between the director and Columbia Pictures boss Harry Cohn who after the phenomenal success of "It Happened One Night" gave Capra just about everything he wanted. Indicates Capra retaliated publicly to Cohn's editing of "Lost Horizon" by suing him for false advertising and for money owed to the director by the studio." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Hunter, Stephen
"Auteur of Corn: A Film Retrospective Explores the Dark Side of Frank Capra's Sunny World." The Washington Post [2 January 1998] D1, D6
"Focuses on the 15-film series starting January 2, 1998 at the American Film Institute, "Capra in the Thirties." Notes that the great American director Frank Capra's name is synonymous with faith in the little guys of America. Reviews four of the films sampled: "Dirigible" (1931), "American Madness" (1932), "The Miracle Woman" (1931), and "Rain or Shine" (1930). States that these early films show a young genius just beginning to feel the thrill of his powers and the engagment of his imagination in ideas." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Hurley, Neil P.
"The divine comedies of Frank Capra." America April 20, 1985 v152 p322(3)

Jacobs, Lewis.
"Film Directors at Work, I. Alfred Hitchcock; II. FrankCapra; III. Garson Kanin; IV. Fritz Lang." Theatre Arts 25 (1941) 40; Theatre Arts 25 (1941) 225

James, Caryn.
"It's a wonderful find: a 1928 silent by Capra." (Frank Capra's "The MatineeIdol", recently rediscovered by the Cinematheque Francaise, to be shown atthe Museum of Modern Art, New York City) (Living Arts Pages)New York Times v145 (Thu, Oct 3, 1996):B2(N), C15(L), col 4, 15 col in.

Jameson, Richard T.
"The lighthouse." (director Frank Capra) Film Comment v28, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1992):24 (4 pages).
Film director Frank Capra is one of the most revered figures in the history of Hollywood. His life and films, including 'Meet John Doe,' 'It's a Wonderful Life,' 'Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,' 'It Happened One Night,' and 'You Can't Take it With You' are reviewed.

Jameson, Richard T.
"Stanwyck and Capra." Film Comment v 17 Mar/Apr 1981. p. 37-9

Johnston, Alva.
"Capra Shoots as He Pleases," Saturday Evening Post May 14, 1938

Karp, Walter
"The patriotism of Frank Capra." Esquire Feb 1981 v95 p32(4)

Kubek, Elizabeth.
""Spent for us": Capra's technologies of mastery in 'Lady for a Day'." (Frank Capra)(Critical Essay) Journal of Film and Video v50, n2 (Summer, 1998):40 (18 pages).
UC users only
Issues discussed concern the portrayal of the mother heroine, Apple Annie, in Frank Capra's 1933 film 'Lady for a Day.' Topics addressed include Capra's conceptions of maternity, class relations, and the role of individual creativity in men and women.

Magny, Joel
"Les Tragedies optimistes de Frank Capra." Cahiers du Cinéma no448 Oct 1991. p. 58-62

McBride, Joseph
"Capra before He Became 'Capraesque'." Sight and Sound, vol. 20, no. 12, pp. 44-47, 49, 2010 Dec
UC users only
Mistichelli, Bill.
"The State of the Union: Capra, altruism, and the Sociobiologists." Journal of Popular Film and Television v25, n3 (Fall, 1997):118 (12pages).
UC users only
Director Frank Capra's film characters generally expressed altruism which critics say, describes Capra's view of life. The characters depict individual uniqueness, unselfish cooperation and a compelling sense of relationship to others. His altruists are child-like and innocent who demand love and support. Some of Capra's films which portrayed altruism include 'Lost Horizon,' 'It's a Wonderful Life,' 'Meet John,' 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town,' and 'State of the Union.'

Morrow, Lance
"Is This Still Frank Capra's America? His theme of common-man decency vs. phoniness has a contemporary ring." (lessons about love and society in 'It Happened One Night,' directed by Frank Capra)(Essay)(Brief Article)(Column) Time Jan 14, 2002 v159 i2 p70
UC users only

"Compares the America shown in old Frank Capra films, circa 1934, to the America of today, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The pure, innocent, allegory of the movie `It Happened One Night'; Discussion of what it means to be an American phony, such as King Westley in the film; Theme of love triumphing over phoniness of too much money and dishonest media." [Ebsco]

Muscio, Giuliana
"From the Lower East Side to Fifth Avenue, and Back: Frank Capra's 'The Younger Generation'." European Contributions to American Studies 2004 53: 313-322 10p.

Phelps, Glenn Alan.
"The "Populist" Films Of Frank Capra."Journal of American Studies [Great Britain] 1979 13(3): 377-392.
UC users only
Cinematographer Frank Capra (b. 1897) best expressed his view of faults and promises of American democracy in four films: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). The films praised America from a Social Darwinist perspective and celebrated commoner virtues, but Capra bemoaned the common man's negligence toward his civic duties with the result of elites dominating a democratic society. Little improvement can be expected, in Capra's view, until the people, in a "Populist" dudgeon, become sufficiently politicized and accept their public obligations.

Quart, Leonard
"Frank Capra and the Popular Front." Cineaste 8:1 (1977) 4

Rollins, Peter C.
"Frank Capra: The American Dream On Film, 1930-1950."OAH Newsletter 1985 13(4): 6-7.
Frank Capra's commercial and government-sponsored films exemplified and promoted key aspects of the American Dream - optimism, patriotism, rural virtue versus urban corruption, and a classless society - but ignored society's flaws and denied any value or virtue in the nation's enemies.

Rosenstock, Bruce
"Capra Contra Schmitt: Two Traditions of Political Romanticism." Theory & Event; 2005, Vol. 8 Issue 4, pN.PAG, 0p
UC users only
Rothman, William.
"Hollywood and the Rise of Suburbia." East-West Film Journal vol. 3 no. 2. 1989 June. pp: 96-105.
Discusses how the growth of suburbia in the USA in the 1930's and 1940's was reflected in Hollywood films, esp. "It's a Wonderful Life".

Scheer, Ronald
"Doublevision: TV Remakes Frank Capra." Journal of Popular Film and Television 8:2 ([1980:Summer]) 28

Schickel, Richard.
"More than a heart warmer: Frank Capra: 1897-1991." (obituary) Time v138, n11 (Sept 16, 1991):77
Frank Capra, one of America's greatest film makers is dead. While his films are primarily remembered for their heartwarming sentiment and the triumph of the "little guy", they also explored themes such as media manipulation of public opinion.

Scott, Ian.
"Frank Capra and Leni Riefenstahl: Politics, Propaganda and the Personal." Comparative American Studies, Dec2009, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p285-297, 13p
UC users only
Shales, Tom.
"It was a wonderful life: director Frank Capra made the movies that warmed everyday people." Washington Post v114 (Wed, Sept 4, 1991):B1, col 2, 42 col in.

Simon, Richard Keller.
"Between Capra and Adorno: West's Day of the Locust and the Movies of the 1930s." Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History vol. 54 no. 4. 1993 Dec. pp: 513-34.
UC users only
"Nathanael West's novel, 'The Day of the Locust,' focuses on the characters and situations that are typical to Hollywood. West focuses his criticisms on the works of director Frank Capra, who was at his peak in the 1930s, and the great essayist Theodor Adorno. He makes use of Capra's storytelling skills and Adorno's critical insights to bring out his views. The novel brings to the fore the love, sex and violence that marked Hollywood movies." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Sklar, Robert.
"Saluting the Shadowy Screenwriter Who Helped Create the Capra Mystique: A Tribute to Robert Riskin, Who Wrote 'It Happened One Night,' 'Mr. Deeds Goes To Town' and 'Lost Horizon'." Forward. Jan 7, 2000. Vol. CII, Iss. 31,270; p. 11
UC users only

Smoodin, Eric.
"'The Moral Part of the Story Was Great': Frank Capra and Film Education inthe 1930s." Velvet Light Trap, 1998 Fall, 42, 20-35.
UC users only
"Examines how Capra's movies entered directly into the era's discussions about Hollywood and the moral, intellectual, and emotional uplift of the adolescent audience during the 1930's, creating the film education movement. Discusses the relationship between educational reformers, the shift in American education towards prioritizing the needs of the adolscent student and eliminating the divide between the classroom and certain leisure activities. Notes this trend caused high schools to offer classes in film appreciation. Includes analysis on gender and the promotion of the division between the sexes through film education." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Sterritt, David.
'A tribute to Capra's mastery." (director Frank Capra dies, leaving a legacy of American film) Christian Science Monitor v83, n200 (Tue, Sept 10, 1991):10, col 1, 16 col in.

