Black Identity / General works on Race and Race Relation

Literature and the Arts

African Americans and the Educational System

African American Sports

General and Miscellaneous

Black Identity / General Works on Race and Race Relations

Affirmative Action: The History of an Idea.
Explores the historical roots of affimative action and the current debate over its usefulness. Looks at several different affirmative action programs including the Univ. of California, Berkeley, the U.S. Army, federal aid to minority businesses, and affirmative action in the Chicago Police Dept. Includes archival footage and features interviews with a wide array of academic scholars. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1996. 56 min. Video/C 4999

Affirmative Action Under Fire: When is it Reverse Discrimination?
The account of a reverse discrimination court case over the firing in 1989 of a white teacher in a Piscataway, New Jersey high school because of her race. Shows how this court case became a national battle for affirmative action and how affirmative action preference advocates paid the white teacher $450,000 to drop her case in order to avoid a Supreme Court decision that would potentially invalidate all affirmative action programs in the United States. Originally produced for the ABC television program Nightline aired on November 11, 1997 under the title: Black teacher, white teacher, affirmative action under fire. Dist.: Films Media Group. 22 min. Video/C 6874

America Beyond the Color Line
Harvard professor Louis Henry Gates travels to the East coast, the deep South, inner city Chicago, and Hollywood to interview influential African Americans and investigate their views on the status of black Americans at the start of the new century. 2003. Dist.: PBS. 220 min. DVD 2336

Black Hollywood Does the increasing success of African-Americans as film actors, directors, and producers signal a genuine shift in the role of race and the influence of people of color in the movie business? In this program, Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. journeys to the West Coast and asks whether Hollywood remains institutionally racist or whether it is becoming increasingly color-blind in pursuit of the box office dollar. Interviewees include Chris Tucker, Samuel L. Jackson, Alicia Keys, Quincy Jones, Nia Long, Don Cheadle, and John Singleton. 56 min.

Ebony Towers The existence of a small group of African-Americans at the heart of the corporate and political establishment is something that, just two decades ago, seemed unimaginable. How did they get there and what is the significance of their success? Beginning at Harvard University, Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. travels to New York City and Washington, D.C. to ask if this new black elite represents genuine progress for black America as a whole. Interviewees include Colin Powell, Russell Simmons, Vernon Jordan, and many others. 56 min.

Streets of Heaven Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. visits Chicago’s South Side in this revealing program, finding out what life is like for residents of notorious housing projects like the Robert Taylor and the Ida B. Wells. "What happened," Gates wonders, "to the city of refuge my father’s generation sought in the North… where ‘the streets of Heaven were paved with gold’?" Confronting a culture of criminality, poverty, and despair, the film takes an unflinching look at the uncertain American dream for which one-fifth of black America still struggles. 56 min.

The Black Belt In this program, Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. finds new meanings in the streets of Memphis, Birmingham, and Atlanta—the battlegrounds on which civil rights were won for black southerners in the 1950s and 60s. The very cities from which African-Americans fled during the era of Jim Crow are today drawing them back by the tens of thousands. But how much have these cities really changed since the civil rights era? Interviewees include Morgan Freeman and Maya Angelou. 56 min.

America in Black and White. Racial Profiling and Law Enforcement
For many African-Americans, simply having dark skin seems to be grounds for being pulled over by police and searched for drugs. Police call it "profiling," based on years of successful drug interdiction through traffic stops, but angry and humiliated victims call it "racial profiling," a blatant form of discrimination. This investigative report examines the issue from the victim's point of view as well as through the eyes of the police. Originally broadcast as segments of: Nightline. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1998. 44 min. Video/C 8641

American Cultural History: Racism
Don't be a sucker / U.S. War Department (1947, 18 min.) -- Integration, Report 1 / Andover Productions (1960, 21 min.) -- Let us break bread together / City of New York, Board of Education (1954, 26 min.) Don't be a sucker: Uses the example of Nazi Germany to drive home the point that American's should not be fooled by people who wage a war against minorities. It warns them not to be "a sucker" and to live in harmony despite differences of color, race or religion. Integration, Report 1: Historical footage of the Civil Rights Movement in 1959 and 1960 including footage of rallies staged in Montgomery, Brooklyn and Washington, D.C. Let us break bread together: A promotional film on Detroit as the host city for the 1968 Olympics showing views of highways, automobile manufacturing, a diverse population and social activities, all shot prior to the city's economic decline. DVD 5153

An American Love Story.
Contents: v. 1. Episode 1. Welcome to America. Episode 2. A piece of the puzzle is missing -- v. 2. Episode 3. I've fallen and I can't get up. Episode 4. It's another new year and I ain't gone -- v. 3. Episode 5. Chaney & the boy. Episode 6. You & me against the world -- v. 4. Episode 7. True love. Episode 8. Marion truth -- v. 5. Episode 9. It's my job. Episode 10. We were never Ozzie and Harriet.

Documentary condensed from 1000 hours of filming the bi-racial Wilson Sims family: Karen Wilson, a white woman, Bill Sims, a black man, and their two daughters--daughter Cicily's entrance to college, her semester in Nigeria, and job search, daughter Chaney's first date, Karen Wilson's solitary visit to her mother, and ill health, Bill Simms' visit to his past life, and career struggles, and, 25 years after their first meeting, Karen and Bill's deciding to attend her high school reunion to face people who have ostracized them in the past. 1999. ca. 500 min. Video/C 6503

Are We Different?: Young African Americans Talk About Cultural Difference and Race in America.
Film gives voice to African-American students around the country as they articulate issues of race, racisim, and race relations. The discussion ranges from whether stylistic differences between whites and blacks are superficial or profound, and the causes and nature of anger and frustration in the black community. Students also question why "blackness" is suddenly so fashionable and talk about black culture with its special speech patterns and gestures and black sprituality and energy. 30 min. DVD X8624

Filmakers Library catalog description

Badass Supermama
A playful, but questioning personal exploration of beauty as perceived by a black women, looking at race, gender, sexuality, body image and representation. These inter-connected issues are examined through 1970's "blaxploitation" movie goddess Pam Grier and her characters, with clips from her films Foxy Brown and Sheba, baby. A video by Etang Inyang, 1996. 16 min. Video/C 7226

Black, Bold & Beautiful: Black Women's Hair
Explores some of the tangled dilemmas surrounding black hairstyles -- to "relax" one's hair into straight tresses or to leave it "natural" and nappy -- choices which raise questions of conformity and rebellion, pride and identity. This informative primer examines the importance of various hairstyles to Afro-American women and how these styles define the personal identity of each woman. Director, Nadine Valcin 1998. 40 min. DVD X6682; Video/C 7978

Women Make Movies catalog description

Black Is - Black Ain't: A Personal Journey Through Black Identity
American culture has stereotyped black Americans for centuries. Equally devastating, the late Marlon Riggs argued, have been the definitions of "blackness" African Americans impose upon one another which contain and reduce the black experience. In this film, Riggs meets a cross-section of African Americans grappling with the paradox of numerous, often contradictory definitions of blackness. He shows many who have felt uncomfortable and even silenced within the race because their complexion, class, sexuality, gender, or speech has rendered them "not black enough," or conversely, "too black." The film scrutinizes the identification of "blackness" with masculinity as well as sexism, patriarchy and homophobia in black America. 1995. 88 min. DVD 3036; also VHS Video/C 3779
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I Shall Not Be Removed: The Life of Marlon Riggs. Video/C 4463

Description from California Newsreel catalog
Independent Television Service's "Black Is...Black Ain't web page

Black Like Who?
Filmmaker Debbi Reynolds explores her racial identity as a black who grew up in a white neighborhood while learning about the experiences and feelings of her parents and new black friends in college. 1995. 30 min. Video/C 5009

Filmakers Library catalog description

Black to the Promised Land
A group of problem students from the Street Academy High School of Brooklyn are taken on a trip to Israel. They experience the everyday life of the Jewish community in a kibbutz. Both Jewish and Black youngsters seem surprised in finding that love, respect and friendship can grow in spite of ethnic differences and the color of their skin. Produced and directed by Madeleine Ali. 1991. 97 min. Video/C 9796

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Black Women On: The Light, Dark Thang.
Explores the politics of color within the African-American community. Afro-American women, representing a variety of hues, speak candidly about the longstanding "caste system" that permeates black society and share personal stories about how being too light or too dark has profoundly influenced their life and relationships. A film by Celeste Crenshaw and Paula Caffey. c1999. 52 min. DVD X6717; Video/C 7982

Women Make Movies catalog description

Black Women, Sexual Politics and the Revolution
Black feminist women speak candidly on issues of sex, class and gender roles. The film examines how African American women deal with issues of poverty, battering, and lack of health care, and addresses how women's roles in community activism are often overlooked or ignored. Also examines the media portrayal of Afro-American women with an emphasis on the representation of Black women in music videos. Dist.: Third World Newsreel. 1991. 30 min. Video/C 5578

Blacking Up: Hip-hop's Remix of Race and Identity
This documentary examines the popularity of hip-hop among America's white youth and asks whether white identification is rooted in admiration and a desire to transcend race or if it is merely a new chapter in the long continuum of stereotyping, mimicry and cultural appropriation. Does it reflect a new face of racial understanding in white America or does it reinforce an ugly history? Against the unique backdrop of american popular music, the film explores racial identity in the United States. The film draws parallels between the white hip-hop fan and previous incarnations of white appropriation from blackface performer Al Jolson to mainstream artists like Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Eminem. It interweaves portraits of white hip-hop artists and fans with insightful commentary by African American cultural critics. 2010 57 min. DVD X3194

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Blacks & Jews
Early in the 20th century black and Jewish Americans joined forces against bigotry and for civil rights but in the late 1960's each group turned inward and the coalition fell apart. This film examines the history of this collaboration and recent racial conflicts between Afro-Americans and Jews and attempts at understanding and reconciliation, with particular emphasis on events in New York City and Oakland, California. A film by Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 min. Video/C 4712

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[The Complete] Blue Eyed [with Jane Elliott].
Contents: 30-minute blue eyed (the most concise version) / producers, Claus Strigel, Bertram Verhaag (30 min.) -- Essential blue eyed (trainer's ed., with debriefing with Jane Elliott) / producers, Claus Strigel, Bertram Verhaag (90 min.) -- Blue eyed (original version) / producers, Claus Strigel, Bertram Verhaag (93 min.) -- [Blue eyed] Trainer's manual (suggestions for using "blue eyed" in diversity training programs).

For over 30 years Jane Elliott has been America's most highly acclaimed diversity trainer. Her powerful and controversial "blue eyed/brown eyed" exercise has had a life-changing impact on thousands in schools, corporations and government. The original "Blue eyed," the definitive record of her technique, proved so powerful that is has been made into three separate versions so it can be conveniently used in any setting. 2004. DVD 3054

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Body Beautiful.
Film situated in England examines the relationship between a Caucasian mother and her bi-racial Caucasian/Nigerian daughter. Producer/director/writer, Ngozi Onwurah. 1991. 23 min. Video/C 3274

Can You See the Color Gray?
Attitudes and feelings about race are expressed by children and teenagers. An exploration of the subtle development of racial attitudes in children of varying ages, some of whom are followed over a two-year period. The video is divided into two parts, followed by a brief intermission, providing an opportunity to address questions or begin discussing the issues that have been raised. Produced, edited and directed by Alexandra K. Corbin. 1996. 54 min. Video/C MM785

Class Divided.
Documents a reunion of Iowa teacher Jane Elliott and her third-grade class of 1970, subjects that year of an ABC News television documentary entitled: The eye of the storm. Shows how her experimental curriculum on the evils of discrimination had a lasting effect on the lives of the students. 26 min. DVD 5915; also vhs Video/C 1143

Eye of the Storm Video/C 3984

Coffee Colored Children.
A semi-autobiographical story set in England of racism, prejudice, and self-definition experienced by bi-racial children of a Caucasian/Nigerian marriage. A film by Ngozi Onwurah. 1988. 17 min. Video/C 3280

Women Make Movies catalog description

The Color of Fear.
Eight North American men of Asian, European, Latino and African descent talk together about how racism affects them. A film / by Lee Mun Wah. 90 min. DVD X4565; Video/C 3588

Color Schemes: America's Washload in 4 Cycles.
The theme is society's intolerance for cultural diversity. 28 min. Video/C 1776

Colors.(Way We Live: Introduction to Sociology; 12)
For racial and ethnic minorities, the struggle for recognition and equality is nothing new. Perhaps nowhere is this more visible than in the United States. The polarizing effects of stereotyping, racial prejudice and discrimination, and its impact on generations of Black Americans are discussed. Learners will also meet the Bazzy family - an Arab-American family in Michigan who must cope with local misconceptions and generalizations about Arab culture in the wake of 9/11. 2005. 27 min. DVD 4807

Combing Thru the Kinks!
African-American women ages nine to ninety-two discuss their hair joys, struggles and dilemmas, with emphasis on hair braiding and its ethnic roots and how their choices of hair styles affect their personal identities. 1999. 41 min. Video/C 8131

Domino: Interracial People and the Search for Identity
Portrays the stories of six interracial people, exploring issues of identity, cultural isolation, and the search for community. Through these personal stories, each person recounts how their identity is affected by their parents' history, hierarchies of race, gender roles, and class. Ultimately, these six individuals demonstrate how living intimately with two cultures can be a source of strength and enrichment. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1994. 45 min. Video/C 4997

The Eye of the Storm.
Award winning documentary records an innovative experiment in which a third-grade teacher divides her all-white class into "blue-eyes" and "brown-eyes," making each group superior or inferior on successive days. The program demonstrates the nature and effects of bigotry by showing changes brought about in the children's behavior and learning patterns. 26 min. Video/C 3984

A Class Divided 26 min. Video/C 1143

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Finding Christa.
A partly documentary film concerning an artist who leaves her three-year old daughter at a children's home and that daughter, a performing artist, who later, at the urging of her adoptive mother, seeks her out. Film by Camille Billops and James Hatch. 1991 55 min. Video/C 4721

Deans, Jill R. "Performing The Search In Adoption Autobiography: Finding Christa and Reno Finds Her Mom." Biography 2001 24(1): 85-98.
Lane, Jim "Black Autobiographical Documentary." Jump Cut /40, Mar 96; p.38-46.

Four Hundred Years Without a Comb.
A documentary/drama in African American history and tradition as told through various combs. Beauty is a big part of Africa and its people around the globe. The advent of slavery and the lack of combs and the ability to groom caused a social, individual, health, and spiritual death for the slaves giving rise to inferiority attitudes regarding hair, skin, nose and lips still present in African-Americans of today. In this film the emphasis is on the hairdressing of African-American women as a manifestation of this "inferior seed". Based on a book of the same title by Willie L. Morrow, published in 1973. 60 min. Video/C 7523

Good Hair
Comedian Chris Rock tackles the very personal issue of hair, and how attaining good hair can impact African American's activities, relationships, wallets, and a self-esteem. Engages in frank, funny conversations with haircare professionals, beautyshop and barbershop patrons, as well as featuring interviews with Dr. Maya Angelou, Nia Long, Ice-T, Raven Symone, and more. Directed by Jeff Stilson. 2009. 95 min. DVD X2652

Fuori/outside
A young woman whose father was Italian American and mother was African American reflects on racism in her family and in her community. Written in the form of a letter to her aging white grandmother, she talks about racism against African Americans by New Yorkers from Southern Italy who had experienced racism themselves. 1997. 13 min. Video/C MM243

Hair Piece: A Film for Nappy-Headed People
An animated satire on the question of self image for African American women from the perspective of hair styling. Lively tunes and witty narration accompany a quick-paced inventory of relaxers, gels and curlers, rituals all-too familiar to African American women, and indeed to all women confronted with an unattainable ideal of beauty. 1985. 10 min. Video/C 7977

Women Make Movies catalog description

I Am a Man
An exploration of "what it means to be a black man in America... confronting issues of race, and racism, through the lens of gender, probing deep within the traditional American ideals of manhood in order to draw out the complex and often ambivalent nature of black male identity. A documentary by Byron Hurt and Andrew Jones. Dist.: Media Education Foundation. 1998. 60 min. DVD 6446

In Search of our Fathers.
Marco Williams, a young filmmaker from Harvard, decided to try to track down his father, a man he never knew. In searching for his roots, he interviews his large family in which nobody had a known father, in order to find out all he could about his own mysterious father. His mother refused to tell him any details about his father, but in 1987 his mother relented and spoke about the affair. James Berry in Springfield, MA was the man he was looking for. After great effort Berry agreed to meet his son. 61 min. Video/C 4429

Filmakers Library catalog description

Lane, Jim "Black Autobiographical Documentary." Jump Cut /40, Mar 96; p.38-46. On the approach to subjectivity, temporality and narrative in the African-American autobiographical documentaries "In Search of our Fathers" and "Finding Christa".

