Jane Campion:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal Articles

Articles and Books on Individual films

Books/Videos

Campion, Jane
Jane Campion : interviewsJackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1999.
MAIN: PN1998.3.C3545 A3 1999

Gelder, Ken
"Jane Campion and the limits of literary cinema." In: Adaptations : from text to screen, screen to text / edited by Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan. London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
MAIN: PN1997.85 .A32 1999

Goodridge, Mike.
"A girl's own story: Jane Campion." In: Directing Boston : Focal Press, 2002.
MAIN: PN1998.A2 G66 2002

Jane Campion : cinema, nation, identity
Edited by Hilary Radner, Alistair Fox, and Irène Bessière Detroit, Mich. : Wayne State University Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C3545 J36 2009

McHugh, Kathleen Anne.
Jane Campion Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.C3545 M38 2007
MOFF: PN1998.3.C3545 M38 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip074/2006036198.html

Polan, Dana B.
Jane Campion London : British Film Institute, 2001.
MAIN: PN1998.3.C3545 P64 2001
PFA : PN1998.3.C3545 P65 2001
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/fy043/2003363619.html

Redding, Judith M.
"Jane Campion." In: Film fatales : independent women directors. Seattle : Seal Press ; [Emeryville, Calif.] : Distributed to the trade by Publishers Group West, c1997. M
MAIN: PN1998.2 .R43 1997

Journal Articles

Ball, Anna
"Writing in the Margins: Exploring the Borderland in the Work of Janet Frame and Jane Campion." eSharp: Electronic Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts Review for Postgraduates, vol. 5, pp. 1-18, Summer 2005.

"Campion, Jane." Current Biography. Apr 1994. Vol. 55, Iss. 4; p. 21

Cantwell, Mary Cantwell
"Jane Campion's lunatic women." (film maker from New Zealand) The New York Times Magazine, Sept 19, 1993 p40 col 1 (125 col in)
"Jane Campion is a highly talented New Zealand motion picture director whose films have won international acclaim. Many of her female characters are mentally unstable, such as the heroin of her new film, 'The Piano.' Her training in Australia, various films and personal life are discussed." [Expanded Academic Index]

Gillett, Sue.
"Views From Beyond the Mirror: the films of Jane Campion." Australian Screen Education 36 (Autumn 2004): 177(1).

Suzette A Henke.
"Jane Campion frames Janet Frame: A portrait of the artist as a young New Zealand poet." Biography. Fall 2000. Vol. 23, Iss. 4; p. 651 (21 pages)

Hopgood, Fincina
"Jane Campion." Senses of Cinema

Margaroni, Maria.
"Jane Campion's selling of the mother/land: restaging the crisis of the postcolonial subject." Camera Obscura 53 (Sept 2003): 93(32).
UC users only
"The writer investigates the drama of geopolitical and maternal separation at the heart of The Piano, a film directed by Jane Campion. In its dramatization of a melancholic daughter's dilemma, The Piano demonstrates that clinging to the body of the mother might be a kind of suicide, as the subject is incapable of constructing itself as a "living system" that is "open to the other, capable of adaptation and change." The film envisions a postcolonial, postpatriarchal contract that is not predicated on a loss that is nostalgically mourned in the new order established, but precisely on an excess (concerning the mother) that opens up the very potential of the new. It is easy to dismiss Campion's (re)turn to the ancestral motherlands of the Victorian female body and the New Zealand landscape as a collapse into essentialism, but her treatment of these maternal bodies is sensitive to the ambiguity of their role within a colonial, phallogocentric economy." [Art Index]

Martin, Adrian
"Losing the way: the decline of Jane Campion." Landfall Nov 2000 i200 p89(14)
"This article discusses the short lived success of filmmaker Jane Campion. Topics include her status as a cult figure, her work, and style."

McHugh, Kathleen A.
"Sounds that creep inside you": female narration and voiceover in the films of Jane Campion." Style Summer 2001 v35 i2 p193(28) (12666 words)
UC users only
Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 2001 Northern Illinois University "All of Jane Campion's feature films, if most notably The Piano, have generated intense and dramatically polarized debate, especially among female spectators and critics. All make use of female voiceover narration and all share a focus on women together with complex structures of narration, characterization, and plot development that thwart any easy or unambiguous interpretation. In addition, Campion revisits genres and storytelling modes of interest to women--abuse narratives, melodrama, battle of the sexes--and re-tells their stories, significantly refusing to invoke their conventional frameworks of truth and morality. Though Campion consistently deals with abuse, oppression, and mistreatment of women in all of her feature films, she resolutely forgoes the moral judgments of melodrama and refuses to portray her protagonists as victims. In this, she proffers an aesthetic challenge to the ressentiment that Wendy Brown argues has shaped the epistemology and politics of much feminist discourse." [Expanded Academic Index]

Murphy, Kathleen
"Jane Campion's shining: portrait of a director." (Cover Story) Film Comment Nov-Dec 1996 v32 n6 p28(5) (3679 words)
UC users only
Campion's adaptation of Henry James's novel 'The Portrait of a Lady' is superb rendering of the nuances of a woman's life. The film stars Nicole Kidman and John Malkovich, and has beautiful cinematography. Some of Campion's other films are also discussed.

Articles and Books on Individual films

Angel at My Table

Bessière, Jean.
"Jane Campion and the International Theme: From The Portrait of a Lady to An Angel at My Table." In: Jane Campion : cinema, nation, identity / edited by Hilary Radner, Alistair Fox, and Irène Bessière Detroit, Mich. : Wayne State University Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C3545 J36 2009

Bloustien, Geraldine.
"Jane Campion: memory, motif and music." Continuum, 1992, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p29-39, 11p
UC users only

Gillett, Sue
"Angel from the Mirror City: Jane Campion's Janet Frame." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema, vol. 10, 2000 Nov

Henke, Suzette A.
"Jane Campion Frames Janet Frame: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young New Zealand Poet." Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, Fall2000, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p651-669, 19p
UC users only

Jones, Lawrence.
"'I Can Really See Myself in Her Story': Jane Campion's Adaptation of Janet Frame's Autobiography." In: Jane Campion : cinema, nation, identity / edited by Hilary Radner, Alistair Fox, and Irène Bessière Detroit, Mich. : Wayne State University Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C3545 J36 2009

McHugh, Kathleen A.
"Jane Campion: Adaptation, Signature, Autobiography." In: Jane Campion : cinema, nation, identity / edited by Hilary Radner, Alistair Fox, and Irène Bessière Detroit, Mich. : Wayne State University Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C3545 J36 2009

Rosen, Alan; Walter, Garry; Politis, Tom; Shortland, Michael
"From shunned to shining: doctors, madness and psychiatry in Australian and New Zealand cinema." The Medical Journal of Australia 1997; 167: 640-644

Rueschmann, Eva
"An Angel at My Table: Sisters, Trauma, and the Making of an Artist as a Young Woman." In: Sisters on screen : siblings in contemporary cinema / Eva Rueschmann. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2000.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.S55 R84 2000

Sigley, Simon.
"'Comme une invitation au voyage': French Reception of Jane Campion, An Angel at My Table, and The Piano." In: Jane Campion : cinema, nation, identity / edited by Hilary Radner, Alistair Fox, and Irène Bessière Detroit, Mich. : Wayne State University Press, c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1998.3.C3545 J36 2009

Holy Smoke!