Stricker, Frank.
"Repressing the working class: individualism and the masses in Frank Capra's films." Labor History v31, n4 (Fall, 1990):454 (14 pages).
UC users only
Reviews five Frank Capra (1897-1991) motion pictures: American Madness (1932), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). While claiming devotion to the common people, Capra ignored all those real movements of the working class, the unemployed, and the poor that made the 1930's a time of great political possibility in the United States. What Capra offered in his films was a concerned, small-proprietor individualism.

Toles, George E.
"Frank Capra: The Art of the Moralist." Canadian Review of American Studies 9:2 (1978:Fall) 249

Turner, George E.
"Great Relationships: Joseph Walker, ASC and Frank Capra." American Cinematographer7911 [November 1998] 71-72

Vidal, Gore
"I Fired Capra." Newsweek 13125-A [Summer 1998] 70-72
"Offers a discussion by writer Gore Vidal of the film career of director Frank Capra. Examines the contradiction between Capra's conservative politics and the populist tone of his films and comments on how the subtext of American politics was evident in all of Capra's films, particularly in films such as "State of the Union" and "Mr. Smith goes to Washington." Notes that Vidal fired Capra from the film "The Best Man" and cites Capra's blend of film and politics as particularly prescient. Part of an issue devoted to American films." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Reviews and Articles About Individual Films

American Madness

McBride, Joseph.
"Capra before he became 'Capraesque'." Sight & Sound, Dec2010, Vol. 20 Issue 12, p44-49, 5p
UC users only
Stricker, Frank.
"Repressing the working class: individualism and the masses in Frank Capra's films." Labor History v31, n4 (Fall, 1990):454 (14 pages).
UC users only
Reviews five Frank Capra (1897-1991) motion pictures: American Madness (1932), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). While claiming devotion to the common people, Capra ignored all those real movements of the working class, the unemployed, and the poor that made the 1930's a time of great political possibility in the United States. What Capra offered in his films was a concerned, small-proprietor individualism.

Tratner, Michael.
"Credit as faith: normalizing debt in the movies of Frank Capra." In: Deficits and desires : economics and sexuality in twentieth-century literature / Michael Tratner. Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2001. p197-214
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PS228.C65 T73 2001

Arsenic and Old Lace

Haslam, Jason.
"'A Secret Proclamation': Queering the Gothic Parody of Arsenic and Old Lace." Gothic Studies, Nov2005, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p127-142, 16p
UC users only

The Bitter Tea of General Yen

"The Bitter Teaof General Yen." (review), New York Times, Jan. 22, 1933, p20

"The Bitter Teaof General Yen." (review), New York Times, Jan. 12, 1933, p5

"The Bitter Teaof General Yen." (review), New Yorker,v8, Jan. 21, 1933, p47

"The Bitter Tea of General Yen." (review), Time,v21, Jan. 23, 1933, p34

Dickens, Homer.
The Films of Barbara Stanwyck / by Homer Dickens; foreword by Frank Capra. pp: 82-85. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, c1984.
Main Stack PN2287.S67.D481 1984

Marchetti, Gina.
"The Threat of Captivity: Hollywood and the Sexualization of Race Relations in The Girls of the White Orchid and The Bitter Tea of General Yen." Journal of Communication Inquiry vol. 11 no. 1. 1987 Winter. pp: 29-42.

Marchetti, Gina.
"The Threat of Captivity: The Bitter Tea of General Yen and Shanghai Express." In: Romance and the "Yellow Peril": Race, Sex, and Discursive Strategies in Hollywood Fiction / Gina Marchetti. p.46-66. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1993.
UCBAsianAmer PN1995.9.A8 M37
UCB Main PN1995.9.A78 M37 1993
PN1995.9.A78 M37 1993

Chung, Hye Seung. "Contrasting cases of Sino-U.S. Censorship Debates: MGM's The Good Earth and Paramount's The General Died at Dawn." In: Hollywood Asian : Philip Ahn and the politics of cross-ethnic performance / Hye Seung Chung. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2006. (Full text available online [UC Berkeley users only]; Print: Main (Gardner) Stacks; Asian American Studies PN1995.9.A78 C58 2006)

Oehling, Richard A.
"Hollywood and the Image of the Oriental, 1910-1950-Part II" Film & History; Sep1978, Vol. 8 Issue 3, p59-67, 9p
UC users only

Palumbo-Liu, David.
"The Bitter Tea of Frank Capra." Positions: East Asia Cultures Critiquevol. 3 no. 3. 1995 Winter. pp: 759-89.
Evaluates Frank Capra's 1932 film The Bitter Tea about interracial love between General Yen and an American woman and explains problems with gender, class, and national identities as main reasons for its failure.

UC users only
Santaolalla, Isabel C.
"East is East and West is West? Otherness in Capra's 'The Bitter Tea ofGeneral Yen.'." Literature-Film Quarterly v26, n1 (Jan, 1998):67 (9 pages).
UC users only
Frank Capra is described as the idealistic voice of the American dream, but those who judge him in this manner must look the other way when examining him in light of "The Bitter Tea of General Yen." This film, about an inter-racial love affair, removes Capra from this clear-cut definition and calls on Hollywood to examine the way it has represented non-whites to reinforce American and national identities.

Smoodin, Eric.
"Going Hollywood sooner or later : Chinese censorship and The bitter tea of General Yen." In: Looking past the screen : case studies in American film history and method / edited by Jon Lewis and Eric Smoodin. Durham : Duke University Press, 2007.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.L58 2007

Smoodin, Eric.
"'The Moral Part of the Story Was Great': Frank Capra and Film Education inthe 1930s." Velvet Light Trap, 1998 Fall, 42, 20-35.
UC users only
"Examines how Capra's movies entered directly into the era's discussions about Hollywood and the moral, intellectual, and emotional uplift of the adolescent audience during the 1930's, creating the film education movement. Discusses the relationship between educational reformers, the shift in American education towards prioritizing the needs of the adolscent student and eliminating the divide between the classroom and certain leisure activities. Notes this trend caused high schools to offer classes in film appreciation. Includes analysis on gender and the promotion of the division between the sexes through film education." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

It Happened One Night

Brouwers, Anke; Paulus, Tom.
"The mortgage the merrier: Hollywood comedies of remarriage in the age of domesticity." Film International; 2006, Vol. 4 Issue 22, p21-32, 12p
UC users only
Brown, Geoff
"It Happened One Night." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin XLV/529, Feb 78; p.33.

Cavell, Stanley
Journal of Popular Film & Televisionv13.n3.Autumn 1985 p.139-150
Article looking at the characteristics of IT HAPPENED ONENIGHT which Stanley Cavell identifies as making it part of h sub-genre of"Comedies of Re-Marriage".

Cavell, Stanley
"A la recherche du bonheur"[Cavell on a sexual innuendo scene of It Happended one Night; book excerpt] Cahiers du Cinema no466 Apr 1993. p. 84-5

Cavell, Stanley
"Knowledge as Transgression: It Happened One Night." In: Pursuits of happiness : the Hollywood comedy of remarriage / Stanley Cavell. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1981.
Main Stack PN1995.9.C55.C38
Moffitt PN1995.9.C55.C38
PFA PN1995.9.C55.C38 1981

Gottlieb, Sidney.
"From Heroine to Brat: Frank Capra's Adaptation of 'Night Bus' (It Happened One Night)" Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 16 no. 2. 1988. pp: 129-136.
UC users only
On the changes made by Frank Capra in adapting Samuel Hopkins Adams' story 'Night Bus' into the film "It Happened One Night".