Interracial Marriage: Blending the Races in America.
Examines how and why couples of different colors, religions, and ethnic roots are drawn to one another, how their differences affect their marriages, and how they deal with their friends and family. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1993. 52 min. Video/C 4994

Just Black?: Multi-Racial Identity.
In this documentary several young people whose parents are of mixed racial heritage talk about their struggle to establish, acquire and assert a racial identity. 57 min. DVD X3201; Video/C 2262

Filmakers Library catalog description

Lockin' Up
By letting her hair coil into dreadlocks, Jamaican-born filmmaker, T. Nicole Atkinson, challenges society's and her own conflicted notions of beauty. Surveys the origins and cultural significance of dreadlocks, including the stereotypes which reflect the racism inherent in Western standards of beauty. A videotape by T. Nicole Atkinson. c1997. 29 min. Video/C 8085

Women Make Movies catalog description

Middle Passage-n-roots
Attitudes about hair and its connection to self-image and self-worth are examined in this insightful documentary. Afros, processed, corn rows, braids and dreds are all explored and explained in this look at the love/hate relationship African-Americans have with their hair. Directed, produced and written by Ada M. Babino. c1995 30 min. DVD 9540 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 7451

The Mirror Lied
How does a young African American woman deal with the ideals of feminine beauty imposed by a white society? This film shows the struggle of the filmmaker's fifteen-year-old sister, Jantre, to accept her appearance. Though she spends an hour each day trying to tame her unruly hair, she never feels attractive. In a bold move to challenge her classmate's standards, Jantre goes to school with her hair in its natural fullness. Director, Jennifer Haskin-O'Reggio. 199? 27 min. DVD X7098; Video/C 6524

Filmakers Library catalog description

Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible
Features the up close and personal stories of white activists and their ongoing journeys of transformation. Participants talk about being unconscious about their learned and internalized sense of white supremacy. They share what was required and what actions they took to move through the common first stages of denial, defensiveness, guilt, fear and shame into making solid commitments towards ending racism. The video uses art, theatre, movement, photographs and music to amplify stories that share richly varied experiences and life processes informed by deep reflection and social justice action. The individuals' interviews are also enhanced by historical sources, spoken word, photographs and video archives which serve to address systemic racist oppression. Directed by Shakti Butler and Rick Butler. 2006. 50 min. DVD 6946

Nappy.
Ten African American women discuss the reasons why they chose to stop straightening their hair and go natural. The film also touches on the consequences of their decisions and on the importance and significance of hairstyles in African American culture. Written and directed by Lydia Ann Douglas, 1997. 28 min. Video/C 6680

Off and Running: An American Coming of Age Story
Documentary about a Brooklyn teen-aged girl, raised by two Jewish mothers and with two adopted brothers, who searches for information about her African-American birth mother. Her complex exploration of race, identity, and family begins to lead the teen into trouble in her personal life, threatening a promising career as a track and field athlete. She eventually picks up the pieces of her life, leading to inspiring results. Directed, produced and sound recorded by Nicole Opper. 2009. 76 min. DVD X5013

One Drop Rule
Explores the recurring and divisive issue in African American communities of skin color. The film inter-cuts intimate interviews with darker skinned African Americans, lighter skinned African Americans and inter-racial children of black and white parents. It investigates the sensitive topic of color consciousness within the African American community with great tact and a clear commitment to healing divisions. 2001. 49 min. Video/C 8280

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Our House: Lesbians and Gays in the Hood.
A hard-hitting and highly informative look at issues, activism and discrimination in the U.S. from the view points of lesbians and gay men of color. "Up front, in your face, hard-hitting interviews with Black Gays and Lesbians provides an uncompromising look at homophobia, racism, alienation and empowerment for Queer African Americans. This riveting documentary gives voice to the multiple identities of gay, women, Black, and the strength inherit in their unity. A new perspective on what is "Black Enough," this video powerfully contextualized gay and lesbian identity within the African American experience." [from Third World Newsreel (distributor) catalog] 60 min. Video/C 3312

Passing
The filmmaker's grandmother recounts memories of a trip she took through the segregated South in 1959. A film by Kym Ragusa. Dist.: Third World Newsreel. 1996. 9 min. Video/C MM244

Perfect Image?
Exposes stereotypical images of black women and explores women's own ideas of self-worth. Poses questions about how black women see themselves and each others and the pitfalls that await those who internalize the search for the "perfect image." 30 min. Video/C 3370

Women Make Movies catalog description

The Politics of Love - In Black and White.
Confronts interracial romance on America's campuses. 33 min. Video/C 2969

Description from California Newsreel catalog

A Question of Color.
Examines the issue of color consciousness within the black community. This film explores a caste system based on how closely skin color, hair texture and facial features conform to a European ideal. A variety of African Americans give their experiences and attitudes towards the questions of color. 58 min. Video/C 2540

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Race is the Place
Focusing on the topic of racism in the United States, the program presents an assemblage of taped monologues, commentaries, readings, musical performances, and stills of visual artworks interspersed with documentary sequences, archival images, and dialogue exemplifying the topic found in American mass media and product packaging. Featuring: Amiri Baraka, Andy Bumatrai, Kamau Daaood, Mayda del Valle, Michael Franti, Lalo Guerrero, Barry "Shabaka" Henley, Danny Hoch, James Luna, Culture Clash, Richard Montoya, Willie Perdomo, Kate Rigg, Boots Riley, Ricardo Salinas, Beau Sia, Herbert Siguenza, Piri Thomas, Haunani-Kay Trask, Lois Ann Yamada ; visual artists: Enrique Chagoya, Michael Ray Charles, Paula de Joie, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Ben Sakoguchi, Cora Yee. Produced and directed by Raymond Telles, Rick Tejada-Flores. c2005. 92 min. DVD 6153

Race: The Floating Signifier.
Stuart Hall, a renown public speaker and teacher, presents a lecture on race and the meaning of racial signifiers (like skin color) at Goldsmiths' College, New Cross, London. Weaving a compelling argument that includes a critical engagement with the work of Anthony Appiah and W.E.B. Du Bois, Hall concludes that because the meaning of race is never fixed but is dependent upon cultural context, it can be described as a "floating signifier." Includes a question and answer period at end of lecture and an interview with Hall by Sut Jhally. 1996. 85 min. DVD 4916; vhs Video/C 4655
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Representation & the Media

Media Education Foundation catalog description

Race, The Power of an Illusion
A three part series exploring the history of race perceptions and behaviors towards races in the United States, within the context of recent scientific discoveries which have have toppled the concept of biological race. c2003. 56 min. each installment

Description from California Newsreel catalog
PBS web site

The Difference Between Us. Follows students who sequence and compare their own DNA looking for a "race marker." It also looks at the history of racism in the U.S., the advent of stereotypes based on physical attributes attributed to races and somatotypes with particular reference to African Americans. DVD 3046; Video/C 9574
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The Story We Tell. Traces the race concept to the European conquest of the Americas, including the development of the slave system, which eventually crystalized into an ideology of white supremacy. By the mid-19th century, race had become the "common sense" wisdom of white America, revealing how social and political inequalities came to be recognized as "natural." DVD 3046; also VHS Video/C 9575
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The House We Live In. Focuses on how institutions shape and create race, giving different groups vastly unequal life chances. After WWII, whiteness increasingly meant owning a home in the suburbs, aided by discriminatory federal policies. DVD 3046; Video/C 9576
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Skin Deep.
A diverse group of college students reveal their honestfeelings and attitudes about race and racism. Students from 3 major universities are interviewed alone on topics including the climate toward talking about race on campus, self separation of ethnic groups, discrimination, affirmative action policies and individual responsibility for change. Concludes with a diverse group of 23 students from 6 major American universities who spent 3 days together to collectively challenge one another with dialogue focusing on such topics as the concept of individual responsibility, feeling separated from each other, wanting others to understand and what can be done to move awareness to action. 53 min. DVD 3705; also VHS Video/C 4055

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Skin Deep, 1960. (People's Century)
Skin deep examines the fight against legal, institutionalized racism in the United States and South Africa. In 1948, South Africa became unique among nations by writing segregation into the law of the land. The architects of apartheid took comfort in the fact that racial segregation was also found in the world's greatest democracy--the United States. 1997. 56 min. Video/C 6436

The Souls of Black Girls
This provocative news documentary takes a critical look at media images-- how they are instituted, established and controlled. The film also examines the relationship between the historical and existing media images of women of color and raises the question of whether they may be suffering from a self-image disorder as a result of trying to attain the standards of beauty that are celebrated in media images. A documentary film by Daphne S. Valerius. 2008. 52 min. DVD X5207

Talking About Race.
A diverse group of college students reveal their honest feelings and attitudes about race and racism. In part 1, students from 3 major universities are interviewed alone on topics including the climate toward talking about race on campus, self separation of ethnic groups, discrimination, affirmative action policies and individual responsibility for change. In part 2, a diverse group of 23 students from 6 major American universities spend 3 days together to collectively challenge one another with dialogue focusing on such topics as the concept of individual responsibility, feeling separated from each other, wanting others to understand and what can be done to move awareness to action. 25 min. Video/C 4054. See Also: Skin Deep

Tongues Untied.
A Film by Marlon Riggs. Derogatory accusations, judgments, and jokes in our culture are met head-on by this video about black, male, and gay identity. Poetry, personal testimony, and drama unite to oppose the homophobia and racism that attempt to split a person into opposing loyalties. 55 min. Video/C 1783

Awards
Berlin International Film Festival - Best Documentary Film
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards - Independent/Experimental Film and Video Award
San Francisco International Lesbian & Gay Film Festival - Audience Award, Best Video

I Shall Not Be Removed: The Life of Marlon Riggs. Video/C 4463

Bibliography of articles/reviews on Tongues Untied
Description from Frameline catalog

Understanding Race.
Examines the history and power of the artificial distinction called "race", viewing it within historical, scientific, and cultural contexts. Topics include the anthropological unity of Homo sapiens; sanctioned discrimination, such as segregation; cultural biases based on racial stereotypes; and the underlying humanity that inextricably links us all. Producer/director, Lynn Dougherty. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1999. 52 min. DVD X7073; Video/C 7183

Urban Tribe (Dreadlocks and Braids -- The Politics of Hair)
Shows African-American "natural hair" styles provided from a salon in Chicago. Customers talk about their attitudes and feelings, while having their hair braided. Directed, edited and photographed by Jennifer Halliday. c2000. 26 min. Video/C MM712

Literature and the Arts

Includes works on the representation of African Americans in film and literature

Harlem Renaissance

Literary & Dramatic Readings (for works by individual African American authors

Literary Criticism and Biography (for works about individual African American authors)

Film History (for works about individual African American actors and directors)

The Movies, Race & Ethnicity (for evolving images of African Americans in the movies)

Musical Traditions of the World (for works about individual African American musicians and muscial contributions and performance works)

Musical Traditions of the World (for works about individual African American musicians and muscial contributions and musical performances)

Dance (for works about individual African American dancers and choreographers, and dance performances)

Achievements in American Black History: Early Black Cinema.
Examines the beginnings of the American Black cinema which flourished between 1916 and the early 30's. 40 min. Video/C 83

Africa to America to Paris: The Migration of Black Writers.
Traces the path of African-American literature from the shores of the U.S. to the Left Bank of Paris at the end of World War II through the late 1960s. The program provides context by first exploring the New Orleans salon poetry of Desdunes and then discussing the historic suppression of black activists in the U.S. after the Harlem Renaissance. This program primarily traces the lives of James Baldwin, Richard Wright and Chester Himes who immigrated to Paris seeking greater intellectual freedom. Includes remembrances of fellow artists and readings from their diaries and works. 1997. 53 min. DVD X1026; vhs Video/C 5624

African Americans in Cinema: The First Half Century
Contains a rich body of primary and secondary source material, critical essays by prominent film scholars, biographies, film reviews and clips, tracing the history of African Americans in film and black films from 1894 to 1950. Includes an interactive searchable database that contains more than 3,300 movies emphasizing the contributions of African Americans to cinema. Compu/D 564

Amos and Andy: Anatomy of a Controversy
Takes a fond look at the controversial radio and television show and attempts to determine if the series was a positive first step for Blacks into the world of entertainment or not and examines the events that led to the show's expulsion from the airwaves in 1966 after complaints from civil rights activists. Highlighted with rare clips of radio show creators Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll, and hilarious clips from the Amos n' Andy TV series. Commentary by Alvin Childress, Ernestine Wade, Reverend Jesse Jackson, Redd Foxx, Marla Gibbs, and Henry Lee Moon. 1983. 60 min. Video/C MM1157

Art of Darkness.
The slaves of the Caribbean contributed not only to the wealth of their masters, but also to the cultural heritage of the British Empire. Documented through letters, paintings and poetry, the eighteenth century is shown to be both an age of high culture and of cruelty. Film shows how the art of the period romanticized the servitude of the plantation blacks as they were depicted as precious, exotic ornaments, even as they were being brutalized in real life. Director, David Maloney. 52 min. Video/C 3963

Filmakers Library catalog description

[Baldwin, James] James Baldwin: Questions and Answers, Wheeler Auditorium, UCB, 4/26/74 DVD X703; vhs Video/C 2092 pt. 1-2

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[Baldwin, James] Patience and Shuffle the Cards: James Baldwin at U.C. Berkeley 1981
"A celebration of the ideas of James Baldwin, punctuated by original music and a ride through the city of Oakland during one of his visits. Also includes additional excerpts from his work read by Professor Erskine Peters, and an illuminating speech by Baldwin." 98 min. Video/C 9305

[Baldwin, James] James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket.
Presents a look at the life and influence of author James Baldwin, at once a major twentieth century American author, a Civil Rights activist and, for two crucial decades, a prophetic voice calling Americans, Black and white, to confront their shared racial tragedy. Through interviews with writers and friends, this documentary captures the passionate intellect and courageous writing of a man who was born Black, impoverished, gifted and gay. 1990. 87 min. DVD 3039; also VHS Video/C 1185

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Baldwin, James] James Baldwin.[Sound recording]
This collection of James Baldwin's speeches, talks and readings includes rare recordings made between 1962 and 1968, one of the most turbulent periods in American history. Disc 1. After the murder of four children (September 25, 1963) -- Men and women in the arts concerned with Vietnam (March 16, 1968) -- Talk at the San Francisco Masonic Auditorium (1961). Disc 2. The artist's struggle for integrity (September 1962) -- Short stories: readings from his second novel, "Giovanni's Room" (October, 1963) -- Interview with James Baldwin by Elsa Knight Thompson & John Leonard (May 7, 1963). Disc 3. Black Muslims vs. the Sit-Ins (April 25, 1961) -- Question and answer session with Baldwin at the Masonic Temple in San Francisco (May 7, 1963). James Baldwin. Pacifica Radio Archives. Sound/D 226

[Baldwin, James] See also:
Literary Biography & Criticism
Online audio recordings

[Baraka, Amiri] Straight, No Chaser
An interview with Amiri Baraka who discusses the cultural and political significance of African American music, rap, and motion pictures. He also addresses the activities of politician Jesse Jackson and motion picture producer Spike Lee. 1992. 60 min. Sound/C 1521

[Baraka, Amiri] See also:
Poetry readings
Literary Biography & Criticism

[Bearden, Romare] Griots of Imagery: A Comment on the Art of Romare Bearden and Charles White
A presentation on the art of two Afro-American artists who are true African keepers of history and culture or "griots", based on the 1993 exhibition of Romare Bearden and Charles White. Bearden's art is based on his reflections concerning what he called "the prevalence of ritual" in African-American life. White's art reflects his concern with the struggle of Black Americans to transcend the vissicitudes of American life. 28 min. Video/C 5271

[Bearden, Romare] Romare Bearden: Visual Jazz.
An intimate and personal look at the life and work of the bold, brilliant artist Romare Bearden who created collages and paintings of humanity in which he sought to "redefine the image of man" in terms of the African-American experience. Film includes rare footage of Bearden at work. 1995. 28 min. Video/C 5563

The Big Black Comedy Show.
Host: Mo'Nique ; co-host: Rodney Perry ; performers: Esau Ali, Doug Williams, DeRay Davis, Chris Spencer. series of large venue, live comedy concerts showcasing the talent of today's most popular African-American stand-up comedians. 2005.
Vol. 1. 88 min. DVD 6922
Vol. 2. 92 min. DVD 6923
Vol. 3. 94 min. DVD 6924
Vol. 4. 94 min. DVD 6925
Vol. 5. 94 min. DVD 6926

Black Hollywood: The Way It Was (Library of Black History)
An extensive exploration of the "Hollywood treatment" given to blacks by the film moguls since the beginning of the film industry. Through interviews with film historians and generous film clips examines how and why stereotypes were created and used by the movie industry. It also explains the economics of the film business and probes the impact of racism, the Depression, and World War II on film production and distribution. Contents: Film excerpts: Birth of a nation -- Scar of shame -- By right of birth -- Black king -- Emperor Jones -- So red the rose -- Broken strings -- Blood of Jesus -- Sports cavalcade -- Cabin in the sky. Originally shown on the television program: Tony Brown's journal. c1986. 104 min. Video/C 8261

Black Picket Fence
Director Sergio Goes' hard-hitting documentary about Tislam Miller, a struggling rapper living in the public housing projects of Brooklyn's East New York, one of the city's most dangerous neighborhoods. Tiz is making impressive strides in his career, but remains tied to his old life, primarily through his drug-dealing best friend, Mel, who has just gotten out of prison. Tiz comes to real that escape may a goal beyond possibility. 2003. 93 min. DVD 5835

Black Shadows on a Silver Screen.
A tribute to the Black film industry which co-existed with the Hollywood motion picture industry from 1915 to 1950. Includes segments from such rare films as By Right of Birth (1917), Body and Soul (1925), and Siren of the Tropics (1932). Features performances by Paul Robeson, Cab Calloway, Ethel Waters, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Louis Armstrong and others. 52 min. DVD X1409; vhs Video/C 1063

Black Theatre: The Making of a Movement.
Pt.1. Pioneers (41 min.)--Pt.2. A theatre of our own (37 min.)--Pt.3. Black theatre and beyond (35 min.). Performers: Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Lonne Elder, Lloyd Richards, James Earl Jones, Imamu Amiri Baraka, Vinnette Carroll, Ed Bullins, Richard Wesley, Ntozake Shange. Produced & directed by Woodie King, Jr. 110 min. Video/C 2537

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Black Women Writers
A discussion dealing with criticism by black men that black women writers have achieved their success by focusing criticism on black males. 28 min. Video/C 4252

Blacking Up: Hip-hop's Remix of Race and Identity
This documentary examines the popularity of hip-hop among America's white youth and asks whether white identification is rooted in admiration and a desire to transcend race or if it is merely a new chapter in the long continuum of stereotyping, mimicry and cultural appropriation. Does it reflect a new face of racial understanding in white America or does it reinforce an ugly history? Against the unique backdrop of american popular music, the film explores racial identity in the United States. The film draws parallels between the white hip-hop fan and previous incarnations of white appropriation from blackface performer Al Jolson to mainstream artists like Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Eminem. It interweaves portraits of white hip-hop artists and fans with insightful commentary by African American cultural critics. 2010 57 min. DVD X3194

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Body and Soul. Part 2, Soul
Singer Ray Charles traces the roots of today's "soul music" through the blues, jazz, hymns, prison laments and work songs. An interpretation of its development is illustrated with performances by Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, and Aretha Franklin. A CBS News production, 1968. DVD 8426 [preservation copy]; Video/C MM736

Boneshop of the Heart: Folk Offerings from the American South.
Explores a rich vein of American individuality through incisive portraits of five contemporary southern folk artists four of whom are African American. Includes interviews with the folk artists Enoch Tanner Wickham, Charlie Lucas, Vollis Simpson, Thornton Dial Sr., Bessie Harvey, Lonnie Bradley Holley. 1990. 53 min. Video/C MM612

Born For Hard Luck.
A biographical study of Arthur Jackson, known as Peg Leg Sam, a Black street corner musician, telling of his days as a hobo and performer with patent medicine shows in the South. 30 min. Video/C 890

Breakin' In: The Making of a Hip Hop Dancer.
music videos. Follows three young women as they compete for roles in hip hop music videos. Through their eyes we see how this world has impacted their personal values, their career ambitions and their concepts of beauty and self-image. Written and directed by Elizabeth St. Philip. Dist.: National Film Board of Canada. 2005. 71 min. DVD 6687

