Shakespeare on Film & Video:
Books and Articles in the UC Berkeley Library












General Works

Articles/Books About Individual Plays

General Works

"Adaptation and the literary film."
Screen;SO: Vol.XLIII nr.1 (Spring 2002); p.1-73
UC users only
"A special section on film adaptation. From very different points of view, the essays presented in this section suggest possible approaches to issues of language and figuration, as well as issues of history, memory, and the national past, which can be more articulated than in traditional critical writing on adaptation. The writers base their discussions on the analysis of movies within their specific signifying practices, and their historical and national contexts. In doing so, they begin to draw a more detailed map of this landscape and to trace new and productive ways of reconnecting cinema and literature. Articles examine adaptations of literary works in Martin Scorsese's and Terence Davies's The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth, respectively; two Indian adaptations of William Shakespeare's Hamlet; the particular performances of female movie stars Emma Thompson, Kate Winslet, and Gwyneth Paltrow; and the reception of Claire Denis's movie, Beau Travail, as a loose adaptation of Herman Melville 1891 novella, Billy Budd, Sailor." [Art Index]

Aebischer, Pascale
Shakespeare's violated bodies : stage and screen performance Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
MAIN: PR3069.B58 A68 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/cam032/2003055765.html

Albanese, Denise
"The Shakespeare film and the Americanization of culture." In: Marxist Shakespeares / edited by Jean E. Howard and Scott Cutler Shershow. London ; New York : Routledge, 2001. Accents on Shakespeare.
Main Stack PR3024.M39 2001

Aldama, Frederick Luis.
"Race, cognition, and emotion: Shakespeare on film." College Literature 33.1 (Wntr 2006): 197(17).
UC users only

Almost Shakespeare: reinventing his works for cinema and television
Edited by James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2004.
MAIN: PR3093 .A46 2004
PFA : PR3093 .A46 2004
Contents: Introduction / James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner -- The politics of culture : the play's the thing / Patrick Finn -- Imitation as originality in Gus van Sant's My own private Idaho / Andrew Barnaby -- Shakespeare transposed : the British stage on the post-colonial screen / Parmita Kapadia -- Suture, Shakespeare, and race, or, What is our cultural debt to the bard? / Ayanna Thompson -- Cinema in the round : self-reflexivity in Tim Blake Nelson's O / Eric C. Brown -- Sex, lies, videotape-and Othello / R.S. White -- The time is out of joint : Withnail and I and historical melancholia, or, Camberwell carrots and Shakespeare / Aaron Kelly and David Salter -- Horatio : the first CSI / Jody Malcolm -- Teen scenes : recognizing Shakespeare in teen film / Ariane M. Balizet -- An aweful rule : safe schools, hard canons, and Shakespeare's loose heirs / Melissa J. Jones -- Prospero's pharmacy : Peter Greenaway and the critics play Shakespeare's mimetic game / Dan DeWeese -- Shakespeare film and television derivatives : a bibliography / Jose Ramon Diaz Fernandez.

Anderegg, Michael A.
Cinematic Shakespeare Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, c2004.
MAIN: PR3093 .A525 2004

Anderegg, Michael A.
Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and popular culture / Michael Anderegg. New York: Columbia University Press, c1999. Series title: Film and culture.
UCB Main PR3093 .A53 1999
Contents via Google books

Anderegg, Michael A.
"Welles/Shakespeare/film: an overview." Film adaptation / edited and with an introduction by James Naremore.p. 154-71 New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2000. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F55 2000

Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Ball, Robert Hamilton
"The Shakespeare Film as Record: : Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree." Shakespeare Quarterly 3:3 (1952:July) 227
UC users only

Ball, Robert Hamilton
"Shakespeare in One Reel." The Quarterly of Film Radio and Television, Vol. 8, No. 2. (Winter, 1953), pp. 139-149.
UC users only

Ball, Robert Hamilton
Shakespeare on Silent Film; a Strange Eventful History. New York, Theater Arts Books [1968].
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .B3 1968

Ball, Robert Hamilton
Shakespeare on Silent Film: A Strange Eventful History. London, Allen & Unwin, 1968.
UCB Main PR3093 .B3 1968

Bowman, James.
"Bard to Death." (film adaptations of the works of William Shakespeare) American Spectator v29, n3 (March, 1996):58 (2 pages).