Hicks, Jimmie.
"Frank Capra (Part 2)." Films in Review v44, n1-2 (Jan-Feb, 1993):8 (16 pages).
Hollywood director Frank Capra's teamwork with Robert Riskin on the film It Happened One Night, with Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert in the lead roles, marked one of Capra's biggest successes. The film received good reviews and establishing Capra as one of the most innovative, spontaneous and insightful directors of the 1930s. He continued to make good films such as Mr Deeds Goes to Town, You Can't Take It With You, Broadway Bill, Lost Horizon, When You're in Love, Mr Smith Goes to Washington, and Meet John Doe.

Hofler, Robert
"Cohn Meets His Match in Capra: After 26 Features and Several Oscar Wins, Whose Studio Was It, Anyway?" Variety [January 1999] 43
"Informs that the 1934 Frank Capra film "It Happened One Night" transformed Columbia Pictures into one of the major studios when the Clark Gable-Claudette Colbert feature won the five principal Academy Awards that year. Comments on the professional relationship between the director and Columbia Pictures boss Harry Cohn who after the phenomenal success of "It Happened One Night" gave Capra just about everything he wanted. Indicates Capra retaliated publicly to Cohn's editing of "Lost Horizon" by suing him for false advertising and for money owed to the director by the studio." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

"It Happened One Night." (review), Literary Digest,v117, Mar. 10, 1934,p38

"It Happened One Night." (review),The Nation,v138, Mar. 14, 1934, p426

"It Happened One Night." (review), New Republic,v78, May 9, 1934, p364

"It Happened One Night." (review), New York Times, Feb. 23, 1934, p23

Maltby, Richard.
"It Happened One Night: The Recreation of the Patriarch." In: Frank Capra: Authorship and the Studio System
Edited by Robert Sklar andVito Zagarrio. pp: 130-63. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998.Series title: Culture and the moving image.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C36 F73 1998

Morrow, Lance
"Is This Still Frank Capra's America? His theme of common-man decency vs. phoniness has a contemporary ring." (lessons about love and society in 'It Happened One Night,' directed by Frank Capra)(Essay)(Brief Article)(Column) Time Jan 14, 2002 v159 i2 p70 (777 words)

Poague, Leland
"'As You Like It' and 'It Happened One Night': The generic pattern of comedy. (Article).Literature/Film Quarterly V/4, Fall 77; p.346-350.
UC users only
Compares generic conventions of literature and cinema by examining Shakespeare's 'As You Like It' to Capra's "It Happened One Night".

Regester, Charlene.
"Otherness Chosen: Manhattan Melodrama and It Happened One Night." In: American cinema of the 1930s : themes and variations / edited by Ina Rae Hark. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 A85735 2007

Shumway, David R..
"Screwball comedies: constructing romance, mystifying marriage." Cinema Journal; Vol.XXX nr.4 (Summer 1991); p.7-23
UC users only
The attitude towards romantic love and marriage expressed by US 'screwball comedies'; compares "Adam's rib" and "Desperately seeking Susan".

Self, L. and Self, R.
"Adaptation as rhetorical process: 'It Happened One Night' and 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town'.""F Criticism" Film Criticism V/2, Winter 81; p.58-69.
Discusses the adaptations of 'It Happened One Night' and 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town' from their literary sources.

Self, L. and Self, R.
"Adaptation as rhetorical process: 'It Happened One Night' and 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town'." Film Criticism V/2, Winter 81; p.58-69.
UC users only
Discusses the adaptations of 'It Happened One Night' and 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town' from their literary sources.

Sklar, Robert.
"Saluting the Shadowy Screenwriter Who Helped Create the Capra Mystique: A Tribute to Robert Riskin, Who Wrote 'It Happened One Night,' 'Mr. Deeds Goes To Town' and 'Lost Horizon'." Forward. Jan 7, 2000. Vol. CII, Iss. 31,270; p. 11
UC users only
Smoodin, Eric.
"'The Moral Part of the Story Was Great': Frank Capra and Film Education inthe 1930s." Velvet Light Trap, 1998 Fall, 42, 20-35.
Frank Capra's movies of the early 1930's, in particular The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933) and It Happened One Night (1934), played a significant role in the film education movement of that era, which was directed at high school students.

Wartenberg, Thomas E.
"It Happened One Night: An Education in Humility." In: Unlikely couples : movie romance as social criticism / Thomas E. Wartenberg. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1999.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.L6 W37 1999)

It's A Wonderful Life

Trailer from It's a Wonderful Life

Barry, Dan.
"50 years later, still a happy ending; as Zuzu can attest, Americans lovering of "Wonderful Life"."(Karolyn Grimes, who played 6-year-old Zuzu Baileyin "It's a Wonderful Life" now promotes items related to the film) (New... New York Times v146 (Thu, Dec 5, 1996):A21(N), B1(L), col 1, 36 col in.

Beuka, Robert.
"Imagining the postwar small town: gender and the politics of landscape in'It's a Wonderful Life'." (Critical Essay) Journal of Film and Video v51, n3-4 (Fall, 1999):36 (12 pages).
UC users only
"George Bailey's struggles in Frank Capra's film 'It's a Wonderful Life' can be seen as an exercise in shaping small-town landscape. If George follows his impulse to abandon his battle with the evil Potter, Bedford Falls will turn into the sleazy Pottersville, but if he does not give in, the town becomes an idealized version of masculine dominance and female enclosure." [Magazine Index]

Connelly, Mark
"A Hollywood Carolís Wonderful Life." In: Christmas at the Movies : Images of Christmas in American, British and European Cinema London ; New York : I.B. Tauris Publishers ; New York, NY : Distributed in the United States and Canada by St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.C5113 C66 2000

Corliss, Richard
"Our town: George Bailey meets True, Blue, and Peggy Sue." Film Comment v 22 Nov/Dec 1986. p. 9-13+
films that explore smalltown America

Costello, Matthew.
"The Pilgrimage And Progress Of George Bailey: Puritanism, It's a Wonderful Life, and The Language of Community In America." American Studies 1999 40(3): 31-52.
"Argues that despite complaints about liberal individualism eroding a sense of community, the rhetoric of consensus still has meaning for Americans, allowing them to reconcile private interest and public virtue. Frank Capra's 1946 film, It's A Wonderful Life illustrates how that rhetoric continues to be relevant. The continued influence of 17th-century Puritan rhetoric can be seen in Capra's film especially in the ideals of material success, a sense of mission, and the idea of community. Each of these virtues is examined through the life of the protagonist, George Bailey, as he seeks to find his moral worth." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Deneen, Patrick J.
"George Bailey's secret life." ('It's a Wonderful Life' protagonist embodies typical postwar American)Commonweal v124, n22 (Dec 19, 1997):31.
UC users only
"George Bailey of 'It's a Wonderful Life' embodied the typical postwar American male who had grandiose dreams of making a big difference. Viewers gave little thought to the fact that Bailey's visions actually portrayed the dark side of the American dream." [Expanded Academic Index]

Deneen, Patrick J.
"Awakening from the American Dream: The End of Escape in American Cinema?" Perspectives On Political Science4/30/2002V.31; N.2p. 96
UC users only

Dickstein, Morris.
"It's a Wonderful Life, but..."
American Film May 1980.

Diski, Jenny
"Curious tears." Sight & Sound II/4, Aug 92; p.39.
Novelist J.D. assesses the lasting appeal of the film.

Fallows, Randall.
"George Bailey in the vital center: postwar liberal politics and 'It's a Wonderful Life.'" (a comparison of Frank Capra's movie and Arthur Schlesinger's political book)Journal of Popular Film and Television v25, n2 (Summer, 1997):50 (7pages).
UC users only
Frank Capra's movie 'It's a Wonderful Life' and Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.'s contemporary political book 'The Vital Center: The Politics of Freedom' have many similarities. The film and the book both depict the significance of ordinary people living by their own liberal values with the aim of maintaining a moral community. Furthermore, 'It's a Wonderful Life' and 'The Vital Center' were created in an attempt to relate the 'typical' American family's dominant values with standard liberal values. The liberal ideals which Schlesinger promotes in 'The Vital Center' are vividly portrayed in Capra's film.