Brian Winston Reads Black Sitcoms: Stereotypes and Lotsa Laffs.
Discusses the ways that black sitcoms reinforce stereotypical racial images, giving examples from The Cosby Show. 30 min. Video/C 2577

[Brooks, Gwendolyn] See :
Poetry readings

Burlesque in Harlem (1949)
Directed by William Alexander . A typical 1950 Harlem burlesque show, complete with racy slapstick comedy, bawdy blues singers, showgirls, and slick tap dancers. Featuring Burlesque in Harlem: Dewey "Pigmeat" Markham, George Wilshire, Vivian Harris, Dick Barrow, Jo Jo Adams, Hucklebuck Jones, Tarza Young, Slip and Slide, Princess D'Orsey, Mabel Hunter, Gertrude Baby Banks, Gloria Howard. 49 min. DVD X4376; Video 999:1216

[Butler, Octavia] 25 Years of Kindred
Renowned science fiction author Octavia Butler, in celebration of Black History Month 2004, presents a lecture discussing how racism, denial, myth-making, and racial stereotypes have influenced our understanding of our cultural heritage; how the past shapes present reality and how we can best use our historical memory to move forward. Program held in the University of California Doe Library, Morrison Room on February 17, 2004. 72 min. DVD 9273 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C MM111

Classified X.
A film by Melvin Van Peebles. Examines the treatment of black characters throughout the history of American cinema, using examples from classic films beginning with footage by Thomas Edison in 1903 to the present, tracing how Hollywood has aided and abetted the public perception of the African-American. From its earliest days, Hollywood reflected society's fear of blacks and countered with wish-fulfilling images of African-Americans as servile, ignorant, superstitious, or untrustworthy. 1997. 50 min. Video/C 5588

Color: A Sampling of Contemporary African American Writers.
San Francisco, CA : The Poetry Center and American Poetry Archives, SFSU, 1994. Amiri Baraka, George Barlow, Conyus Calhoun, Xam Wilson Cartier, Barbara Christian, Lucille Clifton, Rita Dove, David Henderson, June Jordan, Etheridge Knight, Yusef Komunyakaa, Clarence Major, Colleen J. Mcelroy, Harryette Mullen, Ishmael Reed, Mona Lisa Saloy, Sonia Sanchez, Ntozake Shange, Luisah Teish, Lorenzo Thomas, Alice Walker, Al Young. 57 min. Video/C 3477

Color Adjustment.
Written by Marlon T. Riggs and performed by Ruby Dee. A historical view of stereotypical depictions of African-Americans in television and through that depiction traces the roots of racism and race relations in America. 1991. 58 min. DVD 3047; also VHS Video/C 2145

(Requires RealAudio player)

Bibliography of books and articles about this film
Description from California Newsreel catalog

Full-text reviews (ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries)

Cycles.
Drawing on Caribbean folklore, this exuberant experimental drama uses animation and live action to discover a film language unique to African American women. The multilayered soundtrack combines a chorus of women's voices, with the music of Africa and the diaspora--including Miriam Makeba, acappella singers from Haiti, and trumpetiste Clora Bryant. A film by Zeinabu Irene Davis. 1989. 17 min. Video/C 4901

Dance on the Wind: Memoirs of a Mississippi Shaman
Performer, street and stage dancer Eno Washington tells and dances the story of how he discovered the West African roots of African-American dance. Included are details of how he learned to dance, the black dance traditions with which he grew up, his visits to West Africa and the connections he subsequently made among dances whose movements reappear under different names with each generation. Features many performances, current and historical. Produced by Marty Frame, Ivor Miller. Dist. Cinema Guild. 1992. 27 min. Video/C 5562

The Dancing Man: Peg Leg Bates
Documentary on the life and work of tap dancer Peg Leg Bates, much of it told in his own words. Profusely illustrated with archival footage, including many scenes of Bates dancing at different times of his life on stage, in films, and on television. Bates' performing career is complemented by his work as the owner and operator of a resort in the Catskills, which welcomed blacks in the years before integration. Commentary by his contemporaries offer insights into the difficulties faced by early black performers, as they critique Bates' dancing and the impact of his success as a black performer and resort owner. c1992. Director, Dave Davidson. Dist. Cinema Guild. 58 min. Video/C 8168

Dancing the Big Apple
It's 1937, and the nation is struggling to recover from the Great Depression, complicated by a new recession. Three white teenagers enter an African-American nightclub called the Big Apple in Columbia, South Carolina. They see a strange circle dance performed to popular swing music.... So begins an exciting encounter of cultural traditions the builds to a massive dance craze involving Americans from every walk of life - including the FDR family in the White House. Viewers take a journey back to Africa, through slavery, and into the fascinating account of the Ring Shout ceremony practiced by African-Americans - sometimes secretly, sometimes openly - for hundreds of years. With taproots deep in history, The Big Apple dance provided just the right medicine in trying times. A film by Judy Pritchett. 2009. 39 min. DVD X2681

The Darker Side of Black.
Gangsta chic, violence and nihilism, the hard edge of Rap and Reggae increasingly dominates the image of black popular culture. This film investigates the issues raised by the genre, such as ritualized machismo, misogyny, attitudes towards homosexuality and religion, and gun glorification. Filmed in dance halls, hip hop clubs, and using interviews and music video clips, film takes us to London, Jamaica and the U.S. to examine the "darker" side of contemporary black music. Written & directed by Isaac Julien. 59 min. DVD X3212; vhs Video/C 3969

Filmakers Library catalog description

[Dash, Julie] The Cinematic Jazz of Julie Dash.
Afro-American filmmaker, producer, writer and director Julie Dash talks about her life and work and the difficulties she has had getting her films distributed and accepted. Interspersed with her comments are clips from three of her films, Daughters of the Dust, Illusions, and Diary of an African Nun, and she talks about the making of a fourth film, Four Women. One of her principal aims, she says, is "to redefine images of black women on the screen." Written and produced by Yvonne Welbon. 1992. 27 min. Video/C 7081

Women Make Movies catalog description

Didn't We Ramble On.
Film examines how West African people have passed down their rites and spiritual fervor, generation by generation, through the black marching band. As long as 700 years ago, the Yaruba's had musicalprocessions at funerals. By the 17th century, African musicians were seen in Turkish marching bands and admired and copied by the monarchs of Europe. During both World Wars black military bands played a major role in maintaining troop morale. In the U.S. today, the tradition of the black marching band continues on the football fields as exemplified by the Forida A&M Marching Band. In New Orleans today, a jazz procession, a direct cultural link to the Yoruba ceremony of 700 years ago, is an integral part of the Afro-American funeral observance. Producer, Billy Jackson. 15 min. Video/C 3975

Filmakers Library catalog description

Dignity of Man and Origins of African-American Theatre.
A brief history of Black American performers. Includes excerpts from "Colored People's Time." 15 min. Video/C 4842

The Directors. The Films of Spike Lee.
Through in-depth interviews, behind the scenes footage and clips from his films, Spike Lee talks about the ideas, influences, motivations, struggles and successes behind his work. "I have been blessed with the opportunity to express the views of black people who otherwise don't have access to power and the media. I have to take advantage of that while I am still bankable." 1997. 60 min. Video/C 7090

[Ellison, Ralph] Ralph Ellison: An American Journey
This first documentary on one of the most gifted and intellectually provocative authors of modern American literature establishes Ralph Ellison as a central figure in contemporary debates over art, politics, race and nationhood. Also presented here are the first scenes ever filmed from Ellison's landmark novel, Invisible man. c2001. 87 min. Video/C 8923

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Ethnic Notions.
Written and directed by Marlon Riggs. Covering more than one hundred years of United States history, traces the evolution of Black American caricatures and stereotypes that have fueled anti-Black prejudice. Loyal Toms, carefree Sambos, faithful Mammies, grinning Coons, savage Brutes and wide-eyed Pickaninnies roll across the screen in cartoons, feature films, popular songs, advertisements, household artifacts, even children's rhymes. These caricatures permeated popular culture from the 1820s to the Civil Rights era and implanted themselves within the American psyche. 1986. 57 min. DVD 3049; also VHS Video/C 1024
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Description from California Newsreel catalog

Furious Flower: Conversations with African American Poets.
A four part video anthology of African American poetry from the 1940s to 1995 offering intimate portraits of leading poets reading and discussing their own works. Originally presented at the Furious Flower Conference held September 29-October 1, 1994 at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Volume 1, Elders: Part 1 introduces poets who laid the groundwork for today's Black poetry renaissance and mentored many of the younger voices represented in this series. These writers, many of whom began writing during the 1940s provided the wisdom and strong literary voice which brought Black verse to competence and maturity. Featuring Samuel W. Allen, Mari Evans, Naomi Long Madgett, Alvin Aubert, Pinkie Gordon Lane. 114 min. Video/C 6023

Volume 2, Warriors: Part 2 examines the poets of the movements of the 1960s. Their works defined a strong Black cultural identity and waged a war for literary self-determination. Here these veterans read from works which stirred a generation and discuss the achievements and unfulfilled hopes of their movement. Featuring Amiri Baraka, Haki R. Madhubuti, Kalamu ya Salaam, Sonia Sanchez, Eugene Redmond, Nikki Giovanni. 114 min. Video/C 6024

Volume 3, Seers: Part 3 looks at the poetry that followed the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s, which was marked with a broadened scope. While retaining the same political commitment, the poets extended their vision into new regions, exploring personal, sometimes taboo subjects and imbuing traditional forms with a contemporary intensity. Featuring Rita Dove, Toi Derricotte, Dolores Kendrick, Sherley Anne Williams, Gerald Barrax, E. Ethelbert Miller, Michael S. Harper. 114 min. Video/C 6025

Volume 4, Initiates: Part 4 highlights the younger poets of the 1990s who represent the promise and diversity of Black poetry as it develops into the 21st century. Featuring Elizabeth Alexander and members of the Dark Room Collective: Thomas Sayers Ellis, Kevin Young, Sharan Strange, Major Jackson, Vera Beatty, John Keene. 27 min. Video/C 6026

A Great Day in Harlem
Commentators: Art Kane, Robert Benton, Gerry Mulligan, Bud Freeman, Mike Lipskin, Nat Hentoff, Milt Hinton, Soville Browne, Eddie Locke, Horace Silver, Art Farmer, Robert Altschuler, Art Blakey, Mona Hinton, Steve Frankfurt, Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins, Marian McPartland, Horace Silver, Sonny Rollins, Hank Jones, Max Kaminsky, Buck Clayton. A documentary about a photograph taken in 1958 by Art Kane of the jazz greats of the period. Includes home movie footage of that day of the musicians arriving and greeting each other the morning of the shoot. Also includes conversations with musicians and archival performance footage. 60 min. DVD X2129' vhs Video/C 4197

Great Day in Harlem Web site

Griots of Imagery: A Comment on the Art of Romare Bearden and Charles White
A presentation on the art of two Afro-American artists who are true African keepers of history and culture or "griots", based on the 1993 exhibition of Romare Bearden and Charles White. Bearden's art is based on his reflections concerning what he called "the prevalence of ritual" in African-American life. White's art reflects his concern with the struggle of Black Americans to transcend the vissicitudes of American life. 28 min. Video/C 5271

[Himes, Chester] Chester Himes: A Writer's Turbulent Journey.
A program on the life of novelist Chester Himes, who began writing detective novels in his fifties while he was in prison. In his works he created a violent and cynical picture of the African-American experience in the U.S. Here Himes speaks of his youth, the Harlem he knew so well before World War II, his early ventures into writing, his life as an expatriate in France and Spain, the art of fiction and the role of the African-American writer in America. [1999?] 30 min. Video/C 7816

Hip-hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes
A look at the conceptualization of masculinity in hip-hop culture. Pays tribute to hip-hop while challenging the rap music industry to take responsibility for too often perpetuating destructive, deeply conservative styles of manhood that glamorize sexism, violence, and homophobia. Includes interviews with prominent rappers, music industry executives, and social critics. Produced, directed and written by Byron Hurt Dist.: Media Education Foundation. 2006. 61 min. DVD 6448
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[Hughes, Langston] Looking for Langston: A Meditation on Langston Hughes (1902-1907) and the Harlem Renaissance.
A tribute to Langston Hughes, this film attempts to reclaim him as an important black gay voice in American culture. A film by Isaac Julien. 45 min. DVD 6018; Video/C 2911

"A visual tour-de-force, "Looking for Langston" is a beautiful and lyrical meditation of black and white gay identities. Using the life and work of Langston Hughes during the jazz/blues infused Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's, the film weaves together the poetry of Hughes and Essex Hempill, music, sylized dramatic sequences and archival material in a celebration of gay desire and a testament to contemporary society's attempt to shatter multiple identitites." [from Third World Newsreel catalog]

Awards
Berlin International Film Festival - Best Short Film

[Hughes, Langston] See :
Poetry readings

[Hunter, Clementine] Clementine Hunter: American Folk Artist
This video profiles the life and work of one of America's greatest African-American folk artists. In 1940, when she was already in her 50s, Clementine Hunter began to paint her memories of her life in the early part of this century. The resulting images, painted until her death at age 101, are vivid remembrances, pictures "put in her head by God," of a hard but joyous life. Shot on location in northwestern Louisiana, this program shows many of Hunter's colorful paintings and includes commentary by the artist herself and by those who knew her well. By Katina Simmons for the Museum of African American Life and Culture, Dallas. 1993. 30 min. Video/C MM539

[Hurston, Zora Neale] Alice Walker on Zora Neale Hurston.
Discussion and reading at the American Poetry Archives, San Francisco State University, 10/20/80. Video/C 1222

[Hurston, Zora Neale] Zora is My Name!
A funny, stirring story based on the life of Zora Neale Hurston, one of the most distinctive writers of the American South and how a turn-of-the-century Black woman captured the folklore of the rural South. 90 min. Video/C 1838

I Shall Not Be Removed: The Life of Marlon Riggs.
A film biography of Marlon Riggs, the gifted, gay, black filmmaker who produced documentary films addressing issues of identity among Afro-Americans and gays. Clips from his films show how he evolved a unique experimental documentary style, mixing poetry, criticism, the personal and the political. It also documents his long battle against AIDS until his death in 1994 and includes interviews with family, friends, and co-workers. 58 min. DVD X1410; vhs Video/C 4463

Description from California Newsreel catalog
Independent Television Service's "Black Is...Black Ain't web page

Marlon Riggs bibliography

I'll Make Me a World. 1999. 57 min. each installment

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

Lift Every Vice: 1900-1924. Looks at the trials and tribulations of the first generation of African-Americans born into freedom, focusing on the contributions of this generation to the arts and to the birth of jazz... specifically, Bert Williams and George Walker in vaudeville; Oscar Micheaux in film; and many other early Afro-American performers. Video/C 6262

Without Fear or Shame: 1920-1937. This program discusses the lives of African-American leaders W.E.B DuBois, A. Philip Randolph, and Marcus Garvey; the Harlem Renaissance and its major figures, such as Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and women blues singers; and examines the conflicts which arose over what art should express when community leaders seek to use it in the struggle for racial justice. Video/C 6263

Bright Like a Sun: 1935-1954. Discusses the creative visions of African-American artists such as singer, actor, and activist Paul Robeson, who used his fame and artistry to fight for social justice; sculptor Augusta Savage, who built an art school in Harlem to nurture African-American talent; jazz musicians Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, playing the bebop that will become a recognized musical genre. Video/C 6264

The Dream Keepers: 1940-1965. Looks at African-American artists after World War II, and the impact of African-American "firsts" in the arts and other areas of society on the nation as a whole. Focuses on playwright Lorraine Hansberry, ballerinas Delores Browne and Raven Wilkinson, and author James Baldwin and others. Video/C 6265

Not a Rhyme Time: 1963-1986.From the 1960's through the 1980's, African-American artists make inroads both in civil rights and in the performing arts. Focuses on artist Romare Bearden, poet Gwendolyn Brooks and the Black Arts Movement, and author Alice Walker among others. Video/C 6266

The Freedom You Will Take: 1985-The Present. Looks at the contemporary cultural landscape, which has been transformed by the power of African-American film, performance, dance, rap music, and the spoken word art forms. Focuses on Spike Lee and his influence on American independent cinema; choreographer Bill T. Jones and how his work challenges stereotypical views of race, sexuality, and fear; and how hip-hop expresses the hopes and challenges of young African-Americans. Video/C 6267

In Black & White
Using archival newsreels, feature film footage and interviews with Afro-American actors and directors, this film explores the inception, struggle, suppression, and survival of the Black Cinema from the 1920s through the 1950s. This detailed documentary, a stinging indictment of racism in the arts and in American culture, examines the lives and influence of Paul Robeson, Josephine Baker, Oscar Micheaux, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Marcus Garvey and many others on Afro-American cinema. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1992. 92 min. Video/C 5501

International Sweethearts of Rhythm.
Focuses on the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, an all-female multi-racial jazz band of postdepression years with a strong brass section, heavy percussion and a deep rhythmic sense. Includes interviews with former band members, other musicians, and fans. Directed by Greta Schiller, Andrea Weiss. Dist.: Cinema Guild 30 min. Video/C 4080.

