History 1950 to 1970

The Black Panthers

History 1970 to present

Hurricane Katrina (separate page)

History 1950 to 1970 (including works on the Civil Rights Movement)

Television News of the Civil Rights Era, 1950-1970 (University of Virginia)

Affirmative Action: The History of an Idea.
Explores the historical roots of affimative action and the current debate over its usefulness. Looks at several different affirmative action programs including the Univ. of California, Berkeley, the U.S. Army, federal aid to minority businesses, and affirmative action in the Chicago Police Dept. Includes archival footage and features interviews with a wide array of academic scholars. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1996. 56 min. Video/C 4999

Affirmative Action Under Fire: When is it Reverse Discrimination?
The account of a reverse discrimination court case over the firing in 1989 of a white teacher in a Piscataway, New Jersey high school because of her race. Shows how this court case became a national battle for affirmative action and how affirmative action preference advocates paid the white teacher $450,000 to drop her case in order to avoid a Supreme Court decision that would potentially invalidate all affirmative action programs in the United States. Originally produced for the ABC television program Nightline aired on November 11, 1997 under the title: Black teacher, white teacher, affirmative action under fire. Dist.: Films Media Group. 22 min. Video/C 6874

American Cultural History: Racism
Don't be a sucker / U.S. War Department (1947, 18 min.) -- Integration, Report 1 / Andover Productions (1960, 21 min.) -- Let us break bread together / City of New York, Board of Education (1954, 26 min.) Don't be a sucker: Uses the example of Nazi Germany to drive home the point that American's should not be fooled by people who wage a war against minorities. It warns them not to be "a sucker" and to live in harmony despite differences of color, race or religion. Integration, Report 1: Historical footage of the Civil Rights Movement in 1959 and 1960 including footage of rallies staged in Montgomery, Brooklyn and Washington, D.C. Let us break bread together: A promotional film on Detroit as the host city for the 1968 Olympics showing views of highways, automobile manufacturing, a diverse population and social activities, all shot prior to the city's economic decline. DVD 5153

America's War on Poverty.
Produced and directed by Susan Bellows. Produced by Blackside, Inc. 57 min ea.

In this Affluent Society. In the early 1960s, hundreds of Kentucky coal miners are displaced by machines and strike out at their former employers. Millions of others displaced by machines across Appalachia and the rural South head north to begin a new life in Chicago, where they face overcrowded tenements and schools, and the familiar inequities of segregation. This program recounts these stories of desperation and hope and explores the origins of the federal government's war on poverty and how attitudes toward race and faith in the accessibility of the American dream shape the battle plans for the nation's greatest effort to reduce poverty. DVD 9790 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3926

Given a Chance. Early 1965 is a critical period for President Johnson's war on poverty. The Office of Economic Opportunity's goal to have the poor themselves design and run anti-poverty programs attracts strong opposition from local and state governments. Head Start is created to provide poor children with adequate nutrition, health care and the educational advantages that other American children enjoy. This program focuses on the Head Start program in Mississippi. DVD 9791 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3927

City of Promise. The context for the war on poverty shifts after 1965. Urban rebellions provoke a sense of urgency for some, while others now see the war against poverty as hopeless. Increasingly, the media and the public equate poverty with inner-city black communities. This program looks at the anger and despair of the poor and the powerless, and the anger and frustration of the middle class at having to pay for "others' mistakes." It also examines attempts made in Newark, New Jersey, to reclaim the inner city through public/private partnerships. DVD 9792 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3928

In Service to America. By 1967, poverty warriors increase the sophistication of their tactics at the same time that a number of outspoken opponents rise to national prominence. This program highlights the beginning of Legal Services and VISTA, two programs that combined individual action with the idea of volunteerism. Lawyers team up with migrant farm workers in California to fight for better education, health care and working conditions, and VISTA volunteers and local residents organize against strip mining in Appalachia. Both stories raise significant questions about activities the government funds in the name of fighting poverty. DVD 9793 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3929

My Brother's Keeper. The Nixon Administration and the National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) bring the nation to the brink of overhauling the federal social security system and replacing welfare with a guaranteed income for all citizens. When it appears the guaranteed income will be quite low, the NWRO joins an alliance of conservatives and liberals to defeat the proposed legislation. DVD 9794 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3930

CINE Film & Video Awards 1995 (Golden Eagle).

Amerika
Documentary about the escalation and diversity of the anti-Vietnam War protest movement on the homefront. Includes conversations with Vietnam vets, teenagers, and Afro-American militants. Graphically depicts the hightened incidents of mass protest and police repression. Originally produced as a documentary film in 1969. 33 min. Video/C 5854

Anarchy U.S.A.
This radical anti-negro, anti-communist, anti-civil rights propaganda documentary was made shortly after the Watts riots. Employing newsreel footage this film traces the methods used by communists to take over China, Cuba and Algeria, and then attempts to demonstrate that the same tactics have been used by the U.S. civil rights movement. 78 min. Video/C 2962

At the River I Stand.
Documentary of two 1968 events in the civil rights movement-- the sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Shows how the black community, local civil rights leaders, and AFSCME mobilized behind the strikers in mass demonstrations and a boycott of downtown businesses. Directors, David Appleby, Allison Graham, Steven John Ross. 59 min. Video/C 3780

CINE Film & Video Awards 1994 (Golden Eagle)

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Baldwin, James] Baldwin's Nigger
A striking portait of the writer James Baldwin at his sharp-witted best, addressing a group of radical West Indian students in 1960s London. Accompanied by comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory, Baldwin discusses what it means to be black in America, comparing it to the experience of the British Black community. Produced and directed by Horace Ove. 1969. 44 min. DVD 6206

[Baldwin, James] Baldwin vs Buckley
Debate between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, October 26, 1965. Sponsored by the Cambridge Union Society, Cambridge University. The topic of the debate was "The American Dream is at the Expense of the American Negro". DVD X619; vhs Video/C 2299

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Black Civil Rights Films
Contents: Integration report, Part one / producer, Madeline Anderson (1960, 20 min.) -- Poverty in rural America / National Audiovisual Center (1965, 28 min.) -- What about prejudice? / Centron Corporation (1959, 12 min.).

Integration report, Part one: Madeline Anderson's documentary on the use of organized resistance as a force of social change in Montgomery, Alabama, Brooklyn and Washington, D.C. Features 1959 and 1960 footage of demonstrations, marches, sit-ins and boycotts. Poverty in rural America: A Great Society era film depicting the real problems of the poor in rural America in general while demonstrating a palpable reticence to directly address the issue of race in particular. What about prejudice? Centron Corporation's exposition of what life is like for a minority schoolboy in the midst of a socity at odds with him and his heroic actions that make his white schoolmates question their prejudices and hatreds. DVD 2653

The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords.
"Too long have others spoken for us". A History of African-American newspapers and journalism from the mid-19th century through the 20th century. With commentary by historians, newspaper cartoonists, journalists, and photojournalists, tells of the struggles against censorship, discrimination and for freedom of the press. Produced and directed by Stanley Nelson.1998. 86 min. DVD X5463; Video/C 5445

Awards
International Documentary Association
San Francisco International Film Festival - Golden Spire
Sundance Film Festival - Freedom of Expression Award

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Black Power
A discussion between American writer Nat Hentoff and William F. Buckley on the meaning of the term "Black Power," its opponents and implications for race relations and the Black community. Includes significant discussion of the quality of education in "Black ghettos," the writings of James Baldwin and the removal of Adam Clayton Powell from office. Originally taped as an episode of the television program Firing Line on March 7, 1967. 50 min. DVD X2725

Black Power Mixtapes
During the rise of The Black Power Movement in the 60s and 70s, Swedish Television journalists documented the unfolding cultural revolution for their audience back home. Now, after more than 30 years in storage, this never-before-seen footage spanning nearly a decade of Black Power is finally available. The tape highlights the key figures and events in the movement, as seen in a light completely different than the narrative of the American media at the time. Features: featurette; additional interviews with Angela Davis, Shirley Chisholm, and Louis Farrakhan; trailer. A film by Göran Olsson; produced by Annika Rogell. Originally filmed 1967-1975. 96 min. DVD X6940

The Bloods of 'Nam.
Black Vietnam War veterans talk candidly about the discrimination and prejudice they faced from fellow soldiers, their war experiences, and their disillusionment upon returning to the United States. Directed and photographed by Wayne Ewing. Based on the book "Bloods: an oral history of the Vietnam War" edited by Wallace Terry (Main Stack DS559.5.B56 1984; Moffitt DS559.5.B56 1984). 1986. 60 min. Video/C 9996

Briars in the Cottonpatch.
Tells the nearly forgotten story of Koinonia Farm, a small Christian community founded by Clarence Jordan in Southwest Georgia in 1942 where whites and blacks chose to live and work together as equals despite the brutal and frightening consequences. Surrounded by segregationalist Georgians, they withstood bullets, bombs and boycotts in the years leading up to the tumultuous Civil Rights era. This award winning documentary examines the remarkable events that tested the moral boundaries of a community and planted the seeds for the global work of Habitat for Humanity. 2012. 57 min. DVD X9157

Brick by Brick: A Civil Rights Story
This a contemporary American civil rights documentary uses the bitter struggle over equal housing rights in Yonkers, New York during the 1980s to show the 'massive resistance' the Civil Rights movement confronted when it moved North. The story is told through the passionate experiences of Yonkers residents on both sides of the issue. Special features (61 min.): 5 additional interviews (59 min. total); epilogue (2 min.). Written, produced & directed by Bill Kavanagh. 2007. 53 min. DVD X242

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin
One of the first "freedom riders," an adviser to Dr. Martin Luther King and A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the March on Washington, intelligent, gregarious and charismatic, Bayard Rustin was denied his place in the limelight for one reason -- he was also gay. This is a film biography of his life. Produced and directed by Nancy Kates, Bennett Singer. 2002. 84 min.DVD X4571; Video/C 9386

Awards ALA Video Round Table Notable Video for Adults

San Francisco International Lesbian & Gay Film Festival - Audience Award, Best Documentary

Description from California Newsreel catalog
Information from the Bayard Rustin Film Project

[Brown v Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas] Simple Justice.
(American Experience) Recounts the remarkable legal strategy and social struggle that resulted in the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. 133 min. Video/C 2758

[Bunche, Ralph] Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey
An in-depth documentary examining the personal and professional life of Ralph Bunche, the statesman and diplomat who was one of the founders of the United Nations and later received the Nobel Prize for his peacemaking efforts. A film by William Greaves. Based on the biography Ralph Bunche : an American life / by Brian Urquhart (Main Stack E748.B885.U76 1993; Moffitt E748.B885.U76 1993). A film by William Greaves 72 min. DVD 3304

Description from California Newsreel catalog

By River, By Rail
African-Americans recount the story of the early 20th century migration of blacks to the Northern states with a backdrop of songs, art and music of the era. They tell of separated families, of the hardships, prejudice, and struggle for acceptance in the North that resulted in disillusionment. Black luminaries include authors James Cameron and Lucille Clifton, Jacob Lawrence, artist and creator of the Black Migration series, Dr. Julius Garvey, son of Marcus Garvey, poet Maya Angelou and NAACP president Kweisi Mfume. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1998. 22 min. Video/C 5560

By-line Newsreel. (Tyler-Texas Black Film Collection: The Missing Link in Black Cinema)
Newsreels providing close-ups of black leaders in government and sports. Produced by Bill Alexander and Biddy Wood, 1956/1957.

Vol. 1: Opens with shots of black government officials in the Eisenhower Administration followed by footage of Marine Reservists departing for basic training. In sports, the Baltimore Colts with black star Lenny Moore, take on the Chicago Bears, with black star Bobby Watkins. Fashion models wearing "I like Ike" buttons are shown followed by an interview with Mrs. Carmel Carrington Marr, A U.N. official. Video/C 7176

Vol. 2: Opens with Afro-Americans celebrating in the "I'm an American Day" parade in Baltimore. At Altus Air Force Base, a black soldier comes to the aid of a white engineer who is disabled. Black officials of the Eisenhower Administration are shown including Samuel Pierce, Undersecretary of Labor. Concludes with a visit to the Savannah Club in New York's Greenwich Village. Video/C 7177

Vol. 3: Black members of the Eisenhower administration are interviewed including a top aide, the first black member of the White House staff, and Assistant Secretary of Labor, J. Ernest Wilkins. In sports, Air Force athletes are shown competing in Olympic track and field tryouts in Los Angeles. Video/C 7178

Vol. 4: The 1956 Republican National Convention in San Francisco is shown with interviews of leading Black Republicans. In sports, scenes from the Morgan State-North Carolina State football game are shown and at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, President Eisenhower opens the World Series by throwing out the first ball to Dodger catcher Roy Campanella. Video/C 7179

CBS Reports
Historic CBS programs (1960s-70s) dealing with issues related to African American equality and civil rights. Dist.: Films Media Group.

Blacks in America: With All Deliberate Speed? [Pt. 1] Filmed in 1979 in Tupelo, Lexington and other Mississippi locals, this program examines the gains made by African-Americans in the areas of education, employment, housing, health care and politics 25 years after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to outlaw public school segregation. Segregationist academies and Ku Klux Klan activities are also investigated, to demonstrate how integration was being sidestepped by some and openly resisted by others. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on July 24, 1979. Correspondent: Ed Bradley. 52 min. Video/C 8954

Blacks in America: With All Deliberate Speed? [Pt. 2] Filmed in 1979, correspondent Ed Bradley travels to his hometown of Philadelphia, to assess how African-Americans have been faring 25 years after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to outlaw public school segregation. Quality education, employment opportunities, fair and adequate housing and political representation are addressed, as are issues of illiteracy, de facto segregation and racial violence. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on July 25, 1979. Correspondent: Ed Bradley. 51 min. Video/C 8955

Busing. In 1971, when busing was first mandated by the U.S. Supreme Court in the Swann ruling, it strongly polarized public opinion in many communities. Filmed only five years after the controversial precedent was first put into practice, this news program looks at events in Charlotte and Boston, two places that stand as icons in the busing battle. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on May 28, 1976. Correspondent: Charles Collingwood. 53 min. Video/C 8906

The Chicago Riots. The catalyst for the Chicago rioting was an incident over black children trying to cool off at a fire hydrant. CBS News presents this special report, produced as the arson and looting raged that summer of 1966. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who was in the city trying to restore order, talks at length with Mike Wallace about the underlying causes and the ongoing dialogue with Chicago mayor Richard Daley and his administration. The program offers blow-by-blow coverage of the events as well as commentary from civic and religious leaders, witnesses, and law enforcement officials to provide a contemporary overview of a society on the verge of anarchy. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on July 15, 1966. Correspondent: Mike Wallace, Bill Plante. 31 min. Video/C 8994

Filibuster. Examines the stormy passage of Civil Rights Bill H.R. 7152 through the House of Representatives. Filmed in 1964, it begins with a report on the controversial bill's history, from its introduction by John F. Kennedy to the eve of its debate on the Senate Floor. Following that report, Eric Sevareid moderates as Senators Hubert Humphrey and Strom Thurmon engage in a live television debate on the bill's merits. Film footage of John and Robert Kennedy, Justice Dept. officials Nicholas Katzenbach and Burke Marshall, President Lyndon Johnson and the racial clashes of the early 60s captures the tensions that surrounded this most comprehensive civil righs law since Reconstruction. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on March 18, 1964. Correspondent: Eric Sevareid. 55 min. Video/C 8909

From Washington: Report on Integration. In 1957, the eyes of America were on Little Rock, where the compulsory desegregation of Central High School was front-page news. But what about the broader picture? How successful had integration efforts in the South been in the three years following the Brown decision? This program filmed at that time brings together a panel of newsmen from the Southern Education Reporting Service to assess -- against the backdrop of anti-integration violence -- the overall progress being made in complying with the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on September 29, 1957. 31 min. Video/C 8905

Harlem: A Self Portrait. This 1959 CBS News special offers a unique look at a city within a city, capturing the mood and tenor of a community where, at the time, police, not politicians, were the power and six out of seven officers were white. This program surveys a wide range of Harlem life including footage of a speech by Malcolm X and interviews with poet Langston Hughes and a wide variety of African Americans living in Harlem including a retired black police detective, two former gang members, a resident of a new apartment building, partners in a new restaurant venture and others. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on August 18, 1959. Correspondents: Bill Leonard, Tom Costigan. 58 min. Video/C 8902

The Harlem Temper. In this 1963 CBS News special, CBS reporter Harry Reasoner examines the economic and political scene in Harlem, a study in miniature of black leadership in conflict and crisis throughout America. Reasoner interviews civic leaders from such organizations as CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), the National Urban League, and the NAACP, along with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., then Congressman and pastor of Harlem's Abyssinian Baptist Church. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on December 11, 1963. 58 min. Video/C 8901

Hunger in America. A researched study of hunger and malnutrition in the United States, showing views of Black sharecroppers in Alabama, Navajo Indians in Arizona, tenant farmers near Washington, D.C. and impoverished Mexican-Americans in San Antonio. Includes a discussion of surplus foods, food-stamps, and the farm subsidy program. Episode of the television program CBS reports, originally broadcast in 1968. Reporters: Charles Kuralt, David Culhane. 51 min. DVD 6971 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 9366

Ku Klux Klan: The Invisible Empire. Shortly before this program was filmed in 1965, Klansmen were implicated in the murders of five people. Here Charles Kuralt presents an in-depth look at the Klan, featuring its history, its influence, the application process, and rare coverage of an initiation rite. Kuralt asks Klan leaders how they can avoid responsibility for violence when they themselves repeatedly whip up their followers to action. Among those interviewed are Alabama Attorney General Richmond Flowers, KKK Imperial Wizard Robert Shelton, and Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on September 21, 1965. Correspondent: Charles Kuralt. 60 min. Video/C 8991

The Other Face of Dixie. Correspondent Harry Reasoner visits four cities in this 1962 program to examine progress in school integration: Clinton, Tennessee; Norfolk, Virginia; Atlanta, Georgia; and Little Rock, Arkansas. Along with Atlanta governor S. Ernest Vandiver and journalists Ralph McGill and Lenoir Chambers, Reasoner talks with students at Little Rock Central High School, their school board president and Arkansas governor Orval Faubus. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on March 3, 1968. 54 min. Video/C 8908

Remedy for Riot. In this news program from 1968, Harry Reasoner reports on the findings and recommendations of President Johnson's National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. The commission's report offered an analysis of the causes of riots at that time and concluded that unless sweeping changes were made, the nation was moving towards two separate societies, black and white, separate but unequal. By interviewing business, political, religious and community leaders in Detroit, one of the cities hit hardest by turmoil, the program assesses possible courses of action in four major areas: jobs, housing, schools and welfare. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on October 24, 1962. Correspondent: Harry Reasoner. 58 min. DVD X4930; vhs Video/C 8995

Testament of a Murdered Man. A news report presenting an extended interview with Medgar Evers filmed a year before his murder. The NAACP field secretary, WWII veteran, father and civil rights crusader dedicated nine years of his life to fighting racism before he was killed in 1963 in Jackson, Mississippi. Evers discusses his efforts at registering and organizing black voters, as well as the many death threats he and his family received while waging a campaign for civil rights in the South. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on June 12, 1963. Correspondents: Douglas Edwards, Richard Richter. 16 min. Video/C 8992

Watts, Riot or Revolt? Were the Watts riots part of a social revolution, a festering illness or a carnival of senseless violence? And why did it first erupt in L.A. and not in another major American city? This news program, filmed just a few months after the riots, presents a study of the principal events that ignited the conflagration in the summer of 1965 in Watts. A wide variety of individuals comment on the situtation, including L.A. chief of police William H. Parker, Daniel P. Moynihan, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., witnesses to the riots and rioters themselves. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on December 7, 1965. Correspondent: Bill Stout. 55 min. DVD X4932; vhs Video/C 8993

Who Speaks for the South? The court order integrating Georgia public schools conflicted with the state constitution, prompting much debate regarding state's rights. In this 1960 news special Edward R. Murrow reports on the issue of racial segregation in the state's schools, focusing on the proceedings of the School Study Committee, a public forum in which residents of Georgia's ten Congressional districts voiced their opinions presenting a wide and sometimes ominous range of views. Murrow also interviews the Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Ralph McGill, Atlanta's mayor William Hartsfield and Georgia Governor S. Ernest Vandiver. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on May 27, 1960. Correspondent: Edward R. Murrow. 56 min. Video/C 8907

City of Promise (America's War on Poverty; 3).
The context for the war on poverty shifts after 1965. Urban rebellions provoke a sense of urgency for some, while others now see the war against poverty as hopeless. Increasingly, the media and the public equate poverty with inner-city black communities. This program looks at the anger and despair of the poor and the powerless, and the anger and frustration of the middle class at having to pay for "others' mistakes." It also examines attempts made in Newark, New Jersey, to reclaim the inner city through public/private partnerships. 57 min. DVD 9792 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3928

Civil Rights Movement: Primary Sources.
Dist.: Films Media Group.

