Tim Burton:
A Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Library












Books
Journal articles

Articles and Books on Individual films


Books

Breskin, David.
"Tim Burton." In: Inner views: filmmakers in conversation Boston: Faber and Faber, c1992.
Moffitt PN1998.2.B74 1992

Burton, Tim
Burton on Burton London; Boston: Faber and Faber, 1995.
MAIN: PN1998.3.B97 A3 1995

Burton, Tim
Tim Burton : interviews / <2005> Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2005.
PFA : PN1998.3.B86 A3 2005

Hammond, Michael.
"Tim Burton." In: Contemporary American cinema / edited by Linda Ruth Williams and Michael Hammond. London ; Boston : Open University Press, c2006.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]

Hanke, Ken
Tim Burton: an unauthorized biography of the filmmaker Los Angeles, CA : Renaissance Books; [New York] : Distributed by St. Martin's Press, c1999.
PFA : PN1998.3.B86 H36 1999

Heldreth, Leonard G.
"Architecture, duality, and personality: mise-en-scene and boundaries in Tim Burton's films." In: Trajectories of the fantastic : selected essays from the Fourteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts / edited by Michael A. Morrison. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1997.
MAIN: NX650.F36 T7 1997

Horsley, Jason
"Beautiful freaks : Tim Burton's celebrations of specialness." In: The secret life of movies : schizophrenic and shamanic journeys in American cinema / Jason Horsley. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.S247 H67 2009

McMahan, Alison.
The films of Tim Burton : animating live action in contemporary Hollywood New York : Continuum, 2005.
PFA : PN1998.3.B86 M36 2005
MAIN: PN1998.3.B875 M36 2005; View current
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0510/2005009872.html

Page, Edwin.
Gothic fantasy : the films of Tim Burton London ; New York : Marion Boyars Publishers, 2007.
MAIN: PN1998.3.B875 P34 2007

Ray, Brian
"Tim Burton and the idea of fairy tales." In: Fairy tale films : visions of ambiguity / Pauline Greenhill and Sidney Eve Matrix, editors. Logan, Utah : Utah State University Press, 2010.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.F34 F35 2010

Smith, Jim.
Tim Burton London : Virgin, 2002.
MAIN: PN1998.3.B97 S64 2002

Tirard, Laurent
"Time Burton." In: Moviemakers' master class : private lessons from the world's foremost directors 1st ed. New York : Faber and Faber, 2002.
Main Stack PN1995.9.P7.T495 2002
Moffitt PN1995.9.P7.T495 2002

Journal Articles

Andac, Ben.
"Tim Burton." (Great Directors: A Critical Database) Senses of Cinema

Ansen, David
"The disembodied director: maybe Tim Burton isn't twisted. Maybe he's as sane as they come." Newsweek Jan 21, 1991 v117 n3 p58(3)

"Burton, Tim." Current Biography July 1991 v52 n7 p6(5)

Ciment, Michel
"Entretien avec Tim Burton: Une Romance tragique purement émotionnelle." Positif: Revue Mensuelle de Cinéma, vol. 564, pp. 10-14, Feb 2008

Gombeaud, Adrien; Valens, Grégory
"Entretien avec Tim Burton: Rester fidèle à l'ambiguïté." Positif: Revue Mensuelle de Cinéma, vol. 535, pp. 9-12, September 2005

Hanke, Ken
"Tim Burton." Films in Review, Nov-Dec 1992 v43 n11-12 p374(8)
"Tim Burton's career as a movie director and his works are evaluated. From his directorial debut in the short film 'Frankenweenie' to his latest 'Batman Returns,' Burton's collective work is viewed as trivial often contained in shallow storylines. However, a deeper look reveals a consistency in all his films. Further analysis of characters in Burton films attempts to discover his personality. Other Burton films include: 'Pee-Wee's Big Adventure,' and 'Beetlejuice." [Expanded Academic Index]

Hanke, Ken
"Tim Burton" (Part 2). Films in Review, Jan-Feb 1993 v44 n1-2 p40(8)
"Hollywood director Tim Burton's name has been associated with his earlier films such as 'Beetlejuice' and 'Edward Scissorhands,' but Burton became famous with his later films 'Batman' and 'Batman Returns.' His style is evident in his use of the color blue, strong images, fun and cinematic innovation. Burton's work puts these films in a league far ahead of films made on other superheroes such as Superman. There are rumors of a third Batman film, and it is important that Burton directs it, but avoids the mistakes he made in the first two." [Expanded Academic Index]

Hirschberg, Lynn
"Drawn to Narrative." (Magazine Desk)(film director Tim Burton)(Interview)(Biography) The New York Times Magazine Nov 9, 2003 p50 col 01 (92 col in)

"Spielberg 2: Tim Burton." The Economist (US), June 27, 1992 v323 n7765 p103(2)
Director Tim Burton appears to have another enormous hit with the Batman sequel, 'Batman Returns.' He only agreed to direct when he was given input into the storyline. The film's success is starting speculation that a third Batman may be on the way.

Wisniewska, Dorota J.
"Strangers in the Strange Land: The Gothic Mode in Tim Burton's Films." American Studies, vol. 20, pp. 143-56, 2003

Books and Articles About Individual Films

Alice in Wonderland

Corliss, Richard.
"Tim Burton, Wonder Boy." Time, 3/15/2010, Vol. 175 Issue 10, p51-52
UC users only

Elliott, Kamilla.
"Adaptation as Compendium: Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland."" Adaptation, Jul2010, Vol. 3 Issue 2, p193-201, 9p
UC users only

Batman

Alleva, Richard
"Batman Returns." (movie reviews)Commonweal August 14, 1992 v119 n14 p28(2) (1356 words)
UC users only

Bernardo, Susan M.
"Recycling Victims and Villains in Batman Returns." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 16-20, 1994.
UC users only

Breskin, David
"Tim Burton: the Rolling Stone interview." ("Batman Returns" film director) Rolling Stone, July 9, 1992 n634-35 p38(7)
Burton directed the smash hit motion pictures 'Batman' 'Edward Scissorhands' and 'Batman Returns.' His childhood, inspirations, dreams, therapy, education and works are discussed.