[Jordan, June] See :
Poetry readings

Know Your Enemy.
Using video animation and a collage of stills film examines the controversy surrounding politically or socially offensive lyrics in "hip-hop" and rap music. A film by Art Jones. Dist. Third World Newsreel. 27 min. Video/C 3314

The Legend of Bop City.
From 1950 to 1965, an after-hours jazz club called Jimbo's Bop City became an emblem of the spirit and vitality of African-American society, local and world-wide. Located in San Francisco's legendary Fillmore District, Bop City hosted jazz legends Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and Miles Davis. c1998. 52 min. DVD 7109 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 6393

[LeGon, Jenni] Jeni LeGon: Living in a Great Big Way
Explores the fascinating life of the tap dancer, Jeni LeGon who overcame barriers to become the first Black woman to sign a long-term contract with a major Hollywood studio. She subsequently appeared in over a dozen films, yet despite her talent, there were many hard lessons to be learned in a segregated Hollywood. This film showcases the path that Jeni forged for herself and the gift of inspiration that she gave a generation of dance students. The film includes interviews with the tap dancer Fayard Nicholas and archival footage of the Nicholas Brothers, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Fats Waller, Paul Robeson and Cab Calloway. Dist. Cinema Guild. 1999. 49 min. Video/C 7464

Lip
It is Hollywood's favorite role for black women: the maid. Sassy or sweet, snickeringly attentive or flippantly dismissive, the performers who play them steal every scene they are in, and this entertaining video collage reveals the narrow margin Hollywood has allowed black actresses to shine in. But shine they do. Giving lip is proven an art form in these scenes from 1930's cinema to present-day movies featuring a remarkable roster of undervalued actresses and their more celebrated white costars. A video collaboration between Tracey Moffat and Gary Hillberg. 1999. 11 min. DVD 4791

Long Train Running: a History of the Oakland Blues.
A film by Marlon Riggs. Examines taverns and clubs in Oakland, California where a distincitive style of blues music unique to Oakland was developed and performed. Includes interviews with blues musicians in the Oakland area and segments from the San Francisco Blues Festival. 29 min. DVD 1187; also on VHS Video/C 3799

Marlon Riggs bibliography

Looking for Langston: A Meditation on Langston Hughes (1902-1907) and the Harlem Renaissance.
A tribute to Langston Hughes, this film attempts to reclaim him as an important black gay voice in American culture. A film by Isaac Julien. 45 min. DVD 8495; Video/C 2911

"A visual tour-de-force, "Looking for Langston" is a beautiful and lyrical meditation of black and white gay identities. Using the life and work of Langston Hughes during the jazz/blues infused Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's, the film weaves together the poetry of Hughes and Essex Hempill, music, sylized dramatic sequences and archival material in a celebration of gay desire and a testament to contemporary society's attempt to shatter multiple identitites." [from Third World Newsreel catalog]

[Lorde, Audre] The Edge of Each Other's Battles: The Vision of Audre Lorde
Documents black lesbian poet and activist Audre Lorde's (1934-92) social vision, using footage from the four-day conference: I am your sister: forging global connections across differences, held in Boston in 1990. At the conference 1,200 men, women and young people from 23 countries examined the issues of the relations between race, class, gender and sexuality through Lorde's work. Interviews with the organizers of the conference are intercut with conference footage, including performances, controversies and speeches. Producer, director, writer, Jennifer Abod. 2000. 59 min. DVD 7917

Women Make Movies catalog description

[Lorde, Audre] A Litany for Survival: The Life and Work of Audre Lorde
Audre Lorde, poet and lesbian-feminist talks about being lesbian and black in New York in the 1950s and her social/political activity. Includes conversations and readings by Lorde and comments by other writers and family members. 1996. 56 min. Video/C 5667

Awards
American Library Assn. Video Round Table Notable Videos for Adults

Many Steps: The Origin and Evolution of African-American Collegiate Stepping /
The origin and evolution of African American collegiate stepping is explored in this energetic and informative documentary. Stepping dates back to the early 20th century, when black veterans of World War I enrolled in colleges and brought to their dances a highly rigorous, drill-like component and combined it with elements from other black dances. Stepping today is a popular communal art form in which teams of young dancers compete, using improvisation, call and response, complex meters, propulsive rhythms and a percussive attack. 2002. 28 min. Video/C 9421

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Material Witness: Race, Identity and the Politics of Gangsta Rap.(Race & Diversity Series)
Contents: Living with difference -- The denial of race -- Race and language -- Black essentialism as defense -- American hybridity -- Complexity of black identity -- An American mix: DuBois & the classics -- Hip-hop culture as material witness to urban neglect -- Representin' the afflicteds' story -- Gangsta rap and the market -- The burden of the race artist -- A limited choice: purity or stereotype -- A wrong response: the elders react -- Towards a politics of anti-essentialism.

Michael Eric Dyson talks about the important issues of essentialism and notions of identity within the context of race, and discusses hip hop culture and the conflicts around gangsta rap. 42 min. Video/C 4493

Media Assassin.
A discussion of Hip-Hop, Black culture, and racism in America. The audio features an interview with Harry Allen, and the video displays a collage of stills and video animation. 17 min. Video/C 3317

Memories of Duke.
Features Duke Ellington and his band on their 1968 Mexican tour, filmed in Mexico City's Palacio de Bellas Artes as well as in Guadalajara. Historic scenes from early films and interviews with band members, Cootie Williams and Russell Procope are included. A film by Art Jones. Dist.: Third World Newsreel. 85 min. Video/C 3317

[Micheaux, Oscar] Midnight Ramble: Oscar Micheaux and the Story of Race Movies.
Recounts the story of race movies produced for Afro-Americans from the 1920s through 1950 and the role played by Oscar Micheaux, the leading Afro-American producer and director. These movies were designed for Afro-Americans and were frequently shown at midnight. They presented Afro-Americans in a positive light. Featuring interviews with Afro-American actors and actresses, and historians. 58 min. Video/C 3614

The Movies Race and Ethnicity for MRC Micheaux holdings

About Oscar Micheaux, Micheaux Films and "Race Films" (article by John DeBartolo)
Geechee Girls Productions Oscar Micheaux Web site
Information on Micheaux from the Internet Movie Database
Midnight Ramble: The Negro in Early Hollwood
Black Folks Make Movies website

Micheaux Bibliography

[Micheaux, Oscar] Oscar Micheaux, Film Pioneer.
Oscar Micheaux is remembered for his work as a pioneer producer-director whose films offered a positive image and an alternative for African Americans in the 1920s and 1930s. The program is built around the on-camera reminiscences of two performers who appeared in Micheaux films: Bee Freeman, and Lorenzo Tucker. Also included are dramatic reenactments of Micheaux directing and touring the country to sell his films. Dramatic sequences: Danny Glover (as Micheaux). c1981. 28 min. Video/C 8264

[Naylor, Gloria] Gloria Naylor: A Conversation with Gloria Naylor.
Gloria Naylor reads from her works and discusses the value and difficulty of maintaining an African American identity in a world dominated by whites. 21 min. Video/C 2542

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[Micheaux, Oscar] Race Movies: The Popular Art of the Black Renaissance
Explores the involvement of black filmmakers in filmmaking, from its earliest days through the 1920s with particular emphasis on the work of James Weldon Johnson, Oscar Micheaux, and Richard D. Maurice. Focus is on the movies that were made and the production companies that produced them. 1985. 20 min. Video/C 8293

[Morrison, Toni] Identifiable Qualities: A Film on Toni Morrison.
Interview with Pulitzer Prize-winning black novelist Toni Morrison. Here she addresses the events of the Sixties which led to her first novel, the use of personal experience as sources for her strong, black female characters, and the advantage to publishers of placing black writers in the mainstream. 26 min. Video/C 2346

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Morrison, Toni] The Dick Cavett Show: Toni Morrison.
Host Dick Cavett interviews the African-American novelist Toni Morrison about her views on American literature and her own writings. September 23 and 23, 1983. 60 min. Video/C 6793

Toni Morrison.
Readings from Morrison's novel, Beloved. Morrison also talks about the writing process. 52 min. Video/C 1393

[Morrison, Toni] Toni Morrison (World of Ideas with Bill Moyers).
Bill Moyers talks with Toni Morrison about how the invented world of fiction connects with life, about the inner city, the liberation of love and motherhood, the new world black woman who defies the master narrative. Running time not available. Video/C 1573

[Morrison, Toni] Charlie Rose.
Charlie Rose interviews Nobel and Pulitzer prize winning author Toni Morrison, discussing her new book, "Paradise", her life, and her views on America and the issues facing the country. Episode number and air date from cassette label. Broadcast Jan. 19, 1998. 58 min. Video/C 7673

Toni Morrison: A Conversation with Toni Morrison.
Morrison reads from her two novels, Beloved and Jazz and discusses her views of the contributions made to American literature by the experiences of African Americans. 25 min. Video/C 2543

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Morrison, Toni] Toni Morrison--A Writer's Work With [ World of Ideas with Bill Moyers].
Parts I & II. Toni Morrison discusses the difficulties of writing about the painful subjects that occur in her novels. 60 min. Video/C 2315

Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema
A portrait of independent African-American filmmaking in the Southern region of the United States prior to World War II ... an incredible body of truly independent filmmaking made under the most hostile set of circumstances, including racial prejudice, unimaginably low budgets, and crude technical conditions. The film clips shown here, which are a mirror of the Black experience from the 1920s through mid-1950's, focus on the innovative works of film makers Spencer Williams, Oscar Micheaux, Eloyse Gist, and Clarence Muse. Special features: "Includes 2 bonus short films (an extra 107 min.): "The Blood of Jesus and "Go down, death"; scene access. 55, 107 min. 2000. DVD 1589

Negro Novelists/Books and Authors with David Littlejohn.
Littlejohn discusses and interprets the work of three African-American novelists; Richard Wright's Native Son, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, and James Baldwin's Going to Meet the Man. Also included is a reading by Littlejohn, of poems by Gwendolyn Brooks and Le Roi Jones (now Imamu Amiri Baraka). 60 min. Video/C 2009

The "New Negro" Arts Movement (Art: Transatlantic Modernism)
Between WWI and WWII nearly 2 million blacks migrated to Harlem making it an exciting and culturally rich neighborhood. Although there was still much bigotry directed towards blacks it was the first time that America saw the potential for major art to come out of a great black community. Here Professor Corn shows numerous examples of African-Americans being "in vogue" in the 20's -- one example is famed dancer Josephine Baker, whose high moment of fame in Paris -- "Revue Negre" made her a symbol of the "new woman." 1998. 60 min. Video/C 7276

New Orleans' Black Indians: A Case Study in the Arts
Pre-lenten Mardi Gras in New Orleans serves as the background for this study of a mixture between American Indians and Blacks who compose the Black Indian tribes of New Orleans. The traditions, costumes, songs and dances date back more than 100 years and create living history of their folk art which is passed from generation to generation. 1983. 23 min. Video/C 9885

No Maps on My Taps.
Veteran jazz tap dancing stars, including Bunny Briggs, Chuck Green, and Sandman Sims, reminisce about their art and careers. Dist.: Direct Cinema. 58 min. Video/C 2318

The Original Kings of Comedy
Directed by Spike Lee. Features: Steve Harvey, D.L. Hughley, Cedric the Entertainer, Bernie Mac. Documentary capturing four major African American stand-up comedians. Filmed in Charlotte North Carolina during their "Kings of Comedy" tour, they crack jokes about race, sex, families and human responses. Includes backstage footage and interviews. 2000. 115 min. DVD 557

Panorama of African-American Theatre.

Dignity of Man and Origins of African-American Theatre. A brief history of Black American performers. Includes excerpts from Colored People's Time. 15 min. Video/C 4842

Emergence of the African-American Performing Arts Includes brief history of black American performers, and excerpt from Simply heavenly, by Langston Hughes. 15 min. Video/C 4843
Power of the African-American Playwright. A brief survey of the work of Afro-American playwrights. Includes excerpts from Raisin in the sun, Purlie Victorious, and The Colored Museum.15 min. Video/C 4844

Present and Future Direction of African-American Theatre. A brief examination of current and future trends in Afro-American drama. Includes excerpts from the plays Fences and and The Colored Museum. 15 min. Video/C 4845

[Poitier, Sidney] Sidney Poitier: One Bright Light
Explores the life and career of accomplished actor, writer, director, humanitarian and diplomat, Sidney Poitier through his body of work and through the words of his colleagues and admirers. Still the only black American to receive an Academy Award for "Best Actor," he forever altered the racial perceptions held by motion picture audiences and Hollywood executives. Directed and narrated by Lee Grant. 2000. 60 min. DVD 5570

Race Movies: The Popular Art of the Black Renaissance
Explores the involvement of black filmmakers in filmmaking, from its earliest days through the 1920s with particular emphasis on the work of James Weldon Johnson, Oscar Micheaux, and Richard D. Maurice. Focus is on the movies that were made and the production companies that produced them. 1985. 20 min. Video/C 8293

Racism in Literature.
An entertaining and informative look at how racism is handled in comic books and speculative fiction. The program features interviews with minority science fiction authors and cartoonists including black science fiction writer Sanuel R. Delany, native American writer, Owl Goingback, Asian American science fiction writer William F. Wu, and many others. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1995. 30 min. Video/C 5503

Rainbow: Black Poet Sarah W. Fabio
A portrait of Black poet, critic, and historian Sarah Webster Fabio. Includes readings of her works and interviews in which she discusses her approaches to writing, the relationship of the Black experience to her work, and her early influences. Originally released in 1976. 31 min. Video/C MM890

Rap, Race & Equality.
This documentary is an informative look at the issues which rap artists attempt to deal with through their music, such as racism, economic and social inequality and race relations. It suggests that rap music flows out of the African storytelling tradition and shows how it enhances the African American sense of identity. Also examines such controversial areas as sexism and censorship as it applies to rap music. Includes interviews with musicians from Ice Cube, Ice T, Public Enemy, and Naughty by Nature. 52 min. Video/C 3968

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Religion, Rap and the Crisis of Black Leadership: Cornel West.(World of Ideas with Bill Moyers)
A conversation and interview with Cornel West, professor at Harvard University, about religion, rap music, and the crisis of black leadership in America. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1994. 30 min. Video/C 4993

[Riggs, Marlon] Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien: No Regret.
A film by Marlon Riggs, five gay Black men who are HIV-positive discuss how they are battling the double stigmas and racism surrounding their infection and homosexuality. 29 min. Video/C 2646

I Shall Not Be Removed: The Life of Marlon Riggs. Video/C 4463

Marlon Riggs bibliography

Right on! Poetry on Film.
The Original Last Poets. During 1968 on the hot streets of New York a trio of young black performers, calling themselves The Original Last Poets, were creating a hip new form of guerrilla poetry woven of soul, jazz, the blues and gospel. Today they are credited as the tap-root artists of Rap. This film, set on the rooftops and back alleys of the Lower East Side, presents the trio in the full range of performance from satire and power to tenderness and affirmation. 73 min. Video/C 3403

[Ringgold, Faith] Faith Ringgold: The Last Story Quilt. (Portrait of an Artist)
Presents her view of the black female in society. Influenced by authors James Baldwin and Amiri Baraka, Ringgold is credited with developing the "Black Light" color palette. 28 min. Video/C 2690

[Ringgold, Faith] Faith Ringgold Paints Crown Heights
Faith Ringgold details the creation of the quilt she created to represent the twelve diverse cultures and traditions comprising the area of Crown Heights in New York City. 1995. 28 min. Video/C 5564

[Robeson, Paul] Paul Robeson.
James Earl Jones gives a stirring performance as singer citizen Paul Robeson in this stage production. A man of extraordinary versatility, Paul Robeson achieved distinction as both a scholar and an athlete before he became an internationally-honored concert artist and stage and screen actor in the 1930's and 40's. James Earl Jones illuminates with only a few props and a bare stage, Robeson's life and truly heroic persona with a superlative performance that matches the remarkable subject. Originally presented as a broadcast on PBS networks on October 8, 1979. 118 min. Video/C 9569

[Robeson, Paul]Paul Robeson.
A biography of the black man who became both a famous singer and actor who used his international acclaim to focus world attention on racial injustices suffered by Afro-Americans. His efforts world-wide for working class people in the 1930s, 40s and 50s are highlighted in this documentary. By 1950, Robeson's battle for freedom had cost him his rising career. Includes film clips from his performances, including Black spirituals and folk songs of other nations, interviews and archival photographs. 1994. 36 min. Video/C 5417

[Robeson, Paul]Paul Robeson: Here I Stand
Presents the life and achievements of Paul Robeson, an athlete, singer, scholar and champion of the rights of the poor, disenfranchised and people of color. c1999. 127 min. DVD 454; also on VHS Video/C 6429

[Robeson, Paul] Paul Robeson: Scandalize My Name
A biography of the Paul Robeson, the African-American actor of film and stage, athlete, writer, multi-lingual orator, lawyer, and basso profondo concert singer who was also noted for his wide-ranging social justice activism. Focuses on the unrelenting persecutions and blacklisting he suffered throughout his life in response to his outspoken criticism of the treatment of black Americans. Features archival film footage with commentary by authors, academics, actors and his son, Paul Robeson, Jr. Supplementary short issued with: The Adventures of young Indiana Jones. 2007. 32 min. DVD X235

[Robeson, Paul] Paul Robeson: Tribute to an Artist (Paul Robeson : Portraits of the Artist)
Traces Paul Robeson's career through his artistic triumphs, political activism and his socially charged performances of his signature song, "Ol' Man River." Special features: Audio commentary for the Emperor Jones by historian Jeffrey C. Stewart ; Our Paul: remembering Paul Robeson, a new video program with filmaker William Greaves and actors Ruby Dee and James Earl Jones ; Robeson on Robeson, a new video interview with Paul Robeson, Jr. 1979. 29 min. DVD 7280

Awards
Academy Award - Best Documentary, Short Subjects

[Robeson, Paul] Tribute to Paul Robeson.[Sound recording}
Paul Robeson performs many of his songs, along with excerpts from his theatrical and opera performances. 151 min. Sound/C 39

[Shange, Ntozake] See :
Poetry readings

Sisters in Cinema
A documentary tracing the careers of inspiring African American women filmmakers from the early part of the 20th century to the present. Realizing that she wasn't going to find her sisters in cinema in Hollywood, the producer traveled the independent path to uncover a wide range of films directed by African American women outside of the Hollywood studio system. Early filmmakers include Tressie Souders, Zora Neale Hurston, Madame C. J. Walker, Maya Angelou, Madeline Anderson, Kathleen Collins Prettyman, Darnell Martin, Kasi Lemmons, Julie Dash and Eloyce Gist. Produced and directed by Yvonne Welbon. 2003. 62 min. Video/C MM408

Small Steps, Big Strides
This tribute celebrates African American silver screen legends. Included are interviews and rare footage documenting the kinds of roles black actors were first given, the challenges these performers met, and the real behind-the-scenes story of their acceptance and triumphs in Hollywood. Includes special mention of Darryl Zanuck who was the first to open major roles to African American actors. Performers: Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Nicholas Brothers, Dorothy Dandridge, Lena Horne, James Earl Jones, Gregory Hines, Hatti McDaniel, Duke Ellington, Ink Spots, Sidney Poitier, Stepin' Fetchit, Harry Belafonte, Ethel Waters, Darryl Zanuck. c1997. 60 min. Video/C 8208

[Smith, Anna Deavere] Anna Deavere Smith [Interview]
Interview with Anna Deavere Smith, writer, performer and social commentator on her view of the state of race relations in the United States. Concludes with a brief look at human rights films by the Black Audio Film Collective of London, which concerns itself with Black and Afro-Caribbean experiences in the United Kingdom. Segment from the television program Rights & wrongs broadcast April 23, 1994. 27 min. Video/C 6707

Steppin'
An overview of step dancing, an African-American dance and chanting art, whose cultural roots stem from traditional African dance, military marching, and hip-hop. Shown here are college fraternity and sorority team competitions, with commentary and interviews from competitors and teachers on the history and current direction of step shows. 1992. 55 min. Video/C 8167

Stepping
A modernized version of what is known as the African gumboot dance, stepping was adopted by African-American fraternities and sororities, eventually evolving into an essential element of the black college experience. Stepping is a high energy montage of dance, jazz and military movements; an art form that is taking the world by storm. Produced and directed by Marshall Blackwell and Norman Whiteburn. 2008. 75 min. DVD X3013