Clinton and the Law. Clinton High was the first school in Tennessee to desegregate -- an experience that led to chaos and violence. This program reports on the town's efforts in 1957 to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court's mandate in the face of coercive opposition. Footage of the Rev. Paul Turner preaching brotherhood and John Kasper expounding in his rhetoric of intolerance creates a vivid portrait of the times. Other individuals add their views, rounding out the picture of a community's successful struggle to reestablish law and order. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on January 6, 1957 on See It Now. 55 min. Video/C 7362

Mississippi and the 15th Amendment. A college student, a schoolteacher and a fellow of the National Science Foundation were all three ruled illiterate by the local circuit clerk and ineligible to vote. Filmed in 1962, this program reveals the double standards and the dangers faced by African-Americans registering to vote in Mississippi. Interviews with local officials, segregationists, lawyers, clergy and citizens on both sides of the color line expose what amounted to a tacit conspiracy to deprive certain people of their constitutional right to stand up and be counted.Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on September 26, 1962 on CBS Reports. 57 min. Video/C 7363

The Color Line on Campus. For most U.S. colleges today, racial diversity is a goal -- but almost nine years after the Brown decision, it was quite another story. This 1963 program features interviews with James Meredith and other African-American students who broke ground and tradition at universities in the South. Faced with attitudes ranging from passive tolerance to violent rejection, each had achieved enrollment, but not acceptance. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on January 25, 1963 on CBS Eyewitness News. 30 min. Video/C 7364

After Ten Years: The Court and the Schools The 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka ruling made it clear that segregation would not be tolerated and that states must comply with federal law. In this program, filmed ten years after Brown, news correspondents report on the mixed progress made toward integrating public schools in Nashville, New Rochelle, New Orleans and Prince Edward County, Virginia. Stumbling blocks such as faculty segregation, busing and segregational zoning are examined. A discussion featuring Attorney Gen. Robert Kennedy, Gov. of Georgia Carl Sanders and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP concludes the program. Reporters: Dan Rather, Mike Wallace, Martin Agronsky, Charles Kuralt, Harry Reasoner.+ Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on May 13, 1964. 58 min. Video/C 7365

Segregation -- Northern Style In many places above the Mason-Dixon Line, a subtle form of bigotry was at work during the early 1960s, resisting the efforts of Afro-Americans to buy homes in historically white neighborhoods. In this 1964 program, Mike Wallace reveals the fallacies, attitudes and weak legislation that contributed to de facto segregation in the North by tracking the unsuccessful compaign of a middle-class black family to buy in upscale New Jersey. The positive contributions of fair housing and civil rights groups are also presented.Reporter: Mike Wallace. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network in 1964. 58 min. Video/C 7366

Black Power -- White Backlash When the radical wing of the civil rights movement began equating redress with rebellion rather than nonviolent protest, "Black power" became the rallying cry. In this program, filmed in 1966, Mike Wallace explores public sentiment during that turbulent period by assessing the attitudes, opinions and reactions on both sides of the color line. Interviews with major figures of the movement discussing black militancy,economic power, fair housing, nonviolence, and the tensions in Cicero, Illinois, the Selma of the North capture the fervor of 1966. Reporter: Mike Wallace. Originally aired on the CBS. 56 min. Video/C 7367

Commentary of a Black Southern Busrider [Rosa Parks][Sound recording]
Rosa Parks discusses her refusal to give up her seat to a white man and the resulting bus-boycott in Montgomery, Alabama. KPFA broadcast, December 20, 1962. 16 min. Sound/D 220

Covering the South. National Symposium on the Media and the Civil Rights Movement, April 3-5, 1987 / University of Mississippi. Center for the Study of Southern Culture.
Six panel discussions by print and television journalists who do an in-depth examination of how coverage by the news media influenced the Civil Rights Movement and the historical revolution it spawned. Many personal anecdotes are related by Caucasian and Afro-American journalists of their experiences covering the movement including becoming targets of threats and violence. Approximately 86 min. each.

Birth of the Movement, World War II through the 1950's. Covers the early years of the movement including such events as the Montgomery bus boycott, the integration of Central High in Little Rock, James Meredith's enrollment at the University of Mississippi and the murder of Emmett Till. Video/C 3760

Wagner, Terry. "America's Civil Rights Revolution: Three Documentaries about Emmett Till's Murder in Mississippi (1955)." Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television; Jun2010, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p187-201, 15p UC users only

The Mass Movement, 1960-64. Part I. This panel covers the events of 1960-1964 including lunch counter sit-ins, the Freedom Riders, the Birmingham riots, continuing civil unrest in Little Rock and Selma and James Meredith's continued matriculation at the University of Mississippi. Video/C 3761

The Mass Movement, 1960-64. Part II. Continues the coverage of events of 1960-1964 including commentary on the murder of Emmett Till, sit-ins, Freedom Riders, riots in Atlanta with particular commentary on the new young educated black leadership which emerged during the struggle typified by Martin Luther King Jr. Video/C 3762

The Political Movement, 1965-67. Covers the events of 1965-1967 including commentary on the Selma-Montgomery Freedom March, the impact of the signing of the National Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the ensuing Watts Riots which expanded the Civil Rights movement from the South to include all of America. Video/C 3763

The Bottom Line, the Decision Makers.97 min. Video/C 3764

Aftermath, 1968 to the Present.This panel examines the current issues of civil rights, what has changed and what has not changed; issues which have become much more complex in the ensuing 25 years. 113 min. Video/C 3765

Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment
Drew Associates; producer, Gregory Shuker; film makers, Richard Leacock; James Lipscomb, D.A. Pennebaker, Hope Ryden. In June 1963, President John F. Kennedy and his brother, U.S. Attorney General, Robert Kennedy, forced one of the gravest racial confrontations of the 20th century. Despite a federal court order, Alabama Governor George Wallace vowed he would prevent two black students from entering the all-white University of Alabama. With a revolutionary new style of filmmaking using hand-held cameras, filmmaker Robert Drew and his four-team crew were at work recording the crisis as it unfolded, capturing the story from all sides up until its dramatic climax. 1963. 53 min. DVD 3067

Crossing the Bridge
On March 7, 1965 a group of civil rights activists attempted to march from Selma to Montgomery in order to register to vote. As they crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, violence erupted as the police attacked the marchers in a bloody, unprovoked assault that shocked the nation, resulting in far-reaching repercussions. 2002. 50 min. DVD 5158

Dateline Freedom: Civil Rights and the Press.
Tells the compelling, behind-the-scenes story of members of the press covering the struggles of the civil rights movement. Mostly white, mostly male and Southern, these journalists share their recollections. 30 min. Video/C 2759

A Day to Remember: August 28,1963.
Focuses on the civil rights demonstration in Washington, D.C. led by Martin Luther King. 29 min. DVD 7336 [preservation copy]; Video/C 581

The Deadly Deception.
Investigates one of the most notorious medical experiments in American history; the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male. African American men in Macon County, Alabama believed they were receiving free treatment for syphilis; they were instead given medicines that were worthless against the disease. It also discusses the lingering mistrust of the white medical establishment created by this study. Writer, producer and director, Denisce Diianni. 60 min. DVD X524; Video/C 3151

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Defining Black Power[Sound recording]
This series serves as a history lesson for the young and a reminder to those who lived through those times that the issue of African American political power is complex and that the field of thought on the subject is diverse. Rosa Parks -- James Baldwin -- Bayard Rustin/Malcolm X -- Fannie Lou Hamer -- Angela Davis -- Elijah Muhammad -- Malcolm X -- Stokley Carmichael -- Martin Luther King, Jr. -- Huey Newton -- Eldridge Cleaver -- Maulana Karenga -- H. Rap Brown -- Leroi Jones -- John Hope Franklin. Pacifica Radio Archive, [2000] 210 min. Sound/D 223

Detroit Riot 1967: A Community Speaks
This documentary chronicles the sociological and physical devastation, as well as the rebuilding, of the community where the 1967 Detroit riots occurred. Provides historical context of Detroit prior to 1967 and utilizes interviews and footage to explore the causes of the riots, document the destruction, and illustrate the subsequent rebuilding efforts. 2003. 56 min. DVD 7103 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C MM302

Death of a Prophet.
A docu-drama that follows Malcolm X on his last day, Sunday February 21, 1965. Stars Morgan Freeman et al. 60 min. Video/C 2463

The Different Drummer.
Using rare photographs, archival footage, and interviews with Black military personnel, tells of the importance of Black soldiers from the Civil War to World War I. 58 min. DVD 4959 (preservation copy); also vhs Video/C 1010

Dream Deferred.
Produced by SNCC for its southern voter registration drive in 1964, the year of the Mississippi Summer. Contains interviews with activists, voter registrants and leaders, and features Fannie Lou Hamer's speech, including her famous line: "I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired." Dist.: Estuary Press. 33 min. DVD 4222; also VHS Video/C 2799

Richards, Paul. ""Harvey Richards/Civil Rights Movement." Syndic Liteary Journal, no. 5

Exposures of a Movement.
Profiles black photojournalists during the Civil Rights Movement in North and South Carolina. On the front lines, these black photographers took a lot of chances and suffered the same fire hoses and German Shepherds as everyone else. Performer: Alex Rivera, Cecil J. Williams, Count Jackson, James Peeler, George Shinhoster, Jack Claiborne, Thomas Battle, Andrew Young, David Goldfield, Charles Jones, Harvey Gantt, Todd Duncan, Diane Curtain, Thomas Johnson. 1996. 27 min. Video/C 4633

Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years.
A comprehensive history of the people, the stories, the events, and the issues of the civil rights struggle in America. Presents behind-the-scenes insights into such major events as the Montgomery bus boycott, the March on Washington, and the march from Selma to Montgomery.

Part 1, Awakenings, 1954-1956. This first episode of six discusses the history of segregation in the U.S., focusing on the South, and the impact of the 1954 Supreme Court decision against segregation in Brown vs Board of Education. Highlighted is the Emmett Till murder case and Rosa Parks and the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott. DVD 6960; also VHS Video/C 971:1 pt. 1

Part 2, Fighting Back 1957-1962. Focuses on segregation in education in the southern United States. It highlights two specific tests of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in 1954 against segregation - the case of the Little Rock Nine in 1957 (the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas), and James Meredith's enrollment as the first black at the University of Mississippi in 1962. DVD 6960; also VHS Video/C 971:2 Pt. 2

Part 3, Ain't Scared of Your Jails 1960-1961. Focuses on two major events involving students in the civil rights struggle - the lunch counter sit-ins in the south (particularly Nashville, Tennessee) and the Freedom Riders trip from Washington D.C. to Mississippi. Included in the program is the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordination Committee and the importance it played in these events. DVD 6961; also VHS Video/C 971:3 Pt. 3

Part 4, No Easy Walk, 1962-66. Depicts three major movements. Retells the stories of three cities involved in the civil rights movement: the Albany, Ga. police chief and Martin Luther King, Jr. each tested out the strategy of nonviolence in their own way, Birmingham, Ala. where children marched against fire water hoses, and Washington, D.C. where black and white, young and old, north and south came together to march on the nation's capital. DVD 6961; also VHS Video/C 971:4 Pt. 4

Part 5, Mississippi, Is This America? Focuses on the continuing civil rights struggle in Mississippi. The story covers the voter registration drive during Freedom Summer in 1964 when students and others from the north came to Mississippi to implement black participation in the political process. Also includes the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and their unsuccessful attempt to sit in at the 1964 Democatic Party convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey. DVD 6962; also VHS Video/C 971:5 Pt. 5

Part 6, Bridge to Freedom 1965. Covers the push for black voting rights in Alabama and nationally. The division within the civil rights movement between the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) grows, particularly in their approach to the Selma-Montgomery Freedom March in 1965. That same year sees the National Voting Rights Act signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson. DVD 6962; also VHS Video/C 971:6 Pt. 6

Eyes on the Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads.
8 parts. 60 min. ea.

Part 1, The Time Has Come, 1964-1966. During the decade of civil rights protest in the South, a sense of urgency and anger emerged from the black communities in the North. This urgency was best articulated by Malcolm X, then National Minister of the Nation of Islam. Viewers follow the trajectory of Malcolm X's influence, both within the movement and outside. The program shows the influence of his philosophy on the staff of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as they organized the Lowndes County Freedom Organization in Alabama and as they issued the call for "Black power" during the 1966 Meredith March Against Fear in Mississippi. DVD 6963; also VHS Video/C 1652:1 pt. 1

Part 2, Two societies, 1965-1968. This program explores the civil rights movement's first attempt at organizing in the north, as Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference go to Chicago. Their strategies come up against the powerful political machinery of Mayor Richard Daley. Also looks at the 1967 uprising in Detroit as blacks and the police clash on city streets. DVD 6963; also VHS Video/C 1652:2 Pt. 2

Part 3, Power! 1967-1968. Out of the ashes of the urban rebellions, blacks look for new ways to take control of their communities. This program explores the political path to power for Carl Stokes, the nation's first black mayor of a major city. It also describes the founding of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, Calif., and the struggle of black and Hispanic parents in Brooklyn, N.Y., to improve their children's education through community control of the schools. DVD 6964; also VHS Video/C 1652:3 Pt. 3

Part 4, The Promised Land, 1967-1968. Moved by the increasing level of poverty, Dr. Martin Luther King, in the final year of his life, began to organize a Poor People's Campaign, a march of the poor to Washington, D.C., where they would erect Resurrection City to embarrass and motivate a reluctant government. On April 4, 1968, Dr. King was assassinated. Soon after its construction, Resurrection City was shut down, marking the end of a chapter of the civil rights movement. DVD 6964; also VHS Video/C 1652:4 Pt. 4

Part 5, Ain't Gonna Shuffle No More, 1964-1972. Program illustrates the pervasiveness of the black consciousness movement throughout the country in the mid-1960s and early 1970s. Describes the student movement at Howard University for black studies and explores the "coming of age" of black politicians and political activists through a description of the National Black Political Convention at Gary, Indiana. Uses Cassius Clay, who wanted to be called by his new Islamic name, Muhammad Ali, as an example of blacks rejecting old stereotypes and gaining a new sense of pride. DVD 6965; also VHS Video/C 1652:5 Pt. 5

Part 6, A Nation of Law? 1968-1971. By the late 1960's, the anger in the poorer urban areas over charges of police brutality was smoldering. In Chicago, Fred Hampton formed a Black Panther Party chapter, at a time when police surveillance of movement activists was increasing. During this same period, inmates at New York's Attica prison took over the prison in an effort to publicize intolerable conditions. DVD 6965; also VHS Video/C 1652:6 Pt. 6

Part 7, The Keys to the Kingdom, 1974-1980. Examines the relationship between law and popular struggle. In Boston, black parents organized to improve their children's education. In Atlanta, Mayor Maynard Jackson, the city's first black mayor, tries to guarantee black involvement in the construction of Atlanta's airport. DVD 6966; also VHS Video/C 1652:7 Pt. 7

Part 8, Back to the Movement, 1979-1983. Examines two cities ; one in the south the other in the north. In Miami, Florida, viewers witness the destruction of a black community by urban renewal, highway construction, and finally, riots. In the North, we see how Harold Washington gets elected as Chicago's first black mayor. Ends with a look back at the people who made the civil rights movement a force for change. DVD 6966; also VHS Video/C 1652:8 Pt. 8

Separate bibliography of books and articles about this film
Description of series from the Encyclopedia of Television
Full-text reviews from ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries
Williams, Juan. Eyes on the prize: America's Civil rights Years, 1954-1965 / Juan Williams ; with the Eyes on the prize production team; introduction by Julian Bond. New York, NY: Viking, 1987. UCB Main KF4757 .W521 1987; UCB Moffitt KF4757 W52 1987
Interview with Juan Williams Video/C 2230] 6 parts. 60 min ea.

[Farmer James] Race relations in Crisis (An Open Mind Special)
Presents discussions on race relations in America in 1963. On the panel were James Farmer, founder and National Director of CORE, the Congress of Racial Equality; Wyatt Tee Walker, Chief of Staff of the Southern Christian Leadership Congress lead by Martin Luther King; Allan Morrison, New York editor of Ebony magazine; and Nation of Islam leader Malcolm X, striking a contrary and eerily prophetic tone in the midst of this plaintive and urgent discussion. Of particular interest: the discussion of the possibility within the coming few months of a march upon the nation's capitol that was to become the historic March on Washington of August 28th, 1963. Host, Richard Heffner ; panel, Malcolm X, James Farmer, Wyatt Tee Walker, Allen Morrison. Originally produced for television as a segment in the series The Open Mind on June 12, 1963. 100 min. DVD X5615

FBI's War on Black America.
Looks at the FBI's Cointelpro (Counter Intelligence Program) operations. 50 min. Video/C 2964

February One.
Tells the inspiring story of four remarkable young men who initiated the lunch counter sit-ins in Greensboro, NC on February 1, 1960. Based largely on first hand accounts and rare archival footage, the film documents one volatile winter in Greensboro that not only challenged public accommodation customs and law in North Carolina, but served as a blueprint for the wave of non-violent civil rights protests that swept across the South and the nation throughout the 1960's. c2004. Full length (61 min.) version and abbreviated (20 min.) DVD 3089

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Forgotten Fires
A documentary about the burning of two Afro-American churches near Manning, South Carolina in June, 1995 by Ku Klux Klan members. Frank interviews with the victims, the perpetrators, their families, and people who live in the community transforms the event into a complex account of racism, poverty, denial, repentance and forgiveness. 57 min. 1998. Video/C 7456

Description from Berkeley Media LLC catalog

National Educational Media Network (Gold Apple).

4 Little Girls.
Producer/director, Spike Lee. The Birmingham Campaign was launched in 1963. Martin Luther King Jr. and other activists were soon jailed... but it was the participation of the children that advanced the momentum of the Birmingham movement. They marched alongside the adults and were taken to jail with them as well. The 16th St. Baptist Church was close to the downtown area, it was an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, Sept. 15, 1963, dynamite planted by the Ku Klux Klan, exploded in the building...under the fallen debris the bodies of [four] girls were found--Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley died because of the color of their skin. 1998. 103 min. Video/C 5398

Collins, James. "4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Time v151, n7 (Feb 23, 1998):86 (2 pages).
Britt, Donna. "Celebrating Life Before Martyrdom." (Spike Lee's documentary, '4 Little Girls')(Column) Washington Post v121, n44 (Fri, Feb 13, 1998):B1, col 1, 17 col in.
Byrd, Chris. "4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Sojourners v27, n1 (Jan-Feb, 1998):63 (2 pages).
Klawans, Stuart. "4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Nation v265, n4 (July 28, 1997):35 (2 pages).
Leonard, John. "Four Little Girls." (television program reviews) New York v31, n7 (Feb 23, 1998):135 (2 pages).
McCarthy, Todd. "4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Variety v367, n11 (July 21, 1997):38.
Millner, Denene. "Remembering Four Little Girls." (Spike Lee's documentary on the 1963 bombing murder in Birmingham of Carole Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Welsey and Carol Robertson while they were in Sunday School) American Visions v13, n1 (Feb-March, 1998):36.
Morgenstern, Joe. "4 Little Girls." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Fri, July 18, 1997):A13(W), A13(E), col 1, 7 col in.

Freedom!
A documentary series chronicling the epic journey of America's commitment to liberty and the idea of freedom. Based on the book series A History of US by Joy Hakim. c2003. 52 min. each installment

Episode 14: In the 1950s and early '60s a freedom movement emerges with the purpose of ending segregation and racism against African-Americans becoming the most effective social revolution in U.S. history. It also examines the presidency of John F. Kennedy and the rise of the National Farm Workers Association. DVD 2196

Episode 15: Looks at Lyndon B. Johnson, his presidency and the Vietnam War, during a decade that threatened to tear the country apart. DVD 2196

Episode 16: Continues to explore advances made in the Civil Rights Movement and desegregation and looks at the ensuing presidencies. Concludes with the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001 and at what may become the next issues in America's freedom struggle. DVD 2196

Freedom Bound.
Documents the attempt of Negro citizens in Mississippi to register and vote despite intimidation, official brutality, and violence. Expresses the determination of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee to assist the Negroes of Mississippi in their struggle. A film by Harvey Richards. Dist.: Estuary Press. 1963. 28 min. DVD 4224

Freedom is a Constant Struggle: Songs of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement
Disc 1. Hey Nelly Nelly (Judy Collins)(2:50) -- Here's to the State of Mississippi (Phil Ochs)(5:52) -- Ballad of Medgar Evers (SNCC Freedom Singers, led by Matthew Jones)(4:28) -- Death of Medgar Evers (Donal Leace)(4:25) -- Only a pawn in their game (Bob Dylan)(3:30) -- Too many martyrs (Kim & Reggie Harris)(3:31) -- Blowin' in the wind (Peter, Paul & Mary)(2:57) -- It isn't nice (Judy Collins)(3:06) -- Ain't gonna let nobody turn me round (Julius Lester)(2:16) -- Hammer song (Barbara Dane)(3:04) -- Going down to Mississippi (Phil Ochs)(3:02) -- I'm on my way (Barbara Dane)(2:26) -- Thirsty boots (Eric Andersen)(5:10) -- Carry it on (Carolyn Hester)(2:49) -- Wade in the water (Julius Lester)(3:23) -- Move on over (Len Chandler)(4:42) -- I'm going to get my baby out of jail (Len Chandler)(3:34) -- Waves of freedom (Eric Andersen)(6:12) -- This little light of mine (Odetta)(2:10) -- How long (Magpie and Kim & Reggie Harris)(3:32) --Disc 2. Movin' it on (Odetta)(2:15) -- Ain't you got a right to the tree of life (Guy & Candie Carawan)(3:23) -- Freedom school (Jack Washington Landron)(3:32) -- Song for Ben Chaney (Jack Washington Landron)(3:05) -- Goodman, Schwerner and Chaney (Tom Paxton)(2:45) -- Those three are on my mind (Kim & Reggie Harris and Magpie)(3:30) -- Michael, Andrew and James (Mimi and Richard Fari~na)(5:08) -- I have seen freedom (Si Kahn)(4:20) -- Three young men (Carolyn Hester)(3:37) -- In the Mississippi River (SNCC Freedom Singers, led by Marshall Jones)(3:35) -- Freedom is a constant struggle (Julius Lester)(4:10) -- This may be the last time (Bernice Johnson Reagon)(4:03) -- We will not bow down to genocide (Len Chandler)(2:45) -- You should've been down in Mississippi (Magpie)(3:28) -- Father's grave (Jack Washington Landron)(3:18) -- Mississippi summer (Si Kahn)(2:08) -- Fannie Lou Hamer (Sweet Honey in the Rock)(5:18) -- Summer '64/Oh freedom (Greg Trafidlo, Laura Pole, Neal Phillips, Robert Cardwell, and the Voices of Zion)(2:46) -- Shadows on the light (Matthew Jones)(7:28) -- Ella's song (Sweet Honey in the Rock)(5:46). Sound/D 120