Bristol, Michael D.
Big-time Shakespeare / Michael D. Bristol. London ; New York : Routledge, 1996.
Main Stack PR2976.B658 1996
Contents via Google Books

Brode, Douglas
Shakespeare in the movies: from the silent era to Shakespeare in love / Douglas Brode. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.B76 2000

Buchman, Lorne Michael.
Still in Movement: Shakespeare on Screen / Lorne M. Buchman. New York:Oxford University Press, 1991.
UCB Main PR3093 .B8 1991
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .B8 1991

Buhler, Stephen M.
"Antic Dispositions: Shakespeare and Steve Martin's L. A. Story." Shakespeare Yearbook, 1997, 8, 212-29.

Buhler, Stephen M.
Shakespeare in the cinema : ocular proof / Stephen M. Buhler. Albany: State University of New York Press, c2002. SUNY series, cultural studies in cinema/video.
UCB Main PR3093.B84 2002
Contens via Google Books

Buhler, Stephen M.
"Text, Eyes, and Videotape: Screening Shakespeare Scripts." Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 46 no. 2. 1995 Summer. pp: 236-44.

Bulman, James C.
"The BBC Shakespeare and "House Style."" Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 5, Special Issue:Teaching Shakespeare. (1984), pp. 571-581.
(UC Berkeley users only)

Bulman, J.C. and H.R. Coursen.
Shakespeare on Television: An Anthology of Essays and Reviews. Hanover: University Press of New England,1988.
UCB Main PR3093 .S54 1988
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .S54 1988

Burnett, Mark Thornton.
Filming Shakespeare in the global marketplace Basingstoke [England] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
MAIN: PR3093 .B87 2007; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0727/2006050833-t.html

Burt, Richard; Newstok, Scott L.
"Certain Tendencies in Criticism of Shakespeare on Film. Shakespeare Studies, 2010, Vol. 38, p88-103, 16p
(UC Berkeley users only)

Burt, Richard.
"The Love That Dare Not Speak Shakespeare's Name: New Shakesqueer Cinema." In: Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video/ edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. pp: 240-68. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
Main Stack PR3093.S545 1997

Burt, Richard
"Slammin' Shakespeare in Acc(id)ents Yet Unknown: Liveness, Cinem(edi)a, and RacialDis-Integration." Shakespeare Quarterly. 53(2):201-26. 2002 Summer
UC users only

The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare on film
Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .C36 2000
Contents via Google Books

Camp, Gerald M.
"Shakespeare on Film." Journal of Aesthetic Education 3:1 (1969:Jan.) 107
UC users only

Cartmell, Deborah.
Interpreting Shakespeare on screen / Deborah Cartmell. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Macmillan, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.C37 2000
Contents via Google Books

Charnes, Linda.
"Dismember Me: Shakespeare, Paranoia, and the Logic of Mass Culture."Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 48 no. 1. 1997.pp: 1-16.

Charney, Maurice
"Shakespearean Anglophilia: The BBC-TV Series and American Audiences Shakespearean Anglophilia: The BBC-TV Series and American Audiences." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 2 (Summer, 1980), pp. 287-292
UC users only

Chedgzoy, Kate.
Shakespeare's Queer Children: Sexual Politics and Contemporary Culture / Kate Chedgzoy. Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press; New York: Distributed exclusively in the USA and Canada by St. Martin's Press, 1995.
Main Stack PR3024.C48 1995

Clayton, Bertram.
"Shakespeare and the Talkies" The English Review, n. 49, 1929

Collick, John.
Shakespeare, Cinema, and Society / John Collick. Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press; New York: Distributed in the USA and Canada by St. Martin's Press, c1989. Series title: Cultural politics.
UCB Main PR3093 .C641 1989
UCB Moffitt PR3093 C64 1989

Colón Semenza, Gregory M.
"Teens, Shakespeare, and the Dumbing Down Cliché: The Case of The Animated Tales." Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p37-68, 32p
UC users only

Combs, Richard; Durgnat, Raymond
"Shakespeare: a chaos theory." Film Comment v 37 no4 July/Aug 2001. p. 56-61
UC users only
"The writers discuss modern film adaptations of William Shakespeare's plays. Contemporary interpretations of Shakespeare always appear to to contain an element of parody. This parody, explicit or implicit, is part of the message, the zeitgeist, the problem of perspective that each of these adaptations has to tackle: Four centuries of worship have positioned Shakespeare as the preeminent creative force of English literature and have dustily confined him to the classroom as far as a modern young cinema audience is concerned. Al Pacino credits Kenneth Branagh's 1989 Henry V with transforming the market for Shakepeare, but it was 1998's Shakepeare in Love that made the author a star." [Art Index]