Straight from the Streets
Six years in the making, this film begins with footage of the 1992 Los Angeles uprising, and concludes with the Million Man March. It explores the realities of urban life for Afro-Americans focusing on the positive role rap music has played in bringing messages from popular culture to mass audiences. It looks at community self-empowerment, the prevention of gang formation and violence including interviews with rap artists, community leaders and Afro-American citizens. Featuring: Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, Ice-T, Cypress Hill, Rage, DJ Quik, KAM, Kurupt, Maxine Waters, Louis Farrakhan, Denzel Washington, Supreme, Jorge Rivas, SLIP, Tony "Bogard" Thomas, Sen Dog, Lady of Rage, April, Big Ship, Cliff Stearns, Dick Gregory. A documentary film by Keith O'Derek and Robert Corsini. c1999. 110 min. Video/C 6408

Straight Outta Hunters Point: A Hardcore Hip-hop Documentary.
Presents a documentary look at life in the Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco in an emotionally intense reality check focusing on the daily drama of gang-related rap wars which result as rival gangs dispute over who is the best rap artist. Includes interviews with gang members and residents in a community fighting for social and economic survival. 2002. 74 min. DVD 2940

Straight Up Rappin'.
This documentary is about Rap, without music. Examines the political consciousness of a new generation. 29 min. Video/C 2901

Filmakers Library catalog description

Strange Fruit
A documentary exploring the history and legacy of the anti-lynching protest song made famous by Billie Holiday. The film examines the history of lynching, the courage of those who fought for racial justice, and the interplay of race, labor and the left and popular culture as forces that would give rise to the Civil Rights Movement. It also presents the story of the composer Lewis Allan, a Jewish schoolteacher and union activist from the Bronx who wrote the poem and later set it to music. c2002. 58 min. Video/C 8924

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table Notable Video for Adults

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Television & the African American Experience, Civil Rights & Beyond: On the Front Lines: Television and African-American Issues
A three part satellite seminar series examining how television has covered and reflected black history and culture over the past fifty years. In this first segment panelists explore issues from the 1950s and 1960s and how television news has interpreted various racial issues and such divisive events as the Rodney King verdict and the confirmation of Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas. Presented at the Museum of Television and Radio, Los Angeles, California on November 7, 2001. 93 min. Video/C 8496

Television & the African American Experience, Civil Rights & Beyond: Images of African-Americans on Prime-time Television
A three part satellite seminar series examining how television has covered and reflected black history and culture over the past fifty years. In this second segment panelists examine the stereotypes of Amos 'n' Andy in the postwar era, the success of the Cosby show in the 1980s, and the recent trend of burgeoning networks concentrating on African-American-themed programming. Presented at the Museum of Television and Radio, Los Angeles, California on November 7, 2001. 93 min. Video/C 8497

Television & the African American Experience, Civil Rights & Beyond: Bebopping, Hip-hopping, & Slam-dunking: the Influence of African-American Endeavors in Music and Sports on Mainstream Culture
A three part satellite seminar series examining how television has covered and reflected black history and culture over the past fifty years. In this second segment panelists examine the stereotypes of Amos 'n' Andy in the postwar era, the success of the Cosby show in the 1980s, and the recent trend of burgeoning networks concentrating on African-American-themed programming. Presented at the Museum of Television and Radio, Los Angeles, California on November 7, 2001. 90 min. Video/C 8498

That Rhythm--Those Blues (American Experience 110)
Focuses on the rhythm and blues music performed by black musicians during the 1940s and 1950s through the small towns and cities of the South. 58 min. DVD X472 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 1532

To Be Young, Gifted, and Black: A Portrait of Lorraine Hansberry in Her Own Words
Uses excerpts from the letters, diaries, and plays of the late writer Lorraine Hansberry to show her struggle for recognition as a black writer and artist. 90 min. Video/C 5650

[Walker, Alice] A Celebration of Black Women in Literature, Alice Walker.
Dramatization of part of Alice Walker's novel, Meridian, with comments and insights by the author. 25 min. Sound/C 679

[Walker, Alice] Alice Walker.
Poetry reading at the American Poetry Archives, San Francisco State University, 3/21/79. 40 min. Video/C 1223

[Walker, Alice] Alice Walker (Lannan Literary Videos; 14).
Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker reads poems and excerpts from her novels, "The Color Purple" and "The Temple of My Familiar" in Los Angeles on January 9, 1989. Evelyn White interviews Walker at her home. 60 min. Video/C 3484

[Walker, Alice] Alice Walker: A Conversation with Alice Walker (In Black & White)
Alice Walker discusses her life, contemporary America, the "womanist" perspective, and reads from her poetry. 30 min. Video/C 2544

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Walker, Alice] Alice Walker: A Portrait in the First Person.
Interview with the author. Walker discusses issues including family violence and the position of black women in America. 30 min. Video/C 1407

[Walker, Alice] Alice Walker: Possessing the Secret of Joy.
Alice Walker talks about her novel "Possessing the Secret of Joy" which addresses issues of female genital mutilation, and social protest in Africa and America. Archival footage, dramatized scenes from the book and additional interviews with Gloria Steinem and Barbara Christian and others shed light on Alice Walker's career and issues of womanhood worldwide. Originally produced by SBS, Australia and broadcast on the program Masterpiece on 5/31/93. Dist.: Films Media Group. 53 min. Video/c 6891

[Walker, Alice] Visions of the Spirit: A Portrait of Alice Walker.
This documentary chronicles the life and work of Pulitzer prize winning author, Alice Walker. Video/C 1488

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[White, Charles] Griots of Imagery: A Comment on the Art of Romare Bearden and Charles White
A presentation on the art of two Afro-American artists who are true African keepers of history and culture or "griots", based on the 1993 exhibition of Romare Bearden and Charles White. Bearden's art is based on his reflections concerning what he called "the prevalence of ritual" in African-American life. White's art reflects his concern with the struggle of Black Americans to transcend the vissicitudes of American life. 28 min. Video/C 5271

Why We Laugh
Celebrates African-American comedians and their cultural influence on American society. Includes performances, interviews, and insights from some of the most celebrated and outspoken comedians of all time. Icons of comedy Chris Rock, Bill Cosby, and Keenan Ivory Wayans, among others, all weigh in on what it means to be a black comic in America, while cultural critics, noted scholars, and prominent politicians trace the evolution of black comedy from the days of Stepin Fetchit and blackface minstrels straight through to Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam, highlighting the ways in which individuals can inspire cultural change. Based on the book Black comedians on Black comedy : how African-Americans taught us to laugh by Darryl Littleton (Main (Gardner) Stacks PN2286 .L58 2006) Contents: Expression and inspiration -- Minstrel era -- Main stream in America -- Redd Foxx & Dick Gregory -- 1970/1980 comedy TV shows -- Chris Rock & Whoopi Goldberg -- Urban culture on TV -- Kings of comedy -- Taking responsibility -- Dignity does matter. Performers: Cornel West, Chris Rock, Bill Cosby, Keenen Ivory Wayans, Whoopi Goldberg, Spike Lee, Russell Simmons, Sherri Shepherd, Katt Williams, Steve Harvey, Mo'Nique, Eddie Griffin, D. L.Hughley, Richard Pryor, Dick Gregory, Dave Chappelle, Eddie Murphy. 2010. 86 min. DVD X3215

[Wideman, John] John Wideman: A Conversation with John Wideman.
Wideman candidly discusses the dilemma of the committed African American intellectual torn between the urban underclass and a predominantly white, middle class literary audience. He writes because "African Americans have to carry alternative versions of reality in our heads and the model for doing that exists in art." 26 min. Video/C 2546

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Wild Women Don't Have the Blues.
The story of Ma Rainey, Ethel Waters, Bessie Smith, Alberta Hunter, Ida Cox, and other pioneering women blues singers. This film recreates the stories of these women who left an indelible mark on the music world. 58 min. Video/C 2320

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Wilson, August] August Wilson: A Conversation with August Wilson.
The playwright, August Wilson, describes his role as passing down the practical and spiritual wisdom of the African American community and his plays and writings. He expounds upon the influence of black traditions like storytelling and blues music in contributing to his plays. 22 min. Video/C 2545

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Wright, Richard] Richard Wright: Black Boy.
Biographical sketch of the Afro-American writer, Richard Wright. Includes a discussion of his literary works and the times in which he lived, weaving together dramatic recreations from Wright's work and recollections of friends and scholars. It follows Wright's journey from a childhood of poverty through the Chicago Black cultural renaissance of the 1930's, the Communist Party during the Depression, the MacCarthy-era, the American expatriate community in 1950's Paris and his final years. 1994. 87 min. DVD 3037; also VHS Video/C 3634

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[Wright, Richard] Richard Wright: Writing is His Weapon
Discusses the life, work, and ideas of the black American novelist Richard Wright. Born to poor sharecroper parents in the deep South in 1908, this self-taught author, whose novels focus on the harsh life experiences of Afro-Americans refused to let the obstacles of segregation, limited educational facilities and racism discourage him. 1995. 25 min. Video/C 5342

African Americans and the Educational System

African American History 1950 - 1970 (for works on Brown v Board of Education and other Civil Rights-era educational issues and events)

Affirmative Action: The History of an Idea.
Explores the historical roots of affimative action and the current debate over its usefulness. Looks at several different affirmative action programs including the Univ. of California, Berkeley, the U.S. Army, federal aid to minority businesses, and affirmative action in the Chicago Police Dept. Includes archival footage and features interviews with a wide array of academic scholars. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1996. 56 min. Video/C 4999

Affirmative Action Under Fire: When is it Reverse Discrimination?
The account of a reverse discrimination court case over the firing in 1989 of a white teacher in a Piscataway, New Jersey high school because of her race. Shows how this court case became a national battle for affirmative action and how affirmative action preference advocates paid the white teacher $450,000 to drop her case in order to avoid a Supreme Court decision that would potentially invalidate all affirmative action programs in the United States. Originally produced for the ABC television program Nightline aired on November 11, 1997 under the title: Black teacher, white teacher, affirmative action under fire. Dist.: Films Media Group. 22 min. Video/C 6874

After Ten Years: The Court and the Schools
The 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka ruling made it clear that segregation would not be tolerated and that states must comply with federal law. In this program, filmed ten years after Brown, news correspondents report on the mixed progress made toward integrating public schools in Nashville, New Rochelle, New Orleans and Prince Edward County, Virginia. Stumbling blocks such as faculty segregation, busing and segregational zoning are examined. A discussion featuring Attorney Gen. Robert Kennedy, Gov. of Georgia Carl Sanders and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP concludes the program. Reporters: Dan Rather, Mike Wallace, Martin Agronsky, Charles Kuralt, Harry Reasoner.+ Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on May 13, 1964. 58 min. Video/C 7365

Black America and the Education Crisis.
Syndicated columnist Juan Williams moderates a town meeting at Howard University on the crisis of education in the black community. Educators, politicians and other prominent personalities discuss such issues as why black children score lower on standarized tests, how to improve academic performance, and Ebonics. c1997. 45 min. Video/C 6876

Class Divided.
Documents a reunion of Iowa teacher Jane Elliott and her third-grade class of 1970, subjects that year of an ABC News television documentary entitled: The eye of the storm. Shows how her experimental curriculum on the evils of discrimination had a lasting effect on the lives of the students. 26 min. DVD 5915; also vhs Video/C 1143

Eye of the Storm Video/C 3984

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Color Line on Campus.
For most U.S. colleges today, racial diversity is a goal -- but almost nine years after the Brown decision, it was quite another story. This 1963 program features interviews with James Meredith and other African-American students who broke ground and tradition at universities in the South. Faced with attitudes ranging from passive tolerance to violent rejection, each had achieved enrollment, but not acceptance. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on January 25, 1963 on CBS Eyewitness News. 30 min. Video/C 7364

The Eye of the Storm.
Award winning documentary records an innovative experiment in which a third-grade teacher divides her all-white class into "blue-eyes" and "brown-eyes," making each group superior or inferior on successive days. The program demonstrates the nature and effects of bigotry by showing changes brought about in the children's behavior and learning patterns. 26 min. Video/C 3984

A Class Divided 26 min. Video/C 1143

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Free Speech and Racism on Campus: Nightline: June 12, 1989.
Racist attacks are on the rise on America's college campuses. This newscast asks should some kinds of free speech be censored on university campuses because of their racial or sexual content? Includes interviews with Nat Hentoff of the Village Voice, college professors and students at Stanford University and the University of Michigan. 23 min. Video/C 5769

In Plain English.
African-American, Asian-American, Pacific Islander, Chicano/Latin American and Native American undergraduate and graduate students discuss their expectations about college life before they came to the University of Oregon and the reality they encountered while at the university and they examine their experiences with racism and discrimination. A film by Julia Lesage. 42 min. Video/C 3007

Inequity in the Classroom.
Examines the often subtle and inadvertent sexual and racial biases that women students frequently encounter in colleges, universities and adult education settings. 27 min. Video/C 2721

The Intolerable Burden
Documentary film of how Mae Bertha and Matthew Carter enrolled the youngest eight of their thirteen children in the public schools of Drew, Mississippi in 1965, which were all-white schools. The Drew school board had initiated a "freedom of choice" plan to bring the district in compliance with the 1964 Civil Rights Act, but Blacks were not expected to choose all-white schools. It also looks at how the schools have slowly become "resegregated" in recent years, leading to poorer educational opportunities. 2002. 57 min. DVD 4498

Description from First Run/Icarus catalog

The Lottery
Focuses on the charter school experience for African American families. In a country where 58% of African American 4th graders are functionally illiterate, The Lottery uncovers the failures of the traditional public school system and reveals that hundreds of thousands of parents attempt to flee the system every year. Follows four of these families from Harlem and the Bronx who have entered their children in a charter school lottery. Out of thousands of hopefuls, only a small minority will win the chance of a better future. Uncovers a ferocious debate surrounding the education reform movement. Interviews with politicians and educators explain not only the crisis in public education, but also why it is fixable. Directed by Madeleine Sackler. 2010. 80 min. DVD X4977

The Morehouse Men.
Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia is the only African-American men's college in the United States. For 128 years, Morehouse has educated the black elite, seeking to instill moral, social, spiritual and academic values among its students. It boasts Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Olympic gold medalist Edwin Moses and filmmaker, Spike Lee as graduates. This film follows a group of freshmen students and explores the formal and informal processes whereby boys are molded into "Morehouse Men". A film by Sabita Kumari-Dass. 1994. 600 min. Video/C 5717

Negro Colleges in Wartime
U.S. Office of War Information (1944, 8 min.) Included on DVD 5152; also on DVD 372; DVD 8711

Race in the Classroom: The Multiplicity of Experience.
This video depicts moments when race and culture become major factors in the classroom dynamics. It includes vignettes based on real incidents reported by students and teachers in a university environment. 19 min. Video/C 2716

Race to Execution.
Follows the cases of two death row inmates to examine the problem of race discrimination in the U.S. criminal justice system, particularly with regard to death penalty sentencing. Explores the roles of the Supreme Court, prosecutors, juries, politicians, media, and public opinion on capital punishment. Includes interviews with relatives of both the accused and the victims, as well as legal and social experts. A film by Rachel Lyon. c2006. 54 min. DVD 8686

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Racism 101.
Examines the problem of racial conflict on American college campuses focusing on instances and patterns of racism at the University of Michigan and Dartmouth College in 1987 and 1988. 58 min. Video/C 1267

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Reading, Writing & Race.
This program looks at the impact of affirmative action admissions policies, speech codes, and race relations on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley. Includes drama students enacting plays about racial conflicts and intolerance on campus. The film also examines the debate in California over a series of social studies textbooks which are under fire from critics, who charge that they do not adequately reflect California's multicultural heritage. 1991. 60 min. Video/C 6790

Re-writing History (Teach It Like It Was: Re-righting History (Teach It Like It Was)
Program explores issues centered around multicultural education and bias in school textbooks; uses interviews and some footage from Oakland, California community discussions on a set of allegedly racist textbooks. Producer-director, Neal Cassidy ; San Francisco State University, Department of Broadcast Communication Arts. 1992. 30 min. Video/C MM889

School Colors.
This in-depth documentary looks at a turbulent year at Berkeley High School in California, focusing on teachers, students, and parents struggling with the question of whether diversity will enrich American society or tear it apart. 143 min. Video/C 3596

Goodman, Walter. "School Colors." (television program reviews) New York Times v144 (Tue, Oct 18, 1994):B3(N), C20(L), col 1
Leonard, John. "School Colors." (television program reviews) New York v27, n42 (Oct 24, 1994):70.