Brody, Michael.
"Batman: Psychic Trauma and Its Solution." Journal of Popular Culture, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 171-78, Spring 1995.

Ciment, Michel; Vachaud, Laurent
"Entretien avec Tim Burton: Pour moi, l'imaginaire est plus vrai." Positif: Revue Mensuelle de Cinéma, vol. 517, pp. 15-19, March 2004

Corliss, Richard
"Battier and better." Time June 22, 1992 v139 n25 p69(3) (2048 words)
UC users only
The new movie 'Batman Returns' is interesting for its odd characters who have dual identities and are socially isolated. There is also a romance between opposites: Bruce Wayne, who is the hero Batman, and Selina Kyle, the villainess Catwoman.

Fisher, Jennifer
"Museal Tropes in Popular Film." Visual Communication, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 197-201, June 2002.Fisher, Jennifer, Visual Communication, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 197-201, June 2002.

Higley, Sarah L.
"A Taste for Shrinking: Movie Miniatures and the Unreal City." Camera Obscura no. 47 (2001) p. 1-35
"The writer examines the reception of the illusion created by miniatures in seven films: Fritz Lang's Metropolis, David Butler's Just Imagine, Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, Tim Burton's Batman and Edward Scissorhands, and Alex Proyas's The Crow and Dark City. In each of these films, on which thousands or millions of dollars were spent on elaborate miniature photography, viewers are treated to an aerial vista of a city into which they descend along with the protagonists. While the express ambition of the effects artists is to provide an illusion of a believable city viewed from above, the full pleasure of the film relies on its being seen as a set to be gazed at, beyond anything that either Disneyland or the 1939 World's Fair could offer. Rather than menacing viewers, the filmic miniature permits them to disarm and colonize troubling cultural spaces in what it suggests and omits of America's actual inner-city problems." [Art Index]

Kauffmann, Stanley
"Batman Returns." (movie reviews) The New Republic July 27, 1992 v207 n5 p46(2) (1101 words)
UC users only

Klawans, Stuart
"Batman Returns." (movie reviews) The Nation July 13, 1992 v255 n2 p64(1) (566 words)
UC users only

Lowentrout, P.
"Batman: Winging through the Ruins of the American Baroque." Extrapolation Spring92, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p24-31, 8p
UC users only

Morgenstern, Joe
"Tim Burton, Batman and the joker; the director turns his surrealistic wit to the comic classic." The New York Times Magazine April 9, 1989 v138 p44 col 1 (100 col in)

Orr, Philip
"The Anoedipal Mythos of Batman and Cat-Woman." Journal of Popular Culture, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 169-82, Spring 1994.
UC users only

Petrie, Duncan
"But What If Beauty Is a Beast: Doubles, Transformations and Fairy Tale Motifs in Batman Returns." In: Cinema and the realms of enchantment : lectures, seminars and essays / by Marina Warner and others; edited by Duncan Petrie. London : British Film Institute, 1993.
Main Stack PN1995.9.F36.C55 1993

Reed, Cory A.
"Batman Returns: From the Comic(s) to the Grotesque." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 37-50, Summer 1995.
UC users only

Sarchett, Barry W.
"The Joke(r) Is on Us: The End of Popular Culture Studies." Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 71-97, Fall 1996.

Simon, John
"Batman Returns." (movie reviews) National Review August 3, 1992 v44 n15 p45(2) (1210 words)
UC users only

Terrill, Robert E.
"Put on a Happy Face: Batman as Schizophrenic Savior." The Quarterly Journal of Speech, vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 319-35, August 1993.

Thomas, Calvin
"Last Laughs: Batman, Masculinity, and the Technology of Abjection." Men & Masculinities, Jul99, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p26, 21p
UC users only

Thomas, Calvin
"Batman, Masculinity and the Technology of Abjection." In: The trouble with men : masculinities in European and Hollywood cinema / edited by Phil Powrie, Ann Davies and Bruce Babington. London; New York : Wallflower, 2004
On order for Main
Also in:
Men & Masculinities; Jul99, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p26, 21p

Travert, RaphaŽlle
"Tim Burton: Enfance, images, mythologie américaine." Avant Scene Cinéma, vol. 530, pp. 70-72, March 2004

Tringali, Juliana
"Annals of the Superheroine." Bitch Magazine: Feminist Response to Pop Culture; Spring2007 Issue 35, p96-96, 1p
UC users only

Vassilieva, Elena
"Gothic Archetypes in Hollywood: The Trickster and the Double in Batman and The Mask." Anglophonia: French Journal of English Studies, vol. 15, pp. 199-207, 2004.

Wisniewska, Dorota J.
"Strangers in the Strange Land: The Gothic Mode in Tim Burton's Films." American Studies, vol. 20, pp. 143-56, 2003

Zam, Michael.
"Come back to the Batmobile, Robin honey." The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review. Oct 31, 1995.Vol.2, Iss. 4; pg. 55

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Alleva, Richard.
"Strange invaders:"War of the Worlds" & "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory".(Screen)(Movie Review)." Commonweal 132.14 (August 12, 2005): 30(2).

"Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." American Cinematographer (May 2007 supp) p. 20-2
UC users only
"Part of a special section on the collaborations between cinematographers, production designers, and directors in the production of several recent feature films. The writer examines the collaborative work behind the 2005 fantasy film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. During production, digital pre-visualization was much more than just a tool to test the cinematic possibilities of the sets for cinematographer Philippe Rousselot. The 3D Maya models created by director Tim Burton, production designer Alex McDowell, and a team of pre-vis artists from Proof, Inc., were also employed to perform many other tasks, from choreographing Oompa Loompas to virtually dressing sets. For Rousselot, pre-vis was especially vital to the process when he was working against greenscreen backdrops and had to light the scene to specifically match the CGI that would be created." [Art Index]

Clarke, Roger.
"An improper Charlie.(Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)." Sight and Sound 15.8 (August 2005): 23(3).
UC users only
"Roald Dahl's work Charlie and the Chocolate Factory depict about the owner of the sweet factory allows five children into his factory. They are the winners of the golden tickets wrapped in ordinary chocolate bars. The children were spoilt brats. He disliked the film version of the book. This is not a conventional childrenEs film but rather is aimed at elongated children who call themselves adults." [Expanded Academic Index]

Delorme, Stephane
"Pedophobe et deppophile." Cahiers du Cinema no. 604 (September 2005) p. 31-2
"A review of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, a film by Tim Burton. Based on Roald Dahl's popular children's book, the film tells the story of a poor boy who wins a visit to the legendary Willy Wonka's chocolate factory in the company of four other children. In Burton's version of the story, the goody-goody Charlie fades into the background, replaced by the unhappy, disgraceful, and disgraced child that is Willy Wonka, played perfectly by Johnny Depp." [Art Index]

Gilbey, Ryan.
"Charlie and the Chocolate factory.(Movie Review)." Sight and Sound 15.9 (Sept 2005): 58(1).
UC users only
"Tim Burton's adaptation of Roald Dahl's novel plays it straighter than the 1971 film version, which resembled a bad trip. Unfortunately, the factory scenes are dulled by the familiarity of Alex McDowell's production design, although the lack of surprises may partly be the fault of Burton, whose style has been so pervasive. The movie is generally on firmer ground outside the factory gates, where the non-factory sets allow it to take flight. Meanwhile, the flashbacks to Wonka's own childhood impressively evoke quiet misery, an important ingredient that tempers the shrillness in the rest of the picture." [Art Index]

Lichtig, Toby.
"Willy's bonkers.(Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)(Movie Review)." TLS. Times Literary Supplement 5340 (August 5, 2005): 17(1).

Magid, Ron
"Dishing Up Dazzling Eye Candy." Animation Magazine v. 19 no. 8 (August 2005) p. 8-10, 12
UC users only
"In conversation, various people discuss their involvement in the visual effects for Tim Burton's film of Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Topics discussed include the creation of the Chocolate River as an in-camera effect, the CG squirrels created for the Squirrel Room scene, and the variety of means used to create the weird Oompa Loompa pygmy tribe that runs Willy Wonka's phantasmagoric Chocolate Factory." [Art Index]

Magid, Ron
"A Tasty River and Tiny Workers." American Cinematographer v. 86 no. 7 (July 2005) p. 44-5
UC users only
"A discussion of some of the effects used in Tim Burton's new film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. In creating the Chocolate River practically, special-effects supervisor Joss Williams found Natrusol to be the perfect thickening agent, but had more difficulty finding the right color for the chocolate. Making the river practically allowed visual effects to be used on other aspects of the film, such as the Oompa Loompas who operate the factory. Visual-effects supervisor Nick Davis brought in The Moving Picture Company to create these characters, which involved replicating the one actor who played them all, and scaling them down to the required size." [Art Index]

McCarthy, Todd. "Funky hunk o' Wonka.(Movie Review)." Variety 399.7 (July 11, 2005): 21(2).
UC users only

Parsons, Elizabeth
"Buckets of Money: Tim Burton's New Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." In: Fantasy fiction into film : essays / edited by Leslie Stratyner and James R. Keller. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.F36 F37 2007

Pincus, Aaron L.
"The Schizotypy of Willy Wonka." PsycCRITIQUES, Vol 51 (10), 2006. [Review-Media]
UC users only

Pulliam, June.
"Charlie's Evolving Moral Universe: Filmic Interpretations of Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." In: Fantasy fiction into film : essays / edited by Leslie Stratyner and James R. Keller. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.F36 F37 2007

Sawyer, Miranda.
"Dark imaginings: Burton takes a bitter-sweet view of Dahl's weird sugar world.(film)(Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)(Movie Review)." New Statesman (1996) 134.4751 (August 1, 2005): 34(1).
UC users only

Schickel, Richard.
"For Wonka, Tooth Is Beauty: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory's not dark enough.(Arts/Movies)(Movie Review)(Brief Article)." Time 166.3 (July 18, 2005): 72.
UC users only

Seiter, Richard D.
"The Bittersweet Journey from Charlie to Willy Wonka." In: Children's novels and the movies / edited by Douglas Street. New York : F. Ungar Pub. Co., c1983.
Moffitt PN1997.85 .C44 1983

Smith, Sean.
"Citizen Cane; Johnny Depp, Hollywood's hottest eccentric, meets his match playing Willy Wonka in Tim Burton's 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.' How sweet is that?(Interview)." Newsweek (July 4, 2005): 48.
UC users only

Travers, Peter.
"Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.(Movie Review)." Rolling Stone 979 (July 28, 2005): 92(1).

The Corpse Bride

Ball, Ryan
"Black Wedding." Animation Magazine v. 19 no. 9 (September 2005) p. 8-10, 12
UC users only
"Corpse Bride, a new animated film directed by Tim Burton and Mike Johnson, takes the eclipsed art of stop-motion animation to a completely new level. Whereas Jack Skellington, a character in The Nightmare Before Christmas, an earlier stop-motion film directed by Tim Burton, used a series of replacement heads that were changed between frames to create different facial expressions, the leads in this new film all have mechanical heads, permitting greater control of facial expressions. To help accelerate things, the animation was shot on Cannon ELS Mark II digital still cameras instead of being shot on 35mm film." [Art Index]

Newman, Kim.
"Corpse Bride.(Movie Review)." Sight and Sound 15.11 (Nov 2005): 56(1).