A concise companion to Shakespeare on screen
Edited by Diana E. Henderson. Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2006.
MAIN: PR3093 .C65 2006
MOFF: PR3093 .C65 2006; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip059/2005006592.html

Cook, Hardy M.
"Jane Howell's BBC First Tetralogy: Theatrical and Televisual Manipulation." (British Broadcasting Corp.) (Shakespeare - Film &Television) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):326 (6 pages).
UC users only

Cooke-Jess, Carolyn.
""The promised end" of cinema: portraits of cinematic apocalypse in 21st century Shakespearean cinema.(William Shakespeare)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 161(8).
UC users only

Corliss, Richard.
"Suddenly Shakespeare." (new movies based on works by William Shakespeare) Time v148, n21 (Nov 4, 1996):88 (3 pages).

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare in production: whose history? / by H.R. Coursen. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1996.
UCB Main PR3091 .C675 1996

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare in space: recent Shakespeare productions on screen / H.R. Coursen New York: Peter Lang, c2002. Studies in Shakespeare; vol. 14
Main Stack PR3093.C67 2002

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespearean Performance as Interpretation / H.R. Coursen. Newark: University of Delaware Press; London: Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, c1992.
UCB Main PR3091 .C68 1992

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare: the two traditions / H.R. Coursen. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c1999.
UCB Main PR3100 .C68 1999

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare translated : derivatives on film and TV New York : Peter Lang, c2005.
MAIN: PR3093 .C675 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip054/2004027476.html

Coursen, Herbert R.
Teaching Shakespeare with film and television: a guide / H.R. Coursen. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1997.
UCB Main PR2987 .C68 1997

Coursen, Herbert R.
Watching Shakespeare on Television / H.R. Coursen. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, c1993.
UCB Main PR3093 .C68 1993
Contents via Google Books

Crowdus, Gary
"Shakespeare is up to date: an interview with Sir IanMcKellan." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter,1998):46 (2 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. An interview with Shakespearean actor Sir Ian McKellen. McKellen, who has enacted many of the major Shakespearean roles, has long been known as an advocate of updating the playwright's work. In the interview, he discusses a range of topics regarding the adaptation of Shakespeare for the screen, including his 1995 film adaptation Richard III, the choice of seasoned Shakespearean actors for Richard III because they can deliver the lines with the rhythm of contemporary speech, and his appreciation of Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet because it was a film rather than a filmed play." [Art Index]

Crowdus, Gary
"Sharing an enthusiasm for Shakespeare: an interview with Kenneth Branagh." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):34 (8 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. An interview with actor and filmmaker Kenneth Branagh. If any one filmmaker can be considered to be responsible for the current renaissance of film production of plays by Shakespeare, it is Branagh. Branagh discusses several topics in the interview, including his feeling that filming Hamlet invited a more strongly interpretive approach to the central character's inner life than he would take in the theater, his experience that the delivery of rhyming text requires a lightness of touch that is achieved a little more easily in cinema than in the theater, and his experience of being directed in Oliver Parker's Othello." [Art Index]

Crowdus, Gary.
"Words, words, words: recent Shakespearean films."Cineaste v23, n4 (Fall, 1998):13 (7 pages).
UC users only
"Recent Shakespearean films are discussed. The main challenge facing any filmmaker adapting Shakespeare is how to deal with the language, through which he delighted popular audiences with his poetic gifts and playful use of words. The usual response is to cut it, but what is more relevant than what is removed is the particular interpretation of the material that results, as well as the creative decisions made in performance and presentation. Being layered with complexities and ambiguities, the plays lend themselves to varying interpretations and meanings, and, although most filmmakers would be nervous about adding words to Shakespeare, there is no resistance to adding visual imagery to compensate for cuts or to embellish a particular interpretation. The writer goes on to discuss Oliver Parker's Othello, Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet, Al Pacino's Looking for Richard, Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet, and Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night, or What You Will." [Art Index]

Crowl, Samuel.
"Communicating Shakespeare: An Interview with Kenneth Branagh." Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 20(3):24-28. 2002 Summer

Crowl, Samuel.
Shakespeare at the cineplex : the Kenneth Branagh era Athens : Ohio University Press, c2003.
MAIN: PR3093 .C75 2003
MOFF: PR3093 .C75 2003;

Crowl, Samuel.
Shakespeare observed: studies in performance on stage and screen / Samuel Crowl. Athens : Ohio University Press, c1992.
Main Stack PR3093.C76 1992