School, The Story of American Public Education: A Struggle for Educational Equality, 1950-1980.
Part 3: This segment shows how impressive gains in education masked profound inequalities: Seventeen states had segregated schools. Beginning with the 1950s, this program examines the issues that prompted such milestones as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954), the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title IV, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. c2001. Dist.: Films Media Group. 55 min. Video/C 8330

Shattering the Silences.
Documentary explores issues of faculty diversity in American higher education in the mid-1990s, focusing on the professional and personal experiences of eight minority scholars in the humanities and social sciences at various institutions. 86 min. Video/C 4707

Shattering the Silences website (PBS)

That Delicate Balance II--Our Bill of Rights: Equality and the Individual.
Fred Friendly hosts this series on the Bill of Rights and its effect on the United States. This program explores the problems of racial imbalances in public institutions, the constitutionality of all-black-male public schools, and other issues from the current political debate. 58 min. Video/C 2939

Too Important to Fail: Investigating the Alarming Dropout Rate of African American Males
Correspondent Tavis Smiley examines one of the most disturbing aspects of the education crisis facing America today - the increased high school dropout rate among black teenage males. With the school drop out rate among black boys approaching 50&percent;, this documentary surveys the causes of the problem and proposes solutions for it. Dist.: PBS. 2011. 60 min. DVD X7159

What's Race Got to Do with It?
This program "chronicles the experiences of a new generation of college students, in this case over the course of 16 weeks of intergroup dialogue on the U.C. Berkeley campus. As they confront themselves and each other about race, they discover they often lack awareness of how different their experience of campus life is from their peers, to the detriment of an inclusive campus climate. Special features (46 min.): Optional audio commentaries and excerpted interviews with Dave Stark & Jerlena Griffin-Destra (course goals & objectives, creating a space for dialogue, students' lives as the curriculum, course history : how conflict emerges, socioeconomic disparities, assessing the process, facing issues that arise). Written, directed and produced by Jean Cheng. 2006. 49 min. DVD 6626

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Why is There an Achievement Gap Between African American and European American Students?: The Multiple Complexities Involved in Educating Students of Color
Carl A. Grant, author and researcher on multicultural education, discusses the gap in educational achievement between Causcasian and African Americanstudents in the United States. Lecture given October 30, 2003 at the Longaberger Golf Club, Nashport, Ohio. 77 min. Video/C MM148

Sports

Sports documentaries

The Black Athlete.
Features archival films of early Black athletes, and interviews with prominent Black athletes and coaches. Raises questions about the status of Black people in the American culture. 58 min. Video/C 185

Body and Soul. Part 1, Body
An examination of Negro contributions to sports in America. Racial tensions on college and pro teams, and the threat of an Olympic boycott in 1968, suggest that the sports world is not as integrated as some people think. Interviews with sports figures bring up questions about the fairness of treatment that Negro athletes have received from their managers, spectators and country. A CBS News production, 1968. DVD 8425 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C MM735

The Harlem Globetrotters: 6 Decades of Magic
Honored for their unique skills as athletes and entertainers, this relates the story of the Harlem Globetrotters basketball team, from their founding to the present. Includes highlights of their notable players, their experiences as African American athletes, as well as the world wide humanitarian efforts of the Globetrotter organization. 1988. 60 min. Video/C 9375

Hoop Dreams.
This dramatization of the true life story of Arthur Agee and William Gates follows the high school careers of these two young men from inner-city Chicago as they pursue their dream of playing professional basketball. 1994. 176 min. DVD 3802; also VHS Video/C 999:1198
Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

The Journey of the African-American Athlete.
African-American athletes today are much-loved heroes in American sports, but this has not always been true. In the past, many black athletes faced crushing racial discrimination, were rejected by their fellow competitors and fans, and had to wage a lifetime struggle to achieve equality on the playing field. Captured here are some of the Afro-American greats who led the way. 1996. 119 min. Video/C 5430

Only the Ball Was White.
Traces the history of the Negro Leagues through photographs, film footage and interviews with the ball players. Discusses the era when major U.S. baseball leagues refused to hire black athletes, thereby denying them potential stardom by the color line. 30 min. Video/C 4758

Reaching the Finish Line: Black Athletes and Civil Rights.
This program evaluates the societal contributions of Afro-American sports greats Joe Louis, Jesse Owens, Jackie Robinson, Toni Stone, Willie O'Ree, Arthur Ashe and other sports icons who, with commitment and perseverance, broke the color barrier in professional athletics, paving the way for later civil rights victories. Commentary: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, John Isaacs, Charlie Sifford, Don Newcombe, Buck O'Neil, Rachel Robinson, Willie O'Ree, Dusty Baker, Mamie Johnson, Donald Dell. Dist.: Films Media Group. c1999. 32 min. Video/C 6873

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson
The in-depth and intimate story of one of the most important African Americans to live in the first half of the 20th century. Tells the story of Jack Johnson, who was the first African American boxer to win the most coveted title in all of sports - Heavyweight Champion of the World. Includes his struggles in and out of the ring and his desire to live his life as a free man. Directed by Ken Burns. Dist.: PBS. 2005. 220 min. DVD 3434

We Were Kings
In 1974, Muhammad Ali made what some thought would be his last title bid to regain the heavyweight boxing championship, stripped from him years before. Fight promoters offered him five million dollars to come to Zaire to fight George Foreman, a young and seemingly unbeatable opponent. Then, as the world watched, Ali took center ring, pulling off a stunning upset. Film includes an interview with director Leon Gast, on the making of the film. 1996. 94 min. Video/C 6041

General and Miscellaneous

Separate listing of videos about Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

Affirmative Action: The History of an Idea.
Explores the historical roots of affimative action and the current debate over its usefulness. Looks at several different affirmative action programs including the Univ. of California, Berkeley, the U.S. Army, federal aid to minority businesses, and affirmative action in the Chicago Police Dept. Includes archival footage and features interviews with a wide array of academic scholars. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1996. 56 min. Video/C 4999

Affirmative Action Under Fire: When is it Reverse Discrimination?
The account of a reverse discrimination court case over the firing in 1989 of a white teacher in a Piscataway, New Jersey high school because of her race. Shows how this court case became a national battle for affirmative action and how affirmative action preference advocates paid the white teacher $450,000 to drop her case in order to avoid a Supreme Court decision that would potentially invalidate all affirmative action programs in the United States. Originally produced for the ABC television program Nightline aired on November 11, 1997 under the title: Black teacher, white teacher, affirmative action under fire. Dist.: Films Media Group. 22 min. Video/C 6874

African Americans (Multicultural Peoples of North America).
One of a 15 part series which celebrates the heritage of fifteen different cultural groups by tracing the history of their emigration to North America, showing the unique traditions they brought with them, and who they are today. Each volume discusses when and why each group emigrated, where they settled, which occupations they engaged in, and who the important leaders are within each community. 30 min. Video/C 3288

The African American Experience in Japan (Funto to seiko: Afurikan Amerikan no Nihon keiken)
Despite the perception of racism in Japan against African Americans some have made Japan their home and profess to find Japanese culture overall more tolerant than American culture. This documentary examines the complex relationships of African Americans with Japanese people and culture as experienced by several Black Americans living as foreigners in Japan. 1993. 85 min. Video/C 8831

African Americans in the West. Lecture by Quintard Taylor
Historian and university professor Quintard Taylor presents an overview of African American history in the West and comments on his book "In search of a racial frontier, a history of African-Americans in the West.". Originally filmed on March 11, 1995. 48 min. Video/C MM247

American Pimp
In this documentary Albert and Allen Hughes turn their cameras on the world of street pimps in variousAmerican cities. The Black urban pimps interviewed reveal their world and their secrets in a film that is all about power and money. These men exude charm and charisma and boast rock star status in their communities. People are lured by the glamour and money, only to be used as commodities and tossed out once they have passed their prime. Also traces the history of the street pimp from the 1920's to the present, and includes interviews with a woman who's legally employed at a Nevada brothel and her legal pimp. Drected by the Hughes Brothers. c1999. 87 min. DVD 2480

The American Tapestry: Searching for the American Dream
Gregory Nava's trenchant but human examination of the American migration experience. In this documentary the much celebrated Hispanic filmmaker ("El Norte", "Mi Familia", "Selena", etc.) explores the very personal accounts of five American families from a variety of enthnic and racial backgrounds. An elderly Polish Jew relates his arrival at Ellis Island as a seven year-old boy in the 1920's. A Chinese-born grandmother from Oakland, California recalls her own childhood arrival on Angel Island in San Francisco Bay in the early 1930's. Unlike the Ellis Island experience, which was a happy and welcoming one, her arrival thrust her into an atmosphere charged with racial tension, discrimination and hostility. An African-American woman, the daughter of a slave, describes her childhood on a sharecropper's farm in Alabama and her eventual migration to Chicago. In the film's most emotionally powerful moment, he follows a young Mexican woman as she risks her life clandestinely crossing the border into the U.S. Directed by Gregory Nava. 1999. 96 min. Video/C MM1281

Anthem and Affirmations: Two Short Films by Marlon T. Riggs
Anthem: "Marlon Riggs' experimental music video politicizes the homoeroticism of African-American men. With images--sensual, sexual and defiant--and words intended to provoke, Anthem reasserts the 'self-evident right' to life and liberty in an era of pervasive anti-gay, anti-Black backlash and hysterical cultural repression." Affirmations: "An exploration of Black gay male desires and dreams. Affirmations starts with an affectionate, humorous confessional and moves on to a wish for empowerment and incorporation." Anthem / Signifyin' Works (1991, 9 min.) -- Affirmations (1990, 10 min.) DVD X4025

Marlon Riggs bibliography

The Axe in the Attic
In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, two filmmakers, drawn together by outrage, take a sixty-day road trip from New England to New Orleans. Along the way they meet evacuees and witness the loss, dignity, perseverance and humor of people who have become exiles in their own country. The breakdown of trust between a government and its citizens, the influence of race, class, and gender, as well as the ethics of documentary filmmaking itself, form the backdrop for this universal story of the search for home. Directed, and written by Lucia Small and Ed Pincus. 2007. 110 min. DVD X195

Description from Cinema Guild catalog

Big Easy to Big Empty: The Untold Story of the Drowning of New Orleans
Reporter Greg Palast investigates the government's management of planning and relief for Hurricane Katrina. On his arrival to view the relief efforts, he discovers the population of New Orleans is minuscule, the reconstruction sparse, suicide rates climbing, and that many citizens have not, or even know how to return to the city that care forgot. Special features: "Tomorrow's New Orleans: whose city will it be?", a half-hour conversation with Amy Goodman and Greg Palast; excerpt on Katrina and New Orleans from Palast's book, Armed madhouse; extended interviews from LSU's Hurricane Center; booklet featuring "Busted" report by Greg Palast; Crescent City Music, the "New Orleans comes alive, one year later" slideshow. Filmed and edited and co-produced by Big Noise Tactical Media. 2006. 30 min. DVD 8325

Big Mama
Depicts Viola Dees, a devoted, 89-year old grandmother, in her struggle to raise her orphaned 9-year old grandson in South Central Los Angeles. She must contend with her own declining health and a bureaucratic and legal system that continually threatens to force them apart. Produced and directed by Tracy Seretean. 2000. 40 min. Video/C 9420

Awards

Academy Award - Best Documentary, Short Subjects
San Francisco International Film Festival - Golden Gate Award

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Black Death in Dixie
Portrays capital punishment in the U.S. as an instrument that disproportionately targets racial minorities and the poor. Highlights statistics on the racial makeup of America's death row population, mistaken identification, the toll on those wrongfully convicted, and the effects of the Jim Crow era. Directed by Gerry Nelson. Originally produced as an episode of the Irish public television program What in the world? in 2007. Dist.: Films Media Group. 26 min. DVD X2952

Black to the Promised Land
A group of problem students from the Street Academy High School of Brooklyn are taken on a trip to Israel. They experience the everyday life of the Jewish community in a kibbutz. Both Jewish and Black youngsters seem surprised in finding that love, respect and friendship can grow in spite of ethnic differences and the color of their skin. Produced and directed by Madeleine Ali. 1991. 97 min. Video/C 9796

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Boys of Baraka
Each year, 20 African American boys are chosen from the most violent ghettos in Baltimore to enter a transformative two-year course of experimental schooling at the Baraka School in Kenya, East Africa. The purpose of the school, in part, is to demonstrate that a strict regimen of classes and responsibilities has an immediate, if not always permanent, beneficial effect on the self-esteem of ghetto residents. Filmed over three years, the documentary follows a group of 12 year old boys from an inner-city ghetto where 76% of all African American boys never earn a high school deploma. Directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady. Special features: Directors' commentary; "A conversation with Bill Cosby" featurette; Deleted scenes; The boys - an update; Theatrical trailer; Trailer gallery. 2005. 84 min. DVD X3538

Awards
Silverdocs - Audience Award - Feature

Brownsville, Black and White
This powerful documentary explores the complex history of interracial cooperation, urban change, and social conflict in Brownsville, a neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, from the 1930s to the present. A case study of the tragedy of urban American race relations, the film recounts the transformation of Brownsville from a poor but racially harmonious area made up largely of Jews and blacks to a community made up almost entirely of people of color. Produced and directed by Richard Broadman. 2000. 83 min. DVD X3283

Berkeley Media LLC catalog description

Building a Dream.
Documentary about fourteen Oakland families who were part of an innovative project in cooperative owner-built housing, and who spent their weekends and after-work hours building each others' homes under skilled supervision. 24 min. Video/C 323

Claiming Open Spaces
Explores African-American culture as it clashes with the design of the modern American city. The film is both a critical examination of the design and histories of American urban open space, as well as a celebration of leisure, recreation and resistance. Includes case studies of Columbus, Ohio, New Orleans, Louisiana and Oakland, California. Directed by Austin Allen. Dist.: Third World Newsreel. 1995. 87 min. DVD X5675

Common Enemies
This documentary tells the story of a group of Black muslims, American Indians and Chicano radicals who, in the mid-1980's, met eachother in Muammar Qaddafi's Libya. There they attended a series of his meetings intending to meet a revolutionary and to find a common cause. What ensued at the meetings and resulting consequences landed some of the participants in prison and increased political tensions between the U.S. and Libya. Directed and edited by Tonantzin De Aztlan and Nick Guroff. Produced and funded in part by the Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley. 2007. 25 min. DVD X4769

Critical Thinking in Nursing: Lessons from Tuskegee
Explores the theory and practice of critical thinking in the professional life of a nurse. Focuses attention on the role that nurse Eunice River played in the ethically murky Tuskegee Syphilis Study and how her participation may be interpreted today in the context of critical thinking. 1993. 44 min. DVD 5711

Crossroads: A Story of West Oakland
A collage of drawings, photographs, historical footage, interviews and location shooting, this documentary reconstructs the transformation of West Oakland from a pasture land to a port of entry for African Americans from the South. While job opportunities caused mass migration of ethnic groups to the area around the Second World War, the film also shows the population decline in West Oakland after the building of the Cypress Freeway and, later, BART. Souther Pacific Railroad's contribution to the development of the area is highlighted. Producer/director, Bill Jersey. 1996. 29 min. DVD 4327 (preservation copy); also on VHS Video/C 4276

The Deadly Deception.
Investigates one of the most notorious medical experiments in American history; the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male. African American men in Macon County, Alabama believed they were receiving free treatment for syphilis; they were instead given medicines that were worthless against the disease. It also discusses the lingering mistrust of the white medical establishment created by this study. Writer, producer and director, Denisce Diianni. 60 min. Video/C 3151

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Death in the Hood
Portland, Oregon has seen a dramatic rise in youth violence, especially in the neighborhoods in North and Northeast Portland. This documentary examines how youths have responded to this violence, the rise in black on black violence, and the effects it's had on the neighborhoods. Includes commentary by community activists, educators, health and law enforcement professionals and gang members and also shows some innovative efforts in Portland schools to deal with the problem. 1996. 29 min. Video/C MM783

Decolonizing the University: Fulfilling the Dream of the Third World College
The idea of a Third World College called for epistemological, pedagogical, institutional, and social change, to be facilitated by the creation of departments of Asian Studies, Black Studies, Chicano Studies, Native American Studies, and any other Ethnic Studies programs as they developed. Since then, there is only one College of Ethnic Studies in the nation (at SFSU), and only some universities with ethnic studies departments or programs. The purpose of this conference is to have collective dialogues about fulfilling the dream of the Third World College and decolonizing the university at large. Held on "February 26-27, 2010 at UC Berkeley, in commemoration of the Ethnic Studies Department's 40th anniversary and in celebration of the 10th annual Cultural Night of Resistance. Produced by Mattie Harper. 2010. 20 min. DVD X7305

Entering Oakland
A documentary by Claire Burch about the economic problems of African Americans in Oakland, California and a look at the city itself, intermittently punctuated by music, the voice of James Baldwin, and a group of people from Oakland. 1995. 50 min. Video/C 5524

Ethnic Notions.
Written and directed by Marlon Riggs. Covering more than one hundred years of United States history, traces the evolution of Black American caricatures and stereotypes that have fueled anti-Black prejudice. Loyal Toms, carefree Sambos, faithful Mammies, grinning Coons, savage Brutes and wide-eyed Pickaninnies roll across the screen in cartoons, feature films, popular songs, advertisements, household artifacts, even children's rhymes. These caricatures permeated popular culture from the 1820s to the Civil Rights era and implanted themselves within the American psyche. 1986. 57 min. DVD 3049; also VHS Video/C 1024
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Description from California Newsreel catalog

Ethno-racial Classification in Public Policy: Does it Have a Future?
ntroductions: Michael Nacht, Henry Brady, Lee Friedman (14 min.) -- Lecture: Kenneth Prewitt (82 min.). Kenneth Prewitt, director of the U.S. Census Bureau from 1998 to 2001, speaks about ethno-racial classification in the United States and where he thinks its going with particular reference to ethnic representation in the 2000 census and the social ramifications of race in the 21st century. Held at the University of California, Berkeley on April 10, 2003 and recorded by Educational Technology Services, University of California, Berkeley. A Berkeley Webcast event; sponsored by the Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley. 2003. 96 min. Video/C 9587

Family Name.
As a child growing up in Durham, North Carolina, Macky Alston never questioned why all the other Alstons in his school were black. Now, after twenty-five years, he has gone back to unravel the mystery. In this documentary of race relations, Alston travels to family reunions, picnics, housing projects, churches, graveyards & the original Alston plantations to find people who share his family name. A film by Macky Alston. 1997. 89 min. DVD X2970; vhs Video/C 5581

Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans
During slavery, Faubourg Treme was home to the largest community of free black people in the Deep South and a hotbed of political ferment. Here black and white, free and enslaved, rich and poor co-habitated, collaborated, and clashed to create much of what defines New Orleans culture up to the present day. The neighborhood developed during French rule and many families like the Trevignes kept speaking French as their first language until the late 1960s. Treme was the home of the Tribune, the first black daily newspaper in the US. During Reconstruction, activists from Treme pushed for equal treatment under the law and for integration. And after Reconstruction's defeat, a "Citizens Committee" legally challenged the resegregation of public transportation resulting in the infamous Plessy vs.Ferfuson Supreme Court case. Shot largely before Hurricane Katrina and edited afterwards, the film is both celebratory and elegiac in tone. Directed by Dawn Logsdon; written & co-directed by Lolis Eric Elie. 2007. 68 min. DVD 9499

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Fillmore (Neighborhoods: The Hidden Cities of San Francisco.)
Remembered today mainly for its rock and roll auditorium, San Francisco's Fillmore District is one of the great cautionary tales of American urban life. From the wholesale removal of Japanese Americans during World War II, to the jazz heyday of the 1950s to the bulldozers of urban renewal, the Fillmore District has seen its share of drama. This video explores the many worlds of the neighborhood, past and present, and the bittersweet memories of residents who fought for the survival of one of America's premier black communities. c1999. 84 min. Video/C 7746

For Love of Liberty: The Story of America's Black Patriots
This television miniseries uses letters, diaries, speeches, journalistic accounts, historical text and military records to document and acknowledge the sacrifices and accomplishments of African-American service men and women since the earliest days of the republic. The story spans the American Revolution to the Civil War, from the World Wars to present day fighting in Afghanistan, and examines why, despite enormous injustice, these heroic men and women fought so valiantly for freedoms they themselves did not enjoy. Contetns: Disc 1. (115 min.). The Revolution through World War II -- Disc 2. (116 min.). World War II through President Obama -- Disc 3. Bonus material (ca. 307 min.). For love of liberty, abridged version (47 min.) ; For love of liberty : stories of Black patriots in the Civil War (35 min.) ; Archive material (ca. 180 min.) ; Photomontages (ca. 45 min.). Directed by Frank Martin. c2009. 538 min. DVD X5697