Olson, Debbie
" Little Burton Blue: Tim Burton and the Product(ion) of Color in the Fairy Tale Films The Nightmare before Christmas and The Corpse Bride." MP: A Feminist Journal Online; Jun2007, Vol. 1 Issue 6, p32-40, 9p

Steyn, Mark.
"Fantasy lands.(Tim Burton's Corpse Bride)(Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit)(Cinema)(Movie Review)." Spectator 299.9246 (Oct 22, 2005): 74(1)

Ed Wood

Alleva, Richard
"Ed Wood." (movie reviews) Commonweal Dec 2, 1994 v121 n21 p13(2) (695 words)

Ball, Ryan
"Black Wedding." Animation Magazine v. 19 no. 9 (September 2005) p. 8-10, 12
UC users only
"Corpse Bride, a new animated film directed by Tim Burton and Mike Johnson, takes the eclipsed art of stop-motion animation to a completely new level. Whereas Jack Skellington, a character in The Nightmare Before Christmas, an earlier stop-motion film directed by Tim Burton, used a series of replacement heads that were changed between frames to create different facial expressions, the leads in this new film all have mechanical heads, permitting greater control of facial expressions. To help accelerate things, the animation was shot on Cannon ELS Mark II digital still cameras instead of being shot on 35mm film." [Art Index]

Delorme, Stephane
"Au fil de l'os." Cahiers du Cinema no. 605 (October 2005) p. 23
"A review of Tim Burton's Corpse Bride stop-motion film. This film boasts a typically Burtonian scenario, that of a husband-to-be accidentally taken to the world of the dead, a world that is far more colorful than the dreary real world. The eccentric and elegant puppets are used to tell a story that audaciously suggests that the "evil" bride is more desirable than the real-world bride." [Art Index]

French, Lawrence
"An Ode to B-Movie Badness: Tim Burton's Ed Wood." Cinefantastique, vol. 25-26, no. 6 [1], pp. 10-11, 13, 14-15, 17-18, 112, , December 1994.

Higley, S.L.
"A Taste for Shrinking: Movie Miniatures and the Unreal City." Camera Obscura no. 47 (2001) p. 1-35
"The writer examines the reception of the illusion created by miniatures in seven films: Fritz Lang's Metropolis, David Butler's Just Imagine, Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, Tim Burton's Batman and Edward Scissorhands, and Alex Proyas's The Crow and Dark City. In each of these films, on which thousands or millions of dollars were spent on elaborate miniature photography, viewers are treated to an aerial vista of a city into which they descend along with the protagonists. While the express ambition of the effects artists is to provide an illusion of a believable city viewed from above, the full pleasure of the film relies on its being seen as a set to be gazed at, beyond anything that either Disneyland or the 1939 World's Fair could offer. Rather than menacing viewers, the filmic miniature permits them to disarm and colonize troubling cultural spaces in what it suggests and omits of America's actual inner-city problems." [Art Index]

Hultkrans, Andrew
"Look back in angora." (Tim Burton's film on filmmaker Ed Wood) Artforum International Dec 1994 v33 n4 p11(2) (1641 words)
"Tim Burton's 'Ed Wood' depicted the life and art of the surrealist and radical avante-garde filmmaker. Burton's film captured the essence of a man who was considered the worst motion picture director who ever lived. The film explored Wood's films during his best years, including 'Glen or Glenda?' and 'Plan 9 from Outer Space.' Ed Wood did not seek perfection in his works. Rather, he simply wanted to create anything that would serve his purposes." [Expanded Academic Index]

Mellamphy, Deborah.
"The Paradox of Transvestism in Tim Burton's Ed Wood." Wide Screen, 2009, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p1-12, 12p
UC users only

Newman, Kim
"Corpse Bride." Sight & Sound v. ns15 no. 11 (November 2005) p. 56-7
UC users only
"Tim Burton's new film, Corpse Bride, which is co-directed by Mike Johnson, showcases the most subtle effects of stop-motion animation through texture and detail, lighting and costuming that exceeds anything achievable by computers, and a satisfying physicality. Its story originates in a Russian folk tale, but the character designs are Burton's, and the film is unmistakably set in a world that is entirely his own. While his film The Nightmare Before Christmas, has become something of a holiday classic, this movie may prove to be a more fragile prospect, given that the two words of its title are among the most unappealing words known to its prospective young audience." [Art Index]

O'Brien, Geoffrey
"A kinder, gentler perversity." In: Castaways of the image planet : movies, show business, public spectacle. p. 97-105Washington, D.C. : Counterpoint, c2002.
MAIN: PN1994 .O25 2002

Rosenbaum, Jonathan
"Allusion profusion (Ed Wood, Pulp fiction)." In: Movies as politics. Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
MAIN: PN1995.9.P6 R67 1997
MOFF: PN1995.9.P6 R67 1997 SOURCE: In: Movies as politics. University of Calif. Press, 1997. p. 171-78

Summer, Gergory D.
"Ed Wood." (movie reviews) American Historical Review Oct 1995 v100 n4 p1206(2)

Edward Scissorhands

Gilmour, Nicole M.
"'Edward Scissorhands': Vivo Apparatus." (Language and Literature). Michigan Academician Spring 2002 v34 i1 p63(1) (194 words)

Klawans, Stuart
"Edward Scissorhands." (review) The Nation Jan 7, 1991 v252 n1 p22(1) (2254 words)
UC users only

Markley, Robert
"Geek/Goth: Remediation and Nostalgia in Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands." In: Goth : undead subculture / edited by Lauren M. E. Goodlad and Michael Bibby. Durham : Duke University Press, 2007
Main Stack HQ796.S6675 2007

Potter, Russell A.
"Edward Schizohands: The Postmodern Gothic Body." Postmodern Culture: An Electronic Journal of Interdisciplinary Criticism, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 30 paragraphs, May 1992.

Pruett, Shelley
"'Edward Scissorhands': Misunderstood and Unprotected in Suburbia. (Language and Literature)." Michigan Academician Spring 2002 v34 i1 p62(1) (194 words)

Smith, Laurie Halpern
"Look Ma, no hands, or Tim Burton's latest feat." (film director Tim Burton and his newest film, "Edward Scissorhands") The New York Times August 26, 1990 v139 s2 pH18(N) pH18(L) col 1 (25 col in)

Mars Attacks!