Bagnall, Diana
"Jane's addiction." (Jane Campion)(Interview) The Bulletin with Newsweek, Dec 7, 1999 v117 i6203 p100(2)
An critique is presented on filmmaker Jane Campion and her works, along with a brief history of her career. Topics include her newest film, 'Holy Smoke', her international reputation, and her portrayal of female characters.

Bruzzi, Stella
"Holy smoke." Sight & Sound v. ns10 no. 4 (April 2000) p. 48
”This exquisite and unexpected film is vibrant, alive, and comes more from the heart than the head. While it is ostensibly about cults and cultism, the film is ultimately about reconciling imagination with reality. It links fantasy and realism so that the characters, having undergone their own tortured and radical awakenings, become reconciled to compromise. This is an immense, emotional, enthralling movie that wears its brilliance casually.” [Art Index]

Hluchy, Patricia
"Sacred yearnings and carnal sins." (Review)_(movie reviews) Maclean's Feb 28, 2000 p68 (693 words)

Kauffmann, Stanley
"On Films - A Passion in the Desert." (movie review) The New Republic, Feb 7, 2000 p26
UC users only

Maslin, Janet
"A spiritual tug of war in the Australian outback." (movie review) The New York Times Dec 3, 1999 pB24(N) pE24(L) col 5 (15 col in); Oct 8, 1999 pB16(N) pE15(L) col 1 (14 col in)

McGrann, Molly
"Holy Smoke." TLS. Times Literary Supplement July 23, 1999 i5025 p23(1)

Murphy, Kathleen.
"Jane Campion's Passage to India." Film Comment. 36 (1): 30-36. 2000 Jan-Feb.
UC users only
”Jane Campion's Holy Smoke! is a fearless, flawed, and profound movie. Kate Winslett plays Ruth Baron, an open-souled Australian who falls hard for an Indian guru. Her eccentric family hire cult expert P. J. Waters (Harvey Keitel) to deprogram their prodigal daughter. Set against a backdrop of the awesome vastness of the Australian outback, the two engage in spiritual and gender combat in a claustrophobic cabin. Winslett's exposed performance is matched by some raw and brave acting by Keitel. In conversation, Campion discusses, among other subjects, the making of Holy Smoke! and her next project.” [Art Index]

Neroni, Hilary.
"Jane Campion's Jouissance: Holy Smoke and Feminist Film Theory." In: Lacan and contemporary film New York : Other Press, c2004.
MAIN: PN1995 .M379 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip049/2003020952.html

Pullinger, Kate Sight and Sound, Oct 1999 v9 i10 p8(4)
"Soul survivor." (works of film director Jame Campion)
"Jane Campion's 'Holy Smoke' is due to be released in the UK in January 2000. The film stars Kate Winslet and Harvey Keitel. Winslet's character Ruth Barron is a strong-willed and independent woman and ultimately wins her battle against Keitel's character P.J. Waters. Campion's previous releases 'The Piano' and 'The Portrait of a Lady' also portray strong-willed women, however, these were both set in the late nineteenth century." [Expanded Academic Index]

Schickel, Richard
"Divine Enlightenment: Holy Smoke! is surprising, inspiring and funny." (The Arts/Cinema)(Review)_(movie reviews) Time Jan 31, 2000 v155 i4 p73 (478 words)

Stuart, Jan
"Up in smoke." (Holy Smoke)(Brief Article) The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine) Feb 1, 2000 p49 (605 words)
UC users only

In the Cut

Calhoun, John
"Interior Landscapes." American Cinematographer v. 84 no. 11 (November 2003) p. 76-8, 80-2, 84-5
UC users only
"The cinematography in Jane Campion's new film, In the Cut, is discussed. This urban thriller, which focuses on a sensitive woman who becomes embroiled in a murder investigation, functions as a detective story as well as a character dissection, its terrain being New York's literal and metaphorical dark side. Its mood was approached by director of photography Dion Beebe with handheld work, using Arricam and Moviecam lightweight camera systems fitted with Zeiss Ultra Primes or with Century Optics' bellow-mounted Clairmont Swing & Shift system. Beebe's equipment and lighting are discussed.” [Art Index]

Denby, David
Creep shows." ('In the Cut,' 'Mystic River,' 'Elephant')(Movie Review) The New Yorker Oct 27, 2003 v79 i32 p112 (1587 words)
UC users only

Felperin, Leslie
"In the Cut." Sight & Sound v. ns13 no. 12 (December 2003) p. 37-8
UC users only
"A sensuous study of desire and masochism wrapped around a straight-up thriller, this film gives audiences three murdered women to keep them interested while director Jane Campion deals with more troubling preoccupations. However, as finely crafted as this provocative and complex film is, one could argue that it fails as a genre exercise, since experienced thriller fans will guess the killer faster than it takes to recite an Emily Dickinson poem. But once the mystery's been solved, what is left is a minutely etched study in mood and female psychology." [Art Index]

Francke, Lizzie
"Jane Campion: Dangerous Liaisons." Sight & Sound v. ns13 no. 11 (November 2003) p. 19
UC users only
In an interview, film director Jane Campion discusses her latest movie, In the Cut. Among the topics she addresses are the film's fairly positive ending, Meg Ryan and how she reinvented herself for the role of Frannie Avery, and Campion's own plans for the future.

Fuller, Graham; Francke, Lizzie.
"Sex and Self-Danger." Sight and Sound. 13 (11): 16-19. 2003 Nov.
UC users only
"A maelstrom of psychological conflicts, Jane Campion's In the Cut charts the vertiginous progress of dowdy writing teacher Frannie Avery (Meg Ryan), who embarks on an affair with a working-class homicide detective. In its confined spaces and invocations of hatred, distrust, and squalor, the sexually explicit film is an elegy for a heroine who longs for death, literally and spiritually, as much as she longs for love and empowerment." [Art Index]

Gillett, Sue.
"Engaging Medusa: Competing Myths and Fairytales in In the Cut." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 31: (no pagination). 2004 Apr-June.

Garcia, Maria
"In the Cut." Film Journal International Nov 2003 v106 i11 p56(1) (854 words)

Hopgood, Fincina .
"Inspiring passion and hatred: Jane Campion's in the cut: described as a psychosexual thriller, Jane Campion's In The Cut (2003) explores the intense sexual relationship between a creative writing teacher and a detective, set against the backdrop of a serial killer investigation in New York city." Metro Magazine Wntr 2004 i139 p28(5) (1953 words)

Park, Douglas.
"In the Cut.(Movie Review)." Film Quarterly 58.4 (Summer 2005): 39(8).
UC users only
"Jane Campion's most recent movie, In the Cut, has surprised critics because it forsakes her usual territory of Anglo Australia and a high literary mode for New York City and the pop culture ramifications of a slasher/thriller. Nonetheless, the film does continue and amplify themes and plot patterns that are recognizable from the director's earlier major works, such as white middle-class women being forcibly held and at risk from male violence and socially sanctioned power. With regard to style, In the Cut's forceful and vivid cinematography splinters the harsh urban setting, moving the narrative further into dreamscape, into the interiority of female experience. Shifting both toward and away from mainstream cinema was a courageous step, but it overtaxed an often insubstantial public appreciation for Campion's work." [Art Index]

Scott, A.O.
"A Mystery of Language, A Mystery of Murder." (The Arts/Cultural Desk)('In the Cut')(Movie Review) The New York Times Oct 22, 2003 pE1 col 05 (15 col in)

Taubin, Amy
"The Wrong Man." Film Comment v. 39 no. 6 (November/December 2003) p. 51-2
UC users only
”With In the Cut, Jane Campion has dived into the psychosexual abyss and created a broken fairy tale. The film is adapted from the best-selling first-person novel by Susanna Moore, the lurid conclusion of which sparked a flurry of controversy in feminist academic circles. In the Cut has a vague resemblance to the liberated-woman-in-jeopardy thrillers that were the response of 1970s Hollywood to incipient feminist consciousness, but Campion's suspicion of the existing order and her emphasis on the irrational element of female desire do not fit into narrative formulas, as those movies do.”