Freedom March.
Features the San Francisco civil rights protest march of May 26, 1963, sponsored by Bay Area black churches and the labor movement in the shocked aftermath of the Birmingham, Alabama bombing of a black church, killing five children. A film by Harvey Richards. Dist.: Estuary Press. 10 min. DVD 4223; also VHS Video/C 2798

Freedom Never Dies: The Legacy of Harry T. Moore
A documentary film exploring the life and times of a distinguished school teacher whose passionate crusade for equal rights for African Americans could not be discouraged by either the white power structure or the more cautious factions of his own movement. 2000 90 min. Video/C 8056

Freedom Now! [Sound recording]
Radio documentary on the 1963 civil rights march in Birmingham, Alabama. Contains actuality of the rally, riots, and the voices of Martin Luther King, Ralph Abernathy and Birmingham's Mayor and sheriff. Produced by Robert Kramer, Chris Koch, and Dale Minor. WBAI broadcast, 1963. Sound/D 216

Freedom on My Mind.
Revisits the Mississippi freedom movement in the early1960s when a handful of idealistic young activists believed they could change history -- and did. In 1964, organizers of the voter registration drive, fearing for their lives and hoping to attract the nation and federal government to their plight, recruited 1,000 mostly white college students from around the country to join them for Freedom Summer. Three students were murdered but the drive succeeded in signing up 80,000 members, mostly poverty-stricken sharecroppers, maids and day-laborers who confronted jail, beatings and even murder for the right to vote. Produced and directed by Connie Field and Marilyn Mulford. 1994. 110 min. DVD 3038; also VHS Video/C 3566

Awards

CINE Competition - Golden Eagle
International Documentary Association
Sundance Film Festival - Grand Jury Prize, Documentary

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Freedom Riders
This inspirational documentary is about a band of courageous civil-rights activists calling themselves the Freedom Riders. Gaining impressive access to influential figures on both sides of the issue, it chronicles a chapter of American history that stands as an astonishing testament to the accomplishment of youth and what can result from the incredible combination of personal conviction and the courage to organize against all odds. Directed by Stanley Nelson. Based in part on the book Freedom riders: 1961 and the struggle for racial justice, by Raymond Arsenault. Originally released on May 16, 2011 as a segment on the PBS series American Experience. 115 min. DVD X6108

Awards

American Library Assn. Video Round Table Notable Videos for Adults

Fundi, the Story of Ella Baker.
Shows the work of Ella Baker, a little known organizer in the Civil Rights Movement of the past fifty years. 63 min. Video/C 415

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Given a Chance (America's War on Poverty; 2) .
Early 1965 is a critical period for President Johnson's war on poverty. The Office of Economic Opportunity's goal to have the poor themselves design and run anti-poverty programs attracts strong opposition from local and state governments. Head Start is created to provide poor children with adequate nutrition, health care and the educational advantages that other American children enjoy. This program focuses on the Head Start program in Mississippi. 57 min. DVD 9791 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3927

[Hamer, Fannie Lou] Fannie Lou Hamer[Sound recording]
v. 1. Collected speeches of Fannie Lou Hammer [sic] : A collection of several speeches made by this fiery civil rights activist & leader of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party -- v. 2. Fannie Lou Hamer interviewed by Colin Edwards : feminine Black power at work in the jungle of Mississippi Democratic party politics -- v. 3. Vietnam moratorium rally at UC-Berkeley : includes speeches by Fannie Lou Hamer and Roger Alvarado, October 1969. Pacifica Radio Archive. Sound/D 219

Harlem: A Self Portrait
This 1959 CBS News special offers a unique look at a city within a city, capturing the mood and tenor of a community where, at the time, police, not politicians, were the power and six out of seven officers were white. This program surveys a wide range of Harlem life including footage of a speech by Malcolm X and interviews with poet Langston Hughes and a wide variety of African Americans living in Harlem including a retired black police detective, two former gang members, a resident of a new apartment building, partners in a new restaurant venture and others. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on August 18, 1959. Dist.: Films Media Group. 58 min. Video/C 8902

The Harlem Temper
In this 1963 CBS News special, CBS reporter Harry Reasoner examines the economic and political scene in Harlem, a study in miniature of black leadership in conflict and crisis throughout America. Reasoner interviews civic leaders from such organizations as CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), the National Urban League, and the NAACP, along with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., then Congressman and pastor of Harlem's Abyssinian Baptist Church. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on December 11, 1963. Dist.: Films Media Group. 58 min. Video/C 8901

Hunger in America. A researched study of hunger and malnutrition in the United States, showing views of Black sharecroppers in Alabama, Navajo Indians in Arizona, tenant farmers near Washington, D.C. and impoverished Mexican-Americans in San Antonio. Includes a discussion of surplus foods, food-stamps, and the farm subsidy program. Episode of the television program CBS reports, originally broadcast in 1968. Reporters: Charles Kuralt, David Culhane. 51 min. Video/C 9366

Inside the Ku Klux Klan: Faces of Hate
In this program, the leaders of the American Knights of the KKK and the Invisible Empire of the KKK air their views and discuss their efforts to recruit members through rallies, the Internet, and pamphlets. Civil rights crusaders, authors, representatives of the NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League, and religious and civic leaders analyze the Klan's rhetoric and ideology. Contains extensive footage of Klan rallies. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2000. 53 min. Video/C 8282

The Integration Report
Integration report, Part one: Madeline Anderson's documentary on the use of organized resistance as a force of social change in Montgomery, Alabama, Brooklyn and Washington, D.C. Features 1959 and 1960 footage of demonstrations, marches, sit-ins and boycotts. Producer, Madeline Anderson. 1960. 20 min. DVD 2653

The Intolerable Burden
Documentary film of how Mae Bertha and Matthew Carter enrolled the youngest eight of their thirteen children in the public schools of Drew, Mississippi in 1965, which were all-white schools. The Drew school board had initiated a "freedom of choice" plan to bring the district in compliance with the 1964 Civil Rights Act, but Blacks were not expected to choose all-white schools. It also looks at how the schools have slowly become "resegregated" in recent years, leading to poorer educational opportunities. 2002. 57 min. DVD 4498

Description from First Run Icarus catalog

July '64
In the summer of 1964, a three-night riot erupted in two predominantly black neighborhoods in downtown Rochester, New York--the culmination of decades of poverty, joblessness and racial discrimination and a significant event in the Civil Rights era. Using archival footage and interviews with those who were present, the film explores the genesis and outcome of those three nights. Director, Carvin Eison. 2004. 54 min. DVD 6627

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Kennedy v. Wallace: A Crisis Up Close.
(American Experience) A film originally made in 1963 of President John F. Kennedy and the governor of Alabama, George Wallace, during the confrontation over desegregation of Alabama schools. Re-edited to include thoughts of U.S. Attorney General, Nicholas Katzenbach. 60 min. Video/C 2876

[King, Martin Luther] Citizen King
In exploring the last few years of his life, this production traces King's efforts to recast himself by embracing causes beyond the civil rights movement, by becoming a champion of the poor and an outspoken opponent of the war in Vietnam. Tapping into a rich archive of photographs and film footage and using diaries, letters, and eyewitness accounts of fellow activists, friends, journalists, political leaders and law enforcement officials, this film brings fresh insights to King's impossible journey, his charismatic leadership and his truly remarkable impact. Produced, directed and written by Orlando Bagwell and W. Noland Walker Segment of American experience, originally broadcast on Jan. 19, 2001. Dist.: PBS. DVD 2630

[King, Martin Luther] A Day to Remember: August 28,1963.
Focuses on the civil rights demonstration in Washington, D.C. led by Martin Luther King. 29 min. DVD 7336 [preservation copy]; Video/C 581

[King, Martin Luther] "I Have a Dream--": The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King
Presents through historical television news footage the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the forces that brought him to the leadership of his people. Stresses his philosophy and ideals and examines in-depth the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Includes portions of his "I have a dream" speech, delivered in Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963. 1968. 35 min. Video/C 9903

[King, Martin Luther] I Have a Dream: A documentary on Dr. Martin Luther King.[Sound recording]
Based on the life of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. this disc includes actuality of speeches and interviews with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his associates. Produced the day after his assassination. Pacifica Radio Archives. Originally broadcast on April 7, 1968. 45 min. Sound/D 218

[King, Martin Luther] In Remembrance of Martin.
A documentary honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes archival footage, the "I Have a Dream" speech, and a synopsis of key civil rights decisions of the 1950's and 1960's. 60 min. Video/C 2761

[King, Martin Luther] King: A Filmed Record, Montgomery to Memphis.
A chronicle of the struggle for racial equality and justice from 1955 to 1968 through newsreel and television coverage. A film by Ely Landau and Richard Kaplan. 104 min. DVD 7649 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 986

[King, Martin Luther] King: Go Beyond the Dream to Discover the Man(History Channel: The Sixties)
Forty years after Martin Luther King's assassination, newsman Tom Brokaw, takes viewers through the extraordinary life and times of America's civil rights visionary. Go beyond the legend to portray the man, the questions, the myths, and the relevance of Dr. King's message in today's world. Originally broadcast by The History Channel in 2008. 94 min. DVD X742

[King, Martin Luther] MLK, A Call to Conscience
Delves into one of Martin Luther King Jr.'s greatest speeches, Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence, which Dr. King delivered on April 4, 1967. Today this speech is acknowledged to be one of the most powerful ever written by Dr. King. Tavis Smiley deconstructs the meaning of the speech, and puts it in a contemporary context, particularly in light of our nation's current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Directed by Allan Palmer. 2010. 60 min. DVD X3771

[King, Martin Luther] Martin Luther King.
In an interview with Gerild Priestland, Martin Luther King expresses his feelings, hopes, philosophy and religious convictions. 30 min. Video/C 9

[King, Martin Luther] Martin Luther King, Jr.: From Montgomery to Memphis
Surveys the career of Dr. Martin Luther King and his contributions to the civil rights movement that he led, from the bus segregation protests in Montgomery in 1955 to his assassination in Memphis. Employs excerpts from King's speeches, and scenes of major civil right marches in Montgomery, Birmingham, Washington D.C., Selma, Chicago and Memphis to convey the essence of the man and the movement. 1968. 27 min. Video/C 9944

[King, Martin Luther] MLK: The Martin Luther King, Jr. Tapes: Featuring Speeches [SOUND RECORDING]
Contents: The great march to freedom (Detroit, June 23, 1963) -- The great march to Washington (Washington, D.C., August 18, 1963) -- Free at last (Atlanta, February 4, 1968) -- Eulogy (Cleveland, Ohio, April 5, 1968) / [by] Robert F. Kennedy. Sound/D 174

[King, Martin Luther] The Other America
Considered one of the key speeches of his career, civil rights leader Martin Luther King delivers an address entitled The Other America, which tells of the struggle of Black Americans to overcome poverty and achieve equal rights. A film by Allen Willis. Delivered at Stanford University on April 14, 1967. DVD 7132

[King, Martin Luther] Prophet of Peace: The Story of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 1929-1968
Narrated by fifteen Oakland, Calif., fifth-and sixth-graders. A unique animated biography of the great civil rights leader. Dr. King's entire life is covered, from his childhood through his early years as a Southern Baptist minister, his leadership role in the Montgomery boycott, the March on Washington, the voter registration drives, the march from Selma to Montgomery, and his assassination in 1968. Excerpts from two of King's most famous speeches are included, as are sketches of some of his closest associates. c1986. 24 min. Video/C MM874

[King, Martin Luther] Speaking for America: Twelve National Leaders Talk About Their Visions for America. [Sound Recording]
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is included in this series which features l2 prominent political leaders, journalists, and scholars discussing American life and values. 6 cassettes. SOUND/C 153

[King, Martin Luther] We -- Rising Up From King's Legacy
"A poetic interweaving of community-individual actions rising up from Dr. Martin Luther King's legacy, facing painful remnants of our history and joining in hopeful actions engaging today's issues." Spiritual and moral lag -- Courting spiritual death -- Black man got to stand up now -- Much more work to do -- My ancestors were raped an' killed -- Are my hands clean? -- I call for revolution -- Yesterday is just the beginning -- Beware glory hallelujah -- Muertos a manos de la policia -- Every bomb is a theft -- You got a right to make the world a better place -- We fought your American war -- Telling our family stories. c2005. 28 min. DVD 4921

The Klan: A Legacy of Hate in America.
Shows graphically the 120-year infamy of the Ku Klux Klan's reign of terror. 30 min. Video/C 3242

The Klan: The Invisible Empire. (CBS Reports)
Shortly before this program was filmed in 1965, Klansmen were implicated in the murders of five people. Here Charles Kuralt presents an in-depth look at the Klan, featuring its history, its influence, the application process, and rare coverage of an initiation rite. Kuralt asks Klan leaders how they can avoid responsibility for violence when they themselves repeatedly whip up their followers to action. Among those interviewed are Alabama Attorney General Richmond Flowers, KKK Imperial Wizard Robert Shelton, and Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach.Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on September 21, 1965. Dist. Cinema Guild. 60 min. Video/C 8991

Let Freedom Ring
Despite the colossal and continuing legacy of America’s civil rights era, the movement is often best understood through the historical moments in which it took place. This NBC News program presents original coverage from frontline correspondents and camera teams at work during critical junctures in America’s battle for racial equality. Examines the Greensboro sit-ins; the Freedom Rider phenomenon; the efforts by, in support of, and against black students entering southern schools and universities; the March on Washington; and other events and initiatives. DVD version contains a bonus half-hour interview with Dr. Martin Luther King following the success of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. (47 min. + 53 min. of bonus material). Dist.: Films Media Group. 2008. 100 min. DVD X2411

Little Rock Central: 50 Years Later
In 1957, Little Rock Central became a symbol of the struggles and hopes of the Civil Rights Movement. African-American students were not allowed into the building. An eye-opening look at racial equality, education, and class at the high school today. Directed, produced, and filmed by Brent Renaud, Craig Renaud. c2007. 70 min. DVD X5074

Lowndes County Freedom Party.
This program examines the rise of Stokely Carmichael and his Lowndes County Freedom Party, which he formed to get blacks registered to vote. These efforts are examined against the backdrop of murder and intimidation which accompanied the struggle for civil rights. None of the Party's candidates were ultimately elected, but the groundwork had been laid for the poor and disenfranchised in the South to gain political power. 25 min. Video/C 4139

Lynching: The Heinous Past.
Documents the history of lynching in the United States. The film is punctuated by reproductions of picture postcards depicting lynches, collected by James Cameron, who has created a museum in Milwaukee dedicated to keeping alive this memory of man's inhumanity. 22 min. Video/C 9256

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Making Sense of the Sixties.
Part 5, Picking up the Pieces Discusses how and why more extreme splinter groups like the Black Panthers came to be, as well as two new movements: the environmental movement and the women's movement. Finally, it recreates the national mood at the end of the decade when the Vietnam vets came home, when hundreds of Black Panthers were arrested or killed, when Richard Nixon was forced to resign, and when the country is held hostage by OPEC. 58 min. each. Video/C 1953

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Malcolm X] The Autobiography of Malcolm X
The book the Autobiography of Malcolm X is an American classic not only for its compelling story, but also for its uncompromising expression of the pain, anger, and violence of black life in a white America. This documentary focuses on the impact the book had on race relations in America. It also scrutinizes the life of Malcolm X himself. Features dramatizations and interviews with Malcolm X's family and friends, as well as scholars and authors. 1999. 53 min. Video/C 8799

[Malcolm X] Brother Minister: The Assassination of Malcolm X: El-Hajj Malik Shabazz
Brother minister is the explosive documentary that dares to reveal the mystery surrounding the assassination of Malcolm X, a truly American hero. It probes the innocence of two of the convicted assassins, reveals the true identities of the killers, examines the FBI and NYPD clandestine roles in the assassination through recently de-classified documents, and discovers the secret origin of the Nation of Islam and its political and religioius legacy in America. Directed and produced by Jack Baxter and Jefri Aalmuhammed. 1995? 115 min. DVD 5344

[Malcolm X] Death of a Prophet.
A docu-drama that follows Malcolm X on his last day, Sunday February 21, 1965. Stars Morgan Freeman et al. 60 min. Video/C 2463

[Malcolm X] El-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz (Malcolm X)
Focuses on the qualities and characteristics that predicated Malcolm X's rise as a leader and spokesman of the Black America Movement. 56 min. Video/C 998

[Malcolm X] Malcolm X: Make It Plain.
From the series, The American Experience, 1993. This definitive biography weaves together interviews, archival footage, photographs, and an original score to portray the fascinating intellectual journey of a complex man whose ideas resonate today. 150 min. DVD 6533 (preservation copy); vhs Video/C 3218

National Educational Film & Video Festival 1995 (Silver Apple).

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Journal of American History v81, n3 (Dec, 1994):1415 (2 pages))

[Malcolm X] Malcolm X: Make It Plain.[Sound recording]
Ballot or the bullet speeches -- Common enemy speech (Bandung Conference) -- Unity rally speeches -- 1963 Detroit speeches including Leaders used against revolution. 270 min. Sound/D 182

[Malcolm X] Malcolm X: Nationalist or Humanist?
This film includes newsreel footage of several of his most important speeches, as well as events leading up to and following his assassination. An on-camera interview with Malcom's widow, Betty Shabazz, filmed shortly after her husband's death, is the moving backdrop for this brief but powerful documentary. 14 min. Video/C 2791

[Malcolm X] Malcolm X: UC Berkeley Interview, October 1963
Malcolm X, being interviewed by Professor John Leggett and Herman Blake (graduate student)(Dept. of Sociology) at the University of California, Berkeley in October 1963, discusses being a Black Muslim, the conditions of Blacks in this country, their relation with white people, and states the case for Black separatism. Originally recorded October 11, 1963, Lecture #22, Sociology 1-A, University of California, Berkeley. 40 min. DVD 1159; also on VHS Video/C 8501

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[Malcolm X] Malcolm X Talk at UC Berkeley, with Questions and Answers
Originally recorded October 11, 1963, Lecture #22, Sociology 1-A, University of California, Berkeley. ©UC Regents. Introduction (4 min.) -- Program (30 min.) -- Questions (17 min.)

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[Malcolm X] Malcolm X: Militant Black Leader.
Adapted from the book of the same title by Jack Rummel. 30 min. Video/C 2575

[Malcolm X] Seven Songs for Malcolm X
A collection of testimonies, eyewitness accounts, and dramatic reenactments which tell of the life, legacy, loves and losses of Malcolm X. 53 min. 1993. Video/C 4064

Icarus Films catalog description

Ba, Saer Maty. "Visualizing Rhythm, Transforming Relationship: Jazz and Seven Songs for Malcolm X." Studies in Documentary Film, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 137-148, 2008 UC users only

[Malcolm X] Murder of Malcolm X: The Effect on Black America 25 Years Later.
A speech given by Louis Farrakhan, a Black Muslim leader, on the life of Malcolm X. Running time not listed. Video/C 1982

[Malcolm X] Race relations in Crisis (An Open Mind Special)
Presents discussions on race relations in America in 1963. On the panel were James Farmer, founder and National Director of CORE, the Congress of Racial Equality; Wyatt Tee Walker, Chief of Staff of the Southern Christian Leadership Congress lead by Martin Luther King; Allan Morrison, New York editor of Ebony magazine; and Nation of Islam leader Malcolm X, striking a contrary and eerily prophetic tone in the midst of this plaintive and urgent discussion. Of particular interest: the discussion of the possibility within the coming few months of a march upon the nation's capitol that was to become the historic March on Washington of August 28th, 1963. Host, Richard Heffner ; panel, Malcolm X, James Farmer, Wyatt Tee Walker, Allen Morrison. Originally produced for television as a segment in the series The Open Mind on June 12, 1963. 100 min. DVD X5615

[Malcolm X] Voices of Courage and Dissent.[Sound recording]
Black Muslims vs the sit-ins": Malcolm X, James Baldwin and Leverne McCummins discuss the position of the Black Muslims (64 min.) -- Disc 3-4. "Prospects for freedom": Malcolm X talks about the need for Black action for civil rights (Jan. 7, 1965, 60 min.) -- Disc 5. "Friends and enemies": Malcolm X (February 15, 1965, 38 min.) -- Disc 6. "Speech by Malcolm X on December 20, 1964" on the treatment accorded to the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (Atlantic City) ; "John Henrik Clarke on Malcolm X": History professor and friend of Malcolm X speaks about his contributions to the black struggle (53 min.) Presents the most famous lectures and speeches by Malcolm X, minister and Black Nationalist leader. Pacifica Radio Archives. Sound/D 225

[Malcolm X] X 1/2: The Legacy of Malcolm.
Set within the context of current African-American struggles, this provocative video examines the historical and contemporary legacies of Malcolm X. Using mixed media and experimental audio, this video explores Malcolm X's teachings of black pride, unity and self-defense, a new generation's interpretations of his heritage, and a popular culture which tries to commercialize his memory. 41 min. Video/C 3626

March on Washington
Featuring Odetta, Joan Baez, Marian Anderson, A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Jr. 1963 civil rights march in Washington D.C. shows preparation work, people marching, performances and speeches at the Lincoln Memorial. Includes Martin Luther King Jr. giving his "I have a dream" speech. DVD X57

Memphis Dreams: Searching for the Promised Land. (Century: Events that Shaped the World; 8.)
When Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated in 1968 Memphis--like Dallas in 1963--became a symbol of hope extinguished. This program examines the Civil Rights Movement and the last few years of Martin Luther King's life with emphasis on the sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee and the killing of America's greatest civil rights leader, its impact on Afro-Americans and the nation. 46 min. Video/C 6349