Ansen, David
"Mars Attacks!" (movie reviews) Newsweek Dec 23, 1996 v128 n26 p67(1) (1079 words)
UC users only

Hedgecock, Liz
"'The Martians Are Coming!': Civilisation v. Invasion in The War of the Worlds and Mars Attacks! " In: Alien identities: exploring difference in film and fiction / edited by Deborah Cartmell ... [et al.]. London ; Sterling, Va. : Pluto Press, 1999.
Full text available online (UCB users only)

Hoberman, J.
"Pax Americana." ('Mars Attacks!')(Cover Story) Sight and Sound Feb 1997 v7 n2 p6(4)
UC users only
"The film 'Mars Attacks!' is being lambasted as the latest flop of the dark comedy genre to hit the Hollywood screens owing to its bad taste in theme conception, weak narrative point, grotesque and fatuous lead and animated characterizations and mediocre cinematography. It is also overloaded with cameo appearances that it almost failed to deliver a solid and resolute storyline. Director Tim Burton is described as being irresponsible for creating too many self-destructive overtones which parents fear to be too shady for children's entertainment." [Expanded Academic Index]

Magid, Ron
"Strange invaders." American Cinematographer v. 77 (December 1996) p. 50-2+
"The special effects for Tim Burton's film Mars Attacks! are discussed. Two visual effect firms shared the primary work on the movie: Industrial Light & Magic handled the three-dimensional computer graphics Martian characters in some 250 shots, and Warner Digital Studios dealt with the extensive flying saucer scenes and other sequences of global chaos in some 150 shots. Various models, props, and stop-motion puppets were used to rehearse the computer graphics work. Most motion-control shots were executed in multiple passes, but the miniature set was shot in a single pass in order to balance practical internal lights on props with the production's external lighting and creature animation." [Art Index]

Maslin, Janet
"Mars Attacks!" (movie reviews) The New York Times Dec 13, 1996 v146 pB8(N) pC5(L) col 4 (18 col in)

Newman, Kim
"Mars Attacks!" (movie reviews) Sight and Sound March 1997 v7 n3 p53(2)
UC users only
Tim Burton's Mars Attacks! appears doomed to be unjustly written off as a coat-tail rider of Independence Day. It is the type of film that alienates far more people than it converts, but it has so much sheer verve packed into its admittedly incoherent framework that it is difficult on to take something cherishable away from it.

Rafferty, Terrence
"Mars Attacks!" (movie reviews)The New Yorker Dec 16, 1996 v72 n39 p116(3)

Saada, Nicolas
"Mars Attacks!" Cahiers du Ciné?ma no. 511 (March 1997) p. 72-3
A review of Mars Attacks! a film by Tim Burton. Roland Emmerich's paranoia in Independence Day gives way to Tim Burton's wildly imaginative carnivalesque frenzy in this science-fiction film. The references to the science-fiction classics of the 1950s, known for their somewhat clumsy special effects, do not sit well with the perfection of the effects created for this film.

Schickel, Richard
"Mars Attacks!" (movie reviews) Time Dec 30, 1996 v148 n29 p166(1) (247 words)
UC users only

White-Stanley, Debra; Flinn, Caryl
"Protecting the Homeland: Independence Day and Mars Attacks!" In: American cinema of the 1990s: themes and variations / edited by Chris Holmlun. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2008.
Full text available online (UC Berkeley users only)

Williams, David E.
"Galactic antics." American Cinematographer v. 77 (December 1996) p. 40-4+
"The work of cinematographer Peter Suschitzky and a team of experts on Tim Burton's film Mars Attacks! is discussed. A sardonic science-fiction spoof, the movie is based on a set of 1962 bubblegum cards of the same name. These, along with videodiscs of 1950s science fiction movies, constitute the point of departure of the cinematographic approach; elements from the vintage cards were selected to recreate their spirit, using strong colors as accents. With the Martians created via computer graphics interface, the movie was shot with Panaflex cameras and Primo anamorphic lenses. For the scenes in which the Martians storm through Las Vegas, a specially devised lighting system added effect lighting supposedly created by the aliens' ray gun blasts, with interactive colored lighting used in numerous scenes to create crashing, explosive effects." [Art Index]

Woof, William.
"In praise of Tim Burton: finding the masterpiece in "Mars Attacks."" Kinema, Spring 1998, Issue 9, p57-72

The Nightmare Before Christmas

Corliss, Richard
"A sweet and scary treat: The Nightmare Before Christmas spins a fun-house fantasy for two holidays." (new motion picture by Tim Burton) Time Oct 11, 1993 v142 n15 p79(3) (1327 words)
UC users only
Burton, director of 'Batman' and 'Edward Scissorhands,' has made a stop-motion animation film for Walt Disney Co, 'Nightmare Before Christmas.' Henry Selick was the chief animator working on the film. Production and storyline are discussed.

Felperin, Leslie
"Animated Dreams." Sight and Sound, vol. 4, no. 12, pp. 26-29, December 1994.

Newman, Kim
"Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound Dec 1994 v4 n12 p53(2)

Olson, Debbie
" Little Burton Blue: Tim Burton and the Product(ion) of Color in the Fairy Tale Films The Nightmare before Christmas and The Corpse Bride." MP: A Feminist Journal Online; Jun2007, Vol. 1 Issue 6, p32-40, 9p

Romney, Jonathan
"Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas." (movie reviews) New Statesman & Society Nov 18, 1994 v7 n329 p50(1) (870 words)

Betsy Sharkey.
"Tim Burton's 'Nightmare' comes true." ("Nightmare Before Christmas") (Living Arts Pages)The New York Times Oct 10, 1993 v143 s2 pH13(N) ppH13(L) col 1 (51 col in)

"Technical Nightmare." (the making of 'The Nightmare Before Christmas') (How Things Work)Life Nov 1993 v16 n12 p103(2) (433 words)
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'Nightmare Before Christmas' was produced using stop-motion animation with puppets made out of various materials. The process was pain-staking slow with 24 frames making one second of film. Puppeteers made 400 molds of the starring character, Jack Skellington.

Planet of the Apes

Brooks, Xan
"Planet of the Apes." (Review) Sight and Sound Oct 2001 v11 i10 p54(2) Xan Brooks.