Garbowski, Christopher
"It's a Wonderful Life as Faerian Drama." (the role of faeries in the works of J.R.R. Tolkien and in Frank Capra's film)(Critical Essay) Mythlore Fall-Winter 2002 v23 i4 p38(12)

Goodman, Ellen.
"As "A Wonderful Life' hits 50." ("It's a Wonderful Life' Christmas movieclassic)(Column)Washington Post v120, n16 (Sat, Dec 21, 1996):A27, col 6, 18 col in.

Gordon, Andrew.
"It's Not Such a Wonderful Life: The Neurotic George Bailey." The American Journal of Psychoanalysis54 no. 3. 1994 Sept. pp: 219-33.
UC users only
"A little recognized aspect of Frank Capra's 'It's a Wonderful Life' is that of Bailey's divided self in that he must choose between being morally responsible or achieving personal success, incompatible aspects of the American dream. Bailey is torn between caring for the family business which is failing and following his own desires to be an architect. Either choice is a failure of a sort and Bailey choses self-effacement through adopting the family business." [Expanded Academic Index]

Gordon, A.
"You'll never get out of Bedford Falls! The inescapable family in American science fiction and fantasy films." Journal of Popular Film and Televisi XX/2, Summer 92; p.2-8.
Discusses the identical pro-family message in US science-fiction/fantasy films "The wizard of Oz", "It's a Wonderful Life", and the "Star Wars" and "Back to the Future" trilogies.

Hill, Geoffrey Michael
"It's a Wonderful Life": Saint George and the dragon." In: Illuminating shadows: the mythic power of film / Geoffrey Hill. Boston: Shambhala, 1992.
Main Stack PN1995.H48 1992

"It's a Wonderful Life." (review), Life,v21, Dec. 10, 1946, pp: 68-73

"It's a Wonderful Life." (review),The Nation,v164, Feb. 15, 1947, p426

"It's a Wonderful Life." (review), New Republic,v116, Jan. 6, 1947, p44

"It's a Wonderful Life." (review), New York Times, Dec. 23, 1946, p19

"It's a Wonderful Life." (review), New Yorker,v22, Dec. 21, 1946, p87

"It's a Wonderful Life." Spectator, v16.n2, Spring/Sum 1996 p.98-122
Discusses Freud's concept of mastery and how the film ITS A WONDERFUL LIFEelaborates a vision of mastery like Freud's and in doing so, participatesin its own theorization.

"It's a Wonderful Life." (review), Theatre Arts, v31, Feb. 1947, pp: 36-7

Lamm, R.
"Can we laugh at God? Apocalyptic comedy in film."Journal of Popular Film and Television XIX/2, Summer 91; p.81-90.
Defines secular and religious comedy and analyses the latter in relation to the films "It's a Wonderful Life", "Oh, God!", "Monty Python's Life of Brian", "Slaughterhouse-five" and "Dr. Strangelove: or, How I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb".

Kaminer, Wendy.
"It's a Wonderful Life."In: True love waits: essays and criticism / Wendy Kaminer. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Publishing, 1996.
Main StackHQ1421.K26 1996
Moffitt HQ1421.K26 1996

Lauder, Robert E.
"It's a Wonderful Life: Divine Benevolence and Love of Neighbor."In: Image & likeness: religious visions in American film classics /edited by John R. May. pp: 135-44New York: Paulist Press, c1992. Isaac Hecker studies in religion and American culture.
Main Stack PN1995.5.I46 1992

Louden, Bruce
"The Odyssey and Frank Capra's It's a wonderful life." In: Reading Homer : film and text / edited by Kostas Myrsiades. Madison [NJ] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2009.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only) DD> Main (Gardner) Stacks PA4037.A5 R43 2009

Mamet, David
"Crisis in happyland." Sight & Sound Vol XII nr 1 (Jan 2002); p 22-23
"It's a wonderful life" replaced "Casablanca" in the Reagan years as the unofficial 'Favourite Film of America'. An altruistic banker is as close as Hollywood can comprehend the redistribution of wealth.

McGee, Patrick
"Analyzing It's a wonderful life."In: Cinema, theory, and political responsibility in contemporaryculture / Patrick McGee. Cambridge, U.K. ; New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press,c1997. Literature, culture, theory ; 24
Main Stack PN1995.M378 1997

Monmaney, Terence.
"Putting a holiday classic on the couch." (psychoanalysis of 1946 film, 'It'sa Wonderful Life')(Column One) Los Angeles Times v115 (Mon, Dec 25, 1995):A1, col 1, 51 col in.

Mortimer, Lorraine.
The Grim Enchantment of It's a Wonderful Life." Massachusetts Review: A Quarterly of Literature, the Arts and PublicAffairs vol. 36 no. 4. 1995-1996 Winter. pp:565-86.
UC users only
"Frank Capra's 1946 film 'It's a Wonderful Life' has been interpreted in so many ways by various critics. However, some of the film's more positive aspects have been misinterpreted, and even overlooked, in previous critiques. It is obvious in the film that Capra meant the protagonist, George Bailey, played by James Stewart, to portray the hardy American spirit which thrives even in the face of gloom and seeming hopelessness. In this sense, Capra echoes Charles Dickens' vision of decent men shaping a decent world." [Expanded Academic Index]

Napoleon, D.
"Wonderful Life: Broadway Bound." American Film XI/7, May 86; p.10.
Reports on the complicated copyright history of "It's a Wonderful Life".

Noakes, John A.
"Bankers And Common Men In Bedford Falls: How The FBI Determined That It's A Wonderful Life Was A Subversive Movie." Film History [Australia] 1998 10(3): 311-319.
UC users only
"Surveys the critical and popular response to the release of director Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life" in 1946, noting that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) found a "malignant undercurrent" in the film. Lists the FBI's three criteria for determining the subversiveness of a movie, and notes how they were applied to "It's a Wonderful Life," citing economic and class issues and the specific criticism of the banker and his business practices. Considers the FBI's transmission of its findings to the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) and speculates on the reasons the film and its writers were never publicly branded as Communists. Finds that the FBI's evaluation still is important for its "exposure of domestic tensions" in the postwar era." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Phelps, Glenn Alan.
"The "Populist" Films Of Frank Capra."Journal of American Studies [Great Britain] 1979 13(3): 377-392.
Cinematographer Frank Capra (b. 1897) best expressed his view of faults and promises of American democracy in four films: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). The films praised America from a Social Darwinist perspective and celebrated commoner virtues, but Capra bemoaned the common man's negligence toward his civic duties with the result of elites dominating a democratic society. Little improvement can be expected, in Capra's view, until the people, in a "Populist" dudgeon, become sufficiently politicized and accept their public obligations.

Ray, Robert Beverley
" Its a wonderful life and The man who shot Liberty Valance." In: A certain tendency of the Hollywood cinema, 1930-1980 / RobertBeverley Ray. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, c1985.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.R38 1985
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6.R38 1985

Romney J
"The dark end of the street" (Frank Capra's 1946 film, 'It's a Wonderful Life') Sight and Sound, 16-19 Suppl. S Nov. 1997

Rose, Brian.
"It's a Wonderful Life: The Stand of the Capra Hero." Journal of Popular Film and Television VI/2, 77; p.156-66.
UC users only
A look at Capra and his films with emphasis on 'It's a Wonderful Life'.

Rothman, William.
"Hollywood and the Rise of Suburbia." East-West Film Journal vol. 3 no. 2. 1989 June. pp: 96-105.
Discusses how the growth of suburbia in the USA in the 1930's and 1940's was reflected in Hollywood films, esp. "It's a Wonderful Life".

Shumway, David R.
"Marriage as Adultery." In: Modern love : romance, intimacy, and the marriage crisis / David R. Shumway. New York : New York University Press, c2003.
Includes discussion of It Happened One Night
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks HQ503 .S54 2003
Silverman, Kaja
"It's a Wonderful Life." Framework /14, Spring 81; p.16-22.
On male subjectivity and the celestial suture in the film.