Davies, Anthony
Filming Shakespeare's Plays: The Adaptations of Laurence Olivier, Orson Welles, Peter Brook, and Akira Kurosawa / Anthony Davies. Cambridge [Cambridgshire]; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988.
UCB Main PR3093 .D381 1988
UCB Moffitt PR3093 D38 1988
Contents via Google books
Contens via Google Books

Daileader, Celia R.
"Nude Shakespeare in film and nineties popular feminism." In: Shakespeare and sexuality / edited by Catherine M.S. Alexander, Stanley Wells. Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Main Stack PR3069.S45.S53 2001

Daz-Fernandez, Jose Ramon.
"Shakespeare on screen: a bibliography of critical studies." Post Script (17:1) 1997, 91-146.
UC users only

Daz-Fernandez, Joso Ramon.
"Orson Welles's Shakespeare Films: An Annotated Checklist." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 113-36, Spring 2005.

De, Esha Niyogi
"Modern Shakespeares in popular Bombay cinema: translation, subjectivity and community." Screen v. 43 no. 1 (Spring 2002) p. 19-40
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptation. Two Urdu adaptations of British Shakespearean works produced in the late-colonial and early-independence periods in India generated a hybrid art of filmmaking. The movies in question are Sohrab Modi's 1935 Hamlet alias Khoon ka Khoon, which was an adaptation of contemporary British stage productions of the eponymous play, and Kishore Sahu's 1954 Hamlet, which was a shot-by-shot reproduction of Laurence Olivier's 1948 eponymous adaptation. Their makers obviously copied the British sources and profited from the desire inculcated in English-educated producers and consumers to amass cultural capital, but they also interwove traditional narrative and cinematic techniques in these imitations. A "reflexive awareness" of the commonalities between the respective conceptual frameworks, and of their incommensurable differences, resulted from the filmmakers' efforts to reconcile contrasting worldviews, creating a hybrid of European texts as well as of the very notion of translation as the derivation of European models." [Art Index]

Dixon, Wheeler.
"The 'Performing Self' in Filmed Shakespearean Drama." Shakespeare Bulletin 5, no. 4 (1987): 18-19.
Suggests that alhough there is something lost in any filmic translation of a stage drama, there is also something to be gained--a final formalizing of the actor-audience relationship. Discusses, for example, Laurence Olivier's Richard III, Hamlet, and Henry V; Orson Welles's Macbeth; Roman Polanski's Macbeth; Stuart Burge's Julius Caesar; Robert Burton's and Nicol Williamson's Hamlet; and Peter Brook's King Lear

Donaldson, Peter Samuel
"'All which it inherit': Shakespeare, globes and global media." Shakespeare survey 52. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1999. p. 183-200.

Donaldson, Peter Samuel
Shakespearean Films/Shakespearean Directors / Peter S. Donaldson.Boston: Unwin Hyman, 1990.Series title: Media and popular culture
UCB Main PR3093 .D66 1990
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .D66 1990

Eckert, Charles W.
Focus on Shakespearean Films. Edited by Charles W. Eckert. EnglewoodCliffs, N.J., Prentice-Hall [1972]. Series title: Film focus. Series title: A Spectrum book.
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .E3

Fedderson, Kim; Richardson, J. Michael.
"Praising and Burying the Bard: Epideictic Dilemmas in Recent Adaptationsof Shakespeare." In: Relocating praise: literary modalities and rhetorical contexts / edited by Alice G. den Otter. pp: 119-27. Toronto: Canadian Scholars' Press, 2000.
Main Stack PN80.5.R44 2000

"Film adaptations of Shakespeare's works."(Editorial) Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):1 (1 page).
The film industry's renewed interest in Shakespeare returns his works tothe masses. Although Shakespeare had been an important part of popularculture during his own time, as well as in 18th- and 19th-century America,socioeconomic factors combined to transform him in the late 1900s into aelitist cultural figure whose works were shown only in 'legitimate'theaters and seen only by the upper class. The recent slew of filmadaptations of Shakespeare provides an opportunity for ordinary people toappreciate his plays.

Fisher, Bob.
"Tragedy of Epic Proportions." American Cinematographer v. 78 (Jan. '97) p. 58-60+.