The Piano

Aldred, Grantham B.
"Binary Structures, Clothing, and Jane Campion's Piano." Midwestern Folklore, vol. 32, no. 1-2, pp. 57-65, 2006 Spring-Fall

Althofer, Beth
"The Piano, or Wuthering Heights Revisited, or Separation and Civilization Through the Eyes of the (Girl) Child." Psychoanalytic Review, 81:339-342.

Ansen, David; Charles Fleming.
"Passion for 'Piano.'" (filmmaker Jane Campion's new film; includes related article) Newsweek May 31, 1993 v121 n22 p52(2)
"Attendees at the Cannes Film Festival lavished praise on the new film, 'The Piano', by New Zealand film director Jane Campion. The film stars Holly Hunter and Harvey Keitel, and portrays the romance of a mute Scottish woman who comes to New Zealand in the 1850s." [Expanded Academic Index]

Attwood, Feona
"Weird lullaby: Jane Campion's 'The Piano.'" (interpretation of the feminism portrayed in the film) Feminist Review, Spring 1998 n58 p85(17)
UC users only
"Jane Campion's Oscar-winning film 'The Piano' portrays the silent hysteria and unexpressed anger of a woman who cannot speak towards her husband and towards a society that cruelly suppresses female voices. The film depicts women as mere symbols of sex and death, emphasizing women's lack of capacity to speak in public. However, the voice of Ada, the film's heroine, does not entirely fade into nothingness. Instead, it finds its place in the mouth of other silent heroines such as Flora, Ada's daughter, who translates Ada's voice through sign language and balletic expressions." [Expanded Academic Index]

Azeri, Siyaves.
"Silent Neg(oti)ation: The Piano." International Journal of the Humanities, Oct2007, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p89-96, 8p
UC users only

Bauer, Denise.
"Jane Campion's The Piano: A Feminist Tale of Resistance." In: Women making art: women in the visual, literary, and performing arts since 1960 / edited by Deborah Johnson & Wendy Oliver. pp: 211-26. New York: Peter Lang, c2001. Eruptions ; vol. 7
Main Stack NX180.F4.W6575 2001

Bentley, Greg.
"Mothers, Daughters, and (Absent) Fathers in Jane Campion's The Piano." Literature-Film Quarterly. 30(1):46-58. 2002
UC users only
" Jane Campion's film 'The Piano' is a powerful story about power, politics, sexuality, and silence. After the plot's climax, Ada decides to learn to speak as a way to discover her discursive self, and Campion regulates patriarchal structure to silence and the sea." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bihlmeyer, Jaime
"Bluebeard in Jane Campion's "The Piano": A Case Study in Intertextuality as an Enunciation of Femininity in Mainstream Movies." International Journal of the Humanities, 2010, Vol. 8 Issue 7, p183-190, 8p
UC users only

Bihlmeyer, Jaime
"The (Un)Speakable Femininity in Mainstream Movies: Jane Campion's The Piano." Cinema Journal. Lawrence: Winter 2005. Vol. 44, Iss. 2; p. 68 (21 pages)
UC users only
Jane Campion's film The Piano (1993) opens an uncanny space in mainstream movies where cinematic enunciation intersects with the linguistic and psychoanalytic innovations of the last half-century. This article presents a glimpse into the traces (semios) of femininity as latent extra-Symbolic discourse in Campion's film.

Bogdan, Deanne, Davis, Hilary E., bertson, Judith.
"Sweet Surrender and Trespassing Desires in Reading: Jane Campion's The Piano and the Struggle for Responsible Pedagogy." Changing English. 4(1):81-103. 1997 Mar
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Brown, Caroline
"The representation of the indigenous other in Daughters of the Dust and The Piano." NWSA Journal Spring 2003 v15 i1 p1(19) (8407 words)
UC users only
Author's Abstract: "This article examines two films, Daughters of the Dust, by Julie Dash, and The Piano, by Jane Campion. While both are subversive tales that rely on unconventional narrative techniques to examine and challenge female subordination and ethnocentric ideological systems, they are simultaneously "foundational" epics that mythologize this subordination even as they attempt to resist it. Key to this process is each film's reliance on native Others to both create and sustain a space of individuality and revolt for the female protagonist. Despite significant differences in the structure and perspective of each production, in both, the indigenous characters are silenced in order to permit non-native women the right to speak and affirm themselves and their embattled identities. This article analyzes both the tensions and forms of novel representation arising from this process." [Expanded Academic Index]

Bruzzi, Stella.
"Tempestuous Petticoats: Costume and Desire in The Piano." Screen vol. 36 no. 3. 1995 Autumn. pp: 257-66.
UC users only

Bussi, Elisa.
"Voyages and Border Crossings: Jane Campion's The Piano." In: The seeing century: film, vision and identity / edited by Wendy Everett. pp: 161-73. Amsterdam ; Atlanta: Rodopi, 2000. Critical studies (Amsterdam, Netherlands) ; v.14.
Main Stack PN1995.25.S44 2000

Calder, Alex.
"From Post-Colonialism to Settlement Studies: On the Consequences of Buying Land in Old New Zealand and The Piano." New Literatures Review. 39: 125-40. 2003 Summer.

Cantwell, Mary Cantwell
"Jane Campion's lunatic women." (film maker from New Zealand) The New York Times Magazine, Sept 19, 1993 p40 col 1 (125 col in)
"Jane Campion is a highly talented New Zealand motion picture director whose films have won international acclaim. Many of her female characters are mentally unstable, such as the heroin of her new film, 'The Piano.' Her training in Australia, various films and personal life are discussed." [Expanded Academic Index]

Chion, Michel
"Mute music: Polanski's The pianist and Campion's The piano." In: Beyond the soundtrack : representing music in cinema / edited by Daniel Goldmark, Lawrence Kramer, R Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
Music ML2075 .B475 2007
NRLF (UC Press)
Pacific Film Archive ML2075 .B475 2007

Chumo, Peter N., II.
"Keys to the Imagination: Jane Campion's The Piano." Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 25 no. 3. 1997. pp: 173-76.
UC users only
"Artistry frees the human spirit from social constraints in Jane Campion's 'The Piano.' Ada, the film's main character, has chosen to stop speaking and communicates either through a private set of gestures shared with her daughter or by playing a piano. When art supports nature in the film, both grow stronger, while separating art and nature leads to failure. Ada abandons her piano rather than let it carry her into the ocean, but retains its mental image as she enters her new life." [Expanded Academic Index]