Silverman, Kaja
"Male subjectivity andthe celestial suture: It's a wonderful life." In: Feminism and film / edited by E. Ann Kaplan. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Oxford readings in feminism.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W6.F448 2000

Sklar, Robert
"God and man in Bedford Falls: Frank Capra's It's a wonderful life."In:The American self: myth, ideology, and popular culture / editedby Sam B. Girgus 1st ed Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, c1981
Main StackE169.1.A482
Moffitt E169.1.A482

Sterritt, David.
"The most Dickensian filmmaker since D.W. Griffith; life through Frank Capra's eyes." Christian Science Monitor v74 (Thu, April 8, 1982):19, col 1, 36 col in.

Sullivan, Daniel J.
"Sentimental Hogwash? On Capra's It's a Wonderful Life." Humanitas , 2005, Vol. 18 Issue 1/2, p115-140, 26p
UC users only

Toles, George.
"'No Bigger than Zuzu's Petals': Dream-Messages, Epiphanies, and the Undoing of Conventions in It's a Wonderful Life."North Dakota Quarterly vol. 52 no. 3. 1984 Summer. pp: 43-66.

Valenti, Peter.
"The Theological Rhetoric of "It's a Wonderful Life"." Film Criticism, Winter81, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p23-34, 12p
UC users only

Walters, James
"Reclaiming the real : It's a wonderful life." In: Alternative worlds in Hollywood cinema : resonance between realms / James Walters. Bristol, UK ; Chicago : Intellect, 2008.
Main Stack PN1993.5.U6.W35 2008

Wineapple, B.
"The production of character in 'It's a Wonderful Life'." Film Criticism V/2, Winter 81; p.4-11.
Analysis of the creation of character in the film.

Wolfe, Charles
"The return of Jimmy Stewart: the publicity photograph as text."Wide Angle VI/4, 85; p.44-52.
On the historiographic value of the production still with special reference to J.S. in "It's a Wonderful Life" on the cover of 'Newsweek' Dec. 30 1946.

Zagarrio, Vito.
"It Is (Not) a Wonderful Life: For a Counter-Reading of Frank Capra."In:Frank Capra: Authorship and the Studio System
Edited by Robert Sklar andVito Zagarrio. pp:64-94. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998.Series title: Culture and the moving image.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C36 F73 1998

Know Your Enemy Japan

Blakefield, W.J.
"A war within."Sight & Sound LII/2, Spring 83; p.128-133.
On the making of the film "Know Your Enemy Japan".

Gunter, Matthew C.
The Capra touch : a study of the director's Hollywood classics and war documentaries, 1934-1945 Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN1998.3.C3 G86 2012
During World War II, Frank Capra (1897-1991) made propaganda films for the U.S. government. These entries in the Why We Fight documentary series have been largely neglected by Capra scholars. This work analyzes the cinematic and thematic techniques Capra employed in these films, linking them to the techniques and ideology of the director's popular mainstream narrative films

MacDougall, Robert
"Red, Brown and Yellow Perils: Images of the American Enemy in the 1940s and 1950s." Journal of Popular Culture Volume 32 Page 59 - Spring 1999
UC users only

Waugh, Thomas and Pappas, P.
"Joris Ivens defended." (Letter).Cineaste X/4, Fall 80; p.48.
Waugh defends Ivens' reputation and film 'Know your enemy: Japan'. P.P.'s criticisms in 'Cineaste' X/3, Summer 80, p.46-49.

Lady for a Day

Kubek, Elizabeth
"Spent for us": Capra's technologies of mastery in 'Lady for a Day'. (Frank Capra)(Critical Essay) Journal of Film and Video Summer 1998 v50 i2 p40(18)
Issues discussed concern the portrayal of the mother heroine, Apple Annie, in Frank Capra's 1933 film 'Lady for a Day.' Topics addressed include Capra's conceptions of maternity, class relations, and the role of individual creativity in men and women.

Meet John Doe

Andrew, Dudley
"Meet John Doe." Enclitic V/2, Fall-Spring 81-82; p.111-119.
On the tension in the film between an authoritative voice of traditional logic and the more spontaneous tones of actors and visible technique.

Briley, Ron.
"Meet John Doe, Frank Capra, and Baseball: The Celebration and Dark Side of the American Dream."Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 25 no. 3. 1997. pp: 204-13.
UC users only
Frank Capra's film 'Meet John Doe' explored the positive and negative sides of the ideal American character through the metaphor of baseball. Baseball has promoted itself as a game that embodies the best American qualities while becoming a business played by millionaires. Capra's film ignored the comfort many Americans found in the game while using the ballpark as a location from which the central character exposed a deception practiced by a publishing company.

Dickens, Homer.
The Films of Barbara Stanwyck / by Homer Dickens; foreword by FrankCapra. pp: 138-41. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, c1984.
UCB Main PN2287.S67 D481 1984

Dickens, Homer.
The Films of Gary Cooper. pp: 178-80 [1st ed.]. New York, Citadel Press [1970].
UCB Main PN2287.C59 .D5

Hanlon, Mary. Capra, Smith & Doe (Masters Thesis, University of Virginia)

Lindholm, Charles; Hall, John A.
"Frank Capra Meets John Doe: Anti-Politics in American National Identity." In: Cinema and nation / edited by Mette Hjort and Scott MacKenzie. pp: 32-44 Londo; New York: Routledge, 2000.
Main Stack PN1995.9.N33.C56 2000

Magill's survey of cinema: English Llanguage Films. 1st series. pp: 1087-90. Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Salem Press, c1980
UCBHum/Area PN1995 .M32 V.1-6 (1981)

Mamet, David
"Crisis in happyland." Sight & Sound; Jan2002, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p22-23, 2p
UC users only

"Meet John Doe." (review),Life,v10, March 10, 1941, pp: 43-6

"Meet John Doe." (review),The Nation,v152, March 29, 1941, p390

"Meet John Doe." (review), New Republic,v104, March 24, 1941, p405

"Meet John Doe." (review), New York Times, March 12, 1941, p25

"Meet John Doe." (review), New York Times, March 16, 1941, sect 9, p5

"Meet John Doe." (review),Time,v38, March 3, 1941, p78

"Meet John Doe." (review),Variety,v104, March 19, 1941, p16

Phelps, Glenn Alan.
"The "Populist" Films Of Frank Capra."Journal of American Studies [Great Britain] 1979 13(3): 377-392.
Cinematographer Frank Capra (b. 1897) best expressed his view of faults and promises of American democracy in four films: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). The films praised America from a Social Darwinist perspective and celebrated commoner virtues, but Capra bemoaned the common man's negligence toward his civic duties with the result of elites dominating a democratic society. Little improvement can be expected, in Capra's view, until the people, in a "Populist" dudgeon, become sufficiently politicized and accept their public obligations.

Phelps, G.A.
"Frank Capra and the political hero: a new reading of 'Meet John Doe'." Film Criticism V/2, Winter 81; p.49-57.
UC users only

Rogin, Michael P.; Moran, Kathleen.
"Mr. Capra Goes to Washington." Representations. 84: 213-48. 2004.
UC users only
"Part of a special issue devoted to the memory of Michael Rogin, former Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. Frank Capra's so-called "little man" trilogy, comprising Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, and Meet John Doe, documents Capra's deeply ambivalent view of the people and his investment in the personal power of the media manipulator. Often described as a paean to the American populist hero, Mr. Smith presents itself as a film pitting the little man of the people against the political boss. However, what actually drives it is the question of who gets to constitute, speak for, and control the people. The writer examines the trilogy in detail, arguing that, with the aim of making the motion picture, rather than political party or social movement, the vehicle for organizing a mass public, Capra deliberately exaggerates popular innocence, thereby opening up a space between the people in his movies and the people watching them, within which he operates brilliantly to convert his audience to his cause." [Art Index]

Smoodin, Eric.
"'This Business of America': Fan Mail, Film Reception, and Meet John Doe."Screen vol. 37 no. 2. 1996 Summer. pp: 111-28.
"The writer analyzes the fan mail received by Frank Capra after his film Meet John Doe opened to the public in 1941. He discusses the way in which audiences perceived that a major Hollywood film addressed national concerns or embodied a national consensus, the audience's expectations of a Capra film, the pleasures his work generated, and the role some sections of the audience expected a film celebrity of Capra's status to play within the national political scene. He notes that a number of fans spoke of the film--which so clearly narrativized concerns about poverty, leadership, democracy, and the possibilities for collective action--in terms of its significant connection to personal events in their lives. He suggests that the letters indicate that many viewers believed that Hollywood needed to engage more positively with pressing political issues." [Art Abstracts]

Stricker, Frank.
"Repressing the working class: individualism and the masses in Frank Capra's films." Labor History v31, n4 (Fall, 1990):454 (14 pages).
UC users only
Reviews five Frank Capra (1897-1991) motion pictures: American Madness (1932), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). While claiming devotion to the common people, Capra ignored all those real movements of the working class, the unemployed, and the poor that made the 1930's a time of great political possibility in the United States. What Capra offered in his films was a concerned, small-proprietor individualism.