French, Emma.
Selling Shakespeare to Hollywood : the marketing of filmed Shakespeare adaptations from 1989 into the new millennium Hatfield [England] : University of Hertfordshire Press, 2006.
MAIN: PN1995.9.M29 F74 2006

Friedmna, Michael D.
"Introduction: "To think o' th' teen that I have turned you to': The Scholarly Consideration of Teen Shakespeare Films."" Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p1-7, 7p
UC users only

Gates, David.
"Shakespeare: Dead White Male of the Year."(continuing popularity of theworks of William Shakespeare) Newsweek v128, n27 (Dec 30, 1996):82 (6 pages).
The study of Shakespeare has been dropped from many school curriculums, buthis popularity continues virtually unabated and his works continue to beproduced around the world. For example, in New York City before Christmas1996 three new Shakespeare films were showing, with another to open onChristmas.

Gielgud, John, Sir
Shakespeare: Hit or Miss? / John Gielgud with John Miller. London:Sidgwick & Jackson, 1991.
UCB Moffitt PN2598.G45 A3 1991

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare Through the Camera's Eye: III Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 2. (Spring, 1956), pp.235-240.
UC users only

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare through the Camera's Eye: IV." Alice V. GriffinShakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 4. (Autumn, 1966), pp.383-387.
UC users only

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare Through the Camera's Eye--Julius Caesar in Motion Pictures; Hamlet and Othello on Television." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 4, No. 3. (Jul., 1953), pp.331-336.
(Berkeley users only)

Grindley, Carl James.
"'We're Everyone You Depend On': Filming Shakespeare's Peasants." In: Shakespeare and the Middle Ages : essays on the performance and adaptation of the plays with medieval sources or settings / edited by Martha W. Driver and Sid Ray ; foreword by Michael Almereyda and Dakin Matthews. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3069.M47 S54 2009

Gronsky, Daniel
"Shakespeare in Translation: Foreign Film Versions of Shakespeare's Plays." Film International # 11 / 2004:5

Guneratne, Anthony R.
Shakespeare, film studies, and the visual cultures of modernity / Anthony R. Guneratne. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .G86 2008

Hamilton Ball, Robert
"On Shakespeare Filmography" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 299
UC users only

Hardison, O. B.
"Shakespeare on Film: The Developing Canon." PCLS, vol. 12. 1981. pp: 131-145.

Hatchuel, Sarah.
Shakespeare : from stage to screen / Sarah Hatchuel. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .H37 2004
Pacific Film Archive PR3093 .H37 2004

Hirsch, Foster.
Laurence Olivier / Foster Hirsch. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1979. Series title: Twayne's theatrical arts series.
UCB Main PN2598.O55 .H5
UCB Moffitt PN2598.O55 .H5

Hatchuel, Sarah.
Shakespeare : from stage to screen Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
MAIN: PR3093 .H37 2004
PFA : PR3093 .H37 2004
Contents via Google Books

Holderness, Graham.
"Radical potentiality and institutional closure: Shakespeare in film and television." In: Political Shakespeare: essays in cultural materialism / edited by Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield. 2nd ed. pp: 182-201. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994.
Main Stack PR3017.P59 1994

Holderness, Graham.
"Shakespeare Rewound." Shakespeare Survey v45 (Annual, 1993):63 (12 pages).
The adaptation of Shakespearean drama into film is analyzed. Results showthat the main difficulty in capturing the essence of the text intofilm-text is in the simultaneous and overlapping textual planes of WilliamShakespeare's plays. Experimental films have attempted to duplicate this byprojecting each scene on three screans to represent a visual image fromthree perspectives. Others have attempted deconstructive techniques andformal montage.

Homan, Sidney
"A Cinema for Shakespeare." Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 17
UC users only

Howlett, Kathy M.
Framing Shakespeare on filmAthens: Ohio University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .H69 2000

DISSERTATION
Hurtgen, Charles Livermore.
Film Adaptations of Shakespeare's Plays / by Charles Livermore Hurtgen.1962.
NRLFC 2 944 442

Hulbert, Jennifer.
Shakespeare and youth culture / Jennifer Hulbert, Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr., and Robert L. York. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR2976 .H48 2006

Hurtgen, Charles Livermore
"The Operatic Character of Background Music in Film Adaptations of Shakespeare"Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 1. (Winter, 1969), pp.53-64.
(UCB users only)

"The Inaccessible Bard." (Shakespeare film adaptions) Economist v342, n8004 (Feb 15, 1997):81 (2 pages).
Film adaptions of Shakespeare reached their nadir with the recent releaseof the truly horrible 'Tromeo and Juliet,' but dubious productions of theBard in both stage and screen have a long history. Problems even the mostgifted directors have in producing Shakespeare are examined.