Coombs, Felicity
Piano lessons : approaches to The piano / Felicity Coombs and Suzanne Gemmell. London : John Libbey, c1999. Southern screen classics ;1
Main PN1997.P474 C66 1999
Performing The piano / Ruth Barcan and Madeleine Fogarty -- With choices like these, who needs enemies?: The piano, women's articulations, melodrama, and the woman's film / Neil Robinson -- Female sexuality, creativity, and desire in The piano / Richard Allen -- The sickness unto death: dislocated gothic in a minor key / Kirsten Moana Thompson -- In the body of The piano / Felicity Coombs -- Tempestuous petticoats: costume and desire in The piano / Stella Bruzzi -- The return of the repressed?: whiteness, femininity and colonialism in The piano / Lynda Dyson -- From land escape to bodyscape: images of the land in The piano / Laurence Simmons -- A land without a past: dreamtime and nation in The piano / Anna Neill -- Birth of a nation?: from Utu to The piano / Bridget Orr -- Cutting if fine: notes on The piano in the editing room / Claire Corbett

Dalton, Mary M.; Fatzinger, Kirsten James.
"Choosing Silence: Defiance and Resistance without Voice in Jane Campion's The Piano." Women and Language. 26 (2): 34-39. 2003 Fall.
UC users only

Dapkus, Jeanne R.
"Sloughing off the burdens: Ada's and Isabel's parallel/antithetical quests for self-actualization in Jane Campion's film 'The Piano' and Henry James's novel 'The Portrait of a Lady.'" Literature-Film Quarterly, July 1997 v25 n3 p177(11)
UC users only
"The theme of women discovering freedom links Jane Campion's motion picture 'The Piano' and Henry James's novel, 'The Portrait of a Lady.' The protagonist of each work searches for self-actualization, discovering it when she abandons the male-imposed burdens that had controlled her life. Ada in 'The Piano' must abandon the instrument that symbolizes her civilized identity, while Isabel in 'Portrait' needs to give up her passionate, sexual self, and this is how each woman liberates herself.

Davis, Kimberly Chabot
Postmodern texts and emotional audiences / Kimberly Chabot Davis. West Lafayette, Ind. : Purdue University Press, c2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.P474 D38 2007

Davis, Michael.
"Tied to That Maternal 'Thing': Death and Desire in Jane Campion's The Piano." Gothic Studies. 4 (1): 63-78. 2002 May.
UC users only

Dayal, Samir.
"Inhuman Love: Jane Campion's The Piano." Postmodern Culture: an Electronic Journal of Interdisciplinary Criticism. 12(2):86 paragraphs. 2002 Jan
UC users only

DuPuis, Reshela
"Romanticizing Colonialism: Power and Pleasure in Jane Campion's the Piano." The Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 8, 1996

Dyson, Lynda.
"The Return of the Repressed? Whiteness, Femininity and Colonialism in The Piano." Screen vol. 36 no. 3. 1995 Autumn. pp: 267-76.
Also in:
Coombs, Felicity
Piano lessons : approaches to The piano / Felicity Coombs and Suzanne Gemmell. London : John Libbey, c1999. Southern screen classics ;1
Main PN1997.P474 C66 1999

Frus, Phyllis
"Borrowing a melody: Jane Campion's The piano and intertextuality." In: Beyond adaptation : essays on radical transformations of original works / edited by Phyllis Frus and Christy Williams. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2010.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN171.A33 B49 2010

Gelder, K.
"Jane Campion and the Limits of Literary Cinema." In: Adaptations : from text to screen, screen to text / edited by Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan. London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .A32 1999

Gillett, Sue.
"Lips and Fingers: Jane Campion's The Piano." Screen vol. 36 no. 3. 1995 Autumn. pp: 277-87.
UC users only

Golden, Karina
"Exploring the Therapeutic Fairy Tale Motifs of Silence, Betrayal, and the Search for a Voice in the Film 'The Piano'." Journal of Poetry Therapy, volume 13, Number 4, 209-217
UC users only

Goode, Pam.
"Foundational Romance, History and the Photograph in The Piano and Far and Away." Span: Journal of the South Pacific Association for Commonwealth Literature & Language Studies. 42-43:52-64. 1996 Oct

Gordon, Suzy.
"'I Clipped Your Wing, That's All': Auto-Erotism and the Female Spectator in The Piano Debate." Screen vol. 37 no. 2. 1996 Summer. pp: 193-205.

Hanigsberg, Julia E.
"Essay on the Piano, Law, and the Search for Women's Desire." Gender & Law. 41 (1995-1996)
UC users only

Hendershot, Cyndy.
"(Re)Visioning the Gothic: Jane Campion's The Piano." Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 26 no. 2. 1998. pp: 97-108
UC users only
"Filmmaker Jane Campion undermines the sexualization of the Victorian male in the 1992 film, "The Piano." Campion blatantly desexualizes Stewart and re-imagines gender through the character Baines. Baines is able to cast aside traditional gender characteristics, as he is portrayed as both marginal and attractive. However, Baines and Ada are forced to live as outcasts." [Expanded Academic Index]

Hendershot, Cyndy.
"(Re)Visioning the Gothic: Jane Campion's The Piano." In: The animal within : masculinity and the Gothic / Cyndy Hendershot. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR830.T3 H39 1998

Hoeveler, Diane Long
"Silence, sex, and feminism: an examination of The Piano's unacknowledged sources." Literature-Film Quarterly, April 1998 v26 n2 p109(8)
UC users only
"Filmmaker Jane Campion stated her 1992 film "The Piano" was inspired by a variety of sources when in fact "The Piano" is a revision of Jane Mander's "The Story of a New Zealand River" published in 1920 and reissued in 1938 and 1960 also under the title of "The River." Campion does not credit Mander as the source either in the screenplay or in the film." [Expand Academic Index]

Izod, John.
"The Piano, the animus, and the colonial experience." Journal of Analytical Psychology. Vol 41(1), Jan 1996, pp. 117-136
UC users only
Shows how post-Jungian animus theory illuminates the mysterious personality of Ada, the mute heroine of Jane Campion's The Piano (1993). In particular, Ann Ulanov's (1971) thoughts about animus development are connected with Demaris Wehr's (1987) observations concerning the internalization of social oppression in an argument that shows how, notwithstanding she is a woman, Ada is a product of colonial oppression. Her mythological antecedents are also considered and are particularly marked in that she resembles the handless maiden in Marie-Louise von Franz's (1993) analysis of that fairy tale. In this context Ada's ultimate renunciation of her husband is symbolically reinforced by the developing personality of her daughter Flora. The changes in both characters can be seen as implying not only the rebirth of Ada's psyche but also the emergence of a new psychological readiness to throw off the colonial mantle. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

Jacobs, Carol.
"Playing Jane Campion's Piano: Politically. MLN vol. 109 no. 5. 1994 Dec. PAGES: 757-85.
UC users only
The politics of the Jane Campion film "The Piano" unmistakably confront the contemporary issues of feminism, colonialism and environmentalism. The film's content is analyzed.