Toles, George.
"Believing in Gary Cooper." Criticism: A Quarterly for Literature and the Arts. 45 (1): 31-52. 2003 Winter.
UC users only

Miracle Woman

Tibbetts, John
"The Wisdom of the Serpent: Frauds and Miracles in Frank Capra's "The Miracle Woman"." Journal of Popular Film & Television 73 [1979] 293

Mr. Deeds Goes To Town

Bergman, Andrew.
We're in the Money: Depression America and Its Films. pp: 140-44 New York, New York University Press, 1971.
Grad Svcs PN1993.5 U6 B381 1971Shelved: Circulating Collection
Main Stack PN1993.5 U6 B381 1971
Moffitt PN1993.5.U6.B38

From Quasimodo to Scarlett O'Hara: A National Board of Review Anthology,1920-1940
Edited by Stanley Hochman; introduction by Robert Giroux. pp: 220-222.NewYork: F. Ungar, [1982].Series title: Ungar film library.
UCB Main PN1995 .F78

Gehring, Wes D.
"Frank Capra - In The Tradition Of Will Rogers And Other Cracker-Barrel Yankees." Indiana Social Studies Quarterly 1981 34(2): 49-56.
Discusses Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), You Can't Take It with You (1938), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and Meet John Doe (1941), which were "in the tradition of American humor's capable crackerbarrel Yankee"; the films concerned politics.

Gerster, P.
"The ideological project of 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town'." Film Criticism V/2, Winter 81; p.35-48.
An ideological analysis of "Mr. Deeds goes to town" in terms of the 1930's.
UC users only

Gerster, P.
"Speech, Identity, and Ideology in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." Film Criticism; Winter81, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p12-22, 11p
UC users only

Greene, Graham
Graham Greene on Film; Collected Film Criticism, 1935-1940. Edited by JohnRussell Taylor. pp: 96-7.New York, Simon and Schuster [1972].
UCB Main PN1995 .G68 1972
PN1995 .G68 1972

Kauffmann, Stanley
American Film Criticism, From the Beginnings to Citizen Kane; Reviews ofSignificant Films at the Time They First Appeared. Edited by StanleyKauffmann with Bruce Henstell. pp: 334-37.New York, Liveright [1972].
UCB Main PN1995 .K293
PN1995 .K293 *c3 copies

Levine, Lawrence W.
"Hollywood's Washington: Film Images of National Politics during the Great Depression."Prospects: An Annual Journal of American Cultural Studies ( vol. 10. 1985. pp: 169-195.

Maland, Charles
Mr. Deeds and American Consensus." Film & History; Feb1978, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p9-15, 7p
UC users only

"Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." (review), Literary Digest,v121, April11, 1936, p19

"Mr. Deeds Goes to To wn." (review), New Masses,v19, April28, 1936, p29

"Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." (review), New Republic,v86, April22, 1936, pp: 315-16

"Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." (review), New York Times, April17, 1936, p17

"Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." (review), New York Times, Nov.9, 1937, p19

"Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." (review), New Yorker,v12, April25, 1936, p47

"Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." (review),Saturday Review,v19, Dec.31, 1938, p13

"Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." (review), New Yorker,v12, April25, 1936, p47

Phelps, Glenn Alan.
"Frank Capra and the Political Hero: A New Reading of "Meet John Doe." Film Criticism; Winter81, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p49-57, 9p
UC users only
Phelps, Glenn Alan.
"The "Populist" Films Of Frank Capra."Journal of American Studies [Great Britain] 1979 13(3): 377-392.
Cinematographer Frank Capra (b. 1897) best expressed his view of faults and promises of American democracy in four films: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). The films praised America from a Social Darwinist perspective and celebrated commoner virtues, but Capra bemoaned the common man's negligence toward his civic duties with the result of elites dominating a democratic society. Little improvement can be expected, in Capra's view, until the people, in a "Populist" dudgeon, become sufficiently politicized and accept their public obligations.

Rogin, Michael P., Moran, Kathleen.
"Mr. Capra Goes to Washington." Representations. 84: 213-48. 2004.

Self, L. and Self, R.
"Adaptation as rhetorical process: 'It Happened One Night' and 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town'." Film Criticism V/2, Winter 81; p.58-69.
UC users only
Discusses the adaptations of 'It Happened One Night' and 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town' from their literary sources.

Sennett, Ted.
Lunatics and lovers; a tribute to the giddy and glittering era of thescreen's "screwball" and romantic comedies. pp: 116-19.New Rochelle, N.Y., ArlingtonHouse [1973].
UCB Main PN1995.9.C55 .S4

Stricker, Frank.
"Repressing the working class: individualism and the masses in Frank Capra's films." Labor History v31, n4 (Fall, 1990):454 (14 pages).
UC users only
Reviews five Frank Capra (1897-1991) motion pictures: American Madness (1932), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). While claiming devotion to the common people, Capra ignored all those real movements of the working class, the unemployed, and the poor that made the 1930's a time of great political possibility in the United States. What Capra offered in his films was a concerned, small-proprietor individualism.

Mr. Smith Goes to Washingon

Alkana, Linda
"The absent president : Mr. Smith, The candidate, and Bulworth." In: Hollywood's White House : the American presidency in film and history / edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2003.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
MAIN: PN1995.9.U64 H65 2003
PFA PN1995.9.U64.H65 2005
Browne, N.
"The politics of narrative form: Capra's 'Mr. Smith Goes to Washington'." Wide Angle III/3, 80; p.4-11.
Discusses the relationship of political power to cinematic representation in 'Mr. Smith Goes to Washingon'.

From Quasimodo to Scarlett O'Hara: A National Board of Review Anthology, 1920-1940 / edited by Stanley Hochman. pp: 319-22 New York: F. Ungar, [1982] (Series: Ungar Film Library)
Main Stack PN1995.F78

Gallagher, B.
"Speech, identity, and ideology in 'Mr. Smith goes to Washington'. Film Criticism V/2, Winter 81; p.12-22.
Analysis of the ideological structures in "Mr. Smith goes to Washington".

"Forming" an Argument: Mr. Smith's Plea for Conservatism. (Cinema Studies). (Brief Article) Michigan Academician Spring 2002 v34 i1 p23(2)
Gehring, Wes D.
"Frank Capra - In The Tradition Of Will Rogers and Other Cracker-Barrel Yankees."- 1981 34(2): 49-56.
Discusses Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), You Can't Take It with You (1938), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and Meet John Doe (1941), which were "in the tradition of American humor's capable crackerbarrel Yankee"; the films concerned politics.

Gehring, Wes D.
"McCarey vs. Capra: A Guide to American Film Comedy of the '30s." Journal of Popular Film & Television 7:1 (1978)
UC users only

Gianos, Phillip L.
Politics and politicians in American film / Phillip L. Gianos. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998. Praeger series in political communication.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P6.G53 1998
Moffitt PN1995.9.P6.G53 1998

Hanlon, Mary.
Capra, Smith & Doe (Masters Thesis, University of Virginia)

Hurstfield, Julian G.
"The Truths of Washington, D.C." In: The American City: Literary and Cultural Perspectives / edited by GrahamClarke. pp: 105-123. London: Vision Press; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988.Series title: Critical studies series.
UCBEnvDesign PS169.C57 A441 1988
UCB Main PS169.C57 A441 1988

Kelley, Beverly Merrill
"Populism in Mr. Smith goes to WashingtonElitism in The magnificent Ambersons." In: Reelpolitik: political ideologies in '30s and '40s films /Beverly Merrill Kelley ... [et al.] ; foreword by Steve Allen. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1998. Praeger series in political communication.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P6.R44 1998

Magill's survey of Cinema: English Language Films. 1st series. v3, pp: 1128 -30. Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Salem Press, c1980
UCBHum/Area PN1995 .M32 V.1-6 (1981)

Maland, Charles.
"Movies and American Culture in the Annus Mirabilis: Confessions of a Nazi Spy, The Wizard of Oz, and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." In: American cinema of the 1930s : themes and variations / edited by Ina Rae Hark. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2007.
Full text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.U6 A85735 2007
Matthews, Christopher.
"'Mr. Smith' - Frank Capra's enduring gift." ('Mr. Smith Goes to Washington') (column) Los Angeles Times v110 (Mon, Sept 9, 1991):B5, col 2, 13 col in.