Denby, David .
"Misanthropes: Apes and Teens." (Planet of the Apes) (Review) The New Yorker August 6, 2001 v77 i22 p88(2)

Calhoun, John; Essman, Scott
"Show me the monkey." Entertainment Design v. 35 no. 8 (August 2001) p. 28-34
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"Tim Burton's new version of Planet of the Apes is a dream project for Rick Baker, the five-time Oscar-winning makeup artist who is perhaps the nearest thing to a below-the-line celebrity Hollywood can offer. Baker, who received his latest Academy Award last March for Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas, has worked on the majority of the simian-themed movies of the last 25 years, including King Kong, Greystoke, Gorillas in the Mist, and Mighty Joe Young. Burton's film gave Baker the chance to reimagine the advanced, articulate chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans of the 1968 film of Pierre Boulle's novel, which won an Oscar for John Chambers. The writers discuss the work of Baker, costume designer Colleen Atwood, and production designer Rick Heinrichs." [Art Index]

Desowitz, Bill .
"New apes, new planet, old story: simians still rule." (Tim Burton remakes 'Planet of the Apes')(Summer Films) The New York Times May 13, 2001 pMT3(N) pMT3(L) col 1 (35 col in)

Giles, Jeff
"The Trouble With Hairy: It's the people vs. the primates in 'Planet of the Apes'." (Arts and Entertainment)( (movie review) Newsweek August 6, 2001 p58 (448 words)
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Goldman, Michael
"Fade to Black: Tim Burton, Director." Millimeter - The Magazine of Motion Picture and Television Production 29:8 [August 2001] p. 104
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"Director Tim Burton recalls working on "Planet of the Apes." Burton insists that "Planet of the Apes" was always about people, "except the people are monkeys," and he explains that he paid "homage to what came before, even as we changed things around." Burton felt he was required to maintain the idea of actors playing apes, rather than doing it all on the computer." [Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

Goldman, Michael
"Planet Hollywood: "Apes" Relies on Faces and Environments." Millimeter - The Magazine of Motion Picture and Television Production 29:8 [August 2001] p. 20-22, 24
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"Rick Baker's makeup comprises one half of the illusion-building process needed to put a modern stamp on Tim Burton's remake of "Planet of the Apes." Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) artists contributed the other half of the magic - the backdrop of the film - with their digital, miniature, and compositing work. Baker and artists at ILM discuss how they met Burton's complex demands. Baker's approach had little to do with new materials - he says the foam and latex products used in the film have changed little since the original was made in 1968. Baker individualized hero apes based on characteristics such as species, gender, and size. Since Burton opposed character animation for the lead apes and instead followed the original recipe of makeup on human actors, the film's effects are primarily environmental." [Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

Harrison, Josh
"Planet of the Apes." (Screen Zine)(Movie Review) Australian Screen Education Summer 2003 i30 p185(2) (746 words)

Higuinen, Erwan
"Planet of the apes." Cahiers du Cinema no. 560 (September 2001) p. 84
A review of Tim Burton's new version of Planet of the Apes. In typical Burton fashion, the characters are somewhat marginal, slightly mad and elusive, like transient strangers in their own homes. The film is a sign that Burton is maturing as a filmmaker.

Kafka, Alexander C.
"Monkey Doo." (Planet of the Apes)(Review) The American Prospect Sept 10, 2001 v12 i16 p40 (1334 words)

Magid, Ron
"Visual Effects Review: Monkey Man." American Cinematographer 82:8 [August 2001] p. 51-54, 56-59
Focuses on makeup artist Rick Baker's work on the Tim Burton film "Planet of the Apes."

McCarthy, Todd.
"Planet of the apes." (movie review) Variety July 30, 2001 v383 i10 p17
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Newman, Kim
"Apes again." Sight & Sound Vol XI nr 7 (July 2001); p 4-5
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O'Hehir, Andrew
"Gorilla warfare." (Motion picture Planet of the Apes)(Cover Story)Sight and Sound, Sept 2001 v11 i9 p12 (4)
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An overview is presented of the 2001 motion picture 'Planet of the Apes', directed by Tim Burton. The film features eminent actors wearing realistic simian costumes and action scenes which are cutting edge, yet opinion is divided on whether it has the same edginess of the original television series.

Planet of the apes/ re-imagined by Tim Burton
Foreword by Richard D. Zanuck; introduction by Tim Burton;... 1st ed. New York: Newmarket Press, 2001. Newmarket pictorial moviebook.
Main Stack PN1997.P51752.P5 2001

Price, Robert M.
"Apely Pleasures." (movie review) Free Inquiry Winter 2001 v22 i1 p65(1)

"The sci-fi issue." Sight & Sound Vol XI nr 9 (Sept 2001); p 12-22
Science fiction special containing articles on Tim Burton's "Planet of the apes", Spielberg's "A.I." and two versions of "Dune".

Simon, John.
"Planet of the Apes." (Review) New York August 6, 2001 v34 i30 p54(1)

Simon, John.
"Apes & Scrapes." (movie review) J National Review August 20, 2001 v53 i16 pNA (1185 words)
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Steyn, Mark .
"Planet of the Apes." (Review) Spectator August 18, 2001 v287 i9028 p41 (957 words)

Tayler, Christopher
"Planet of the Apes." (Review) TLS. Times Literary Supplement August 24, 2001 i5134 p19(1)

Toomarkine, Doris
"Planet of the Apes." (Review) Film Journal International Sept 2001 v104 i9 p59

Traver, Peter
"Planet of the Apes." (Review) Rolling Stone August 30, 2001 i876 p131(2)

Vint, Sherryl
"Simians, subjectivity and sociality: 2001: A Space Odyssey and two versions of Planet of the Apes." Science Fiction Film and Television Volume 2, Issue 2, Autumn 2009 pp. 225-250
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Williams, David E.
"Antisocial Darwinism." American Cinematographer 82:8 [August 2001] p. 26-30, 32-35, 37-38, 40-41
Discusses the production of the Tim Burton film "Planet of the Apes." Focuses on the lighting expertise of the movie's cinematographer, Philippe Rousselot, and his use of a variety of light sources, cameras, and color tones during filming.