Jane Campion's The piano
Edited by Harriet Margolis. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000. Cambridge University Press film handbooks series
Main PN1997.P474 J36 2000
Introduction : "A strange heritage" : from colonization to transformation? / Harriet Margolis -- Music in The piano / Claudia Gorbman -- The last patriarch / Ann Hardy -- The piano, the animus, and colonial experience / John Izod -- Ebony and ivory : constructions of Maori in The piano / Leonie Pihama -- Foreign tunes? Gender and nationality in four countries' reception of The piano / Stephen Crofts

Jay, Betty
"'All Imperfect Things': Motherhood and the Aesthetics of Ambivalence in The Piano." Scope: An Online Journal of Film Studies, vol. 4, 2006 Feb

Johnson, Barbara
"Muteness envy." In: The feminist difference : literature, psychoanalysis, race, and gender p. 129-53. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1998.
MAIN: PN98.W64 J64 1998
MOFF: PN98.W64 J64 1998

Kaufman, Cynthia.
"Colonialism, purity, and resistance in The Piano." Socialist Review. 1994. Vol. 24, Iss. 1-2; p. 251 (5 pages)
Jane Campion's film "The Piano" illustrates how ideals of white femininity and certain promises of liberation for white women are implicated in structures of colonialism. Ignoring the contested colonial context creates an oversimplified vision of women's liberation.

Klinger, B.
"The art film, affect and the female viewer: "The Piano" revisited." Screen (London, England) v. 47 no. 1 (Spring 2006) p. 19-41
UC users only
"The art film's evocative image as a site of lingering affective power and uncertain meaning explains the enduring fascination of Jane Campion's 1993 film The Piano with female viewers. The film's closing scene, where the protagonist imagines herself anchored to her piano at the bottom of the sea, illustrates the relationship between cinematic visuals and affective responses negotiated through the viewer's past experiences. The associations that occur between this arresting image and those of other texts are created by means of a series of parallelisms that cover a wide territory, from the visual to the cultural; far from being unbounded, they find their roots in the viewer's cultural experience. Particulars between viewers vary, but through its graphic reenactment of a drama of a female identity that can potentially intersect in heterogeneous ways with the experiences of viewers, Campion's film invites personalization, which is a prime feature of cult relationships to film." [Art Index]

Knight, Christine.
"Ada's piano playing in Jane Campion's {The Piano}: genteel accomplishment or romantic self-expression?" Australian Feminist Studies, 21, no. 49 (Mar, 2006): 23-34
UC users only

Langdell, Cheri Davis.
"Pain of Silence: Emily Dickinson's Silences, Poetic Persona and Ada's Selfhood in The Piano." The Emily Dickinson Journal vol. 5 no. 2. 1996. pp: 196-201.

Logan, Deborah A.
"No Voice Is Hushed': Ada McGrath's Buried Life." VIJ: Victorians Institute Journal, vol. 31, pp. 56-84, 2003

Mabry, Rochelle.
"Fighting Fire with Fire: Reclaiming Phallocentric Conventions in Feminine Costume Dramas." West Virginia University Philological Papers. 48:107-14. 2001-2002

Maio, Kathi.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Ms. Magazine v4, n5 (March-April, 1994):84.

Margaroni, Maria.
"Jane Campion's selling of the mother/land: restaging the crisis of the postcolonial subject." Camera Obscura 53 (Sept 2003): 93(32).
UC users only
"The writer investigates the drama of geopolitical and maternal separation at the heart of The Piano, a film directed by Jane Campion. In its dramatization of a melancholic daughter's dilemma, The Piano demonstrates that clinging to the body of the mother might be a kind of suicide, as the subject is incapable of constructing itself as a "living system" that is "open to the other, capable of adaptation and change." The film envisions a postcolonial, postpatriarchal contract that is not predicated on a loss that is nostalgically mourned in the new order established, but precisely on an excess (concerning the mother) that opens up the very potential of the new. It is easy to dismiss Campion's (re)turn to the ancestral motherlands of the Victorian female body and the New Zealand landscape as a collapse into essentialism, but her treatment of these maternal bodies is sensitive to the ambiguity of their role within a colonial, phallogocentric economy." [Art Index]

McGlothlin, Erin.
"Speaking the 'Mind's Voice': Double Discursivity in Jane Campions's The Piano." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities. 23 (2): 19-32. 2004 Winter-Spring.
UC users only
"The writer investigates the drama of geopolitical and maternal separation at the heart of The Piano, a film directed by Jane Campion. In its dramatization of a melancholic daughter's dilemma, The Piano demonstrates that clinging to the body of the mother might be a kind of suicide, as the subject is incapable of constructing itself as a "living system" that is "open to the other, capable of adaptation and change." The film envisions a postcolonial, postpatriarchal contract that is not predicated on a loss that is nostalgically mourned in the new order established, but precisely on an excess (concerning the mother) that opens up the very potential of the new. It is easy to dismiss Campion's (re)turn to the ancestral motherlands of the Victorian female body and the New Zealand landscape as a collapse into essentialism, but her treatment of these maternal bodies is sensitive to the ambiguity of their role within a colonial, phallogocentric economy." [Art Index]

Molloy, Maureen
"Death and the Maiden: The Feminine and the Nation in Recent New Zealand Films." Signs , Vol. 25, No. 1 (Autumn, 1999), pp. 153-170
UC users only

Molina, Caroline.
"Muteness and Mutilation: The Aesthetics of Disability in Jane Campion's The Piano." In: The Body and Physical Difference: Discourses of Disability / David T. Mitchell and Sharon L. Snyder, editors. pp: 267-82. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, c1997. Body, in Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism.
Main Stack HV1568.B63 1997

Najita, Susan Yukie.
"Family Resemblances: The Construction of Pakeha History in Jane Campion's 'The Piano'." Ariel-A Review of International English Literature. 32(1):81-115. 2001 Jan
"Jane Campion's 1992 motion picture 'The Piano' is set in 1850 New Zealand, and attempts to portray a Pakeha nationalist identity by recuperating a fragmented past. This goal is articulated through sex roles and gender difference, relations between the indigenous Maori and white settlers, and traumatic temporalities outside a linear history." [Expanded Academic Inde]

Najita, Susan Yukie.
"Making Pakeha history : familial resemblances in Jane Campion's The piano." In: Decolonizing cultures in the Pacific : reading history and trauma in contemporary fiction / Susan Y. Najita. New York ; London : Routledge, 2006.
Main Stack PR9645.N35 2006
Moffitt PR9645.N35 2006

Najita, Susan Yukie.
"Family resemblances: The construction of Paheka history in Jane Campion's The piano." Ariel: A review of international English literature, 32(1) p81. Jan, 2001. Language: English.

Natharius, David. Dobkin, Bethami A.
"Feminist Visions of Transformation in The Ballad of Little Jo, The Piano, and Orlando." Women and Language. 25 (1): 9-17. 2002 Spring.

Norgrove, Aaron
" But is it music? The crisis of identity in 'The Piano.'" Race and Class, July-Sept 1998 v40 n1 p47(10)
"Critical acclaim for the motion picture 'The Piano' has focussed on the its portrayal of gender issues. However, another aspect of the film is its setting in the colonial structures of New Zealand, probably in the early 19th century. Director Jane Campion uses imagery to portray aspects of relations between the white settlers and the indigenous Maoris. These aspects include the portrayal of the Maoris as a group rather as individual characters, and the portrayal of the Maoris as part of nature." [Expanded Academic Index]

Perez Riu, Carmen.
"Two Gothic Feminist Texts: Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights and the Film, The Piano, by Jane Campion." Atlantis: Revista de la Asociacion Espanola de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos. 22 (1): 163-73. 2000 June.