Mighty Times: The Legacy of Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks' simple act of defiance on Dec. 1, 1955, against racial segregation on city buses inspired the African American community of Montgomery, Alabama, to unite against the segregationists who ran City Hall. Over the course of a year, the Montgomery Bus Boycott would test the endurance of the peaceful protestors, overturn an unjust law and create a legacy of mighty times that continue to inspire those who work for freedom and justice today. A project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. Producers, Robert Hudson; director Bobby Huston. 2002. 40 min. Video/C 9167

Mighty Times: The Children's March
In May of 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. asked black people of Birmingham, Alabama to go to jail in the cause of racial equality. The adults were afraid to go to jail and so the school children marched and over 5000 of them were arrested. This lead President Kennedy to sponsor the 1964 Civil Rights Act which eventually to the march on Washington. Contains vintage film footage, re-stagings of some activities and interviews with some of the protesters. 2004. 40 min. DVD 5138

Awards
Academy Award - Best Documentary, Short Subjects
International Documentary Association Award

Miss Smith of Georgia
Portrait of the Georgia author and civil rights activist Lillian Eugenia Smith who was the first prominent white southerner to denounce racial segregation openly and to work actively against it. This program includes extensive interviews with the author as well as brief appearances by author Carson McCullers and actress Ruby Dee. Originally broadcast as a television program in 1962. 30 min. DVD 4363

Mississippi, America
Through an examination of historical events of 1964, this program gives testimony to persistence and courage in the face of oppression, as citizens and the lawyers who volunteered to help them, confront violence, murder and government repression in Mississippi in order to win the right to vote for Afro-American citizens. Directed and written by Judith McCray. 56 min. Video/C 5851

[Moore, Harry T.] Freedom Never Dies: The Legacy of Harry T. Moore
A documentary film exploring the life and times of a distinguished school teacher whose passionate crusade for equal rights for African Americans could not be discouraged by either the white power structure or the more cautious factions of his own movement. 2000 90 min. Video/C 8056

Muhammad Ali and the Negro Movement
A discussion between heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali and William F. Buckley on the draft board reversal of of its earlier determination that he was not sufficiently intelligent to serve as a result of him joining the Black Muslims. Buckley questions Ali about his refusal to be drafted, the "Negro movement" and other topics. Originally taped as an episode of the television program Firing Line on December 12, 1968. 50 min. DVD X2727

The Murder of Emmett Till
The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began. Produced and directed by Stanley Nelson. Dist.: PBS. 2003. 60 min. DVD 9526; vhs Video/C 9440

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table Notable Videos for Adults

The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till DVD 5182

Ralph Jr., James R. "The Murder of Emmett Till." Journal of American History, Dec2003, Vol. 90 Issue 3, p1137-1138, 2p UC users only
Segall, Rebecca; Holmberg, David. "Who Killed Emmett Till?" Nation; 2/3/2003, Vol. 276 Issue 4, p37-40, 4p UC users only
Wagner, Terry. "America's Civil Rights Revolution: Three Documentaries about Emmett Till's Murder in Mississippi (1955)." Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television; Jun2010, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p187-201, 15p UC users only

Murder on a Sunday Morning
A documentary investigating a true tale of murder and injustice in Jacksonville, Florida. When a 15-year-old black male is arrested for the murder of Mary Ann Stephens, everyone involved in the case--from investigators to journalists--is ready to condemn him,except for his lawyer, Patrick McGuiness. McGuiness reopens the inquiry, and discovers a slew of shocking and troubling elements about the case. Most importantly, can the police be lying? A film by Jean-Xavier de Lestrade 2003. 111 min. DVD 1842

Awards
Academy Award - Best Documentary, Features

Nashville: We were Warriors (Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict)
In Fall 1959, James Lawson offered free evening classes on nonviolent action to university students in Nashville with the goal of training and preparing them to desegregate the city's business district. Lawson had spent three years in India learning about Mohandas Gandhi. Now he guided his students in a study of both the history and practice of nonviolent methods--to prepare them for their "sit-ins" at downtown stores. Lawson's guidance helps the students endure the beatings and arrests, and lead a boycott, as they bring their stuggle for civil rights to the steps of Nashville City Hall and ultimately to the forefront of national attention. Written, produced and directed by Steve York. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2000. 33 min. Video/C 7372

Negroes with Guns: Rob Williams and Black Power.
Forefather of the Black Power movement and pioneer in internationalizing the Black American struggle, tells the story of Robert F. Williams, a Civil Rights fighter who dared to advocate armed self-defense against the racist terrorism of the Jim Crow South. Directors, Sandra Dickson, Churchill Roberts. 2005. 53 min. DVD 4469

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Nine From Littlerock
On September 27, 1957 nine black students attended Little Rock Central High School for the first time, escorted by U.S. Army troops sent in by President Eisenhower to enforce the law desegregating schools. This film, narrated by Jefferson Thomas, one of the nine students, looks into the life of each student seven years after their enrollment at Central. Provides personal narrative accounts of their reaction to events at the time and in retrospect and of their success in continuing their educations. Directed by Charles Guggenheim. c2005. 19 min. DVD X5434

No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger.
Documentary footage of Harlem's 1967 protest march against America's involvement in the Vietnamese Conflict. Includes interviews with three Black Vietnam veterans who discuss the relationship between racism and war and their experiences with racism in the United States. Dist. Cinema Guild. 1968. 68 min. Video/C 4971

Oh Freedom After While: 1939 Sharecroppers Roadside Protest.
In January 1939, Missouri Bootheel sharecroppers--black and white--staged a dramatic roadside protest to call attention to unjust treatment by local plantation owners. Their demonstration spurred the U.S. government to develop new housing for displaced sharecroppers. Some demonstrators also established a remarkable farming community--and learned how to make lasting change in their lives. 1999. 57 min. Video/C 6453

Description from California Newsreel catalog
Reviews (via California Newsreel)

On Strike! Ethnic Studies, 1969-1999
A historical presentation of the struggle to create and maintain a Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California Berkeley. Includes interviews with participants in the 1969 demonstrations when the program was first established, with the 1999 demonstrators when the funding for the program was threatened and with Ethnic Studies faculty at U.C.B. Directed and produced by Irum Shiekh. 1999. 36 min. DVD 8561; vhs Video/C 6521
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[Parks, Rosa] Commentary of a Black Southern Busrider
[Sound recording] Rosa Parks discusses her refusal to give up her seat to a white man and the resulting bus-boycott in Montgomery, Alabama. KPFA broadcast, December 20, 1962. 16 min. Sound/D 220

[Parks, Rosa] Mighty Times: The Legacy of Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks' simple act of defiance on Dec. 1, 1955, against racial segregation on city buses inspired the African American community of Montgomery, Alabama, to unite against the segregationists who ran City Hall. Over the course of a year, the Montgomery Bus Boycott would test the endurance of the peaceful protestors, overturn an unjust law and create a legacy of mighty times that continue to inspire those who work for freedom and justice today. A project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. Producers, Robert Hudson; director Bobby Huston. 2002. 40 min. Video/C 9167

[Parks, Rosa] Rosa Parks.
Program sponsored by the Afro-American Studies Dept. of U.C. Berkeley, honoring Rosa Parks and Septima Clark who were civil rights activists in Montgomery Alabama. 75 min. Video/C 2211:1-2

[Parks, Rosa] Rosa Parks Memorial Service.
Julian Bond, Sam Brownback, Johnnie Carr, John Conyers, Cain Hope Felder, Ernest Green, Dorothy I. Height, Gwen Ifill, Edward M. Kennedy, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Cicely Tyson, Melvin Watt, Oprah Winfrey. Televised coverage of the memorial service for civil rights legend Rosa Parks. Participants pay tribute to Ms. Parks as a catalyst of the civil rights movement, her legacy as a voice for the black community, and her service to the nation, in passionate speeches and with music. October 31, 2005. 176 min. DVD 4849

Philadelphia, Mississippi.
In June 1964, three young civil rights workers--Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner--traveled to Philadelphia, Mississippi in order to investigate the burning of a black Methodist church. Shortly after their arrival, all three men were murdered and hastily buried outside of town, victims of what is generally acknowledged to be a KKK conspiracy. The tragedy almost immediately turned the town into the focus of intense international media scrutiny; the lives of both black and white townsfolk were irrevocably changed in the process. "Philadelphia Mississippi" investigates these lives thirty years later, and attempts to measure the changes in race relations and social conditions in the town since 1964. 60 min. Video/C 3937

Poisoned Dreams (1960-1964). (The Century: America's Time; 10.)
Beset by both international and domestic pressures, America during the Camelot years was swiftly approaching a political-cultural meltdown. This program documents U.S.-Soviet conflicts of interest in Cuba and Vietnam and the growing polarization at home between civil rights activists and segregationist hard-liners, which resulted in the Birmingham riots and the freedom march on Washington, D.C. 43 min. Video/C 6363

The Politics of Love - In Black and White.
Confronts interracial romance on America's campuses. 33 min. Video/C 2969

[Powell, Adam Clayton] Adam Clayton Powell: An Autobiographical Documentary.
Documents the life of Adam Clayton Powell, congressman and pastor of the largest Black congregation in the country. Traces Powell's efforts to eliminate oppression and injustice in America. 58 min. Video/C 261

Filmakers Library catalog description

[Powell, Adam Clayton] Adam Clayton Powell.
A look at the most influential and flamboyant civil rights leader in America from the 1930s through the 1950s. From his emergence as a pastor of Harlem's Abyssinian Baptist Church, to his riotous political climb and eventual ruin. He had an illustrious but controversial career. He had multiple marriages, taunted the white establishment, his desegregation of Congress, and his shameful smearing of Martin Luther King Jr. Narrated by Julian Bond. Directed by Richard Kilberg 1989. 53 min. DVD X2965; vhs Video/C 1770

Awards
International Documentary Association

Filmakers Library catalog description

Race relations in Crisis (An Open Mind Special)
Presents discussions on race relations in America in 1963. On the panel were James Farmer, founder and National Director of CORE, the Congress of Racial Equality; Wyatt Tee Walker, Chief of Staff of the Southern Christian Leadership Congress lead by Martin Luther King; Allan Morrison, New York editor of Ebony magazine; and Nation of Islam leader Malcolm X, striking a contrary and eerily prophetic tone in the midst of this plaintive and urgent discussion. Of particular interest: the discussion of the possibility within the coming few months of a march upon the nation's capitol that was to become the historic March on Washington of August 28th, 1963. Host, Richard Heffner ; panel, Malcolm X, James Farmer, Wyatt Tee Walker, Allen Morrison. Originally produced for television as a segment in the series The Open Mind on June 12, 1963. 100 min. DVD X5615

[Randolph, A. Philip] A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs & Freedom.
Biography of the African American labor leader, journalist, and civil rights activist, A. Philip Randolph. Randolph won the first national labor agreement for a black union, The Sleeping Car porters. His threat of a protest march on Washington forced President Roosevelt to ban segregation in the federal government and defense industries at the onset of WWII and again he forced Truman to integrate the military. Finally with the 1963 March on Washington, Randolph succeeded in placing civil rights at the forefront of the nation's legislative agenda as he passed the torch to Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes music of the labor and civil rights movements. Director: Dante James. 86 min. Video/C 4127

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Revolution '67
Focuses on the explosive urban rebellion which erupted in Newark, New Jersey, in July 1967; a tragedy caused by similar problems that sparked race riots across America. The film takes viewers on a daily chronicle of events, including the calling-in of the State Police and National Guard, their occupation of the city and use of unnecessary firepower. Final toll: 26 dead. Produced & directed by Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno. c2007. 90 min. DVD 9367

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow
A 4-part series offering the first comprehensive look at race relations in America between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement presenting the context in which the laws of segregation known as the "Jim Crow" system originated and developed. A film by Bill Jersey, c2002. 56 min. each installment

Awards
International Documentary Association - Limited Series Award
Peabody Awards

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Program one, Promises betrayed (1865-1896). As reconstruction ended African Americans' efforts to assert their rights began to be repressed. Whites succeeded in passing laws that segregated and disfranchised African Americans which they enforced with violence. This first episode recounts the black response by documenting the work of early African American civil rights leaders including Booker T. Washington, anti-lynching crusader Ida B. Wells and others. DVD 3048; vhs Video/C 9424

Fighting Back (1896-1917). Illustrates the early rise of a successful black middle class in the late 19th century and the determination of white supremacists to destroy fledgling black political power. Growing oppression had a profound effect on a professor at Atlanta University, W.E.B. Du Bois and a teenage Walter White, both of whom would become leaders in the newly founded National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. DVD 3048; vhs Video/C 9425

Don't Shout Too Soon (1917-1940). Chronicles the years between the wars as a time of massive black migration from the South and continuing conflict within it. A new round of race riots and lynching broke out in the aftermath of World War I and by the 1930's many African-Americans found their sole support from Socialists and Communists, who helped organize tenant farmers and sharecroppers and defended the falsely accused "Scottsboro Boys." While NAACP counsel Charles Houston began a lengthy legal campaign to chip away at Jim Crow, Walter White waged war in the court of public opinion. Video/C 9426

The Road to Brown: The Untold Story of "The Man Who Killed Jim Crow".
The story of segregation and the brilliant legal campaign against it which helped to launch the Civil Rights movement. Also a moving and long-overdue tribute to a daring but little known Black lawyer, Charles Hamilton Houston - "the man who killed Jim Crow." 50 min. DVD 4768; also vhs Video/C 1845

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

The Road to Mississippi: Reclaiming Our History.
Students travel to the South to interview residents of the area where the film Mississippi Burning was produced. They seek to discover the true history of the civil rights movement from those who loved it, rather than from the distortions presented in the Hollywood film. 30 min. Video/C 2580

[Rustin, Bayard] Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin
One of the first "freedom riders," an adviser to Dr. Martin Luther King and A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the March on Washington, intelligent, gregarious and charismatic, Bayard Rustin was denied his place in the limelight for one reason -- he was also gay. This is a film biography of his life. Produced and directed by Nancy Kates, Bennett Singer. 2002. 84 min. DVD X4571; Video/C 9386

ALA Video Round Table Notable Video for Adults

Description from California Newsreel catalog
Information from the Bayard Rustin Film Project

San Francisco State On Strike.
Documentary film of a five month long strike in the Fall of 1968 at San Francisco State College in which the Third World Liberation Front mobilized students to call for "the power to change the racist nature of eduction" and to demand the establishment of a Black Studies Department at the college. 20 min. DVD 3044; Video/C 4132

Description from California Newsreel catalog

San Francisco State Strike.
Documents the 1969 strike at San Francisco State College led by minority students and later joined by the teachers' union. Video/C 1929

Scarred Justice: the Orangeburg Massacre 1968
Everyone remembers the four white students slain at Kent State University in 1970, but most have never heard of the three black students killed in Orangeburg, South Carolina two years earlier. This stirring investigative documentary restores that bloody tragedy to the history of the Civil Rights Movement after years of official denial...Interviews with survivors of the Massacre, as well as journalists, the governor and a patrolman who had fired at the students reconstruct the horror of that night. Although the Justice Department charged nine officers with abuse of power, all were acquitted by a South Carolina jury. Forty years later, no one has been held accountable. Produced and directed by Bestor Cram and Judy Richardson. 2009. 57 min. DVD X911

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Second American Revolution.
Hosts Bill Moyers, Ruby Dee, and Ossie Davis examine the search of Blacks for racial equality in Twentieth Century America. 116 min. Video/C 868

Simple Justice.
Recounts the remarkable legal strategy and social struggle that resulted in the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. 133 min. Video/C 2758

Sing for Freedom: The Story of the Civil Rights Movement Through Its Songs. [Sound Recording]
Contents: We are soldiers in the army -- Keep your hand on the plow -- This little light -- You better leave segregation alone -- Your dog loves my dog -- Ain't gonna let nobody turn me around -- I woke up this morning with my mind on freedom -- Keep your eyes on the prize -- Oh Pritchett, oh Kelly -- Up above my head -- This little light -- Brown baby -- Which side are you on? -- I'm gonna sit at the welcome table -- Mass meeting and prayer -- Guide my feet -- I'm on my way -- Rev. Ralph Abernathy -- Yes, we want our freedom -- Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. -- Ninety-nine-and-a-half won't do -- Get on board -- No danger in the water -- Medgar Evans speaking -- Keep your eyes on the prize -- We shall overcome. Sound/D 118 (also in Music Library MUSI CD14465 Music)

[Smith, Eugenia] Miss Smith of Georgia
Portrait of the Georgia author and civil rights activist Lillian Eugenia Smith who was the first prominent white southerner to denounce racial segregation openly and to work actively against it. This program includes extensive interviews with the author as well as brief appearances by author Carson McCullers and actress Ruby Dee. Originally broadcast as a television program in 1962. 30 min. DVD 4363

SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference.
Conference prodeedings of veteran and youth activists gathered at Shaw University in North Carolina to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), an organization which formed the vanguard of the Civil Rights Movement. 2011.

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Volume 1, Opening Plenary
SNCC Advisor, Timothy Jenkins opens the conference explaining that this is not simply a gathering of reminiscence, but a coming together to provide "missing chapters in history" to a new generation of freedom fighters. Following Jenkins is a vivid and substantive description of SNCC's birth and impact given by Professor Julian Bond, retired NAACP Board of Directors Chair, who participated in SNCC's 1960 founding conference. An important lesson that emerges from this opening session is that while SNCC Veterans do not define themselves as heroes and heroines, serious and effective struggle requires commitment, and commitment often involves risk. Speakers: Chuck McDew (Former SNCC Chairman), Charles Meeker (Raleigh Mayor), Timothy Jenkins (SNCC Executive Committee Member), Judy Richardson (SNCC Field Secretary), Hollis Watkins (SNCC Field Staff), Julian Bond (SNCC Communications Director), William J. Barber (President NC-NAACP) 100 min. DVD X5468

Volume 2, Early Student Movement Philosophy and Activism
While deep dissatisfaction was a major factor mobilizing the young people who would engage in direct action protests, often the first steps into activism led to a greater-than-anticipated commitment. Adult mentoring played a large role; adults who had long been struggling for change supported young activists and helped expand their view of the world. Speakers: Muriel Tillinghast (SNCC Field Secretary), David Dennis (Congress of Racial Equality aka CORE), Joan T. Mulholland (student, Tougaloo College), Johnny Parham (Atlanta Student Movement) 53 min. DVD X5469

Volume 3, From Student Activists to Field Organizers
The most remarkable aspect of the civil disobedience and sit-ins of the 1960s was the leadership of young people. Importantly, young activists were challenging other young people to join them, and also challenging established civil rights organizations to speed up the pace of their efforts. Their commitment and energy led to the grassroots organizing work that defined the freedom movement of the 1960s. In this session, panelists discuss their deepening involvement with the Southern Movement as grassroots community organizers. Harry Belafonte makes an unscheduled appearance in the session. Speakers: Charlie Cobb (SNCC Field Secretary), Jean Wheeler Young (SNCC Field Secretary), Chuck McDew (SNCC Chairman), Dorie Ladner (SNCC Field Secretary), Wendell Paris (SNCC Field Secretary), Wazir "Willie" Peacock (SNCC Field Secretary) 68 min. DVD X5470

Volume 4, SNCC Builds an Organization
This session presents a behind-the-scenes look at the people and elements that kept SNCC running as an organization. The panelists, former SNCC staffers (many of whom also worked "in the field" as well), represent some of the glue that held SNCC together as an organization. Their work was vital in addressing communications to transportation and the provision of other resources for SNCC members. Speakers: Karen Spellman (SNCC Research Department), Judy Richardson (SNCC Field Secretary), Betty Garman Robinson (SNCC Atlanta Headquarters), Margaret Lauren Herring (SNCC Atlanta Headquarters), Tamio Wakayama (SNCC Photographer), Freddie Greene Biddle (SNCC Field Secretary) 77 min. DVD X5471

Volume 5, The Raleigh Civil Rights Movement.
Just 12 days after the Greensboro, North Carolina sit-in of February 1, 1960, students attending Shaw University and Saint Augustine College in Raleigh, North Carolina began sitting in at lunch counters. This panel of local leaders provides a close-up look at the sit-in movement in the city of SNCC's birthplace, and the segregation existing there in the 1940s and 50s. Speakers: Cash Michaels (Editor, The Carolinian), McLouis Clayton (Professor, Shaw University), George C. Debnam (Board of Trustees Shaw University). 78 min. DVD X5472

Volume 6, Luncheon Keynote: Rev. James Lawson, "We Have Not Yet Arrived"
At SNCC's founding conference in 1960 it was Rev. James Lawson who captured the political imagination of the students. In this address Lawson outlines his belief in the continuing value and necessity of non-violent struggle for social change and justice. "The power and energy of the 1960s movement is needed for the 21st century." 41 min. DVD X5473

Volume 7, The Societal Response to SNCC
This panel and audience discussion considers the complex response to SNCC by the general public and specific sections of society. SNCC's work inspired many students, and the organization found considerable support in groups like the National Student Association and the Students for a Democratic Society. Within this discussion, a larger question is also raised and considered: What should we do today? Speakers: Larry Rubin (SNCC Field Secretary), John Doar (Former Head, Justice Department - Civil Rights Division), Timothy Jenkins (SNCC Executive Committee Member), Peniel Joseph (Professor, Tufts University), Dorothy M. Zellner (SNCC Atlanta Headquarters) 82 min. DVD X5474