Winter, Jessica
"Gorillas in Our Midst: Shock the Monkey." The Village Voice 46:30 [31 July 2001] p. 122
[Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

Sleepy Hollow

Arnold, David L.G.
"Fearful pleasures, or "I am twice the man": the re-gendering of Icabod Crane." ("Sleepy Hollow")(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly, Jan 2003 v31 i1 p33-38
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"Director Tim Burton's decision to cast "quirky hunk" Johnny Depp as Ichabod Crane in his 1999 adaptation of Washington Irving's short story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" might at first seem an odd one. Irving's Ichabod Crane is an interloper, a representative not only of thoughtless rapacity but also of creeping urbanization and industrialism, who must be expelled to preserve the idyllic homogeneity of Sleepy Hollow. Depp's Crane is also an interloper, an avatar of the new scientism that threatens this bucolic fairyland, but his seems on the surface to be a much more assimilable kind of alien-ness, largely because of his appearance. By comparison to more traditional renditions of this character, Depp bears all the attributes of regular physical attractiveness. Lying beneath his sexiness is a strain of femininity that simultaneously undercuts and enhances the viewer's reception of him as a masculine presence and as a match for Katrina Van Tassle. This changes the story in a significant way, but also serves to highlight the gender dynamic that lies at the heart of Irving's tale." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Bernardo, Susan M.
"The Bloody Battle of the Sexes in Tim Burton's Sleepy Hollow." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 39-43, 2003.
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"In the fall of 1999, Tim Burton's "Sleepy Hollow" was released in theaters a few weeks after Halloween. Based on Washington Irving's well-known story of the failed wooing of the local heiress by an awkward schoolmaster, the film recasts the narrative in order to supply the viewer with resolution of the relationship issue while mingling genres. The movie uses elements of horror, mystery thriller, detective film, and fairy tale. The modifications Andrew Kevin Walker's screenplay make to the story lead not only toward the exploration of superstition, the supernatural, and the symbolic (linked with the feminine in the picture) in opposition to reason, science, and the written word (linked with the masculine); but also toward the unraveling of patriarchal property rights and female revenge. The women in this rendering of "Sleepy Hollow" run the gamut from the dutiful daughter to the wicked child and the witch woman. Ichabod Crane stands at the intersection of these women and their claims against a patriarchy that destroys itself through conspiracy and vice. The film resolves all these contentious forces through death and the redefinition of the relationship between the sexes." [International Index to the Peforming Arts]

Calhoun, John
"Headless in Sleepy Hollow." Entertainment Design v. 33 no. 10 (November 1999) p. 38-40
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"For Tim Burton's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, production designer Rick Heinrichs created Washington Irving's upstate New York town in England. From the beginning, Burton said he wanted to summon up the Hammer Films style, that is, the artifice-heavy look of low-budget horror movies produced by the English studio in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. This desire for a foggy soundstage environment was one of the factors that first drew the production to London. The design of the film combines exteriors of the title village, built on a reserve north of London, and soundstage exteriors constructed at Leavesden and Shepperton Studios." [Art Index]

Corliss, Richard
"Tim Burton's Tricky Treat: The auteur of Batman and Edward Scissorhands is back in top form with a creepy Sleepy Hollow." (movie reviews) Time Nov 22, 1999 v154 i21 p102 (676 words)
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Costa de Beauregard, Raphaelle
"La Figure du stylet et autres figures de style dans Sleepy Hollow de Tim Burton." Anglophonia: French Journal of English Studies, vol. 9, pp. 179-91, 2001

DeCaro, Frank
"A twitchy take on a tale of terror." (Tim Burton's 'Sleepy Hollow') The New York Times Nov 14, 1999 pAR33(N) pAR33(L) col 1 (35 col in)

Giles, Jeff
"The Headless Horseman Rides Again: In 'Sleepy Hollow,' the undead soldier isn't just a myth--he's a menace." (movie reviews) Newsweek Nov 22, 1999 v134 i21 p91 (497 words)
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Grigoriadis, Vanessa
"Hollow man." (film director Tim Burton) New York, Nov 22, 1999 v32 i45 p50(3)
Film director Tim Burton is known for his unusual often dark films such as Edward Scissorhands and Batman. His latest project in 1999 is filming Washington Irving's story of the headless horseman in Sleepy Hollow.

Guerin, Marie-Anne
"Sleepy Hollow." Cahiers du Cinema no. 543 (February 2000) p. 32-5
"A review of Sleepy Hollow, a film by Tim Burton. This film stars Johnny Depp as Ichabod Crane, a late-19th-century policeman who goes to investigate strange serial murders that have been taking place in the New England village of Sleepy Hollow. The murderer is the legendary headless horseman, who decapitates his victims. Ichabod takes it on himself to recover the heads and discover the killer. In the film, whatever Ichabod sees is transformed by terror, a panic that, although fleeting, leaves its traces on life as a proof of the living nightmare that is childhood. The fragmented memory of primitive terror is the material and subject of the film, in which to see is an act that both stimulates and abuses memory." [Art Index]

Kervorkian, Martin
""You must never move the body!": burying Irving's text in "Sleepy Hollow."" (Washington Irving)(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly Jan 2003 v31 i1 p27-32
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"When comparing Washington Irving's short story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" to Tim Burton's film, one may perhaps find only limited resemblance, but the author argues that the movie bears a rather precise relationship to the original tale. The filmmakers have not whimsically moved or arbitrarily desecreated Irving's textual corpus; rather, they have preserved it almost wholly intact, where they found it. By burying it in the midst of a minutely realized spectacle of the supernatural, they have aggressively subjected the story to a diametrically opposed presentation of a world. The picture privileges the sensory text over the written word - the world of objects behind the words moves into the foreground, eclipsing the printed page." [Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