Pettit, Z.
"Translating Verbal and Visual Language in The Piano." Perspectives Volume 15, Issue 3, 2007
UC users only

Pihama, Leonie
"Are films dangerous? A Maori woman's perspective on 'The Piano.'" (Special Aotearoa/New Zealand Issue) Hecate Oct 1994 v20 n2 p239(3) (1785 words)
"Renowned filmmaker Jane Campion's film, 'The Piano,' was critically acclaimed. However, the film has been criticized by Maoris for their depiction in the film. Maori women were pictured as willing sexual partners for Pakeha men. This colonial interpretation has given the impression that the Maoris were unreasoning and impulsive sexual creatures. Maoris have criticized the film for such depiction as it has failed to authentically portray their cultural and intelligence levels." [Expanded Academic Index]

Reid, Mark A.
"A Few Black Keys and Maori Tattoos: Re-Reading Jane Campion's The Piano in PostNegritude Time." Quarterly Review of Film & Video. 17(2):107-16. 2000 June
UC users only
The authors discussed character development and motivation in the motion picture The Piano. Topics include Victorian morality, romance, and narrative structure.

Roscoe, Jane. Hardy, Ann.
"Scratching the Surface: The Piano's Post-Colonial Veneer." Span: Journal of the South Pacific Association for Commonwealth Literature & Language Studies. 42-43:143-57. 1996 Oct

Rosenbaum, Jonathan
"Sexual disease (The piano)." In: Movies as politics. p. 140-44. Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
MAIN: PN1995.9.P6 R67 1997
MOFF: PN1995.9.P6 R67 1997

Roth, Bennett E.
"The piano: A modern film melodrama about passion and punishment." Psychoanalytic Psychology. Vol 17(2), Spr 2000, pp. 405-413
UC users only

Rothermel, Dennis.
"Heroic Endurance in The Piano (1993), Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), The Pianist (2002) and Hero (2002)." Quarterly Review of Film & Video, Jul2007, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p267-275, 9p
UC users only

Rothstein, Edward
"A piano as anchor, threat and movie star." (symbolic importance of the piano in the motion picture 'The Piano') (Living Arts Pages) The New York Times Jan 4, 1994 v143 pB1(N) pC15(L) col 1 (21 col in)

Segal, Naomi.
"The Fatal Attraction of The Piano." In: Scarlet Letters: Fictions of Adultery from Antiquity to the 1990s / Nicholas White and Naomi Segal. pp: 199-211. Houndsmills, Great Britain: Macmillan Press Ltd.; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1997.
Main Stack PN3352.A38.S29 1997

Sharp, Helena; Garry Gillard.
"'A path of great courage': The Piano." (Film As Text)(Critical Essay) Australian Screen Education Summer 2004 i35 p109(4) (2109 words)

Simmons, Rochelle
"The Piano." In: The cinema of Australia and New Zealand / edited by Geoff Mayer & Keith Beattie. London ; New York : Wallflower Press, 2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1993.5.A8 C55 2007

Sklarew, Bruce H.
"I have not spoken: Silence in The Piano." International Journal of Psycho-Analysis. Vol 79(5), Oct 1998, pp. 1011-1013
Presents a brief psychoanalytic interpretation and review of the film The Piano (1993), directed by Jane Campion. The author notes that an interesting quality of The Piano is the dearth of information about Ada's childhood other than the sudden onset of her muteness at the age of 6 yrs; there is no mention of her mother. It is also noted that throughout the film we see multiple representations of the merged and the interchangeable identities of Ada and Flora (Flora speaks for Ada), the mother-daughter dyad. The significance of the piano as a poignant transitional object linked to the absence of Ada's mother is discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

Thornley, Davinia
"Duel or Duet? Gendered Nationalism in The Piano." (Critical Essay) Film Criticism Spring 2000 v24 i3 p61 (6090 words)
UC users only
”The touted feminist text of Jane Campion's film The Piano is undermined by a lack of inter-racial understanding or even interaction on the part of Ada, its main protagonist. It has been argued that the developing sexual relationship between Ada and Baines, her lover and a fellow Scotsman "gone native," enacts a fantasy of reconciliation that permits them to become "real" New Zealanders. However, Ada's femininism not only suppresses the heterogeneity of the native Maori, but also negates the race completely, and as such must be seen as a form of imperialism. Moreover, Baines's "understanding" of the Maori appears one-way, with the Maori characters constantly giving and Baines simply receiving--an analogy that could apply to colonialism itself.” [Art Index]

Van Buren, Jane.
"Silences From The Deep: Mapping Being And Nonbeing in The Piano and in a Schizoid Young Woman." American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Jun2000, Vol. 60 Issue 2, p139, 23p
UC users only

Wrye, Harriet Kimble.
"Tuning a clinical ear to the ambiguous chords of Jane Campion's The Piano." Psychoanalytic Inquiry. Special Projections of psychic eality: A centennial of film and psychoanalysis. Vol 18(2), 1998, pp. 168-182
UC users only
Reflects on the ways in which the complex iconography of The Piano provides access to early hungers, fears, and longings oriented toward the mother's sensual and voluptuous body--the journey into the primal swampy "dark continent." The birth of desire and emergent capacity to speak and be heard, and the genuine capacity for mutuality in love that emerges slowly in both George Baines and Ada McGrath, has its roots in the discovery and acceptance of the "dark continent" of the feminine body. It's suggested that such creative discovery and acceptance lead from repressive sensory isolation to erotic vitality. Adult heterosexual erotic excitement, evidenced in Ada and Baines's love affair, reveals the rich reparative possibilities of adult relationships to heal early deprivation and provide the path to oedipal resolution. The author concludes that the imagery of the film furnishes an associative vehicle for patients to explore their internal unconscious relations to the internal mother and father, which form or deform their intersubjective adult relations. The clinical case of a female analysand is also presented in this article, for whom the iconography of The Piano became a central organizing metaphor. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

Zarzosa, Agustin.
"Jane Campion's The Piano: melodrama as mode of exchange." New Review of Film & Television Studies, Dec2010, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p396-411, 16p
UC users only

Reviews

Alleva, Richard.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Commonweal v121, n1 (Jan 14, 1994):27 (2 pages).
UC users only

Blake, Richard A.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) America v170, n2 (Jan 15, 1994): 14.
UC users only

Bruzzi, Stella.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v3, n10 (Oct, 1993):10 (4 pages).

Buck, Joan Juliet.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Vogue v183, n12 (Dec, 1993):127 (2 pages).

Canby, Vincent
"The Piano." (movie reviews) The New York Times Oct 16, 1993 v143 p13(N) pp13(L) col 1 (33 col in)

Corliss, Richard.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Time v142, n22 (Nov 22, 1993):79.
UC users only

Crisp, Quentin.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Christopher Street, n210 (Feb, 1994):9.

Denby, David.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) New York v26, n46 (Nov 22, 1993):72 (2 pages).

Francke, Lizzie.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v3, n11 (Nov, 1993):50 (2 pages).

Gage, Carolyn.
"'The Piano': Dangerous Music." (movie reviews) off our backs v24, n2 (Feb, 1994):21.

Greenberg, Harvey.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Film Quarterly v47, n3 (Spring, 1994):46 (5 pages).
UC users only

Halprin, Sara.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Women's Review of Books v11, n10-11 (July, 1994):35 (2 pages).