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), Commonweal, v31, Oct. 27, 1939, p14

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), Commonweal, v33, Nov. 1, 1940, p58

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), v8, Film Comment, v5, Nov.-Dec. 1972, pp: 10-14

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), v15, Film Criticism, v5, Winter 1981, pp: 12-22

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." Journal of American Studies v13, Dec.1979, pp: 377-92

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), Life, v7, Oct.16, 1939, pp: 67-74

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), Life, v7, Oct.16, 1939, pp: 67-74

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." Literature/Film Quarterly,v15, v11:1, (1983) pp: 28-35

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), New Masses, v33, July8, 1941, p29

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), New Masses, v33, Oct. 31, 1939, p26-7

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), New York Times, Oct.20, 1939, p27

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), New Yorker, v15, Oct.21, 1939, pp: 73-4

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." (review), Theatre Arts, v24, Oct.23, 1939, pp: 119-24

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." Variety,Oct, 11, 1939 p3

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." WideAngle, v3.no.3 1980, p.4-11

Nelson, Joyce
"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington: Capra, Populism and comic-strip art." Journal of Popular Film and Television III/3, Summer 74; p.245-255.
UC users only
Capra's populist and comic-strip art as exemplified by 'Mr. Smith goes to Washington'.

Phelps, Glenn Alan.
"The "Populist" Films Of Frank Capra."Journal of American Studies [Great Britain] 1979 13(3): 377-392.
"Cinematographer Frank Capra (b. 1897) best expressed his view of faults and promises of American democracy in four films: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). The films praised America from a Social Darwinist perspective and celebrated commoner virtues, but Capra bemoaned the common man's negligence toward his civic duties with the result of elites dominating a democratic society. Little improvement can be expected, in Capra's view, until the people, in a "Populist" dudgeon, become sufficiently politicized and accept their public obligations." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Reelpolitik: Political Ideologies in '30s and '40s Films
Beverly Merrill Kelley ... [et al.] ; foreword by Steve Allen. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998. Praeger series in political communication.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P6.R44 1998
The eight films discussed are: Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington for its populism, The Magnificent Ambersons for elitism, Gabriel over the White House for fascism, Citizen Kane for anti-fascism, Casablanca for internationalism, All Quiet on the Western Front for its isolationism, Vidor's Our Daily Bread for communism, and his The Fountainhead for its anti-communism.

Rogin, Michael P., Moran, Kathleen.
"Mr. Capra Goes to Washington." Representations. 84: 213-48. 2004.

Smoodin, Eric.
"'Compulsory' Viewing for Every Citizen: Mr. Smith and the Rhetoric of Reception." Cinema Journal vol. 35 no. 2. 1996 Winter. pp: 3-23.
UC users only
"Upon its release in 1939, the reception of Frank Capra's motion picture Mr. Smith Goes to Washington was influenced and regulated by both corporate and governmental interests. Capra's story of the ultimate political outsider was promoted by exhibitors who asserted its educational value, thus entering a debate about the practicality and efficacy of teaching democratic values to adolescents and children, primarily concentrating on a domestic response. Interest in the movie's educational value was also expressed by State Department officials, who concentrated much more on what the movie might teach a national body politic rather than an adolescent one and speculated upon its potential global reception. However, State Department and diplomatic officials disapproved of the movie's "malicious ridicule" of U.S. governmental institutions and the way in which it distorted the facts concerning American life. This shared consensus on the movie's powerful ability to indoctr!inate was thus an absolute fracture when it came to determining the best way to indoctrinate and discern the meaning of democracy." [Art Abstracts]

Smoodin, Eric
"'Everyone Went Wild Over It': Film Audiences, Political Cinema, and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." In: Law on the screen / edited by Austin Sarat, Lawrence Douglas, Martha Merrill Umphrey. Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2005. Series Amherst series in law, jurisprudence, and social thought
Main Stack PN1995.9.J8.L42 2005

Stricker, Frank.
"Repressing the working class: individualism and the masses in Frank Capra's films." Labor History v31, n4 (Fall, 1990):454 (14 pages).
UC users only
Reviews five Frank Capra (1897-1991) motion pictures: American Madness (1932), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). While claiming devotion to the common people, Capra ignored all those real movements of the working class, the unemployed, and the poor that made the 1930's a time of great political possibility in the United States. What Capra offered in his films was a concerned, small-proprietor individualism.

Tomasulo, Frank P.
"Colonel North Goes to Washington: Observations on the Intertextual Re-Presentation of History." Journal of Popular Film and Television vol. 17 no. 2. 1989 Summer. pp: 82-88.
Relates the presentation of Oliver North's televised appearance at the Iran-Contra hearings to events in Frank Capra's "Mr. Smith goes to Washington".

Vermilye, Jerry.
The Films of the Thirties / Jerry Vermilye; introduction byJudith Crist. pp: 242-3. 1st ed. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, c1982.

Wolfe, Charles.
"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington: Democratic Forums and RepresentationalForms." In: Frank Capra: Authorship and the Studio System
Edited by Robert Sklar andVito Zagarrio. pp: 190-221. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998.Series title: Culture and the moving image.
UCB Main PN1998.3.C36 F73 1998
Also in Close viewings: an anthology of new film criticism / edited byPeter Lehman. Tallahassee: Florida State University Press ; Gainesville, FL:Orders to University Presses of Florida, c1990.
Main Stack PN1995.C543 1990

The Negro Soldier

Cripps, Thomas
"The Making of The Negro Soldier." In: Making movies Black : the Hollywood message movie from World War II to the civil rights era / Thomas Cripps. New York : Oxford University Press, 1993.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.N4 C687 1993
Moffitt PN1995.9.N4 C687 1993
Cripps, Thomas and Culbert, David.
"The Negro Soldier (1944): Film Propaganda In Black And White."American Quarterly 1979 31(5): 616-640.
"Discusses the symbiotic relationship among the army, blacks, social scientists, and the Hollywood film community that made the World War II army orientation film The Negro Soldier in 1944. Frank Capra chose Stuart Heisler to direct it. The result was a 43-minute documentary of high technical quality that portrayed blacks with middle class values and stressed black history. Both black and white troops were enthusiastic, as were most civilian audiences. The impact of The Negro Soldier with its well-executed theme of racial integration extended into three areas: promotion, in that black pressure groups learned that film could be a tool for social change; production of "message films"; and the demise of "race movies."" [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Doherty, Thomas.
"The Negro Soldier." In: Projections of war : Hollywood, American culture, and World War II / Thomas Doherty. Doherty, Thomas Patrick. New York : Columbia University Press, c1993.
Main (Gardner) Stacks D743.23 .D63 1993 AVAILABLE
Moffitt D743.23 .D63 1993
Contents via Google books
Garrett, Greg
"It's everybody's war: racism and the World War Two documentary." Journal of Popular Film and Television, Summer 1994 v22 n2 p70(9)
UC users only
"American propaganda during World War II focused on defining the principles of democracy, emphasizing that the war was one every American should support, regardless of race or color. However, the armed forces during that conflict were still segregated, a fact that is not lost in most of the documentary films of the time. Although the main message in these films were that 'it is everybody's war,' the undertone taken always reflected the superiority of white America." [Expanded Academic Index]