Krohn, Bill
"Comment le cavalier sans tete a pris corps." Cahiers du Cinema no. 542 (January 2000) p. 52-7
"Filmmaker Tim Burton has produced Sleepy Hollow, a film version of Irving Washington's 1820 American literary classic The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Set in 1799, this splendid and fantastic fairy-tale film presents Ichabod Crane, a policeman who is sent to Sleepy Hollow in upstate New York to arrest a serial killer who has already decapitated three victims. Crane falls in love with the daughter of the richest man in town and almost loses his own head before putting an end to the killings, which were committed by the headless horseman, the ghost of a German mercenary killed during the American Civil War. The screenplay is subtly different to both the legend and the book that inspired it and is therefore entirely Burtonian. The writer goes on to discuss the writing and filming processes." [Art Index]

Magid, Ron
"Horror on the Hoof." American Cinematographer 80:12 [December 1999] p. 48
"Discusses the computer effects and bringing to life the Headless Horseman in Tim Burton's "Sleepy Hollow." States director Tim Burton asked ILM's Jim Mitchell, who brought computer-generated Martians to life in "Mars Attacks!," to oversee "Sleepy Hollow"'s visual effects. Notes to minimize the workload, Mitchell also initially lobbied to do the Headless Horseman the old-fashioned way. Comments Mitchell as saying, "But in the back of our minds, Tim and i knew that something just wasn't going to be right with that approach." Mentions that they eventually decided that the Headless Horseman would be an actual person riding the horse and flailing his axe around, except that they would just digitally erase his head." [Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

McCarthy, Todd
"Sleepy Hollow." Variety Nov 15, 1999 v377 i1 p87 (1296 words)
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Newman, Kim
"The cage of reason." (Tim Burton's 'Sleepy Hollow') Sight and Sound Jan 2000 v10 i1 p14(3)
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"Sleepy Hollow once more demonstrates director Tim Burton's curious ability to rethink anything as an experiment in expressionist autobiography. Although the most striking divergence from the original Washington Irving story is the addition of a genuine supernatural creature, Burton's real rebellion lies in perceiving Ichabod Crane not as an awkward weirdo but as an identification figure. Actor Johnny Depp's Crane is a marginalized hero, given to fainting spells and being squirted in the eye with blood, but a hero nonetheless. The character Brom Van Brunt is the latest in a line of bested bullies that Burton has enjoyed gruesomely killing off, and Christina Ricci's Katrina seems a natural inhabitant of Burton's world. The pleasures of Sleepy Hollow come from high style rather than high camp, and it is never less than ravishing to watch." [Art Index]

O'Hehir, Andrew
"Sleepy Hollow." Sight & Sound v. ns10 no. 2 (February 2000) p. 54-5
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"This movie version of a Washington Irving story is loaded with pseudo-ghoulish detail and imbued with a distinctive atmosphere but suffers from terminal vagueness and clutter. Its plot is a complicated skein of unrelated fairytale elements and coincidences punctuated occasionally by balletic beheadings. Its characterization, meanwhile, is almost wholly haphazard." [Art Index]

Orr, Stanley
"'A Dark Episode of Bonanza': Genre, Adaptation and Historiography in Sleepy Hollow." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 44-49, 2003.
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"Washington Irving's "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is a text inextricable from the discourses of colonization, one which apparently critiques but ultimately naturalizes Anglo-American conquest and settlement. While director Tim Burton and screenwriter Andrew Kevin Walker in one sense "bury" Irving's text in their film adaptation, "Sleepy Hollow," they also exhume and analyze its ideologically charged corpus. Throughout the course of their revisions, Burton and Walker evoke and amplify Irving's basic elements, but they do so in a way that denaturalizes the colonial discourse of Irving's tale. The narrative syntax of "Sleepy Hollow" elaborates the movie's critique of the detective genre." [Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

Pizzello, Stephen
"Galloping Ghost." American Cinematographer 80:12 [December 1999] p. 38-42, 44, 46, 49-53
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"Highlights the production of Tim Burton's "Sleepy Hollow," an adaptation of Washington Irving's famous folktale "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." Comments on cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki's technique in making the film. Details on designer Rick Heinrichs' elaborate sets--both in soundstages at England's Leavesden and Shepperton Studios, and on location in Marlow, a small town just outside of London." [Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

Pizzello, Stephen
"Head Trip: With "Sleepy Hollow," Director Tim Burton Lends His Unique Creative Sensibility to the Tale of Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman." American Cinematographer 80:12 [December 1999] p. 54-56, 58-59
"Provides an interview with "Sleepy Hollow" film director Tim Burton. States with his keen pictorial instincts and his affection for all things fantastic, Tim Burton is a lightning rod for eccentric, stylized images--which may explain his distinctly unruly coiffure. Comments Burton's latest picture, "Sleepy Hollow," is based on Washington Irving's classic 1819 short story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," but inventively retools the legend of Icahbod Crane and the Headless Horseman. Talks about his creative strategy on the project, as well as his collaboration with director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki, ASC." [Available in full-text in International Index to the Peforming Arts (UC Berkeley users only)]

Sweeney Todd

Adams, William
"Blood and music." PsycCRITIQUES, Vol 53 (38), 2008
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Olney, Ian.
"Texts, Technologies, and Intertextualities: Film Adaptation in a Postmodern World." Literature Film Quarterly, 2010, Vol. 38 Issue 3, p166-170, 5p
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This article discusses various reports published within the issue, including one by Paola Bonifazio about the documentary film "We Want Roses Too," directed by Alina Marazzi, one by Brian Patrick Riley about the film "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street," directed by Tim Burton, and one by Jonah Corne on the film "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," directed by Julian Schnabel.

Riley, Brian Patrick.
""It's Man Devouring Man, My Dear": Adapting "Sweeney Todd" for the Screen." Literature Film Quarterly, 2010, Vol. 38 Issue 3, p205-216, 12p
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"Serving a dark and vengeful god." Sondheim Review; Summer2008, Vol. 14 Issue 4, p8-12, 5p,
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Teachout, Terry
"The Hollywood Musical Done Right." Commentary; Feb2008, Vol. 125 Issue 2, p49-52, 4p
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