Volume 8, Up South: "We Raised Money, We Raised Hell"
This panel explores the evolution of SNCC organizing that took place above the Mason-Dixon line. Panelists discuss how support groups originally formed to provide money and other assistance for the Southern movement found themselves increasingly involved in local protests and political struggles. Speakers: Mike Miller (Bay Area Friends of SNCC), William Strickland (Northern Student Movement), Fannie Rushing (Chicago Friends of SNCC), Betita (Liz) Sutherland Martinez (New York Friends of SNCC), D'Army Bailey (Student Activist, Louisiana Sit-In Movement), Julie Poussaint (New York Friends of SNCC). 81 min. DVD X5475

Volume 9, More Than a Hamburger
This panel explores the evolution of SNCC organizing that took place above the Mason-Dixon line. Panelists discuss how support groups originally formed to provide money and other assistance for the Southern movement found themselves increasingly involved in local protests and political struggles. Speakers: Courtland Cox (SNCC Program Secretary), Gwen Patton (SNCC Field Secretary), Frank Smith (SNCC Field Secretary), Ed Brown (SNCC Field Secretary), Leah Wise (SNCC Volunteer), Kathleen Cleaver (SNCC Campus Travel Program Secretary and Black Panther Party), Professor Doris Dozier Crenshaw (SNCC SCLC Alabama) 89 min. DVD X5476

Volume 10, Moving on Mississippi: "We Had to be Strong"
Not unexpectedly, some of the Southern Movement's most vivid stories are found in Mississippi. Panelist Lawrence Guyot, former Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), insists that Mississippi is the state that "made the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee." This panel features the first-personal accounts of some of the Movement's most unsung heroes and heroines. The significance and impact of the MFDP forms an important part of the discussion. Speakers: Owen Brooks (Delta Ministry Mississippi), Brenda Travis (Pike County Non-Violent Movement), Hollis Watkins (SNCC Field Secretary), Lawrence Guyot (Chair, MFDP), Willie Blue (SNCC Field Secretary), Michael Sistrom (Historian). 80 min. DVD X5477

Volume 11, Alabama: "Turning to Ourselves"
Lowndes County, Alabama, where SNCC consciously organized an independent Black political party in 1966, played an especially important role in for empowerment of Black citizens and the development of the organization. SNCC's success in Lowndes County --one of its least known achievements -- is discussed. Speakers: Ruby Sales (SNCC Field Secretary), Gloria House (SNCC Field Secretary), Willie Ricks (SNCC Field Secretary), Annie Pearl Avery (SNCC Field Secretary), Hasan Kwame Jeffries (Professor, The Ohio State University) 86 min. DVD X5478

Volume 12, Southwest Georgia: "Do You Want to Be Free"
This panel discusses the Southwest Georgia Project, one of SNCC's earliest and most significant campaigns. Project Director, Charles Sherrod gives a vivid description of dealing with fear in rural terrain that was as vicious and violent as any place in Mississippi. This session concludes an appearance by Shirley Sherrod who recounts her recent victorious effort to win compensation for black farmers long discriminated against by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Speakers: SNCC Field Secretaries: Donald Harris, Penny Patch, Rutha Harris, Sam Mahone, John Perdew ; SNCC Project Director Charles Sherrod. 76 min. DVD X5479

Volume 13, Arkansas, Cambridge, MD, Danville, VA: "Everybody Say Freedom"
Panelists reflect on the events in Danville -- the "Last Capital of the Confederacy" -- where SNCC engaged in dramatic protest against segregation and experimented with economic challenge. The panel discusses the significant and unique struggle in Cambridge, Maryland where the protests were led by an older woman from a prominent family. In addition to fighting to end segregation, Cambridge's agenda included health care, housing and work-force issues. Arkansas may have been the only place in the South where SNCC was invited in by a semi-official organization. Speakers: Avon Rollins (SNCC Field Secretary), Bill Hanson (SNCC Project Director Arkansas), Ivanhoe Donaldson (SNCC Field Secretary), Matthew Jones (SNCC Staff/Freedom Singer). 83 min. DVD X5480

Volume 14, The Impact and Influence of SNCC on American Society, 1960 to 1968.
Panelists present insights on SNCC drawn from their years of careful study of the Southern Freedom Movement. Clayborne Carson, author of "In Struggle: SNCC and the Awakening of Black America," describes the outbreak of sit-ins as the "beginning of a new period of struggle." Charles Payne, (whose book, "I've Got the Light of Freedom" is a definitive work on Mississippi's freedom struggle), says "SNCC convinced people they could step into roles they had never played before." SNCC's national impact was great, the panel agrees, but author Taylor Branch wonders why the organization's importance remains so little-recognized. Speakers: Vincent Harding (SNCC and SCLC Advisor), Charles Payne (Professor, University of Chicago), Taylor Branch (Author), Clayborne Carson (Professor, Stanford University), Tom Hayden (Students for a Democratic Society). 116 min. DVD X5481

Volume 15, What Was SNCC? How Did It Evolve Over the Years? Why Did It Cease to Exist? Imprint [San
This panel probes the complex evolution of SNCC: the radicalizing effect of its style of grassroots organizing, its disillusionment with establishment politics, the attacks on SNCC by former liberal allies and more conservative black civil rights organizations, and the government's COINTELPRO assault. SNCC's own political naivet is also discussed. Panelists include SNCC veterans from different eras in the organization's history. Speakers: Joyce Ladner (Tougaloo College Activist), Timothy Jenkins (SNCC Executive Committee Member), Cleveland Sellers (SNCC Program Secretary), Zohorah Simmons (SNCC Field Secretary). 102 min. DVD X5482

Volume 16, What Was SNCC? How Did It Evolve Over the Years? Why Did It Cease to Exist?
SNCC's impact on elections across the nation is still little known, but the changes unfolding in the South helped accelerate an emerging black electoral surge in America. Ivanhoe Donaldson explains how Julian Bond's successful campaign for a seat in the Georgia state legislature resulted in a call for assistance from Richard Hatcher who would win his campaign to become Mayor of Gary, Indiana. Courtland Cox uses the "regime change" resulting from SNCC's work in Lowndes County, Alabama as a case study. Speakers: Ivanhoe Donaldson (SNCC Field Secretary), Courtland Cox (SNCC Program Secretary), Julian Bond (SNCC Communications Director). 95 min. DVD X5483

Volume 17, Luncheon Keynote: Harry Belafonte, "Why Can't Our Children Find Us?"
Harry Belafonte challenges SNCC members to resist sinking into sentimentalism but instead ask "What can we do with our lives using that same kind of commitment and determination to continue the important work of transforming the United States into a 'more perfect' union?" Belafonte holds up his new organization, the Gathering for Justice, which consists of an intergenerational group of activists, as a model. He implores SNCC Veterans to join the organization and ask themselves "Where are we, who are we talking to, and what are we talking about?" 65 min. DVD X5484

Volume 18, Ella Baker's Roots: "Give People Light and They Will Find a Way"
This panel examines the legacy of Ella Baker, the inspiration behind the original SNNC founding conference. Rev. William Barber, discusses his campaign to formalize Ella Baker's legacy in North Carolina by commemorating her birthday as "Ella Baker Day," and declaring her home in Littleton, North Carolina a historic site. The session closes with a powerful rendition of Ella Baker's favorite song, "Guide my feet while I run this race" performed by Bernice Johnson Reagon of Sweet Honey in the Rock. Speakers: Rev. William Barber (Chair, North Carolina NAACP), Timothy Tyson (Author), Carolyn Brockington (Ella Baker's grandniece) 81 min. DVD X5485

Volume 19, Depictions of the Movement in Popular Culture
Over the years, the popular media has had a troubled relationship with organizations like SNCC. Hollywood film director Phil Alden Robinson maintains that a big challenge to producing freedom movement films for theatrical distribution is the assumption that the films won't sell overseas. The entertainment values that drive the news limit the depiction of day-to-day grassroots organizing to dramatic protests. However, "media" is no longer defined as exclusively Hollywood, network television or mainstream print media. "Young people especially", says photographer Maria Varela, "are not just cultural consumers but culture-makers." Speakers: Jennifer Lawson Gittens (Activist), Judy Richardson (SNCC National Office Atlanta), Danny Lyon (SNCC Staff Photographer), Charlie Cobb (SNCC Field Secretary), Chuck Neblett (SNCC Freedom Singer), Maria Varela (SNCC Field Secretary), Phil Alden Robinson (Film Director) 95 min. DVD X5486

Volume 20, Black Power, Black Education and Pan Africanism.
Throughout the ten years of its formal organizational existence, SNCC did a variety of things it felt necessary: sit-ins, freedom rides, campaigns aimed at the desegregation of public facilities, voter registration drives and the organizing of political parties. Doing what is necessary is a tradition of Black struggle. Pan Africanism, independent Black education and empowerment are all foundations of the Black struggle. In this context of deep political and cultural currents, we look at SNCC in relation to the political struggles of the 1960s. In addition, we look at the institutions beyond U.S. borders which SNCC's ideas helped inform. Speakers: Courtland Cox (SNCC Program Director), Geri Augusto (Secretariat, 6th Pan African Congress), Gregory Carr (Professor, Howard University), Sylvia Hill (6th Pan African Congress), Howard Moore (SNCC Attorney). 89 min. DVD X5487

Volume 21, Black Power, Black Education and Pan Africanism.
This session looks at what made SNCC "radical" by focusing on the people who worked with SNCC. The session also addresses the emergence of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Although 96 percent of its members were denied the right to vote, the MFDP transformed not only Mississippi politics, but the rules of the national Democratic Party. "It is the greatest example of small-democracy that we have," says Professor Wesley Hogan. Former MFDP Chairman, Lawrence Guyot, gives a detailed presentation of the MFDP and its challenges in 1964 and 1965. MFDP Attorney Armand Derfner describes the Party's continuing impact, focusing on the Voting Rights Act. Former SNCC Field Secretary, MacArthur Cotton, describes the step-by-step process involved in organizing the MFDP. Speakers: Lawrence Guyot (Chair MFDP), Michael Thelwell (Director, Washington Office MFDP), Armand Derfner (MFDP Attorney), Wesley Hogan (Professor, Virginia State University), MacArthur Cotton (SNCC Field Secretary) 96 min. DVD X5488

Volume 22, Women Leaders and Organizers: "You Can Do This"
This panel looks critically at the challenges that women overcame to perform a range of work done for SNCC. Women stepped forward as never before in the ranks of civil rights organizations. "You went ahead and learned how to do it and did it," says one panelist. Ruby Doris Smith Robinson, the woman who actually ran SNCC is discussed; also the "profound" influence of Ella Baker. Speakers: Frances Beal (SNCC Black Women's Liberation Committee), Mary King (SNCC Atlanta National Headquarters), Cynthia Fleming (Professor, University of Tennessee), Doris Derby (Free Southern Theater), Maria Varela (SNCC Field Secretary), Martha Prescod Norman Noonan (SNCC Field Secretary) 96 min. DVD X5489

Volume 23, The Black Church and Black Struggle
The Black church was born in struggle in the midst of slavery, and despite laws and vigilante actions targeting it for destruction the church has not only survived, but has played a sustained and central role over more than 300 years of Black struggle in America. This panel of Black churchmen, with very active audience participation, reflects and examines the historical role of the church, its specific role in the Movement of the 1960s, and the lessons of that struggle for today. Speakers: Rev. Bernard Lafayette (SNCC Field Secretary), Rev. Nelson Johnson (Student Organization for Black Unity), Rev. David Forbes (Raleigh Student Movement) 90 min. DVD X5490

Volume 24, Highlander, SSOC and Organizing in the White Community: "We Knew That We Were Not Free."
Though Black-led and powered by the energy of the Black population, Whites have always been part of the Southern Freedom Movement. Indeed, as all the panelists note, in its largest sense the southern struggle was not just for Black-only freedom. Three "White" organizations were of particular importance to SNCC: The Highlander Center founded in the 1930s to begin addressing the needs of poor Appalachian Whites embraced the civil rights struggle providing one of the few southern sites for integrated discussion and planning; the Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) which reflected a White southern radical organizing tradition and was one of SNCC's earliest supporters; and finally, the Southern Student Organizing Committee (SSOC), young White southerners who took seriously SNCC's call for Whites to organize White communities. The panel discusses the work of all these organizations as well as the remarkable success of the Washington, DC-based Jews for Urban Justice organization which also developed in response to SNCC's work. Speakers: Bob Zellner (SNCC Field Secretary), Sue Thrasher (Southern Students Organizing Committee), Sharlene Kranz (SNCC Staff), Margaret Lauren Herring (COFO Worker), Candie Carawan (Highlander Center), Ed Hamlett (White Southern Students Project) 97 min. DVD X5491

Volume 25, SNCC and the Black Arts Movement: "We Had to Change the Conversation"
John O'Neal, one of the founders of the Free Southern Theater, and Jamila Jones, a founder of the Harambee Singers, were directly involved with the Southern Movement and describe where artistic effort fit into that political struggle. Northern poets Amiri Baraka and Haki Madhubuti, describe the intersection and interaction between the southern struggle, its activists, and the nationwide Black arts movement in which they were key actors. The session examines the continuing engagement with the power of word and song. Speakers: Moderator, A.B. Spellman (Poet, Author), Amiri Baraka (Poet, Playwright), Haki Madhubuti (Poet, Founder, Third World Press), Jamila Jones (Harambee Singers), John O'Neal (Free Southern Theater) 89 min. DVD X5492

Volume 26, Plenary: Joyce Ladner
Joyce Ladner is introduced by her sister Dorie Ladner. Both were deeply involved with SNCC in Mississippi. Joyce and Dorie's parents were like many African American parents in that they understood how to survive under Jim Crow and constantly worried about the welfare of their children. Nevertheless, the Ladners taught their children not to accept insult and, in their own way, acted as a supportive rearguard. NAACP Mississippi Field Secretary Medgar Evers was a profound influence on both Ladner sisters. Joyce Ladner traces her roots in the tiny Black community of Palmers Crossing to civil rights activism. Speakers: Joyce Ladner (Tougaloo College Activist) 61 min. DVD X5493

Volume 27, SNCC Children Speak
Children of SNCC veterans present their memories of SNCC and the lessons they learned from a young age. Speakers: Maisha Moses (Daughter of Bob and Janet Moses), James Forman, Jr. (Son of James Forman), Tarik Smith (Son of Frank and Jean Smith Young), Sabina Zuniga Varela, Zora Cobb (Daughter of Charlie Cobb), Hollis Watkins, Jr. 71 min. DVD X5494

Volume 28, Luncheon Keynote: Congressman John Lewis, "Stand Up and Make Some Noise"
John Lewis, Chair of SNCC from 1963 to 1966, has been a member of Congress for 24 years. Jailed 40 times and badly beaten several times during civil rights protests, Lewis became deeply involved with the sit-in movement. "We did what young people do so well," says Lewis. "We got in the way." His address is filled with reminiscence, acknowledging old friends in SNCC and invoking the Movement martyrs. His years in Congress and the election of Barack Obama, says Lewis, does not negate the need to continue the struggle. "You're not too old to fight, to push. It's in your blood, in your DNA. Stand up and make some noise." 53 min. DVD X5495

Volume 29, Luncheon Keynote: U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, "The Nation's in Your Debt"
According to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, the first Black Attorney General of the United States, There is a "direct line" from the 1960 lunch counter sit-in that took place in Greensboro, North Carolina to the election of President Barack Obama in 2008. Both Holder and Mr. Obama are "beneficiaries" of SNCC's work. The Attorney General acknowledges that the United States still suffers from racial inequality in everything from unemployment rates to the length of prison terms. "There is still work to be done." 28 min. DVD X5496

Volume 30, The Young People's Project: "Come Let Us Build a New World"
In 1988 Bob Moses founded the Algebra Project, with a mission to spread math literacy and encourage teenagers to organize and make demands on their school system. In turn, an outgrowth of the Algebra Project is the Young People's Project (YPP) where young people organize their peers. In this session YPP members explain and demonstrate how their work is structured around simple tools for building relationships. Young "math literacy workers" and organizers divide the meeting attendees into small groups or "Neighbors Circles." They are encouraged to share their experiences and discover each other's areas of interest. Speakers: Omo Moses (Young People's Project), Albert Sykes (Young People's Project), Various Young People's Project Activists. 87 min. DVD X5497

Volume 31, The Cradle to Prison Pipeline
One third of the prison population is Black; one sixth is Latino. Seven million children have a parent in prison. Fourth grade reading scores are being used to project prison needs in some states. Every day 192 children are arrested for violent crimes; 393 are arrested daily on drug charges. This panel traces the path to prison that many minority children begin traveling in early childhood. Carmen Perez, now involved with The Gathering for Justice organized by Harry Belafonte, vividly portrays the gang world that surrounded her childhood in a community outside of Los Angeles, saying how "lucky" she was to have someone "invest" in her. The panelists discuss inspiration from SNCC in their efforts to tackle the issues confronting them today. Speakers: Benetta Standly (ACLU Florida), Crystal Mattison (Children's Defense Fund Freedom School Program), Carmen Perez (The Gathering for Justice), Carrie Richburg (Pen or Pencil) 91 min. DVD X5498

Volume 32, Actions for a New World.
Members of this panel insist that SNCC continues to influence their work. "We know that not only policy must be changed," says Jonathan Lewis of the Gathering for Justice, "but the attitudes that support our work." Another panelist, Djuan Coleon of the National Alliance of Faith and Justice says 17 states are following SNCC's footsteps and trying to take grassroots organization into education. "SNCC", says Ace Washington of the Baltimore Algebra Project is, "Something I want to go on." Speakers: Ash-Lee W. Henderson (Student Activist), Jonathan Lewis (The Gathering for Justice), Djuan Coleon (National Alliance of Faith and Justice), Ace Washington (Baltimore Algebra Project), Marilyn Shaw (Baltimore Algebra Project). 159 min. DVD X5499

Volume 33, Special Program: Dick Gregory, "They're Asking Different Questions Today"
"When you finally get a Black President you get a nice, polite, well-behaved educated one who ain't mad." Gregory was one of a handful of prominent entertainers who consistently supported SNCC. And he was one of the very few of this handful who regularly put his own life on the line. As he explains it: "I made all the money I needed to make, then I bumped into y'all and found out that there's another bank." Dick Gregory acknowledges recent progress in modern politics while addressing continuing problems . 67 min. DVD X5500

Volume 34, Plenary: In Remembrance of Ella Baker, Howard Zinn, and James Forman
SNCC and the Southern Movement have lost a lot of important people over the years both from political assassinations and natural causes. Charles Sherrod's moving version of "One more time" incorporates the names and photos of heroes in a moving tribute to their work. Ella Baker's grandniece, Dr. Carolyn Brockington, discusses her "Aunt Ella." Constancia "Dinky" Romilly tells of the COINTELPRO poisoning of her husband, SNCC Executive Director, James Forman, and how he "healed himself." Historian Vincent Harding honors Howard Zinn who lost his job for pushing his students to challenge injustice and racism in society. Harding reluctantly accepted Zinn's faculty position. Speakers: Carolyn Brockington, Constancia "Dinky" Romilly, Vincent Harding. 70 min. DVD X5501

Volume 35, Dinner Keynote: Danny Glover, "The Real Costs Lie Ahead"
As a college student at San Francisco State in 1968 Glover recounts that "SNCC articulated my own rebelliousness." He recalls the campus struggle for an ethnic studies department and explains that SNCC "taught us organizing." Glover elaborates on what he considers to be the new era of struggle in the 21st century. "We are world citizens today", says Glover, "and 2.5 billion people in this world are living on less than one dollar a day." Climate change, immigration, global rights for workers, are complex challenges. With the United States so dominant, African Americans--"the moral center of this country"-- have to find ways to be active in these struggles. 75 min. DVD X5502

Volume 36, Freedom Concert.
This session is full of the sound and power of movement song. Bernice Johnson Reagon explains the origin of the SNCC Freedom Singers. She introduces a brief video of Cordell Reagon who organized the singers with Charles Sherrod. Many well known activists participate in the session including Guy Carawan who introduced "We Shall Overcome" to SNCC in 1960. Folk singer Len Chandler, a regular presence at protests and rallies, explains singing freedom songs: "When you hear something twice, sing it!" Harry Belafonte leads the audience in his famous Banana Boat Song. SNCC's own anthem, "We'll Never Turn Back," written by Georgia activist Bertha Gober, closes out the gathering. 108 min. DVD X5503

Volume 37, Plenary: Bob Moses, "We the People."
In 1960 as director of the SNCC's Mississippi Project, Bob Moses traveled to the South to try to register black voters. In 1982 he received a MacArthur Fellowship, and used the money to create the Algebra Project, a foundation devoted to improving minority education in math. "Lack of education" says Moses, was the "subtext" of the voting rights struggle. "We won the right to vote; the fight for public accommodations, but not education. And in that way, though Blacks are citizens, they are second class citizens." The current fight, Moses explains, is for quality public education as a constitutional right. He introduces Albert Sykes who began working with Moses in Jackson, Mississippi more than a decade ago. Featured speaker: Bob Moses ; introduction, David Dennis. 57 min. DVD X5504

Volume 38, Closing Program: Bernice Johnson Reagon, "Solidarity of Past, Present and Future"
"What you hear in Bernice's songs is the essence of struggle," says Judy Richardson introducing Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon. And Reagon declares that "I am standing on ground plowed by people before I came into being." She describes her deep involvement with the freedom struggle in Albany, Georgia. A noted scholar of Black music, she says that the spirituals, often thought of as old people's music, "leaped into service in jail cells in the 1960s." The cultural history of Black people has always reflected what Black people expect from life on earth. Her presentation in song and spoken word outlines the history expressed by Black spiritual music and how it connects to contemporary struggle. "You will not be able to get through your life if you dismiss the ground you're standing on." 79 min. DVD X5505