Iyengar, Sujata.
"Shakespeare in HeteroLove." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 122-27.
UCB users only

Jackson, Russell
"Shakespeare and the Cinema." In: The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare / edited by Margreta de Grazia and Stanley Wells. pp: 217-33. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Series title: Cambridge companions to literature.
UCB Main PR2894 .C33 2001

Jackson, Russell
"Working with Shakespeare: confessions of an adviser." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):42 (3pages).
UC users only
A historical adviser on Shakespearean productions describes hiswork. He served as 'text' adviser on three film adaptations of Shakespeare by Kenneth Branagh, on Oliver Parker's 'Othello' and on John Madden's'Shakespeare in Love.' He has also served as a consultant on stage and radioproductions of Shakespeare. His work entails assessing how the original Shakespearean text has been changed and suggesting where to add or take outportions of the text. He does this while also considering the point of view ofthe screenwriter.

Jess-Cooke, Carolyn
Shakespeare on film : such things as dreams are made of London ; New York : Wallflower, 2007.
MAIN: PR3093 .J47 2007

Jorgens, Jack J.
Shakespeare on Film / Jack J. Jorgens. Bloomington: Indiana UniversityPress, c1977.
UCB Main PR3093 .J6
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .J6

Jorgens, Jack J.
"Shakespeare on film and television." In: William Shakespeare: his world, his work, his influence / John F. Andrews, editor. pp: 681-703. New York: Scribner, c1985.
Main Stack PR2976.W5354 1985 p.

Juan Gil, Daniel
"Avant-garde Technique and the Visual Grammar of Sexuality in Orson Welles's Shakespeare Films." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. [no pagination], Fall 2005

Kachur, B.A.
"The First Shakespeare Film: A Reconsideration and Reconstruction of Tree's 'King John.'"(Beerbohm Tree) Theatre Survey v32, n1 (May, 1991):43 (21 pages).
"Considers the actors, scenery, costumes, sites, and cinemagraphic techniques used in British director Herbert Beerbohm Tree's production of King John (1899), the first Shakespearean play to be filmed. Pays particular attention to the numerous contemporary periodicals used to reconstruct the history of this film." [Historical Abstracts]

Kingsley-Smith, Jane E.
"Shakesperean authorship in popular British cinema." (Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly July 2002 v30 i3 p158(8)
UC users only
"'The Immortal Gentleman,' 'Time Flies,' and 'Shakespeare in Love' are 20th-century motion pictures portraying William Shakespeare as struggling with inspiration. Questions of Shakespeare as author of the plays with which he is identified and the possibility of his work having been collaborative are raised in these movies but ultimately resolved in his favor.' [Expanded Academic Index]

Lake, James H.
"Auteurial Control of Audience Response in Some Film Adaptations of Shakespearean Tragedy."Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 16(3):33-35. 1998 Summer

Lamm, Zachary
" The Cinematic Shrews of Teen Comedy: Gendering Shakespeare in Twentieth-Century Film." Genders; 2009, Issue 49, p1-1, 1p
UC users only

Lan, Yong-Li.
"Returning to Naples: Seeing the End in Shakespeare Film Adaptation." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 128-34.
UCB users only

Lane, Anthony
"Shakespeare on Film." In: Nobody's perfect : writings from the New Yorker / Anthony Lane. New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2002.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .L28 2002

Lane, Anthony.
"Tights! Camera! Action! What Does it Mean that the Bard Recently Hit No.1 at the Box Office?"(film adaptations of Shakespearean plays) New Yorker v72, n36 (Nov 25, 1996):65 (11 pages).
William Shakespeare' plays have been vehicles for films since the earlyhistory of the motion picture industry. An overview of these adaptions andassessments of the new 'Romeo and Juliet' and of Al Pacino's 'Looking forRichard' are presented.

Lanier, Douglas M.
"Recent Shakespeare Adaptation and the Mutations of Cultural Capital." Shakespeare Studies, 2010, Vol. 38, p104-113, 10p
UC users only

Lanier, Douglas M.
"Shakescorp noir." (Screen Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Shakespeare Quarterly, Summer 2002 v53 i2 p157(24)
UC users only
"The rise of Shakespeare-based motion pictures in the 1990s may be seen as an attempt to reconfigure the relationship between traditional literature, multinational media industries, global economic capital and celebrity culture. This proliferation should not obscure the concept of film as a pervasive culture industry closely linked to coporate capitalism." [Expanded Academic Index]

Lanier, Douglas
"World-Wide Shakespeares: Local Appropriations in Film and Performance." Shakespeare Quarterly. Winter 2007. Vol. 58, Iss. 4; p. 562 (5 pages)