James, Caryn
"A distinctive shade of darkness." (Jane Campion's film, 'The Piano') The New York Times Nov 28, 1993 v143 s2 pH13(N) pH13(L) col 1 (36 col in)

Johnson, Brian D.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Maclean's v106, n47 (Nov 22, 1993):72 (2 pages).
UC users only

Kaufman, Cynthia.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Socialist Review v24, n1-2 (Wntr, 1995):251 (5 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) New Republic v209, n24 (Dec 13, 1993):30 (2 pages).
UC users only

Kerr, Sarah.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) New York Review of Books v41, n3 (Feb 3, 1994):29 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Nation v257, n19 (Dec 6, 1993):704 (3 pages).
UC users only

Klinger, Barbara.
"The art film, affect and the female viewer: The Piano revisited." Screen, Spring2006, Vol. 47 Issue 1, p19-41, 23p

Knight, Christine.
"Ada's Piano Playing in Jane Campion's "The Piano": Genteel Accomplishment or Romantic Self-expression?" Australian Feminist Studies, Mar2006, Vol. 21 Issue 49, p23-34, 12p
UC users only

Kroll, Jack.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Newsweek v122, n20 (Nov 15, 1993):76 (2 pages).

Lane, Anthony.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) New Yorker v69, n40 (Nov 29, 1993):148 (4 pages).

Pearson, Harry.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Films in Review v45, n3-4 (March-April, 1994):566 (2 pages).

"Piano lessons - The Piano directed by Jane Campion." American Anthropologist. Dec 1995. Vol. 97, Iss. 4; p. 763 (6 pages)
UC users only

Quart, Barbara.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Cineaste v20, n3 (Summer, 1993):54 (3 pages).

Romney, Jonathan.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society v6, n276 (Oct 29, 1993):33 (2 pages).

Rueschmann, Eva
"Out Of Place: Reading (Post) Colonial Landscapes As Gothic Space In Jane Campion's Films." Post Script, Winter-Summer2005, Vol. 24, Issue 2/3
UC users only

Seligman, Craig.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) Advocate, n642 (Nov 16, 1993):88.

Simon, John.
"The Piano." (movie reviews) National Review v45, n25 (Dec 27, 1993):66 (2 pages).
UC users only

Travers, Peter
"Sex and 'The Piano.'" (motion picture directed by Jane Campion) Rolling Stone, Dec 9, 1993 n671 p76(1)
"The motion picture industry has not honored Campion for her excellent work because Hollywood insiders get jealous when foreign productions excel. 'The Piano' is an excellent film which deserves Academy Awards but is unlikely to get them." [Expanded Academic Index]

The Portrait of a Lady

Alleva, Richard.
"The Portrait of a Lady." Commonweal Feb 28, 1997 v124 n4 p19(2) (1293 words)
UC users only

Ansen, David
"The Portrait of a Lady." Newsweek Dec 23, 1996 v128 n26 p67(2) (1080 words)
UC users only Adapting Americas in Novels Adapted for Films. Full Text Available Adaptarea Americii în romanele adaptate în film. By:

Barlowe, Jamie
""On which (we) looked up at her": Henry James's and Jane Campion's Portrait(s) of a lady'" In: He said, she says : an RSVP to the male text / edited by Mica Howe and Sarah Appleton Aguiar. p. 221-37. Madison [NJ] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c2001.
MAIN: PS228.F45 H4 2001

Bauer, Dale M.
"Jane Campion's Symbolic Portrait." Henry James Review vol. 18 no. 2. 1997 Spring. pp: 194-96.
UC users only

Bentley, Nancy.
"'Conscious Observation of a Lovely Woman': Jane Campion's Portrait of a Lady." Henry James Review vol. 18 no. 2. 1997 Spring. pp: 174-79.
UC users only

Bentley, Nancy
"Conscious observation: Jane Campion's Portrait of a lady." In" Henry James goes to the movies
Edited by Susan M. Griffin. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, c2002.
Main Stack PS2127.F55 H45 2002

Boudreau, Kristin
"Is the World Then So Narrow? Feminist Cinematic Adaptations of Hawthorne and James." The Henry James Review - Volume 21, Number 1, Winter 2000, pp. 43-53
UC users only

Bousquet, Marc
"I Don't Like Isabel Archer." The Henry James Review - Volume 18, Number 2, Spring 1997, pp. 197-199
UC users only

Bowman, James
"The Portrait of a Lady." The American Spectator Feb 1997 v30 n2 p63(1)

Bruzzi, Stella
"The Portrait of a Lady." Sight and Sound March 1997 v7 n3 p60(1)

Chandler, Karen Michele.
"Agency and Social Constraint in Jane Campion's The Portrait of a Lady." Henry James Review vol. 18 no. 2. 1997 Spring. pp: 191-93.
UC users only

Coe, Jonathan.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) New Statesman (1996) v126, n4323 (Feb 28, 1997):43 (1 page).
UC users only

Dapkus, Jeanne R.
"Sloughing off the burdens: Ada's and Isabel's parallel/antithetical quests for self-actualization in Jane Campion's film 'The Piano' and Henry James's novel 'The Portrait of a Lady.'" Literature-Film Quarterly, July 1997 v25 n3 p177(11)
UC users only
"The theme of women discovering freedom links Jane Campion's motion picture 'The Piano' and Henry James's novel, 'The Portrait of a Lady.' The protagonist of each work searches for self-actualization, discovering it when she abandons the male-imposed burdens that had controlled her life. Ada in 'The Piano' must abandon the instrument that symbolizes her civilized identity, while Isabel in 'Portrait' needs to give up her passionate, sexual self, and this is how each woman liberates herself.

Denby, David.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) New York v30, n1 (Jan 13, 1997):45 (2 pages).

Francke, Lizzie.
"On the Brink." In: Film/literature/heritage / edited by Ginette Vincendeau. London : British Film Institute, 2001.
MAIN: PN1995.3 .F54 2001
PFA : PN1995.3 .F44 2001

Francke, Lizzie.
"On the Brink." Sight & Sound v. ns6 (November 1996) p. 6-9
”A discussion of Jane Campion's adaptation of Henry James's Portrait of a Lady. Campion and screenwriter Laura Jones offer a reading of James's work that harks back to Campion's first youthful exploration of the novel and elaborates on it. Campion's work to date has been so deliriously uncensored that it taps into the most perverse parts of the female psyche, unafraid to deal with women who are the undoing of themselves. At the troubled, and therefore fascinating, core of her work is the exploration of female masochism. This is no less predominant in Portrait, where Isabel allows herself to be ensnared by Osmond into the most sadomasochistic of relationships. Campion traces Isabel's journey, from ingenue to a woman caught up in an elaborate style. In this film haunted by Eros and Thanatos, the path to love seems one of psychotic self-destruction.” [Art Index]

Gelder, Ken
"Jane Campion and the limits of literary cinema." In: Adaptations : from text to screen, screen to text / edited by Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan. London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
MAIN: PN1997.85 .A32 1999

Goodridge, Mike.
"A girl's own story: Jane Campion." In: Directing Boston : Focal Press, 2002.
MAIN: PN1998.A2 G66 2002