Soundtrack for a Revolution
Tells the story of the American civil rights movement through its music, the freedom songs protesters sang on picket lines, in mass meetings, and in jail cells as they fought for justice and equality. Includes new performances of the freedom songs by top artists, archival footage, and interviews with civil rights foot soldiers and leaders. Freedom songs evolved from slave chants, from the labor movement, and even from the black church; music crucial in helping the protesters to face down brutal aggression with dignity and non-violence. Performers: Anthony Hamilton and the Blind Boys of Alabama, Angie Stone, Joss Stone, Mary Mary, the Carlton Reese Memorial Unity Choir, Wyclef Jean, Richie Havens, The Roots, John Legend. Directed by Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman. 2009. 82 min. DVD X6094

The Strange Demise of Jim Crow: How Houston Desegregated Its Public Accomodations,
Told by the participants themselves, this documentary reveals the behind-the-scenes compromises, negotiations, and the controversial news black-outs which helped bring about the quiet 1960 desegregation of Houston's hotels, restaurants, lunch counters, and theaters. 1997. 57 min. Video/C 6454

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Strange Fruit
A documentary exploring the history and legacy of the anti-lynching protest song made famous by Billie Holiday. The film examines the history of lynching, the courage of those who fought for racial justice, and the interplay of race, labor and the left and popular culture as forces that would give rise to the Civil Rights Movement. It also presents the story of the composer Lewis Allan, a Jewish schoolteacher and union activist from the Bronx who wrote the poem and later set it to music. c2002. 58 min. Video/C 8924

Awards ALA Video Round Table Notable Video for Adults

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[Till, Emmett] The Murder of Emmett Till
The shameful, sAs a college student at San Francisco State in 1968 Glover recounts that "SNCC articulated my own rebelliousness." He recalls the campus struggle for an ethnic studies department and explains that SNCC "taught us organizing." Glover elaborates on what he considers to be the new era of struggle in the 21st century. "We are world citizens today", says Glover, "and 2.5 billion people in this world are living on less than one dollar a day." Climate change, immigration, global rights for workers, are complex challenges. With the United States so dominant, African Americans--"the moral center of this country"-- have to find ways to be active in these struggles.adistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began. Produced and directed by Stanley Nelson. Dist.: PBS. 2003. 60 min. DVD 9526; vhs Video/C 9440

ALA Video Round Table Notable Video for Adults

Ralph Jr., James R. "The Murder of Emmett Till." Journal of American History, Dec2003, Vol. 90 Issue 3, p1137-1138, 2p UC users only
Segall, Rebecca; Holmberg, David. "Who Killed Emmett Till?" Nation; 2/3/2003, Vol. 276 Issue 4, p37-40, 4p UC users only
Wagner, Terry. "America's Civil Rights Revolution: Three Documentaries about Emmett Till's Murder in Mississippi (1955)." Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television; Jun2010, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p187-201, 15p UC users only

[Till, Emmett] The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till
This film that helped reopen one of history's most notorious cold case civil rights murders, is the result of the director's 10-year journey to uncover the truth. In August, 1955, Mamie Till-Mobley of Chicago sent her only child, Emmett Louis Till, to visit relatives in the Mississippi Delta. Little did she know that only 8 days later, Emmett would be abducted from his Great-Uncle's home, brutally beaten and murdered for one of the oldest Southern taboos : whistling at a white woman in public. It was Beauchamp's nine years of investigation, summarized in the film, that was primarily responsible for the reopening of the case by the Justice Department. 2005. 70 min. DVD 5182

Awards
National Board of Review, USA - Freedom of Expression Award

Campbell, Christopher. "The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till (2005): A Film by Keith Beauchamp." Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 172-174, Summer 2008 UC users only
Segall, Rebecca; Holmberg, David. "Who Killed Emmett Till?" Nation; 2/3/2003, Vol. 276 Issue 4, p37-40, 4p UC users only
Wagner, Terry. "America's Civil Rights Revolution: Three Documentaries about Emmett Till's Murder in Mississippi (1955)." Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television; Jun2010, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p187-201, 15p UC users only

A Time for Burning
Originally produced in 1967, this classic cinema verite fim captures the awakening of the civil rights movement as it challenged the nation to change its ways. Originally rejected by three major networks for being too converversial, the film captures the struggles of the pastor of an all-white Lutheran church in Omaha, Nebraska as tries to get his congregation to reach out to their fellow black Lutherans, only to find a wall of resistance among his church. Conceived, directed and edited by Bill Jersey & Barbara Connell. Originally released as a documentary film in 1967. 58 min. DVD 4898

A Time for Justice: America's Civil Rights Movement
Uses first-hand testimony of participants and archival footage to present a compelling look at the battle for civil rights in the South, recalling the crises in Montgomery, Little Rock, Birmingham, and Selma. It depicts the struggle through the experiences of its "foot soldiers," who rode where they weren't supposed to ride, walked where they were forbidden to walk and sat where they weren't supposed to sit and stood their ground until they won their freedom. Dist.: Direct Cinema. 1992. 38 min. Video/C 8987

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till
This film that helped reopen one of history's most notorious cold case civil rights murders, is the result of the director's 10-year journey to uncover the truth. In August, 1955, Mamie Till-Mobley of Chicago sent her only child, Emmett Louis Till, to visit relatives in the Mississippi Delta. Little did she know that only 8 days later, Emmett would be abducted from his Great-Uncle's home, brutally beaten and murdered for one of the oldest Southern taboos : whistling at a white woman in public. It was Beauchamp's nine years of investigation, summarized in the film, that was primarily responsible for the reopening of the case by the Justice Department. 2005. 70 min. DVD 5182

Awards
National Board of Review, USA - Freedom of Expression Award

The Murder of Emmett Till DVD 9526

Campbell, Christopher. "The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till (2005): A Film by Keith Beauchamp." Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 172-174, Summer 2008 UC users only
Segall, Rebecca; Holmberg, David. "Who Killed Emmett Till?" Nation; 2/3/2003, Vol. 276 Issue 4, p37-40, 4p UC users only
Wagner, Terry. "America's Civil Rights Revolution: Three Documentaries about Emmett Till's Murder in Mississippi (1955)." Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television; Jun2010, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p187-201, 15p UC users only

Voices of the Civil Rights(History Channel: The Sixties)
From the fearless resolve of a single woman to the remarkable voice of thousands marching, this History Channel special offers an overview of one of America's great defining periods. A compilation of materials on the civil rights movement, from personal narratives of life in the period, to insights into the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission, to the 1965 march on Montgomery, along with biographies of two of the leaders of the movement. Contents: Disc 7. Voices of civil rights (44 min., c2005) ; Mississippi State secrets (44 min., c2001) ; Crossing the bridge (44 min., c2001) -- Disc 8. Martin Luther King, Jr. : the man and the dream (59 min., c1997) ; Thurgood Marshall : justice for all (44 min., c1997). Originally broadcast on The History Channel and other television channels, including Save our history, History undercover, History uncovered, Reputations (BBC), and Biography (A&E). 243 min. DVD X745

Voices of the Civil Rights Movement: Black American Freedom Songs, 1960-1966. [Sound recording]
Contents: Freedom medley: Freedom chant ; Oh freedom ; Thislittle light of mine -- This little light of mine --If you miss me from the back of the bus -- Lord, holdmy hand while I run this race -- Get on board,children -- Calypso freedom -- Freedom now chant -- Ohfreedom -- Ain' scared of nobody -- Leaning on the everlasting arms -- Sermon / Rev. LawrenceCampbell -- We are soldiers in the army -- Go tell iton the mountain -- Wade in the water -- Come bah yah --Walk with me, Lord -- Jesus on the mainline, tell himwhat you want -- Freedom train -- Don't you think it'sabout time that we all be free -- We're marching on tofreedom land -- We shall overcome -- We'll never turnback -- We shall not be moved -- Certainly, Lord --Get your rights, Jack -- Which side are you on -- Wokeup this morning with my mind on freedom -- Been in thestorm so long -- Dog, dog -- The A & P song -- OhPritchett, oh Kelly -- I told Jesus -- 99 1/2 won't do-- I'm on my way -- City called heaven -- In theMississippi River -- Ain' gonna let nobody turn me 'round -- Will the circle be unbroken --Governor Wallace -- Ballad of Medgar Evers -- UncleTom's prayer -- Oginga odinga -- We shall overcome. Sound/D 119 (also in Music Library MUSI CD11872)
[Wallace, George] George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire.
Four times governor of Alabama, four times a candidate for president, George Wallace was a fierce defender of Southern pride. This film through extensive archive footage and interviews presents the life of a man central to the civil rights years in the South, a lightening rod for controversy, a liberal judge who betrayed his principles for power, a politician who harnessed the anger lurking beneath American society to create a lasting conservative movement and a man ultimately reborn through suffering. 2000. 269 min. Video/C 7056

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table: Notable Videos for Adults

We Shall Overcome
Traces the transformation of the title song from an old slave spiritual to the anthem of the civil rights movement, while chronicling its effect on human rights movements in the United States and in other parts of the world, using historical footage and personal recollections. Narrator: Harry Belafonte. Performers: Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, Taj Mahal, Peter, Paul & Mary, the SNCC Freedom Singers, Guy Carawan, Julian Bond, Andrew Young, Desmond Tutu. 1989. 58 min. Video/C 6400

Description from California Newsreel catalog

We'll Never Turn Back.
Includes segments on Julian Bond, Bob Moses, Fannie Lou Hamer and other civil rights leaders. Interviews black farmers and share croppers about their experiences trying to register to vote. A film by Harvey Richards. Dist.: Estuary Press. 1963. 33 min. DVD 4225; also VHS Video/C 2792

Richards, Paul. ""Harvey Richards/Civil Rights Movement." Syndic Liteary Journal, no. 5

[Williams, Mabel] Self Respect, Self Defense and Self Determination
Introduction: Angela Davis ; moderator, Rachel Herzing ; speakers, Mabel Williams, Kathleen Cleaver. Mabel Williams and Kathleen Cleaver, two women of the 60s Black liberation struggle share their personal experiences -- resisting the KKK and police repression, forced exile and their international experiences in Third World nations -- and how their their story relates to the struggle today. Recorded in Oakland, California on March 14, 2004. Program presented by Freedom Archives, East Side Arts Alliance, Malcolm X Grassroots Movement. 72 min. Dist.: Freedom Archives 72 min. Video/C MM291
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[Williams, Rob] Negroes with Guns: Rob Williams and Black Power.
Forefather of the Black Power movement and pioneer in internationalizing the Black American struggle, tells the story of Robert F. Williams, a Civil Rights fighter who dared to advocate armed self-defense against the racist terrorism of the Jim Crow South. Directors, Sandra Dickson, Churchill Roberts. 2005. 53 min. DVD 4469

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[Williams, Juan]Interview with Juan Williams.
Juan Williams, author of the book and TV series, Eyes on the Prize, speaks at UC Santa Cruz about the civil rights movement in the 1990's. Video/C 2230

You Got to Move!
A documentary about personal and social transformation, YOU GOT TO MOVE records the progress of individuals who, together with Tennessee's legendary Highlander Folk School, founded by Myles Horton, have worked for union, civil, environmental, and women's rights in the South. The film takes us beyond the individual issues to the very process of social change and the evolution of leadership. At a time when so many people may feel powerless, this film joyfully announces people do count, that they can make a difference. Directed and edited by Lucy Massie Phenix and Veronica Selver. 1985. 28 min. DVD X6736; Video/C 1226

The Black Panthers

UC Berkeley Library Social Activism Sound Recording: Black Panther Party

All Power to the People!: The Black Panther Party and Beyond .
This powerful documentary provides the historical context for the establishment of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense in the mid-1960's. Government documents, rare news clips, interviews with ex-activists and FBI/CIA agents define the bloody conflict between political dissent and repressive government authority in the U.S. during the period of the 60s and the 70s. Directed by Lee Lew-Lee. 1996. 115 min. DVD X3204; vhs Video/C 6523

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Aoki.
Chronicles the life of Richard Aoki, a third-generation Japanese American who became one of the founding members of the Black Panther Party. Filmed over the last five years of Richard's life, this documentary features extensive footage with Richard and exclusive interviews with his comrades, friends, and former students. A film by Ben Wang & Mike Cheng. 94 min. 2009. DVD X6738

Berkeley in the Sixties.
A film by Mark Kitechell. Contents: Pt. 1 Confronting the university: the Free Speech Movement-- pt. 2. Confronting America: the anti-war movement (32 min.) -- pt. 3. Confronting history: the counter-culture movement(45 min.). Through interviews with participants and archival footage, presents a history of Berkeley, California in the 1960s. This film is a celebration and tribute to the spirited rebellion of the students of Berkeley in the 1960s. It romanticizes the past in some ways, but the participants, many of them just as dedicated to causes as they were as youths at Berkeley offer realistic and honest remembrances from those hectic days. The film is in three distinct segments: Part I -- Confronting the University. The demonstrations began simply with students protesting the appearance of the House Un-American Activities Committee on campus to investigate communist appearances as speakers. It was the beginning of Speaker Ban. It tells of the creation of the student activist group known as SLATE, and the increasing confrontations with the University administration then led by W. Clark Kerr. 41 minutes. Part II -- Confronting America. Largely about the efforts to carry their activism beyond the campus and the narrow environment of Berkeley and Oakland. The issues of Civil Rights and Free Speech soon give way to protest against the war in a place called Vietnam. 31 minutes. Part III -- Confronting History. The emergence of the counter-culture in neighboring San Francisco, and the politicization of blacks as represented by Stokeley Carmichael and more especially the activities of Huey Newton and Bobby Seale and the Black Panthers creates a new environment for many of the people in this movement. Suddenly differences in perspective and scope of activism change. 44 minutes. Notes: Edited by Veronica Selves. Photographed by Stephen Lighthill. Narrated by Susan Griffin. Written by Griffin, Kitchell, and Stephen Most. Among those interviewed are: Frank Bardacke, Jentri Anders, John Gage, Jack Weinberg, Michael Rossman, Bobby Seale, David Hilliard, Ruth Rosen, Suzy Nelson, Barry Melton, John Searle, Mike Miller, Hardy Fry and Susan Griffin. Songs heard on the track include They All Sang Bread And Roses, Fortunate Son (Creedence Clearwater Revival), The Weight (The Band) The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (Gil Scott Heron) and The Jefferson Airplane's Embryonic Journey. 1990. 117 min. DVD 1460; vhs Video/C 1761
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Black August 2000[Sound Recording]
A live program celebrating the history of the black power movement in the United States with particular emphasis on the Black Panther Party through "historical voices and culture," speeches and song. Featuring George Jackson, Georgia Jackson, Ruchell Magee, Hugo Pinell, Spearhead with Michael Franti, Babatunde Lea, E. W. Wainwright and the African Roots of Jazz, Rosemari Mealy, Kiilu Nyasha, Kumasi, Curly Estremera, Yuri Kochiyama, Devorah Major, Ida McRay, the San Quentin Six, Pierre Labossiere, Naru. Held at the Alice Arts Center, Oakland, California in August, 2001. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 180 min. Sound/C 1503

Black Panther.
Interviews with founding members of the Black Panther Party and documentary footage of the organization's meetings and marches. (NOTE: this is basically the same film as Off the Pig [Video/C 5852]) 15 min. DVD 3044; also VHS Video/C 4131

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Video clip of Huey Newton interview in the Alameda County jail (also includes clip of Eldridge Cleaver) [From the video Black Panther. Permission to digitize courtesy of California Newsreel]

Video clip of Free Huey rally, Alameda County jail [From the video Black Panther. Permission to digitize courtesy of California Newsreel]

Black Panther Miscellany
Four archival films from the late 1960s presenting the political leaders and activities of the Black Panther Party.Contents: l. Angela Davis prison interview (Container title: Angela Davis in Prison) (col., 17 min.) -- 2. Bobby Seale in prison (b&w, 15 min.) -- 3. Columbia University, 1970 (Container title: Jean Genet and Black Panthers) (col., 12 min.) -- 4. Alameda County, California (Container title: Black Panthers in Alameda County ) (b&w, 8 min.). [c2001?] 53 min. Video/C 8159

Black Panther Recordings from the Pacifica Foundation Archives
Online audiorecordings of Black Panther interviews, speeches, and other activities 1969-1990. See Separate listing and information regarding access to these recordings

Black Panthers (Le Panthers Noir; Huey!)
Huey!: Original uncut international documentary directed by French filmmaker Agnès Varda of the "Free Huey" rally held at the Oakland Auditorium on February 17th 1968. 46 min. DVD 8791; also DVD X4115; vhs Video/C 7315
Mauldin, Beth. "Searching for the Revolution in America: French Intellectuals, Black Panthers and the Spirit of May '68." Critique: Journal of Socialist Theory; 2008, Vol. 36 Issue 2, p219, 25p UC users only

The Black Panthers
This event is organized by the Graduate Assembly, University of California, Berkeley. This event took place on October 25, 1990, at Booth Auditorium, Boalt Hall, University of California, Berkeley. Speakers: Benny Stewart, Pedro Niguera. Sheba MacKeba, Baroni Stevens, Landon Williams, Bobby Seale. approx. 2 hours, 16 min. DVD X701; Video/C 2574

NOTE: first 8 minutes of this recording are very poor quality.

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Note: Some portions at beginning have poor video quality.

Black Panther Miscellany
Four archival films from the late 1960s presenting the political leaders and activities of the Black Panther Party.Contents: l. Angela Davis prison interview (Container title: Angela Davis in Prison) (col., 17 min.) -- 2. Bobby Seale in prison (b&w, 15 min.) -- 3. Columbia University, 1970 (Container title: Jean Genet and Black Panthers) (col., 12 min.) -- 4. Alameda County, California (Container title: Black Panthers in Alameda County ) (b&w, 8 min.). [c2001?] 53 min. Video/C 8159

Black Power Mixtapes
During the rise of The Black Power Movement in the 60s and 70s, Swedish Television journalists documented the unfolding cultural revolution for their audience back home. Now, after more than 30 years in storage, this never-before-seen footage spanning nearly a decade of Black Power is finally available. The tape highlights the key figures and events in the movement, as seen in a light completely different than the narrative of the American media at the time. Features: featurette; additional interviews with Angela Davis, Shirley Chisholm, and Louis Farrakhan; trailer. A film by Göran Olsson; produced by Annika Rogell. Originally filmed 1967-1975. 96 min. DVD X6940

Black Power, White Backlash, 1966.(Civil Rights Movement: Primary Sources)
When the radical wing of the civil rights movement began equating redress with rebellion rather than nonviolent protest, "Black power" became the rallying cry. In this program, filmed in 1966, Mike Wallace explores public sentiment during that turbulent period by assessing the attitudes, opinions and reactions on both sides of the color line. Interviews with major figures of the movement discussing black militancy, economic power, fair housing, nonviolence, and the tensions in Cicero, Illinois, the Selma of the North capture the fervor of 1966. Reporter: Mike Wallace. 56 min. Video/C 7367

The Century: America's Time: Unpinned
Riots and protests intensified in the U.S. as the war in Vietnam dragged on, with anti-war and civil rights activists seeking violent ways to agitate for peace and equality. This program pesents the unrelenting rage that divided the nation during those perilous years, as the Watts race riots, the assissinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy, and the Kent State killings made headline news. 45 min. Video/C 6364

[Cleaver, Eldridge] Eldridge Cleaver recorded at Syracuse. [SOUND RECORDING]
San Francisco: More, 1968.UCB Bancroft Phonotape 1525:1c-2a B; UCB Bancroft Phonodisc 423

[Cleaver, Eldridge] Soul on Wax: Eldridge Cleaver Recorded at Syracuse [SOUND RECORDING]
[Hawthorne, CA?]: More Record Company, distributed by All Platinum Record. UCB Bancroft Phonodisc 727

[Cleaver, Eldridge] Leaving Cleaver: Henry Louis Gates Remembers Eldridge Cleaver
In March 1997, social activist, former Black Panther, and author, Eldridge Cleaver sat down with Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. for a discussion of his life as a civil rights activist. It would be the last major interview Cleaver gave before his death. Includes commentary from Cleaver's former wife, Kathleen, as well as selections from 12 hours of audio tapes of a 1975 interview that Gates did with Cleaver in Paris. 1998. 60 min. DVD X115

[Cleaver, Kathleen]Kathleen Cleaver on Mumia [sound recording]
Kathleen Cleaver speaks at San Francisco State University about the case of African American journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal, convicted in 1982 of murdering a Philadelphia policeman. Abu-Jamal's Black Panther background and the political atmosphere of Philadelphia at the time stirred ardent advocates, pro and con, as the trial intersected racial politics and criminal justice. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 120 min. Sound/C 1508

[Cleaver, Kathleen]Self Respect, Self Defense and Self Determination
Introduction: Angela Davis ; moderator, Rachel Herzing ; speakers, Mabel Williams, Kathleen Cleaver. Mabel Williams and Kathleen Cleaver, two women of the 60s Black liberation struggle share their personal experiences -- resisting the KKK and police repression, forced exile and their international experiences in Third World nations -- and how their their story relates to the struggle today. Recorded in Oakland, California on March 14, 2004. Program presented by Freedom Archives, East Side Arts Alliance, Malcolm X Grassroots Movement. 72 min. Dist.: Freedom Archives 72 min. Video/C MM291
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Cointelpro 101
Cointelpro 101 exposes illegal surveillance, disruption, and outright murder committed by the US government in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s. Cointelpro refers to the official FBI COunter INTELigence PROgram carried out to surveil, imprison, and eliminate leaders of social justice movements and to disrupt, divide, and destroy the movements as well. Many of the government's crimes are still unknown. Through interviews with activists who experienced these abuses first-hand, with rare historical footage, the film provides an educational introduction to a period of intense repression and draws relevant lessons for the present and future. Interviews with: Muhammad Ahmad (Max Stanford), Bob Boyle, Kathleen Cleaver, Ward Churchill, Kathleen Cleaver, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Jose Lopez, Geronimo Ji-Jaga Pratt, Lucy Rodriguez, etc. Production team, Andres Alegria, Prentis Hemphill, Anita Johnson and Claude Marks. 2011. 56 min. DVD X5779