Lehmann, Courtney
"Crouching Tiger, Hidden Agenda: How Shakespeare and the Renaissance Are Taking the Rage Out of Feminism." Shakespeare Quarterly - Volume 53, Number 2, Summer 2002
UC users only

Lehmann, Courtney
"Kenneth Branagh at the Quilting Point: Shakespearean Adaptation, Postmodern Auteurism, and the (Schizophrenic) Fabric of 'Everyday Life'"Post Script - Essays in Film and the Humanities 17:1 [Fall 1997] p.6-27
UC users only
"Offers an analysis of the film adaptation of Shakespeare's "Henry V" by the actor-director Kenneth Branagh and discusses how his dual identity as an Irishman and as an Englishman has influenced his aesthetic philosophy toward the production of Shakespeare. Argues that this "schizophrenic" aspect of Branagh's cultural heritage informs his merging of the "high" culture of Shakespeare with the "low" cultural form of film and is indicative of art during the postmodern age." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Lehmann, Courtney.
Shakespeare remains: theater to film, early modern to postmodern Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2002.
MAIN: PR3093 .L45 2002
Contens via Google Books

Lehmann, Courtney.
"Brave New Bard." (best books on Shakespeare in the movies)(Critical Essay) Cineaste v26, n1 (Winter, 2000):62.

Leonard, Kendra Preston.
Shakespeare, madness, and music : scoring insanity in cinematic adaptations / Kendra Preston Leonard Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2009.
Music ML80.S5 L43 2009

Literatur in Film und Fernsehen: von Shakespeare bis Beckett
Herbert Grabes (Hg.).Konigstein/Ts.: Scriptor, 1980.
MAIN: PN1997.85 .L49 1980

London, Todd.
"Shakespeare in a strange land." (theater and motion picture versions ofShakespeare's works) American Theatre v15, n6 (July-August, 1998):22 (8 pages).
Most theater and motion picture production groups have presented some ofShakespeare's works in a way that makes it easier for people to understandthem. However, a review of modern theater renditions and film adaptationsof Shakespearean works during the early 1998 showed that they have onlyundermined some values for appreciating Shakespeare's plays. These filmadaptations include Al Pacino's 'Looking for Richard' and Joe Calarco's'Romeo and Juliet.'

Lyons, Donald.
"Lights, Camera, Shakespeare." Commentary, vol. 103 no. 2. 1997 Feb. pp: 57-60.

Manvell, Roger
Shakespeare and the Film. New York, Praeger [1971].
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .M3

Manvell, Roger
Shakespeare and the Film / Roger Manvell. Rev. and updated. SouthBrunswick, N.J.: A. S. Barnes, 1979.
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .M3 1979

Marder, Louis.
"The Shakespeare film: facts and problems." Shakespeare Newsletter (Univ. of Illinois at ChicagoCircle) (23) 42, 49. 1973

McGuire, Philip C.
Speechless Dialect: Shakespeare's Open Silences / Philip C. McGuire.Berkeley: University of California Press, c1985.
UCB Main PR3091 .M27 1985

McKernan, Luke.
"Beerbohm Tree's King John rediscovered: the first Shakespeare film, September 1899." Shakespeare Bulletin (11:1) 1993,35-6; (11:2) 1993, 49-50.
UC users only

McLean, Andrew M.
Shakespeare, Annotated Bibliographies and Media Guide for Teachers /Andrew M. McLean. Urbana, Ill.: National Council of Teachers of English,c1980.
NRLFB 3 494 435

Meier, Paul.
"Kenneth Branagh: With Utter Clarity." (Interview) TDR (Cambridge, Mass.) v41, n2 (Summer, 1997):82 (8 pages).
Kenneth Branagh has directed film versions of 'Henry V' and 'Much Ado AboutNothing' and is credited with making the works of Shakespeare accessible toa new generation. He was interviewed on Oct 30, 1995, just before he beganproduction of the film version of 'Hamlet.' He explained that he tries toachieve a balance between imaginative interpretation and faithfulness tothe text. During rehearsals, he often provides background information aboutthe characters and time period, but encourages actors to add their ownpersonal response to the language. Branagh also discussed aesthetics,meter, famous Shakespearean actors and other topics.

Melnikoff, Kirk (ed. and introd.)
"Orson Welles and Shakespeare on Film." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 5-136, Spring 2005.