Gunter, Matthew C.
The Capra touch : a study of the director's Hollywood classics and war documentaries, 1934-1945 Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN1998.3.C3 G86 2012
During World War II, Frank Capra (1897-1991) made propaganda films for the U.S. government. These entries in the Why We Fight documentary series have been largely neglected by Capra scholars. This work analyzes the cinematic and thematic techniques Capra employed in these films, linking them to the techniques and ideology of the director's popular mainstream narrative films

Why We Fight

Austin, Jacqueline
"A battle of wills: how Leni Riefenstahl and Frank Capra fought a war with film and remade history." In: Artistic strategy and the rhetoric of power: political uses ofart from antiquity to the present / edited by David Castriota. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, c1986.
Main StackNX650.P6.A781 1986
Moffitt NX650.P6.A78 1986

Barsam, Richard Meran
"This Is America": Documentaries for Theaters, 1942-1951" Cinema Journal, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Spring, 1973), pp. 22-38
UC users only

Bazin, Andre; Cardullo, Bert, transl.
"On Why We Fight: History, Documentation, and the Newsreel (1946)." Film & History 2001 31(1): 60-62.
UC users only
"Why We Fight (1942-45), Frank Capra's seven-part propaganda series about World War II, represents a new genre - the edited ideological documentary - in which the brilliant piecing together of newsreel film aims not so much at showing as at making a point." [America: History and Life]

Bohn, Thomas W.
An Historical and Descriptive Analysis of the "Why We Fight" Series: with a new introduction / Thomas William Bohn. New York: Arno Press, 1977.
UCB Main D743.23 .B63 1977

Cardullo, Bert
"On "Why We Fight": History, Documentation, and the Newsreel (1946)." Film & History 31:1 (2001) p. 60-62
UC users only

Cavallero, Jonathan
"Redefining Italianita: The Difference Between Mussolini, Italy, Germany, And Japan in Frank Capra's 'Why We Fight'." Italian Americana 2004 22(1): 5-16 12p.

Doherty, Thomas.
"Government Work: Why We Fight." In: Projections of war : Hollywood, American culture, and World War II / Thomas Doherty. Doherty, Thomas Patrick. New York : Columbia University Press, c1993.
Main (Gardner) Stacks D743.23 .D63 1993 AVAILABLE
Moffitt D743.23 .D63 1993
Contents via Google books

Gallez, Douglas W.
"Patterns in Wartime Documentaries." The Quarterly of Film Radio and Television, Vol. 10, No. 2 (Winter, 1955), pp. 125-135
UC users only

Garrett, Greg.
"Muffling the Bell of Liberty: Censorship and the World War IIDocumentary." JASAT (Journal of the American Studies Association of Texas) vol. 22. 1991 Oct. pp: 63-73.
"Examines two World War II documentary films thatwere banned by the US Army. Frank Capra's The Battle of China (1944) presented a controversial portrait of Chinese military leadership and John Huston's Let There Be Light (1946) was a volatile film about psychologically damaged soldiers returning fromwar." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

German, Kathleen M.
"Frank Capra's 'Why We Fight' series and the American audience." Western Journal of Speech Communication v54, n2 (Spring, 1990):237 (12 pages).
"In 1942, successful Hollywood filmmaker, Frank Capra, was drafted by the Office of War Information to produce a series of documentaries explaining the American involvement in World War II to both military personnel and civilians. The result of his efforts was the seven-part Why We Fight series seen by millions worldwide. This analysis investigates Capra's portrayal of fundamental American values through the visual contrast techniques of parallel editing and deep focus. Capra's failure to adapt the visual framework of arguments from preceding films to The Battle of China explains its temporary suppression by the United States government. COPYRIGHT Western States Communications Association 1990." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

Gunter, Matthew C.
The Capra touch : a study of the director's Hollywood classics and war documentaries, 1934-1945 Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2012.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN1998.3.C3 G86 2012
During World War II, Frank Capra (1897-1991) made propaganda films for the U.S. government. These entries in the Why We Fight documentary series have been largely neglected by Capra scholars. This work analyzes the cinematic and thematic techniques Capra employed in these films, linking them to the techniques and ideology of the director's popular mainstream narrative films
Kristal, M.
"God, country, and Capra." (six government-commissioned Why we fight documentaries) American Film v 9 Dec 1983. p. 80+
"Orientation: Frank Capra and 'Why We Fight'." In: The People's Films; A Political History of U.S. Government Motion Pictures. pp: 153-9. New York, Hastings House [1973].Series title: Studies in public communication. Series title: Communication arts books.
UCB Main PN1995.9.D6 M31
UCB Moffitt PN1995.9.D6 M3

Rollins, Peter C.
"Birth of a film genre." The World & I. Jun 1995. Vol. 10, Iss. 6; pg. 64, 1 pgs

Rollins, Peter C.
"Frank Capra's Why We Fight Film Series and Our American Dream."Journal of American Culture vol. 19no. 4. 1996 Winter. pp: 81-86
UC users only
Frank Capra's seven 'Why We Fight' feature-length films praised democracy and criticized oppression. Capra designed the series as a specific reply toLeni Riefenstahl's 'Triumph of the Will,' condemning mob psychology andarticulating America's reasons for joining what many initially regarded asa European war. Capra often resorted to ethnic stereotyping to make hispoints, but the films' central appeal remains the portrayal of democracy asa primary path toward freedom and strength.

Scott, Ian S.
"Frank Capra and Leni Riefenstahl: Politics, Propaganda and the Personal." Comparative American Studies, Dec2009, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p285-297, 13p
UC users only

Scott, Ian S.
"Why we fight and Projections of America: Frank Capra, Robert Riskin, and the making of World War II propaganda." In: Why we fought : America's wars in film and history / edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor. Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2008.
Main Stack PN1995.9.W3.W53 2008

Springer, Claudia.
"Military propaganda: Defense Department films from World War II and Vietnam." Cultural Critique; Spring 1986, Issue 3, p151-167, 17p
UC users only

Steele, Richard W.
""The Greatest Gangster Movie Ever Filmed": Prelude To War." Prologue 1979 11(4): 220-235.
"Sketches the armed forces' struggle for betterunderstanding of the war effort that resulted in the1942 propaganda film Prelude to War. The great American director Frank Capra made the movie and, like many of his films, filled it with patriotic, simple ideas aimed at a mass audience. The film put World War II on a personal level while reducing it to a clash of ideologies rather than of nations. Full of stereotyping, it did not deal with Nazi racial policy, but insteadportrayed the Axis as mobsters plotting to grab the world. Yet for all of Capra's artistry, the film had little influence on either military men or civilians. It influenced the least educated the most." [from ABC-CLIO America: History and Life]

You Can't Take It With You

Caruso, Patrick; Plate, S. Brent.
"When Your Family is Other, and the Other Your Family: Freedom and Obligation in Frank Capra's You Can't Take It With You." In: Imag(in)ing otherness : filmic visions of living together / edited by S. Brent Plate, David Jasper. Atlanta, Ga. : Scholars Press, c1999.
Main Stack PN1995.9.E95.I46 1999
Compar Ethn PN1995.9.E95.I46 1999

Gehring, Wes D.
"Frank Capra - In The Tradition Of Will RogersAnd Other Cracker-Barrel Yankees." Indiana Social Studies Quarterly - 1981 34(2): 49-56.
Discusses Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town(1936), You Can't Take It with You (1938), Mr. SmithGoes to Washington (1939), and Meet John Doe(1941), which were "in the tradition of Americanhumor's capable crackerbarrel Yankee"; the filmsconcerned politics.

Videos

Frank Capra's American dream
Culver City, CA : Columbia TriStar Home Video, 1999.
UCB Media Ctr DVD 3000

Men Who Made the Movies: Frank Capra.
New York, NY: WNET Television Station, 1973.
UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 2033 pt. 1-2 AT NRLF: pt. 1-pt. 2NRLF VIDEO/C 2033 pt. 1-pt. 2 Type EXP NRLF for loan details.

World War II: The Propaganda Battle
[Created and developed by the Corporation for Entertainment and Learning, Inc. and Bill Moyers]. Washington, D.C.: PBS Video, 1984.


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