Gordon, Rebecca M.
"Portraits Perversely Framed: Jane Campion and Henry James." Film Quarterly. 56 (2): 14-24. 2002-2003 Winter.
UC users only
"The writer discusses Jane Campion's film version of Henry James's Portrait of a Lady. Generally, critics who became enamored with Campion for her earlier films, such as The Piano, responded ambivalently to Portrait of a Lady. Some regarded the dubious decision to make a Hollywood-style movie, worse still an adaptation, as Campion dabbling in the waters of "literary" cinema, "coarsening" her vision as a consequence. Undoubtedly, Campion was making a bid for the mainstream with the film, because it oozes money and high production values. Appearing in 1996 after a spate of Jane Austen movie adaptations and during a surge of American and British "literary" films, Campion's contribution seems suspiciously like an opportunity to exploit the trend for films based on the classics." [Art Index]

Green, Jesse
"That was no 'Lady': pilfering literature; what benumbs a legend most? Why do film makers add insult to injury by invoking the authors whose works they are debasing?" The New York Times May 11, 1997 v146 s2 pH23(N) pH23(L) col 1 (33 col in)

Halliwell, Martin.
"Transcultural Aesthetics and the Film Adaptations of Henry James." In: Classics in film and fiction / edited by Deborah Cartmell [et al.]. London ; Sterling, Va. : Pluto Press, 2000. Film/fiction ; v. 5
Main Stack PN1997.85.C56 2000

Horne, Philip
"The Portrait of a Lady." TLS. Times Literary Supplement March 7, 1997 n4901 p20(1)

Izzo, Donatella.
"Setting a Free Woman Free: The Portrait(s) of a Lady." Q/W/E/R/T/Y: Arts, Litteratures & Civilisations du Monde Anglophone. 8: 169-79. 1998 Oct.

Johnson, Brian D.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) Maclean's v110, n3 (Jan 20, 1997):69 (1 page).
UC users only

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) New Republic v215, n26 (Dec 23, 1996):28 (2 pages).
UC users only

Kelly, David.
"The Lady in the Frame: Two Portraits by Henry James and Jane Campion." Senses of Cinema: An Online Film Journal Devoted to the Serious and Eclectic Discussion of Cinema. 18: (no pagination). 2002 Jan-Feb.

Klawans, Stuart.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) Nation v264, n4 (Feb 3, 1997):35 (2 pages).
UC users only

Kramer, Lawrence.
"Recognizing Schubert: Musical Subjectivity, Cultural Change, and Jane Campion's The Portrait of a Lady." Critical Inquiry. 29 (1): 25-52. 2002 Fall.

Lane, Anthony
"The Portrait of a Lady." The New Yorker Jan 6, 1997 v72 n41 p75(1)

Lurie, Susan.
"A Twentieth-Century Portrait: Jane Campion's American Girl." In: Victorian afterlife : postmodern culture rewrites the nineteenth century / John Kucich and Dianne F. Sadoff, editors. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2000.
MAIN: PR461 .V5 2000

Mabry, Rochelle.
"Fighting Fire with Fire: Reclaiming Phallocentric Conventions in Feminine Costume Dramas." West Virginia University Philological Papers. 48: 107-14. 2001-2002.

Margolis, Harriet and Hughes, Janet
"Jane Campion's The portrait of a lady." In: Nineteenth-century American fiction on screen / edited by R. Barton Palmer. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Main Stack PN1997.85.N54 2007

Maslin, Janet
"The Portrait of a Lady." The New York Times Dec 27, 1996 v146 pB1(N) pC3(L) col 5 (29 col in)

McCarthy, Todd.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) Variety v364, n6 (Sept 9, 1996):114 (1 page).

Murphy, Kathleen
”Jane Campion's shining: portrait of a director.” Film Comment v. 32 (November/December 1996) p. 28-31+
”Only a filmmaker with the hubris to think that art and moral adventure matter could have made The Portrait of a Lady in the densely telling hues and uncompromising forms Jane Campion has achieved. Campion's film largely succeeds in recasting Henry James's exquisitely wrought prose, his interior epiphanies and apocalypses, into dialogue, images, and performances that explode in slowest, completely devastating motion. The novel's central metaphors, resonating dialogue, and actors are authentically brought to life, without cinematic disguise or distortion, with Campion recording the journeys of women into unknown territory with passionate conviction, making their quests as emblematic of the human condition as any Adam's.” [Art Index]

Nadel, Alan.
"The Search for Cinematic Identity and a Good Man: Jane Campion's Appropriation of James's Portrait." Henry James Review vol. 18 no. 2. 1997 Spring. PAGES: 180-83.
UC users only

Ozick, Cynthia
"Cinematic James." In: Quarrel & quandary : essays New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 2000.
MAIN: PN511 .O95 2000

Ozick, Cynthia
"What only words, not film, can portray." (adapting Henry James) The New York Times Jan 5, 1997 v146 s2 pH1(N) pH1(L) col 1 (40 col in)

Pawelczak, Andy.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) Films in Review v48, n1-2 (Jan-Feb, 1997):78 (2 pages).

Sadoff, Dianne F.
""Intimate Disarray": The Henry James Movies." The Henry James Review - Volume 19, Number 3, Fall 1998, pp. 286-295
UC users only

Schickel, Richard.
"The Portrait of a Lady." (movie reviews) Time v148, n29 (Dec 30, 1996):153 (2 pages).
UC users only

Shargel, Raphael.
"The Portrait of a Lady." The New Leader Dec 29, 1997 v80 n19 p32(2) (1461 words)
UC users only

Shaw, Daniel.
"Isabel Archer: Tragic Protagonist or Pitiable Victim?." Literature/Film Quarterly. 30 (4): 249-55. 2002.
UC users only
"The author suggests that the title character of "Portrait of a Lady" by Henry James is not a tragic heroine, but rather a victim of her society. Isabel Archer is forced by social conventions to return to her husband rather than stay with the man she loves. Jane Campion's film adaptation further weakens the character by ending prematurely, leaving Isabel's decision unmade." [Expanded Academic Index]

Simon, John
"The Portrait of a Lady." National Review Feb 10, 1997 v49 n2 p58(1) (1329 words)
UC users only

Sklar, Robert
"A novel approach to movie making: reinventing 'The Portrait of a Lady.'" The Chronicle of Higher Education Feb 14, 1997 v43 n23 pB7(1)
"Jane Campion's film version of Henry James's 'Portrait of a Lady' invites consideration of how filmmakers use literature. Campion's concern is to show how Isabel, the story's main character, defines freedom differently than the film's audience. We see freedom as the impermanence of choice, while Isabel asserts her self-worth by entering a bad marriage without being forced. The debate should not center on whether the film or the novel is preferable, but on what adaptations should try to accomplish." [Expanded Academic Index]

Walton, Priscilla L.
"Jane and James Go to the Movies: Post Colonial Portraits of a Lady." Henry James Review vol. 18 no. 2. 1997 Spring. pp: 187-90.
UC users only

Wexman, Virginia Wright.
"The Portrait of a Body." Henry James Review ( vol. 18 no. 2. 1997 Spring. pp: 184-86.
UC users only

Wilson, Emma.
"Isabel's Child: The Portrait of a Lady." Film Studies: An International Review. 3: 18-30. 2002 Spring.

Sweetie

D'Cruz, Doreen.
"Textual Enigmas and Disruptive Desires in Jane Campion's "Sweetie." Australian Feminist Studies, Mar2006, Vol. 21 Issue 49, p7-22, 16p
UC users only


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