Communists on Campus
An American propaganda documentary created "to inform and impress on American citizens the true nature and the true magnitude of those forces that are working within our nation for its overthrow...and the destruction of our educational system." Film covers the July 1969 California Revolutionary Conference and other demonstrations, warning against the activities of Students for a Democratic Society, the Black Panthers, student protestors and Vietnam War demonstrators as they promote a "socialist/communist overthrow of the U.S. government," taking as their mentor Chairman Mao Tse-Tung. Featuring Mike Klonsky, Bernadine Dohrn, Mark Rudd, Rap Brown, Bobby Seale, David Hilliard, Herbert Aptheker, Tom Hayden, Mario Savio, Gus Hall, Bettina Aptheker, Eldridge Cleaver, Archie Brown, Jeff Jones, Marie W. Johnson, Roberta Alexander, Carol Henry, Ora Williams, Marlene Dixon, Ray "Masai" Hewitt, Don Cox, Huey P. Newton, William Kunstler, Charles Garry, Noel Ignatin, Roscoe Proctor, Kenny Horsten, Bob Avakian, Andy Stapp, Angela Davis, Donald Kalish, Sergei Pavlov. (1970s) 55 min. Video/C 6927

[Davis, Angela] Angela Davis, Ruchell Magee, San Quentin Six statement, 1972[Sound Recording]
Black Panther Party member Angela Davis talks about her acquittal. Ruchell Magee, indicted for the Marin County Courthouse shoot-out, talks about his case. Final segment is the San Quentin Six statement for defendants charged with conspiracy and murder written by Luis Talamantez. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. SOUND/C 1505

[Davis, Angela] A Conversation with Angela Davis.
Interviewed by Rev. Cecil Williams. Davis speaks in jail during her incarceration in 1970 on charges of being an accomplice to conspiracy, kidnapping, and homicide in the Black Panther seige at the Marin County Hall of Justice (August 7, 1970). DVD 7496 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 2214

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Eyes on the Prize II. A Nation of Law? 1968-1971
Out of the ashes of the urban rebellions, blacks look for new ways to take control of their communities. This program explores the political path to power for Carl Stokes, the nation's first black mayor of a major city. It also describes the founding of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, Calif., and the struggle of black and Hispanic parents in Brooklyn, N.Y., to improve their children's education through community control of the schools. 60 min. DVD 6965; vhs Video/C 1652:3

Eyes on the Prize II. part 3, Power! 1967-1968
Out of the ashes of the urban rebellions, blacks look for new ways to take control of their communities. This program explores the political path to power for Carl Stokes, the nation's first black mayor of a major city. It also describes the founding of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, Calif., and the struggle of black and Hispanic parents in Brooklyn, N.Y., to improve their children's education through community control of the schools. 60 min. DVD 6964; vhs Video/C 1652:6

FBI's War on Black America.
Looks at the FBI's Cointelpro (Counter Intelligence Program) operations. 50 min. Video/C 2964

Framing the Panthers.
Through the words of Black Panther Dhoruba Bin Wahad, and archival footage of meetings, rallies and street scenes, the story of the Black Panther's struggle to strengthen the civil rights of African Americans unfolds. Examines the FBI's treatment of the Black Panther Party. 30 min. DVD 6964; vhs Video/C 2464

[Garry, Charles] Charles Garry: Street Fighter in the Courtroom
A dynamic first-hand biography of the life's work of combative civil rights lawyer and activist, Charles Garry. Focusing on six compelling cases that brought the social and political battles of the street into the courtroom, this documentary relives the drama of the 1960s through archival footage of the events and interviews with journalists, defendants and Charles Garry himself. Contents: HUAC -- The Panthers -- Growing up -- The Chicago Conspiracy Trial -- Murder trial of Bobby Seale -- Stop the draft week -- Los Siete de la Raza. [200-?] 58 min. DVD 9959 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 7980

Ghosts of Attica
Offers the definitive account of America's most violent prison rebellion, its suppression, and the days of torture that ensued. Using newly uncovered video of the assault, interviews with eyewitnesses who've never spoken before on camera, and footage of inmates and hostages throughout their battles against the state, this film unravels one of America's deepest cover-ups, and shows how the legendary prison riot transformed the lives of its survivors. Produced and directed by Brad Lichtenstein. c2001. 89 min. DVD X3433; vhs Video/C 8490

Description from Icarus Films catalog

Christianson, Scott; Toplin, Robert Brent. "Ghosts of Attica." Journal of American History, Dec2002, Vol. 89 Issue 3, p1172-1173, 2p UC users only

Growing up in America.
Featuring: Allen Ginsberg, Jerry Rubin, Abbie Hoffman, Fred Hampton, Deborah Johnson, Fred Hampton, Jr., William Kunstler, John Sinclair, Don Cox, Timothy Leary. In 1969 Morley Markson made a film that captured the heart and soul of the 1960's and called it Breathing Together: Revolution of the Electric Family. Eighteen years later, Markson tracked down the living legends included in his film to see how their perspective of the Sixties may have changed. Asked to look at the footage of their younger selves, they reflect on how much their lives and the times have changed in 3 decades. 1988. 90 min. Video/C 4972

[Hampton, Fred] The Murder of Fred Hampton
Mike Gray started out to make a film about the Black Panther Party, but on Dec. 4, 1969, the Chicago police raided a Panther apartment and his film became a documentary about the murder of Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party. The film footage of the raid directly contradicted the State Attorney's version of the raid and so filmmakers and Panthers came together to prove that Hampton had been the designated target of the violent, punitive raid. The film's inquiry pursues official spokesmen and traps them in their attempts at covering up an orchestrated assassination. Originally produced in 1971. 88 min. DVD 7490; vhs Video/C 7577

[Jackson, George]George Jackson Funeral[Sound Recording]
The funeral service for Black Panther leader George Jackson. Includes music by Elaine Brown (off mike) with eulogies by Bobby Seale and Huey Newton. Sound/C 1511 (audiocassette recording)

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[Jackson, George]George Jackson: Last Interview
The last recorded interview with George Jackson 1n August 1971, about three weeks before his death in an attempted prison escape. In the interview he makes the statement that "nothing short of death can stop the movement." SOUND/C 1511

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[Jackson, George]George Jackson Tribute[Sound Recording]
Statements by James Baldwin, Jean Genet and Philippe Sollers about George Jackson directly after his death from gunshot wounds on August 21, 1971 as he attempted to escape from San Quentin prison. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 180 min. Sound/C 1503 30 min. Sound/C 1506

[Jackson, George] Prisons on Fire: George Jackson, Attica & Black liberation [Sound Recording]
Thirty years ago, America's prisons burned. Who were the Attica Brothers? Why did 1,500 Black, Puerto Rican, and white prisoners seize control of New York State's Attica Prison? Thirty years later prison rights activists grapple with this history through contemporary interviews and narration including the voices of George Jackson, Angela Davis, Harry Belafonte, and others.

Voices: George Jackson, Jonathan Jackson Jr., Georgia Jackson, Angela Davis, David Hilliard, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, David Johnson, Hugo Pinell, Luis Talamantez, Sundiata Tate, Frank Smith, William Kunstler, Elizabeth Fink, Michael Deutsch, L. D. Barkley, Ruchell Magee. 60 min. Sound/D 171

[Jackson, George]Statement by Bobby Seale Regarding the Death of George Jackson

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[Jackson, George]George Jackson re: Lenin, JFK, 1970 [sound recording]
Side one originally produced by Granada TV in 1970 Unedited footage of George Jackson talking about Lenin's book "State and Revolution," the conditions of his cell and John F. Kennedy. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. Sound/C 1505

[Jackson, Jonathan] Jonathan Jackson Funeral, 1970; Georgia Jackson press conference, 1971 [sound recording]
Side 1: Statements read by Huey Newton at the funeral of 17-year old Jonathan Jackson (brother of George Side 1 originally produced in 1970; side 2 originally produced in 1971. Jackson) who died in an August 7, 1970 shootout after taking a judge and several jurors hostage in a Marin County courtoom. Side 2: A press conference with George Jackson's mother the day after his death after an attempted escape from prison. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 45 min. Sound/C 1507

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[Jackson, Jonathan] Jonathan Jackson Memorial Program, 1975 [sound recording]
A memorial program honoring Jonathan Jackson, the younger brother of Black Panther Party leader George Jackson, five years after his death in 1970 at the age of 17 in a police shootout at the Marin County Courthouse. Includes readings from his letters to his brother in prison, and excerpts from George Jackson, Huey Newton and Malcolm X on the black power movement. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 30 min. Sound/C 1512

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Leaving Cleaver: Henry Louis Gates Remembers Eldridge Cleaver
In March 1997, social activist, former Black Panther, and author, Eldridge Cleaver sat down with Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. for a discussion of his life as a civil rights activist. It would be the last major interview Cleaver gave before his death. Includes commentary from Cleaver's former wife, Kathleen, as well as selections from 12 hours of audio tapes of a 1975 interview that Gates did with Cleaver in Paris. 1998. 60 min. DVD X115

Legacy of Torture: The War Against the Black Liberation Movement
In 2005 several former members of the Black Panther Party were held in contempt and jailed for refusing to testify before a San Francisco Grand Jury investigating a police shooting that took place in 1971. The government alleged that Black radical groups were involved in the 34-year old case in which two men armed with shotguns attacked the Ingleside Police Station resulting in the death of a police sergeant and the injuring of a civilian clerk. The two lead San Francisco Police Department investigators from over 30 years ago, along with FBI agents, have re-opened the case. Rather than submit to proceedings they felt were abusive of the law and the Constitution, five men chose to stand in contempt of court and were sent to jail. Directed and edited by Andres Alegria, Claude Marks and The Freedom Archives. Dist. Freedom Archives. 28 min. DVD 6902
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Lowndes County Freedom Party.
This program examines the rise of Stokely Carmichael and his Lowndes County Freedom Party, which he formed to get blacks registered to vote. These efforts are examined against the backdrop of murder and intimidation which accompanied the struggle for civil rights. None of the Party's candidates were ultimately elected, but the groundwork had been laid for the poor and disenfranchised in the South to gain political power. 25 min. Video/C 4139

[Magee, Ruchell] Interview with Ruchell Magee [sound recording]
A prison interview with Black Panther Party member Ruchell Magee who discusses what happened on the day of the Marin County courthouse rebellion and his case and appeals. He speaks on why his and Angela Davis' cases were separated, on being his own attorney and the case he presented to President Ronald Reagan for a pardon. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 60 min. Sound/C 1509

Making Sense of the Sixties. Part 5, Picking Up the Pieces
Discusses how and why more extreme splinter groups like the Black Panthers came to be, as well as two new movements: the environmental movement and the women's movement. Finally, it recreates the national mood at the end of the decade when the Vietnam vets came home, when hundreds of Black Panthers were arrested or killed, when Richard Nixon was forced to resign, and when the country is held hostage by OPEC. 59 min. DVD 1809 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 1953:5 Pt. 5

Mayday (Black Panthers)
Newsreel footage of a public Black Panther demonstration held on May 1, 1969 in honor of Huey Newton. With Angela Davis. 14 min. DVD 6792; vhs Video/C 5855

The Murder of Fred Hampton
Mike Gray started out to make a film about the Black Panther Party, but on Dec. 4, 1969, the Chicago police raided a Panther apartment and his film became a documentary about the murder of Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party. The film footage of the raid directly contradicted the State Attorney's version of the raid and so filmmakers and Panthers came together to prove that Hampton had been the designated target of the violent, punitive raid. The film's inquiry pursues official spokesmen and traps them in their attempts at covering up an orchestrated assassination. Originally produced in 1971. 88 min. DVD 7490; vhs Video/C 7577

[Muntaqim, Jalil]Jalil Muntaqim: Voice of Liberation
An interview with Jalil Muntaqim who talks about becoming a Black Panther and part of the Black Liberation Army. Arrested in 1971 at the age of 19, he is one of the longest held U.S. political prisoners. In 1997 he initited the Jericho Amnesty Movement which advocates amnesty for U.S. political prisoners on the basis of international law, working to gain the recognition that political prisoners do exist in this country and should be granted amnesty because of the political nature of their cases. Videocassette of a film originally made in 2000. Based on an interview by John O'Reilly and Nina Dibner. Freedom Archives, [2000]. 20 min. DVD 6896; vhs Video/C 9868
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[Newton, Huey] A Huey P. Newton Story.
Directed by Spike Lee. Actor and writer Roger Guenveur Smith presents a solo perfomance of Huey P. Newton's life in a stream-of-consciousness monologue inspired by the writings and interviews of Newton, the late co-founder of the Black Panther Party. Director Spike Lee complements Smith's performance with an imaginative mixture of multiple camera angles and documentary footage. Based on the taped performance before a live audience in New York City, the film also features an award-winning score by Marc Anthony Thompson and guest solos by Branford Marsalis. c2002. 90 min. DVD 5791; vhs Video/C 9568

[Newton, Huey] Huey.
A documentary film of the "Free Huey Newton" rally in California. Huey Newton is interviewed in the Alameda County Jail. Also includes an official Panther newsreel featuring interviews with Huey Newton, Eldridge Cleaver, and the Black Panther 10 point program presented by Bobby Seale. 53 min. Video/C 2175

[Newton, Huey] Huey Newton Interview, August 1971; Black Panther Party members in San Quentin, 1971 [sound recording]
Side one originally produced by Granada TV in August 1971; side 2 originally taped in August 1971. Side one: Unedited footage of Huey Newton discussing the Vietnam War, international solidarity and the significance of George Jackson's murder. Side two: Unidentified Black Panther Party members discuss the formation of the BPP branch in San Quentin, the underground prison economy, and the treatment they received as Panthers in prison from guards including censorship and threats for shaking hands with George Jackson. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 30 min. SOUND/C 1504

An online recording of this tape is available. See UC Berkeley Library Social Activism Sound Recording Project: The Black Panther Party

Off the Pig
Documentary footage of members of the Black Panther Party talking about police brutality and strategies for Blacks to liberate themselves. With Huey P. Newton, Eldridge Cleaver, Bobby Seale, Angela Davis. Film concludes with art works by Afro-American protest artist, Emory Douglas. (NOTE: this is basically the same film as Black Panther [Video/C 4131]) 15 min. DVD DVD 3044; vhs Video/C 5852

Panther (1995)
Directed by Mario Van Peebles; script by Melvin Van Peebles. The story of the rise and fall of a 1960s black radical movement that captured the imagination of its time. Memoirs by its founders and others have suggested that the Black Panthers never had the power or numbers they claimed, but they served a historic purpose, creating the image of an armed, militant "self-defense" group that was an alternative to the nonviolent philosophy of Martin Luther King [from Roger Ebert's review, Chicago Sun Times, 5/03/1995. Video 999:1629
Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

Passin' it On.
Black Panther leader Dhoruba Bin Wahad served 19 years in prison for the shooting of two New York City police officers, before his conviction was overturned because of prosecutorial misconduct. This video examines his story against the background of the issues that gave rise to the Black Panther Party. The film also offers startling insight into the role of the Black Panter Party in social change. Special DVD features: Follow-up interview with Dhoruba Bin Wahad in Ghana; Interview with author & activist Kathleen Cleaver; Filmmaker interviews; Former Black Panther Jamal Joseph interview; Filmmaker biographies. Director, John Valadez. 57 min. DVD 7581; vhs Video/C 3248

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

First Run/Icarus catalog description

[Pratt, Elmer Geronimo] Twelve years later.[Sound Recording]
Los Angeles, Calif.: Pacifica Tape Library, [1983?]. 56 min. SOUND/C.391

Prelude to Revolution: Huey Newton in Jail
Fed up with years of harassment of blacks by local police, young Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale formed armed patrols to monitor "pig" activity in Oakland, California in 1966. Thus the Black Panther Party for Self Defense was born. The Party embraced a militant policy of self-determination and separatism for their people. Members of the Party became increasingly militant, outspoken and violent eventually resulting in the imprisonment of its leaders. This tape features a never before seen interview (circa 1966 or 67) by filmmaker John Evans with then-imprisoned Black Panther Party leader, Huey P. Newton. 36 min. DVD X3003; Video/C 5492

Public Enemy
Documentary look at the Black Panther Party, combining footage from the 1960s with shots of four former members as they appear now: prisoner-turned-playwright Jamal Joseph; musician and record producer Nile Rodgers; law professor and lecturer Kathleen Cleaver; and the last surviving founding member, Bobby Seale. c1999. 50 min. Video/C 9730

Description from First Run/Icarus catalog

[Seale, Bobby] Interview with Bobby Seale.
Interview on the subject of the Black Panther Party. 16 min. NOTE: poor image and sound quality in some portions. DVD X699; vhs Video/C 2027

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[Seale, Bobby]Staggerlee: A Conversation with Black Panther Bobby Seale
A portrait of Bobby Seale of the Black Panther Party, interviewed from San Francisco County Jail, February 13, 1970. Directed by Francisco Newman. 58 min. DVD X5458

[Seale, Bobby] A Talk with Bobby Seale [Sound Recording]
Interviewed by Elsa Knight Thompson. Los Angeles: Pacifica Tape Library, 1969. Media Resources Center SOUND/C 304; UCB Bancroft Phonotape 711 A

[Seale, Bobby] Trial of Bobby Seale. [Sound Recording]
Los Angeles: Pacifica Radio Archive, 1986. UCB Bancroft Phonotape 1829 C

Self Respect, Self Defense and Self Determination
Introduction: Angela Davis ; moderator, Rachel Herzing ; speakers, Mabel Williams, Kathleen Cleaver. Mabel Williams and Kathleen Cleaver, two women of the 60s Black liberation struggle share their personal experiences -- resisting the KKK and police repression, forced exile and their international experiences in Third World nations -- and how their their story relates to the struggle today. Recorded in Oakland, California on March 14, 2004. Program presented by Freedom Archives, East Side Arts Alliance, Malcolm X Grassroots Movement. 72 min. Dist.: Freedom Archives 72 min. Video/C MM291
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Soledad Brothers, 1970 [Sound Recording]
Interviews with the Soledad Brothers, George Jackson, John Cluchette and Fleeta Drumgo in which they talk about their lives in prison, their histories, Jonathan Jackson and the Marin County shootout. George Jackson addresses his early history, racism in prison, his brother's death (Jonathan Jackson) and the possiblity of his own death. John Cluchette talks of the first Soledad incident, political views of prison, and about George and Jonathan Jackson. San Francisco, Calif.: Freedom Archives, 2001. 60 min. Sound/C 1513

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Still Revolutionaries
This compelling documentary explores the lives of two women who were in the Black Panther Party between 1969 and 1975. Katherine Campbell and Madalynn Rucker reflect on the reasons and events that led to their joining the Black Panthers, the type of work they did within the Party, and the challenges they faced as they chose to leave it and reconstruct their lives. 2000. 16 min. DVD 527; Video/C 7591

Description from Berkeley Media LLC catalog

The Struggle Inside: 30 Years After the Murder of George Jackson
Features historical materials, including recordings of George Jackson, Angela Davis, Ruchell Magee, Georgia Jackson (George's mother), Harry Belafonte, James Baldwin and others. 37 min.