Forgotten Fires
A documentary about the burning of two Afro-American churches near Manning, South Carolina in June, 1995 by Ku Klux Klan members. Frank interviews with the victims, the perpetrators, their families, and people who live in the community transforms the event into a complex account of racism, poverty, denial, repentance and forgiveness. Directed by Michael Chandler. c1998. 57 min. Video/C 7456

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

From the Ground Up.
Tells the story of young people who find the courage to cross cultural boundaries and engage in healing today's most serious racial issues. In this unique documentary, two dissimilar communities; the University of California at Berkeley, and the rural Alabama town of Greensboro are connected by the actions of twenty-three students who helped rebuild two burned-down African American churches. Directed by Yoav Potash. 1999. 27 min. Video/C 6573

Fuori/outside
A young woman whose father was Italian American and mother was African American reflects on racism in her family and in her community. Written in the form of a letter to her aging white grandmother, she talks about racism against African Americans by New Yorkers from Southern Italy who had experienced racism themselves. 1997. 13 min. Video/C MM243

Ghost of James Baldwin, Chrismas day at Glide Memoria
A film by Claire Burch. A tribute to James Baldwin with voiceovers from his writings and original music superimposed on free Christmas dinners served to the homeless, while a homeless break-in is taking place across the street. 1995. 63 min Video/C 5540

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Ghosts Along the Freeway.
In the 1950's new freeways gave Americans increased mobility but also became instruments of destruction. This film examines the effects the coming of the "super highways" had on two established neighborhoods in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Area. Rondo Avenue was the heart of St. Paul's African-American community, and Lowry Hill once boasted many of Minneapolis' most lavish homes. When the freeway tore through these two communities, the character of these neighborhoods was changed forever. 1991. 10 min. Video/C 4550

Girls in White Dresses
This documentary follows the debutante season of six middle-class African-American young women in Oxnard, California. The film explores the history of the debutante tradition in the African-American community and whether it is still a valid "rite of passage" for young women today. Directed by Ronisa Wilkins Shoate. c2009. 27 min. DVD X4989

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Harlem Diary: Nine Voices of Resilience
Nine Harlem youths from ages 12 to 24 working under the direction of sociologist Terry Williams, use notebooks and video cameras to tell the story of their lives and present a collage of themselves and their unique neighborhood. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2003. 97 min. DVD 3733

Hate Crime.
Shows two examples of communities that are having some success in solving the problem of hate crimes. In South Carolina after the burning of Afro-American churchs, law enforcement officials arrested members of the Ku Klux Klan and one black church filed a lawsuit against the KKK winning a $38 million judgment against the Klan from a racially mixed jury. The second case spotlights a pioneering high school class on tolerance developed by teacher Joe Moros that has changed the social climate at San Clemente High School in California where tensions among whites, Latinos, blacks and Asian-Americans led to brutal violence and killing in the 1990s. Dist.: Films Media Group. c1999. 56 min. Video/C 6875

Herskovits at the Heart of Blackness
This documentary traces the career of Melville J. Herskovits, the pioneering American anthropologist of African Studies and controversial intellectual who established the first African Studies Center at an American university and authored, The Myth of the Negro Past. Features rarely seen archival footage, provocative animation, unique photo montage re-enactments and interviews from leading scholars of race and culture. c2009. 57 min. DVD X1914

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Homeboys: Life and Death in the Hood
Embroiled in the deadly economy of crack cocaine, young African American "gangbangers" talk frankly of their experiences dealing drugs, being part of violent gangs, and losing their closest friends to violence. c1989. 28 min. Video/C MM107

Homeboys: "My Daddy's in Jail"
Re-visits the young men interviewed eight years ago in the film "Homeboys: life and death in the hood" -- all but one now in jail. Equal time is given to their young children, who are struggling to remember their fathers and to understand why their fathers are not living at home. Both generations describe the pain of life without their fathers. c1999. 26 min. Video/C MM108

How Biased Are You?
Explores the history and practice of racism through its extreme manifestations, such as slavery, the Holocaust, segregation, bias crimes, and racial profiling, as well as its more subtle demonstrations, such as the pernicious subconscious biases that can exert an influence on everyday behavior. Uses hidden cameras to show the different experiences of black and white persons in the same situations, such as shopping in a store. Examines the Implicit Association Test, a bias-sensitivity test developed by Anthony Greenwald and Mahzarin Banaji, which looks for hidden, subconscious biases. Also looks at prejudice in children of various ages. Originally produced by Discovery Communications, Inc. in 2000. 45 min. Video/C 8474

Humane Hatred: From Anguish to Art in the Protest Literature of the Black Experience. [Sound Recording]
Recorded at Iowa State University on Dec. 2, 1977. A lecture examining the protest literature of African American and African authors. 51 min. Sound/C 1496

Hunger in America
A researched study of hunger and malnutrition in the United States, showing views of Black sharecroppers in Alabama, Navajo Indians in Arizona, tenant farmers near Washington, D.C. and impoverished Mexican-Americans in San Antonio. Includes a discussion of surplus foods, food-stamps, and the farm subsidy program. Episode of the television program CBS reports, originally broadcast in 1968. Reporters: Charles Kuralt, David Culhane. 51 min. DVD 6971 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 9366

I Remember Harlem.
Traces the rise, decline, and regeneration of America's largest Black community over three centuries. 60 min. ea. Video/C 527:1-4

Joe's Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads
Spike Lee's first film recreates the world of the corner barbershop, the local meeting place where people talk, put their money on the lucky numbers and sometimes get a haircut. Set against the graffiti-covered concrete of Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn (later the setting for Lee's Do the Right Thing), this film skillfully combines wit and drama to provide a unique and highly entertaining perspective on attempts to break away from the urban treadmill. ca 1982. 60 min. Video/C 5961

The Katrina Experience. Disc 1, A Compilation of Short Films
An eye in the storm (USA, 2006, 20 min.) / directed by Neil Alexander -- Still standing (USA, 2006, 7 min.) / directed by Paola Mendoza -- New Orleans furlough (USA, 2006, 10 min.) / directed by Amir Bar-Lev -- After Katrina: rebuilding St. Bernard Parish (USA, 2006, 22 min.) / directed by Adam Finberg. Eye on the storm: A stunning video diary offering up first person accounts that go way beyond the television coverage, beginning from the day the hurricane barreled its way into the lives of New Orleans' residents through their struggles to make sense of the aftermath. Still standing: A filmmaker comforts her Columbian grandmother as they examine the wreckage of her home in Waveland, Mississippi after the hurricane. The vulnerability of the foreign and the elderly is poignantly revealed, as well as this grandmother's surprisingly indomitable spirit. New Orleans furlough: A member of the National Guard returns from Iraq and sees in New Orleans' devastation a new mission. But his personal demons make him as dysfunctional as our own government was in coping with the tragedy. After Katrina: rebuilding St. Bernard Parish: A sensitive elegy to a working-class community's destroyed neighborhood and its passionate commitment to rebuild. We are offered intimate views of the nitty-gritty challenges that confront its residents. 2006. DVD 6048

The Katrina Experience. Disc 2, Desert Bayou
During Hurricane Katrina, without their knowledge, nearly 600 African Americans were airlifted to the almost entirely white state of Utah. This film seeks to examine whether two cultures can come together in a time of utter chaos, or whether their differences will prove too great a challenge to overcome. In their own words, evacuees tell how they survived the storm of the century only to end up at a military installation in the deserts of Utah. 2006. 76 min. DVD 6049

The Katrina Experience. Disc 3, New Orleans Music in Exile
Like their neighbors, the legendary New Orleans music community was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Music documentarian Robert Mugge creates an emotional portrait of horror, heartbreak, and hope as the musicians who lived through the disaster pick up the pieces and try to rebuild their lives. New Orleans artists comment on how broken levees, flood, looting, and black mold wreaked havoc on music and life in this colorful city. Directed by Robert Mugge. 2006. 112 min. DVD 6050

The Katrina Experience. Disc 4, Tim's Island
On August 29, 2005, when Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, sixteen people, seven dogs and eight cats took shelter in Tim's loft in an old dairy in New Orleans. When the levees broke, they found themselves surrounded by eight feet of water with a clear view of others stranded and access to news reports of the dire circumstances at the Superdome -- meanwhile, they had to find a way to survive. A wry study of group behavior under severe stress as Tim's houseguests cope with survival. 2006. 85 min. DVD 6051

The Klan: A Legacy of Hate in America.
Shows graphically the 120-year infamy of the Ku Klux Klan's reign of terror. 30 min. Video/C 3242

The Klan: The Invisible Empire. (CBS Reports)
Shortly before this program was filmed in 1965, Klansmen were implicated in the murders of five people. Here Charles Kuralt presents an in-depth look at the Klan, featuring its history, its influence, the application process, and rare coverage of an initiation rite. Kuralt asks Klan leaders how they can avoid responsibility for violence when they themselves repeatedly whip up their followers to action. Among those interviewed are Alabama Attorney General Richmond Flowers, KKK Imperial Wizard Robert Shelton, and Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach.Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on September 21, 1965. Dist. Cinema Guild. 60 min. Video/C 8991

Laid to Waste: a Chester Neighborhood Fights for its Future
"Simply put, this acclaimed documentary is the best case study of environmental injustice and racism available on video. In the economically depressed, largely African-American "West End" of Chester, Pennsylvania, Zulene Mayfield lives next door to the fourth-largest trash-to-steam incinerator in the nation and a few doors away from a large processing facility for infectious and hazardous medical waste. The county's sewage treatment plant sits adjacent to her neighbors' homes a block away, and additional waste-processing facilities have been proposed for the community." 1996. 53 min. DVD 4597

Description from Berkeley Media LLC catalog

Legacy
Terrell Collins, a 14-yr.-old African American boy living in a Chicago housing project, was an honor student initially intended to be featured in a documentary on "ghetto success stories." On the day filming was to begin, Terrell was fatally shot. Here his cousin, Nickcole Collins, narrates the documentary that becomes his legacy, chronicling the transformations in the life of his family in the wake of the tragedy. Nickcole's mother takes the G.E.D. and becomes a kindergarten teacher; her aunt kicks a lifelong drug habit and the family matriarch, Dorothy, moves out of public housing into her own home. Director, producer, writer, Tod Lending. 1989. 90 min. DVD 5982; vhs Video/C 7470

Mississippi Triangle
Explores ethnic relations among Chinese, African Americans, and whites in the Mississippi Delta. Focuses on the little-known history of the Chinese community, using historical footage and interviews with Delta residents. Co-directors, Christine Choy, Worth Long, Allan Siegel. 1984. 80 min. DVD 7157 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 2495
Mountains That Take Wing: Angela Davis & Yuri Kochiyama: A Conversation on Life, Struggles & Liberation
Internationally renowned professor and writer Angela Davis, and 89-year-old grassroots organizer and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Yuri Kochiyama share intimate conversations about personal histories and influences that shaped them and their shared experiences in some of the most important social movements in 20th century United States. Directed by C.A. Griffith & H.L.T. Quan. 2009. 97 min. DVD X6448

Description from Women Make Movies catalog

The N Word: Divided We Stand.
Features commentary from celebrities, journalists, historians and everyday people regarding their personal history with and society's use of the N word ("nigger"). Explores the history and relevance of the word and the social status within and between the races. Writer & director, Todd Larkins. 2004. 85 min. DVD 6438

The New Majority: Beyond the melting Pot; a report on California's cultural and racial demographics and how they affect our society.
Part of the UC Berkeley Open Window Series. California's cultural and racial demographics - by K. Russell -- Diversity: Changing the face of politics; election reapportionment - by T. Mock -- Hate crimes - by K. Debro -- Labor unions and the new immigrants - by H. Frieze -- University of California, Berkeley: Multicultural education - by W. Lasola -- The arts - by H. Norman -- English only initiative - by J. McKelvey -- The lives of immigrants - by B. Pimentel -- A look at immigration policy - by F. Langner. DVD 9607; Video/C 2010

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No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson
On Valentine's Day 1993, 17-year-old high school basketball and football star Allen Iverson was bowling in Hampton, Virginia when an argument erupted into a brawl, pitting Iverson's African-American friends against a group of white patrons. The fallout from the fight and the subsequent trial landed Iverson a lengthy prison sentence and sharply divided the city along racial lines. Directed by Steve James. Originally broadcast as a episode on the television series "30 for 30" on ESPN. c2010. 80 min. DVD X5738

No Loans Today: South Central Los Angeles.
A documentary film which examines daily life in the African-American community of South Central Los Angeles, which centers on the ABC Loan Company, a pawnshop/check cashing outlet and the economic services it provides to the local community. Through interviews with African-American business owners and local residents film examines the economic and social problems endured by community residents such as crime, gangs and unemployment. 56 min. Video/C 3876

Icarus Films catalog description

No Time to Stop: Stories of Immigrant and Visible Minority Women.
Features three immigrant women in Canada from Hong Kong, Ghana and Jamaica respectively. They talk about the circumstances that shape their lives and how their dreams are marred by hardship, sexism and racism. They personalize the complex issues facing immigrant women who are forced to take low-paying, low-status jobs in Canada. 30 min. Video/C 3344

Not in Our Town
Documentary about the people of Billings, Montana who joined together to stand up for Native American, Afro-American and Jewish neighbors who were under attack by white supremacists. In response to a series of hate crimes, the community moved into action. 30 min. Video/C 4362

Off and Running: An American Coming of Age Story
Documentary about a Brooklyn teen-aged girl, raised by two Jewish mothers and with two adopted brothers, who searches for information about her African-American birth mother. Her complex exploration of race, identity, and family begins to lead the teen into trouble in her personal life, threatening a promising career as a track and field athlete. She eventually picks up the pieces of her life, leading to inspiring results. Directed, produced and sound recorded by Nicole Opper. 2009. 76 min. DVD X5013

The Order of Myths
The first Mardi Gras in America was celebrated in Mobile, Alabama in 1703. In 2007, it is still racially segregated. Filmmaker Margaret Brown, herself a daughter of Mobile, escorts us into the parallel hearts of the city's two carnivals. With unprecedented access, she traces the exotic pageantry, diamond-encrusted crowns, voluminous, hand-sewn gowns, surreal masks and enormous paper mache floats. Against this opulent backdrop, she uncovers a tangled web of historical violence and power dynamics, elusive forces that keep this hallowed tradition organized along enduring color lines. Directed by Margaret Brown ; produced by Margaret Brown, Sara Alize Cross. Dist. Cinema Guild. c2008. 77 min. DVD X356

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults
Silverdocs Documentary Festival - Cinematic Vision Award

OT, Our Town
Against all odds, the students at Dominguez High School set out to put on the school's first theatrical production in more than 20 years. But what does Thornton Wilder's famous play about life in rural Grover's Corners have to do with Compton, California? This film follows the students on their discovery of the power of art and the human spirit. Produced & directed by Scott Hamilton Kennedy. 2003. 77 min. DVD 1906

Panel on Ethnic Diversity with Troy Duster, Elaine Kim and Alex Saragoza, January, 1991.
A panel of five faculty members discuss a report, chaired by Tony Duster. The Duster report concludes that students at the University of California, Berkeley, 50% of whom are of a cultural minority, tend to cluster into ethnic groups rather than interact. Julia Curry, Alex Saragoza, Elaine Kim, and Snow Arrow Fausett discuss problems facing various ethnic groups. UC Berkeley, Open Window series program; 921. DVD 9608; vhs Video/C 1932

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Paris is Burning.
A film by Jennie Livingston. Story of the young men of Harlem who originated "voguing" and turned these stylized dance competitions into glittering expressions of fierce personal pride. A story of street-wise urban survival, gay self-affirmation, and the pursuit of a desperate dream. 1992. 76 min. DVD 4430; Video/C 3211

Awards

Berlin International Film Festival - Best Documentary
International Documentary Association
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards - Best Documentary
National Society of Film Critics Awards, USA - Best Documentary
New York Film Critics Circle Awards - Best Documentary
San Francisco International Lesbian & Gay Film Festival - Best Documentary
Sundance Film Festival - Grand Jury Prize

Interview with Jennie Livingston in Lavender Limelight

The Performed Word
The power of the Afro-American performed word, particularly that of black preachers, is examined services and interviews with Bishop E. E. Cleveland of Berkeley, California, esteemed as the embodiment of his culture and the bearer of Afro-American tradition. Directors, Ernest Shinagawa, Carlos de Jesus. 1982. 60 min. DVD 7460 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3209

Pizza Pizza Daddy-o.
Shows Afro-American girls playing singing games on a Los Angeles playground. Provides an anthropological and folkloric record of eight of these games. Directed and written by Bess Lomax Hawes and Bob Eberlein. 1968. 18 min. Video/C MM573

A Place of Rage.
Features interviews with Angela Davis, June Jordan, and Alice Walker. Within the context of the civil rights, Black power and feminist movements, the trio reassess how women such as Rosa Parks and Fannie Lou Hamer revolutionized American society. Angela Davis talks about her involvement with the Black Panthers and the communist party. Also included insights from filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha . 1991. 52 min. DVD X60; vhs Video/C 2321

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Women Make Movies catalog description

A Portrait of Jason.
"Filmed in one wild night at New York’s Chelsea Hotel, Shirley Clarke’s explosive Portrait of Jason is a landmark of nonfiction film – the combination of a visionary director, a complex and enigmatic subject, and a moment of new cinematic and social possibilities. Jason Holliday is an unapologetically gay cabaret performer with charisma to spare, a knack for drama, and a life that’s provided him with plenty of stories to tell – about racism, homophobia, parental abuse, show business, drugs, sex, prostitution, the law, and whatever else he can think of while the cameras are rolling. Jason is endlessly entertaining – he sings, tells his stories, performs, breaks down, gets back up, keeps going. But he is as elusive as he is talented, and the more intimate the details he reveals, the less clear his "identity" becomes. As the night goes on he plays an increasingly intense game of cat-and-mouse with the filmmakers, who can be heard egging him on from behind the camera. The climax of the film is a shocking attempt by the crew to break through the layers of Jason's charisma to reveal the person underneath." A film by Shirley Clarke. 1967. 105 min. Video/C 2526

Sutpen, Tom. "Dancing and Dirging with Jason." Bright Lights Film Journal, May 2005 | Issue 48

Poverty in Rural America
A Great Society era film depicting the real problems of the poor in rural America in general while demonstrating a palpable reticence to directly address the issue of race in particular. 1965. 28 min. DVD 2653

Prejudice: More Than Black & White
Muslims, blacks, gays, people with disabilities, and immigrants of every ethnicity and color: they and many other groups have stood in the spotlight glare of intolerance, easy targets for every sort of discrimination and violence. What makes people prone to irrational hate, and what steps can individuals and society take to eradicate it? In this program, psychology professors Susan Fiske and Mahzarin Banaji share their insights and experiences. A pro-gay Baptist minister who formerly took a biblical stance against homosexuality and an ex-imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan who now speaks out for tolerance also offer their views. Contents: Defining prejudice -- Religious & ethnic prejudice -- Prejudice : a brief history -- The Roots of prejudice -- Implicit prejudice : taking the test -- Embracing tolerance : a case study -- Creating change : a reason of hope. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2008. DVD X5136

Primetime: Fighting Back Against Foreclosure
As the U.S. government continues to bail out the financial industries, this documentary looks at two New York City women who are dealing with the potential foreclosure of their homes. The complex issues of subprime mortgage loans are explored and how the foreclosure crises has had a disproportionate impact on communities of color. Directors, Manauvaskar Kublall, Jennifer Fasulo. Dist.: Third World Newsreel. c2009. 23 min. DVD X5464

Prom Night in Mississippi
In 1997, actor Morgan Freeman, a resident of the small town of Charleston, Miss., offered to pay for the senior prom at Charleston High School under one condition: the prom must be racially integrated. His offer was ignored. In 2008 he offered again, and the offer was accepted, changing the tradition of two separate proms for blacks and whites that had endured since the high school was integrated in 1970. Shows the problems and lessons learned as the event was planned and held. With comments from Morgan Freeman, students, and others. Intended to explore attitudes of racial intolerance that still persist today. Directed & produced by Paul Saltzman. Special features: Deleted scenes (18 min.) ; Interview with the filmmakers (22 min.) ; Theatrical trailer (2 min.) ; Filmmaker bio ; About Docurama ; Docurama trailers. 2009. 89 min. DVD X3008

A Question of Racial Profiling.
The issue of racial profiling of minorities by police is highly-charged with legal, political, ethical and social implications. This report examines the issue from the points of view of ordinary black Americans, the police and social scientists. Originally broadcast as segments of NBC Dateline in 2004. 40 min. DVD 4774

The Quiet One (1948)
An award-winning documentary filmed on the streets of Harlem in the late 1940's which shows the devasting psychological effects of life in the ghetto on a ten-year old boy named Donald. Abandoned by his parents, Donald lives a quiet life of despair until he is sent to Wiltwyck School for Boys for psychiatric care. 65 min. Video/C 6502

Race Against Prime Time.
Documentary which explores how television news coverage of violent racial conflicts acts in complicated ways to exacerbate community and individual conflicts. 60 min. Video/C 1443

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Race & Racism, Red, White & Black.(90's home video collection ; 6)
This television series looks at people, places and ideas from around the world... fast-paced, entertaining, irreverent, funny and thought-provoking reports from the creative edge of the video age. This segment is about race. What we say and what we do about racial and multicultural differences tells a lot about who we are as individuals, and as Americans. Contents: Chicago street scenes / by Joe Winston -- La conversacion / by Deep Dish TV -- Malcolm X / from American (in)justice by Denis Mueller and Deb Ellis -- Rose Auger / by Robbie Leppzer Turning Tide Productions -- Gil Scott Heron ; Fran & Tak ; Closing credits / by Skip Blumberg -- Helen Wray & Sammy / by Jeff Spitz -- Prof. William King / by Jimmy Sternfield -- Rudolph Acuna / by Nancy Cain -- Dr. Joel Kovel / by Johnnie Jones and John Schwartz -- Straight out of Brooklyn / Samuel Goldwyn Mayer Company -- Black memorabilia / by Eddie Becker -- Charlie Cooke / by Jay April. 60 min. DVD X1374; Video/C 2204

Race is the Place
Focusing on the topic of racism in the United States, the program presents an assemblage of taped monologues, commentaries, readings, musical performances, and stills of visual artworks interspersed with documentary sequences, archival images, and dialogue exemplifying the topic found in American mass media and product packaging. Featuring: Amiri Baraka, Andy Bumatrai, Kamau Daaood, Mayda del Valle, Michael Franti, Lalo Guerrero, Barry "Shabaka" Henley, Danny Hoch, James Luna, Culture Clash, Richard Montoya, Willie Perdomo, Kate Rigg, Boots Riley, Ricardo Salinas, Beau Sia, Herbert Siguenza, Piri Thomas, Haunani-Kay Trask, Lois Ann Yamada ; visual artists: Enrique Chagoya, Michael Ray Charles, Paula de Joie, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Ben Sakoguchi, Cora Yee. Produced and directed by Raymond Telles, Rick Tejada-Flores. c2005. 92 min. DVD 6153

Racism: A History
Originally produced by the BBC in 2007. Dist.: Films Media Group.

The Colour of Money
Reaching back across the centuries, this program sheds light on historical attitudes toward human differences. It assesses the significance of biblical narratives, including the "curse of Ham", in the evolution of European concepts of race, and goes on to examine the basis of institutionalized racism - entwined with fervent capitalism - on which the transatlantic slave trade operated. The destruction of America's indigenous civilizations and the dehumanization and exploitation of Africans are studied alongside the writings of Enlightenment philosophers and historians. Includes commentary by Dr. Orlando Patterson, Dr. Barnor Hesse, and Professor James Walvin. Director/producer, David Olusoga. 53 min. DVD X5137

Fatal Impact
During the 19th century, racial categorization took on a pseudoscientific stance. This program shows how the academic racism of the period helped to spread imperialist policies across the globe. Sifting through the "science" of eugenics and its link to social Darwinism, the film juxtaposes racial hygiene theories with racial warfare in Tasmania, Victorian apathy in famine-wracked India, and horrific German colonization tactics in Namibia. Commentary by David Dabydeen, Dr. Maria Misra, and Professor Catherine Hall. Director/producer, Paul Tickell. 53 min. DVD X5138

A Savage Legacy
Focuses on a pattern of segregation and genocide evident in King Leopold's Belgian Congo rampages, South Africa's apartheid rule, the terrorism of Jim Crow, and less obvious examples that persist in today's global community. Several renowned authors, including Dr. Michael Eric Dyson of Georgetown University, Dr. Manning Marable of Columbia, and Dr. Kwame Anthony Appiah of Princeton, contribute expert commentary. Director/producer, Tim Robinson. 52 min. DVD X5139

Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey
An in-depth documentary examining the personal and professional life of Ralph Bunche, the statesman and diplomat who was one of the founders of the United Nations and later received the Nobel Prize for his peacemaking efforts. Based on the biography Ralph Bunche : an American life / by Brian Urquhart. A film by William Greaves. 2001. 117 min. DVD 3304

Warren, Freda. "Ralph Bunche Reconsidered: An Interview with William Greaves." Cineaste, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 35-37, 2001 UC users only

Rare Black Short Subjects: The Negro in Industry, Sports & Entertainment
Newsreels from All American News (9 min): Urban League delves into labor situation. Students make lowly mud a thing of beauty. Valet to F.D.R. tells of historic journeys. Meet a bear in Memphis zoo. Unloading supplies at Nettuno Beach, Italy. Tuskegee offers fine physical fitness course. Negro comedy act. -- Negro in industry (11 min.) -- Kilroy is here (9 min.) -- Negro in sports (10 min.) -- Negro in entertainment (11 min.). Programs and newsreel footage produced in the 1940's highlighting the accomplishments of African Americans, particularly in industry, sports and entertainment. Includes advertisements by Chesterfield cigarettes to promote Black pride. Video/C 999:1215

Remembering Wei Yi-fang, Remembering Myself--: An Autobiography
An Afro-American lesbian of Honduran Black and Nicaraguan Black extraction tells of her life in Taiwan, where she had gone after graduating from college to learn Chinese. Included are re-enactments of incidents from her childhood, how she started an English-language magazine in Taiwan, and how she was involved in a motorcycle accident in which she was seriously injured and a local Taiwanese woman was killed. A film by Yvonne Welbon. c1995. 29 min. Video/C 9724

Women Make Movies catalog description

Representation & the Media.
Stuart Hall, a renown public speaker and teacher, lectures on the central ideas of cultural studies--that reality is not experienced directly, but through the lens of culture, through the way that human beings represent and tell stories about the world in which they live. Using visual examples, Hall shows how the media--and especially the visual media--have become the key players in the process of modern story telling. 55 min. DVD 4917; vhs Video/C 4654
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Race: The Floating Signifier

Description from Media Education Foundation catalog

The Root Of It All
Six Black women sit around talking about their hair--what it represents, how difficult it is to treat, and what ramifications different styles have for them. Produced and directed by Carla Thompson. 1994. 18 min. DVD 9905

Shakespeare in Sable: History of the Black Shakespearean Actor.
A recount of the black Shakespearean actor, especially in America. Author Errol G. Hill introduces the subject followed by live performances by contemporary black actors presenting scenes from various Shakespeare plays, followed by a question and answer segment. A talk based on the book by Professor Errol G. Hill, Dartmouth University. 1996. 51 min. DVD X101

Sickle Cell Anemia.
Dr. Daniel Foster and Dr. Helen M. Ramney, head of the Dept. of Internal Medicine, U.C. San Diego, discuss various aspects of sickle cell anemia, a disease of the blood which afflicts only members of the Black population. 29 min. Video/C 43

Silence: In Search of Black Female Sexuality in America
An examination of the sexual wants, needs, and desires of 15 black women, from all ages, backgrounds, and professions. This collection of film clips, personal accounts, and expert insights takes us on a journey throughout American history, exposing skeletons that lie deep in the bedroom--as the filmmaker addresses the continued violence and exploitation perpetrated on black women. Written, produced, and directed by Mya B. 2004. 74 min. DVD 9904

Skinheads USA: The Pathology of Hate : Soldiers of the Race War.
A close-up look at white-supremacist skinhead hate groups active in the United States. Covers an actual neo-Nazi skinhead organization's day-to-day activities at its headquarters, white power rallies and recruitment drives, and visits a prison where four skinheads are jailed for the murder of a black man. Film powerfully captures firsthand the distorted idealism and openly racist objectives of the neo-Nazi youth movement. Dist.: Films Media Group. 54 min. Video/C 4998

Slippin': Ten Years with the Bloods
Documents the exploits of a group of African-American gang members through the mean streets of South Central LA for ten years after the 1992 LA race riots. Delves into the ongoin Blood/Crip gang war to reveal the short and brutal lives of LA street gangstas and the tragic personal toll that the gang life takes on families and friends. As the years and the bodies pile up, the boys grow into men and the highwire allure of street life gives way to the harsh realities of survival. Special features: "Slippin' ghettocam 1993" (28 min.); video footage shot by gang members themselves. Written and directed by Tommy Sowards and Joachim Schroeder. 84 min. 2005. DVD 7753

Stereotypes and Minorities; Familiar Faces, Unknown Names.
Stereotypes & minorities: an overview of the treatment of black actors in Hollywood. Actors Della Reese and Nick Stewart offer their insights and reflect on the changing roles of blacks in films. Familiar faces, unknown names: features the character actors -- those supporting players that we recognize but never know who they are. c1991. 45 min. Video/C 8304

Straight Outta Hunters Point: A Hardcore Hip-hop Documentary.
Presents a documentary look at life in the Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco in an emotionally intense reality check focusing on the daily drama of gang-related rap wars which result as rival gangs dispute over who is the best rap artist. Includes interviews with gang members and residents in a community fighting for social and economic survival. 2002. 74 min. DVD 2940

Streetcar Stories.
Streetcar Stories is a cultural and social history of the place that streetcars once held in the everyday life of New Orleans, Louisiana before automobiles took over the city streets. Special attention is given to the bitter 1929 streetcar strike that gave the poor boy sandwich its name, female operators during World War II, and the segregation and integration of the streetcars. 1995. 58 min. Video/C MM692

The Third Ward
A group of artists find inspiration in the remnants of a besieged black neighborhood's storied past. House by house they worked alongside residents and local volunteers to craft a stunning new vision of what could be. Documents a community's struggle to survive - from segregation to the limited promise of integration, from drug wars to the economic challenges of gentrification. Directed by Andrew Garrison. Dist.: New Day Films. c2007. 60 min. DVD X4646

The Trials of Darryl Hunt
Chronicling this capital case in Winston-Salem, N.C. from 1984-2004, filmmakers Ricki Stern and Annie Sundberg painstakingly frame the judicial and emotional reponses to a brutal rape/murder case, and the implications surrounding Darryl Hunt's wrongful conviction against a backdrop of class and bigotry in America. Directors, Ricki Stern and Annie Sundberg. 2006. 107 min. DVD 8592

Tulia, Texas
In 1999 undercover narcotics agent Thomas Coleman executed one of the biggest drug stings in Texas history. Coleman and his drug task force arrested 46 Tulia residents - of which 39 were African American - on charges of suspected drug dealing. At the discovery that Coleman himself had a criminal record investigations were re-opened and all the defendants were eventually set free and pardoned by the Texas governor. Coleman himself was convicted of perjury, but the West Texas jury gave him only a suspended sentence. A co-production of Cassandra Herrman and Kelly Whalen. 2007. 54 min. DVD X296

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Two Nations of Black America.
There is a growing economic divide in black America. Today, America's black middle class is the largest in its history, yet roughly one-third of black America continues to live in poverty. This film measures the economic and social success of the civil rights movement and the gap between middle class and poor African-Americans through interviews with noted Afro-Americans and historical film footage. Commentary: Cornel West, Julian Bond, Maulana Karenga, Eldridge Cleaver, Kathleen Cleaver, Angela Davis, William Julius Wilson, Jesse Jackson, Quincy Jones, David Sykes, Christopher Edley, Orlando Patterson. 1998. 56 min. DVD DVD X6916; Video/C 5690

The Vanishing Family: Crisis in Black America
Focuses on the problems of Black single-parent families in Newark, New Jersey. In conversations with unmarried parents, news reporter Bill Moyers investigates patterns of teen-age pregnancy, the role of welfare, and the changes in values among Black families. Originally presented as a segment of CBS reports. c1986. 64 min. DVD 6967 [preservation copy]; Video/C 9438

Visions of a Common Good: A Conversation on Race, Ethnicity, and American Common Ground
Nathan Glazer, Ronald Takaki, Robert Pickus. William Simmons, moderator. Professors Glazer (Harvard) and Takaki (UCB) seek to define a common cultural ground for an America that is diverse, united and fulfills the best of its founder's values. Co-sponsors, World Without War Council, James Madison Foundation and the Center for Teaching and Study of American Cultures." Joint lecture delivered 4/26/94 at the University of California Berkeley. 90 min. DVD 4221; Video/C 2713

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Voices of a Divided City.
Film examines racial problems of urban areas focusing on the 1974 riots in Boston that were triggered by busing of children from the predominantly Black community of Roxbury to Charlestown with a mostly Irish population. Residents speak on the street and during a discussion group about the issues of racism and the impact busing and affirmative action programs have on their communities. 59 min. Video/C 455

Violence in Black America Life.
Examines the eruption of racial violence in America. Scenes from various race riots make up part of the program. 60 min. Video/C 530

Wade in the Water
Through a mixture of private videos, and uncensored interviews, the children of New Orleans' violent Central City neighborhood have created a riveting look at life in New Orleans through the eyes of its children. The film class at Singleton Charter School invited students to take video cameras home and tell their stories expressing their thoughts in the chaos after Katrina. Through their own remarkably honest and unusual footage, we enter the kids shuttered housing projects, flooded homes and darkened streets to discover a New Orleans that was a disaster long before Katrina, a place where role models are scarce and gun violence is normal. Dist.: Cinema Guild. 2007. 75 min. DVD X2112

What About Prejudice?
Centron Corporation's exposition of what life is like for a minority schoolboy in the midst of a socity at odds with him and his heroic actions that make his white schoolmates question their prejudices and hatreds. 1959. 12 min. DVD 2653

What Black Men Think
Documentary film examines the role that myths, stereotypes and misrepresentations have played in the decimation of modern era black relationships and how the symbiotic relationship between government, media and black leadership perpetuates misinformation to further marginalize the role of black men in society. Directed by Janks Morton. 2007. 87 min. DVD X3299

What's Race Got to Do with It?
This program "chronicles the experiences of a new generation of college students, in this case over the course of 16 weeks of intergroup dialogue on the U.C. Berkeley campus. As they confront themselves and each other about race, they discover they often lack awareness of how different their experience of campus life is from their peers, to the detriment of an inclusive campus climate. Special features (46 min.): Optional audio commentaries and excerpted interviews with Dave Stark & Jerlena Griffin-Destra (course goals & objectives, creating a space for dialogue, students' lives as the curriculum, course history : how conflict emerges, socioeconomic disparities, assessing the process, facing issues that arise). Written, directed and produced by Jean Cheng. 2006. 49 min. DVD 6626

Description from California Newsreel catalog

When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts
An extensive documentary covering a wide variety of perspectives on the pivotal events that preceded and followed Katrina's passage through New Orleans, a catastrophe during which the divide between race and class lines has never been more pronounced. Special feature (Discs 1 & 2): Optional audio commentary by filmmaker Spike Lee. Directed by Spike Lee. Originally produced as a television documentary in 2006. 255 min. DVD 6725

Awards

American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults
Emmy Awards - Exceptional Merit in Nonfiction Filmmaking; Outstanding Directing for Nonfiction Programming
Peabody Award
Venice Film Festival - Human Rights Film Network Award; Venice Horizons Documentary Award

William Julius Wilson.
(World of Ideas with Bill Moyers.) Interview with William Julius Wilson, sociologist and author, discussing the problems of urban poverty, welfare, and race in the United States. 60 min. Video/C 1885

Willie Brown and Robert Naylor.
Willie Brown and Robert Naylor talk about their jobs and relationship with the State Assembly, the Senate, and the Governor. 60 min. Video/C 720

Women, the New Poor.
Follows the lives of four women in Connecticut exploring how they cope with poverty. Interviewed are Bernice, an unemployed African American single mother; Dody, a displaced homemaker with a home beyond her means; Paula, a young divorcee with three part-time jobs; and Alexis, a Latina who moved into a shelter with her teenage daughter after a fire destroyed their home. Stressing the need for education, job training and support, this documentary illustrates commonalties among poor women of different backgrounds. 28 min. Video/C 3345

Women's Work
Urban Bush Women is an extraordinary dance/theater company led by artistic director, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar. Since 1984, the group has been creating works that celebrate the heritage of African Americans, interacting with communities through workshops and performances. Using historic perspectives on dance, music, song, and folklore, the company affirms many aspects of African-American life. [1995?]. 27 min. Video/C 8205



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