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The Thursday Club
A documentary of historical footage interspersed with interviews of retired Oakland police officers who battled anti-war demonstrators and Black Panthers in the 1960s. Portraying a generation that lived through the Depression and World War II before they became policemen, this film covers the Vietnam War protests that spilled from Berkeley into Oakland, the racial integration of the Oakland Police Department, and the ambivalence of black officers during the department's war with the Black Panthers. Produced and directed by George Paul Csicsery. 2005. 60 min. DVD 4100

The Two Nations of Black America
There is a growing economic divide in black America. Today, America's black middle class is the largest in its history, yet roughly one-third of black America continues to live in poverty. This film measures the economic and social success of the civil rights movement and the gap between middle class and poor African-Americans through interviews with noted Afro-Americans and historical film footage. Includes commentary by Cornel West, Julian Bond, Maulana Karenga, Eldridge Cleaver, Kathleen Cleaver, Angela Davis, William Julius Wilson, Jesse Jackson, Quincy Jones, David Sykes, Christopher Edley, Orlando Patterson. 1998. 56 min. Video/C 5690

Voices of Black Panther Women.
A panel discussion of women who are members of the Black Panther party in which they relate their personal struggles and experiences as "Panther women" engaged in civil rights activism. Symposium at UC Berkeley, date unknown. ©UC Regents. DVD 1345; also VHS Video/C 2557

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[Washington, Nuh] Call me Nuh & The Last Statement of Nuh Washington
Nuh was a committed member of the Black Panther Party and later, worked with the Black Liberation Army. In the 1970's Nuh was captured along with other Black Panther Party members and later charged and convicted of murder. Evidence has subsequently surfaced suggesting he was unjustly convincted. In this interview Nuh talks about his politics and spirit. Based on an interview in 1988 by Fiona Boneham and Paper Tiger TV. The last statement of Nuh Washington recorded on March 21, 2000. an Francisco, CA: Freedom Archives, [2000]. 20 min. DVD 6896; vhs Video/C 9869
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Wearing the Green: Longtermers of the New York State Prison System
Profiles the work of ex-convicts in New York (some former Black Panthers) who are working to battle inequities which still mark the meting out of justice. Through Harlem's Community Justice Center, they work to make neighborhoods where unemployment, crime and drug use are high, into "self-respecting" safe communities so that today's children will not become "victims of the street." 52 min. Video/C 4528

What We Want, What We Believe: The Black Panther Party Library
Disc 1. Newsreel films: Off the pig (14:34 min.) ; Mayday (13:30 min.) ; Repression (13:33 min.) ; Interviews with Field Marshall Donald Cox ; footage from the 35th reunion of the BPP -- Disc 2: Footage from the Wheelock Academic Conference ; FBI agents discussing COINTELPRO tactics -- Disc 3: Interviews with BPP Movement lawyers discussing Panther cases ; Black Panther Defense Committee -- Disc 4: interviews with Newsreel members ; special features. Features three films on the Black Panther Party made in 1968-1969 by the Newsreel film collective and extensive additional footage on Black Panther history and legacy from Roz Payne and the Newsreel filmmakers. Includes video and audio interviews with party members and movement participants including FBI agents, lawyers and journalists, as well as documents from the Roz Payne Archives chronicling both the movement and government attempts to suppress it. DVD 6792

History 1970 to present

Documentaries about Hurrican Katrina

Affirmative Action: The History of an Idea.
Explores the historical roots of affimative action and the current debate over its usefulness. Looks at several different affirmative action programs including the Univ. of California, Berkeley, the U.S. Army, federal aid to minority businesses, and affirmative action in the Chicago Police Dept. Includes archival footage and features interviews with a wide array of academic scholars. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1996. 56 min. Video/C 4999

Affirmative Action Under Fire: When is it Reverse Discrimination?
The account of a reverse discrimination court case over the firing in 1989 of a white teacher in a Piscataway, New Jersey high school because of her race. Shows how this court case became a national battle for affirmative action and how affirmative action preference advocates paid the white teacher $450,000 to drop her case in order to avoid a Supreme Court decision that would potentially invalidate all affirmative action programs in the United States. Originally produced for the ABC television program Nightline aired on November 11, 1997 under the title: Black teacher, white teacher, affirmative action under fire. Dist.: Films Media Group. 22 min. Video/C 6874

Another America.
Both the riots in Los Angeles and the murder of an uncle at his store in Detroit forced the filmmaker to start a personal investigation to examine the relationships between the Korean-American and Afro-American communities. Through his camera and many personal interviews, Cho reveals a rarely seen portrait of life in the inner city and takes a hard look at his own uncle's murder, telling how this crime affected not only his family, but the entire city. A film by by Michael Cho. 56 min. Video/C 4495

Description from Center for Asian American Media catalog

The Bombing of Osage Avenue
Documents the military-style eviction of the Philadelphia-based black nationalist project MOVE in 1985 when city and state police converged on a city block in the heart of Afro-American Philadelphia. By the next day, 61 homes were destroyed and 11 members of the MOVE organization were dead. This documentary investigates this event and its impact on the Philadelphia community. Producer/director, Louis Massiah 1986. 58 min. Video/C 8637

The Day After Diallo: Organizers Speak Out on Police Brutality.
Video highlights recurring police violence against people of color in the context of the killing of Amadou Diallo, an unarmed Black man who was shot forty-one times in the vestibule of his apartment by four members of the New York City Street Crimes Unit. On Feb. 25, 2000, a jury acquitted these officers of all charges. Protests erupted and confrontations between the police and demonstrators ensued. New York, N.Y.: Witness Project, 2000. 6 min. DVD 3263

[Davis, Angela] A Conversation with Angela Davis.
Interviewed by Rev. Cecil Davis. Davis speaks in jail during her incarceration in 1970 on charges of being an accomplice to conspiracy, kidnapping, and homicide in the Black Panther seige at the Marin County Hall of Justice (August 7, 1970). DVD 7496 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 2214

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Death in the Hood
Portland, Oregon has seen a dramatic rise in youth violence, especially in the neighborhoods in North and Northeast Portland. This documentary examines how youths have responded to this violence, the rise in black on black violence, and the effects it's had on the neighborhoods. Includes commentary by community activists, educators, health and law enforcement professionals and gang members and also shows some innovative efforts in Portland schools to deal with the problem. 1996. 29 min. Video/C MM783

[Farrakhan, Louis] God is Angry, Says Farrakhan: Black Power 1996
Reviews the Million Man March of October 1995 organized by Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam, and what Farrakhan means to black society. The film traces, through archival footage, the history of the black struggle for power and the civil rights movement with interviews with Stokley Carmichael who now lives in Africa, and other activists of the sixties. Commentary: Stokely Carmichael, David Hilliard, Akua Njeri, Omali Yeshitela, Robert D. Williams, Nelson Perry, Rick Tingling-Glemmons, Ishmael Muhammad, Penny Hess. 1996. 57 min. Video/C 8309

[Farrakhan, Louis] An Interview with Louis Farrakhan.
Demagogue or insightful promoter of black responsibility? In this exclusive ABC News "Nightline" interview, Ted Koppel and Minister Louis Farrakhan discuss Farrakhan's incendiary rhetoric and charismatic leadership. Topics probed include Farrakhan's allegedly anti-Semitic statements that have alienated the Jewish community, and his friendship with and billion-dollar gift from Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi. Farrakhan also discusses his pivotal roles as organizer of the Million Man March and spokesman for African-American Muslims. 1998. 22 min. Video/C 5514

[Farrakhan, Louis] Louis Farrakhan: Thursday, April 5, 1984 / ABC News.
A television interview with Louis Farrakhan, the controversial leader of a Black Muslim sect, concerning threats he made against a black reporter, Milton Coleman, who released information regarding Jesse Jackson's use of the term "hymie." 41 min. Video/C 5764

Finally Got the News
A documentary presenting the workers' view of working conditions inside Detroit's auto factories. It focuses on the activities of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers in their efforts to build an independent African American labor organization which, unlike the United Auto Workers, would respond to the racism and dangerous working conditions faced by African American workers in the industry. It also explores the educational "tracking," the role of African American women in the labor force, and racial relations between workers. 1970. 55 min. Video/C 6858

Description from First Run/Icarus Films catalog

The Fire This Time.
Through interviews with civic leaders, politicians and Los Angeles city residents film examines social conditions in Watts and other areas of inner city Los Angeles which have led to violence and rioting in the past. Critiques past governmental policies which have failed to correct the problem and makes suggestions for future solutions. 90 min. Video/C 3464

Fires in the Mirror
On Aug. 19, 1991 in Crown Heights (Brooklyn, N.Y.) a Hasidic man accidentally runs over a Black boy (Gavin Cato). Three hours later a young Jewish scholar (Yankel Rosenbaum) was murdered by Black youths. Four days of fire-bombing and riots ensued. Smith acts out the roles of these 18 persons involved in the racial conflict, trying to present the differing views of this serious problem. Includes actual film footage of the riots and violence. 82 min. DVD 1252 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3083

Smith, Anna Deavere. Fires in the Mirror: Crown Heights, Brooklyn, and Other Identities / Anna Deavere Smith. 1st Anchor Books ed. New York: Anchor Books/Doubleday, 1993. (Main Stack PS3569.M465.F56 1993; Moffitt PS3569.M465.F56 1993)

Focus Reparations
In this program, NewsHour correspondent Elizabeth Bracket reports on a Chicago resolution in support of reparations to descendants of African American slaves. The segment includes interviews with proponents, Dorothy Tillman, a Chicago Alderman who sponsored the resolution and Rep. John Conyers who has sponsored a congressional bill to form a presidential commission to study the concept. Also interviewed are economist Walter Williams who opposes the resolution, as well as Alderman Brian Doherty, the only board member to dissent. Dist.: Films Media Group. c2001. 15 min. Video/C 8424

Foreign Talk.
A Chinese American woman is confronted by two African American men while riding a commuter train. An excellent short narrative for discussions about cross-cultural understanding, communication and stereotypes. 11 min. Video/C 3235

Center for Asian American Media catalog description

[King, Rodney] Rodney King and the LA Riots, March 1991

Birth of a Nation: 4x29x92.
This hard-hitting documentary offers a rare view of the L.A. rebellion which erupted within minutes of the verdict that acquitted the four police officers accused of brutally beating motorist Rodney King. With the hand-held immediacy of combat coverage and set to the best of rap and hip hop, the video maker follows the events on the street, all shot at the epicenter of the rebellion where businesses burn, emotions explode and Black and Latino communities refuse to sit back and take it. A film by Matthew McDaniel. Dist.: Third World Newsreel. 1994? 62 min. Video/C 3628

Hands on the Verdict: The 1992 L.A. Uprising.
Film probes the issues surrounding the civil unrest following the Simi Valley, Calif. verdict in the Rodney King police brutality trial. Examines also the South Central Los Angeles community of Watts, the truce between street gangs, the Crips and the Bloods, and the persistence of racism and police brutality in the L.A. Police Dept. 54 min. Video/C 3394

L.A. Is Burning: Five Reports from a Divided City.
One year after the Los Angeles riots, Frontline revisits the city. Tracing the chronology of events from the moment the Rodney King verdict was announced, through the next 72 hours of riots, to present day L.A. 87 min. Video/C 3068

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

The Nation Erupts.
An experimental view of the Los Angeles rebellion, this video explores the media depictions and omissions around the beating of Rodney King. Going beyond the nightly news soundbytes into the rage of urban communities throughout the nation, this tape demystifies the riots and lends a human face to the national rage. Also contains footage on community initiatives to stop the violence, Black and Korean organizing for peace, and the undercovered Latino community's response to the beating. Dist.: Third World Newsreel. 58 min. Video/C 3625

No Justice...No Peace: Young, Black Immediate.
Interspersed with film clips of the Rodney King beating, filmaker interviews Afro-American college students in California concerning their experiences of racism, police harassment and the commonly percieved identity of Afro-American men as violent. 15 min. Video/C 3845

Outcry L.A.: Riots, Trials, Recovery.
Riot footage of the Watts Riots taken primarily by amateur videographers at ground zero. See how the riot started, how it unfolded and how it blew up. The film examines the riots, through the five days they shook the nation, with particular reference to the events surrounding the convicted police officers, commentary by Chief Daryl Gates and many others who played significant roles. It also looks at grassroots efforts to reclaim Watts after the riots. 1999. 88 min. Video/C 7467

Rodney King Decision-rioting, KPIX News Special Report.
5:00 news, 4/30/92. Filmed off air, reports on the protests and the riots. 60 min. Video/C 2377

Rodney King FBI Tapes.
Scenes from the beating of Rodney King by members of the Los Angeles California Police Dept. on March 3, 1991 at regular speed, slow motion, and in a computerized simulation study. 60 min. DVD 1248; also on VHS Video/C 2494 Requires Windows Media Player or Flip4Mac

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Various real-time and slow-motion replays of the Rodney King incident

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Short clip showing a computer-generated 3D model of King interacting with a police officer.

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Comparison of computer-generated models of interaction between King and police with actual footage of the action. Shows vector and force analysis of FBI agent using baton.

The Rodney King Case: What the Jury Saw in CA v. Powell.
Presents the key portions of both the prosecution and defense cases. Condenses 150 hours of gavel-to-gavel coverage and includes the 81 second amateur videotape which recorded the events that occurred during the evening of March 3, 1991. 116 min. DVD 9603 [Preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 2531

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

The Rodney King Incident: Race and Justice in America.
Presents the unedited version of the Rodney King videotape as well as new evidence ignored by the major media at the time. All of the key participants are interviewed, including Rodney King, the police officers, the state trial prosecutor, and former L.A. Police Chief Daryl Gates. All parties offer their divergent points of view about these tumultuous events. Dist.: Films Media Group. 56 min. Video/C 6391

Sa-I-Gu.
Explores the embittering effect the Rodney King verdict rebellion had on a group of Korean American women shopkeepers. It underscores the shattering of the American Dream while taking the media to task for playing up the "Korean-Black" aspect of the rioting. This film provides a perspective that is essential to discussions of the L.A. riots, ethnic relations, and racism in the United States. Includes interviews with the filmakers Elaine Kim and Christine Choy. 41 min. Video/C 2837
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Center for Asian American Media catalog description

Choy, Christine; Kim, Elaine; Sil, Dai; Gibson, Kim. "Sa-I-Gu. (short Story)" (movie reviews) Amerasia Journal v19, n2 (Spring, 1993):161 (3 pages).
Gateward, Frances. "Breaking the Silences: An Interview with Dai Sil Kim-Gibson." Quarterly Review of Film & Video. 20(2):99-110. 2003 Apr-June UC users only
James, David.
"Tradition And The Movies: The Asian American Avant-Garde In Los Angeles." Journal of Asian American Studies 1999 2(2): 157-180. UC users only

State of Emergency: Inside the Los Angeles Police Department.
Investigates police brutality in Los Angeles both before and after the beating of Rodney King while presenting grassroots solutions for police reform. Through interviews with L.A.P.D. officers and supervisors, the tape reveals what life is like behind the thin blue line. 30 min. Video/C 3393

Twilight--Los Angeles
On March 3, 1991, the African-American, Rodney King, was brutally beaten by four white Los Angeles police officers who stopped him for speeding. On April 29, 1992, when the jury's "not guilty" verdict dismissed the officers on trial for the assault, the city ignited into three days of rioting, looting and violence that left neighborhoods smoldering. "Twilight: Los Angeles," adapted from Anna Deavere Smith's searing one-woman play, captures this tumultuous and challenging moment in America's race relations. c2000. 90 min. DVD X79 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 8086

Hill vs. Thomas
Archival footage covering the events surrounding the Judiciary Committee and Senate hearings regarding Anita Hill's sexual harrassment accusations against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, with four CBS News correspondents providing their firsthand insights into the case. Originally broadcast on the CBS program I remember, November 18, 1997. 45 min. Video/C 7841

Million Man March
An analysis and highlights of the Million Man March organized by Louis Farrakhan and attended by Afro-American men from all walks of life. Held in Washington D.C. on October 16, 1995. 57 min. Video/C 4225

Million Man March Special.
Coverage and analysis of the Million Man March including live crowd shots, interviews with rally participants on the Mall, and speechs by African American men from all walks of life, ending with a 2-1/2 hour speech by march organizer Louis Farrakhan. 400 mins. Video/C 4214

Mumia Abu-Jamal: A Case for Reasonable Doubt?
America's most "celebrated" death row inmate, Mumia Abu-Jamal, speaks for the first time behind prison walls. Mumia was convicted and sentenced to death for the 1981 murder of a 25 year-old white Philadelphia policeman. His conviction has been protested by activists and celebrities who call him a political prisoner because of the perceived irregularities in both the evidence and the conduct of his trial. Produced and directed by John Edginton. 1997. 74 min. Video/C 4928

The Nation of Islam: A Portrait.
A self-portrait of the followers of Elijah Muhammad, in the words of the people themselves. 60 min. Video/C 22

News Coverage of People's Temple Suicides in Guyana.
Extracts from news immediately following the tragedy orchestrated by Jim Jones, leader of the People's Temple. Excerpts from news coverage of Milk/Moscone assassinations which followed shortly after Guyana. 60 min. Video/C 2300

A People's Temple Meeting with Jim Jones.
Features Jim Jones presiding over a meeting, presumably in Berkeley. Members offer testimony and songs in praise of Jim Jones and the Lord. Rare black and white footage of unknown origin and date. 30 min. Video/C 2328

Rodney King and the LA Riots SEE [King, Rodney]

Sa-I-Gu.
Explores the embittering effect the Rodney King verdict rebellion had on a group of Korean American women shopkeepers. It underscores the shattering of the American Dream while taking the media to task for playing up the "Korean-Black" aspect of the rioting. This film provides a perspective that is essential to discussions of the L.A. riots, ethnic relations, and racism in the United States. Includes interviews with the filmakers Elaine Kim and Christine Choy. 41 min. Video/C 2837
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Center for Asian American Media catalog description

Choy, Christine; Kim, Elaine; Sil, Dai; Gibson, Kim. "Sa-I-Gu. (short Story)" (movie reviews) Amerasia Journal v19, n2 (Spring, 1993):161 (3 pages).
Gateward, Frances. "Breaking the Silences: An Interview with Dai Sil Kim-Gibson." Quarterly Review of Film & Video. 20(2):99-110. 2003 Apr-June UC users only
James, David.
"Tradition And The Movies: The Asian American Avant-Garde In Los Angeles." Journal of Asian American Studies 1999 2(2): 157-180. UC users only

Seven Days in Bensonhurst.
The 1989 murder of Yusef Hawkins by white youths in the Bensonhurst section of New York City set off a racial and political fire storm. On the eve of the first verdicts in the murder case, writer Shelby Steele returns to talk to the participants and tries to unravel the forces that propelled this racial crisis. From the television program, Frontline. 59 min. DVD X1454 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 1854

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

[Simpson, O.J.] Merchandising Murder: the O.J. Simpson Industry.
It's been called the trial of the century -- former football star O.J. Simpson facing charges of murderinghis wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman. But is the trial itself the cause of all the fuss or has the event been manufactured by the media and merchandisers seeking to exploit the case? Film examines the huge million dollar industry which has sprung up to cash in on the compatible with the rights of the accused in a nation where murder seems to pay for everyone but the victims. 48 min. Video/C 4085.

First Run/Icarus catalog description

[Simpson, O.J.] The O. J. Simpson Trial. Pt.1, Background and Opening Statements.
Coverage of background information and opening statements before Judge Ito in the televised trial of O. J. Simpson for the murders of his former wife Nicole Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman on June 12, 1994. 60 min. Video/C 4084.

[Simpson, O.J.] The O. J. Simpson Trial. Pt.2, The Prosecution.
The prosecution team, led by Marcia Clark, assisted by William Hodgman presents evidence against the accused in the trial of O. J. Simpson for the murders of his former wife Nicole Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman on June 12, 1994. Key strategies focus on 911 calls from Nicole, a trail of blood discovered at Mr. Simpson's home and DNA analysis of blood stains. 60 min. Video/C 4142

[Simpson, O.J.]The O. J. Verdict.
Ten years after the verdict was made in the O.J. Simpson case, this program looks back on the trial through interviews with the defense, prosecution and journalists. The program explores the role that race played in arguably the most controversial verdict in the recent history of the American justice system. Originally aired as a segment of the television program Frontline on October 4, 2005. Dist.: PBS. 58 min. DVD 4769

[Simpson, O.J.] A Question of Evidence.
Presents testimony by key witnesses to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to send O.J. Simpson to trial. Shows Court TV broadcast excerpts from the preliminary hearing before Judge Kathleen Kennedy Powell. Includes defense attorneys Gerald Uelman and Robert Shapiro, and prosecutors Willia Hodgman and Marcia Clark. 51 min. Video/C 4083

State of Emergency: Inside the Los Angeles Police Department.
Investigates police brutality in Los Angeles both before and after the beating of Rodney King while presenting grassroots solutions for police reform. Through interviews with L.A.P.D. officers and supervisors, the tape reveals what life is like behind the thin blue line. 30 min. Video/C 3393

[Thomas, Clarence; Hill, Anita] Clarence Thomas and Anita Hill: Public Hearing, Private Pain.
Discusses the Thomas confirmation hearings, the charges of sexual harassment by Anita Hill, and the reactions from African-Americans. 58 min. Video/C 2773

National Educational Film & Video Festival 1994 (Gold Apple).

[Thomas, Clarence; Hill, Anita] Clarence Thomas Confirmation Hearings.
Taped off air by the Office of Media Services, 10/11/91, and 10/15/91. Approx. 6 hours. Video/C 2170:1-3

[Thomas, Clarence] Sex & Justice
Presents highlights from the dramatic confrontation between Senator Clarence Thomas and former colleague Anita Hill during the widely publicized Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1991, paving the way for how people view sexual harassment in the workplace. 1993. 77 min. DVD X5718; Video/C 3185

Thulani Davis asks "Why Howard Beach?"
A discussion of how the Howard Beach incident is indicative of racism in the United States. Comments on the news media's superficial treatment of this and other recent racial incidents. 30 min. Video/C 2578

Twenty Years After: The Third World Strike.
Original footage from the Third world strike and a discussion on what happened, why it happened, and what has happened since, with Carlos Munoz, Jr., Anthony Garcia, Octavio Romano V, Troy Duster. DVD 1188; also VHS Video/C 1403

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Two Towns of Jasper
In 1998 in Jasper, Texas, James Byrd, Jr., a black man, was chained to a pickup truck and dragged to his death by three white men. The town was forever altered, and the nation woke up to the horror of a modern-day lynching. The filmmakers set out to document the aftermath of the murder by following the trials of the local men charged with the crime. The result is an explicit and troubling portrait of race in America, one that asks how and why a crime like this could have occurred. Originally produced in 2002 as a segment of the television series POV. Dist.: PBS. 83 min. Video/C 9470

Awards

American Library Association Video Round Table Notable Video for Adults Peabody Awards

Cole, David. "Two Towns of Jasper." Visual Anthropology Review, Volume 21. Issue 1-2. March 2005 UC users only
Petersen, Jennifer. "Media as Sentimental Education: The Political Lessons of HBO's The Laramie Project and PBS's Two Towns of Jasper." Critical Studies in Media Communication, Aug2009, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p255-274, 20p UC users only
Rojas, Hernando; Shah, Dhavan V., et. al. "Media Dialogue: Perceiving and Addressing Community Problems." Mass Communication & Society, Spring2005, Vol. 8 Issue 2, p93-110, 18p, UC users only

W.A.T.T.S.: We are Taught to Survive
Gains unmitigated access to the peace treaty signed by rival gangs in South Central Los Angeles and the ongoing struggles for a peaceful community. Includes interviews with members of the Crips and Bloods gangs. Produced, edited and photographed by Richard Adams. Produced as a thesis project for the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. 2001. 23 min. Video/C 9168

Watts, Riot or Revolt? (CBS Reports)
Were the Watts riots part of a social revolution, a festering illness or a carnival of senseless violence? And why did it first erupt in L.A. and not in another major American city? This news program, filmed just a few months after the riots, presents a study of the principal events that ignited the conflagration in the summer of 1965 in Watts. A wide variety of individuals comment on the situtation, including L.A. chief of police William H. Parker, Daniel P. Moynihan, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., witnesses to the riots and rioters themselves. Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on December 7, 1965. Dist.: Films Media Group. 55 min. Video/C 8993

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