Melkinoff, Kirk
"Wartime Shakespeare: The Strange Case of Bataan (1943)." Literature Film Quarterly; 2007, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p129-139, 11p
UC users only
"The article endeavors to examine Hollywood films between 1934 and 1943 that incorporate elements of Shakespearean drama into their narrative. The author focuses on the film "Bataan," a World War II combat film that uses elements of "Hamlet" and "Macbeth." A connection between "Bataan" and "Hamlet" can be seen in the lead character's surname in "Bataan," Dane and allusion to Hamlet the Danish prince, and in the film's examination of the consequences of inaction, a central theme of "Hamlet." The author examines the career of "Bataan" screenwriter Robert Hardy Andrews. The article discusses the box office failure of several 1934-1943 Shakespeare films." [Ebsco]

Millard, Barbara C.
"Shakespeare on Film: Towards an Audience Perceived and Perceiving." Literature/Film Quarterly 5:4 (1977:Fall) 352
UC users only

Morris, Peter
Shakespeare on Film. Ottawa, Canadian Film Institute, 1972.
UCB Main PR3093 .M61
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .M6

Morris, Peter
"Shakespeare on film." (incl index of films, 1929-1971) Films in Review v 24 Mar 1973. p. 132-63

Morrison, Michael A.
John Barrymore, Shakespearean actor / Michael A. Morrison. Cambridge [England]; New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Series title: Cambridge studies in American theatre and drama 10.
UCB Main PR3112 .M67 1997

Mullin, Michael
"Shakespeare USA: The BBC Plays And American Education." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 5, Special Issue:Teaching Shakespeare. (1984), pp. 582-589. (Berkeley users only)

Mulrooney, Jonathan.
"Rough magic in America.(Shakespeare on Film)." Shakespeare Bulletin 24.1 (Spring 2006): 29(17). (Berkeley users only)

Murphy, Andrew.
"The Book on the Screen: Shakespeare Films and Textual Culture."In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 10-25. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Naremore, James, ed.
"Welles/Shakespeare/film: an overview."In: Film adaptation / edited and with an introduction by James Naremore. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c2000. Naremore, James. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F55 2000

Niyogi De, Esha
"Modern Shakespeare in popular Bombay cinema: translation, subjectivity and community." Screen;Vol.XLIII nr.1 (Spring 2002); p.19-40
Two Indian adaptations of 'Hamlet': "Khoon ka khoon" (1935) and Kishore Sahu's "Hamlet" (1955)are considered for their illustration of a colonial and post-colonial translation of an imperious 'master text'.

O'Brien, Geoffrey.
"The Ghost at the Feast. (review of film adaptations and other productionsof Shakespeare) New York Review of Books v44, n2 (Feb 6, 1997):11 (6 pages).

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Clip Art: Theorizing the Shakespeare Film Clip." Shakespeare Quarterly. 53(2):227-40. 2002Summer
UC users only

Osborne, Laurie (ed. and introd.)
"Screening Shakespeare." Colby-Quarterly, 2001 Mar, 37:1.

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Mixing Media in Shakespeare: Animating Tales and Colliding Modes of Production." Post Script, vol. 17 no. 2. 1998 Winter-Spring. pp: 73-89..
UC users only

Osborne, Laurie (ed. and introd.).
"Screening Shakespeare." Colby Quarterly. 37(1). 2001 Mar

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Speculations on Shakespearean cinematic liveness.(Shakespeare ON FILM)(William Shakespeare)(Critical essay)." Shakespeare Bulletin 24.3 (Fall 2006): 49(17).
UC users only

Pearson, Roberta E.; Uricchio, William.
"How many times shall Caesar bleed insport: Shakespeare and the cultural debate about moving pictures." Screen, v. 31 (Autumn '90) p. 243-61
Also in:
The silent cinema reader / edited by Lee Grieveson and Peter Kramer. London ; New York : Routledge, 2004.
Main Stack PN1995.75.S547 2004
PFA PN1995.75.S547 2004

Pendleton, Thomas A.
"Shakespeare . . . with additional dialog." Cineaste, v. 24 no1('98) p. 62-6
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare.The writer considers how Shakespeare's dialog is dealt with in film adaptations of hisplays. Shakespeare's language intimidates, and although filmmakers will cut, adapt,rearrange, reassign speeches, choose strange settings, and do all kinds of things to thetexts, they are very wary of adding their own words. In fact, they are usually moreconcerned about eliminating words, and most films cut one third or even half of the lines.However, filmmakers are somewhat less hesitant about interpolating other texts and feelrelatively free to add songs. The writer goes on to discuss the effectiveness of the dialogin several films, including Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night, which may well be the best of thecurrent crop of Shakespeare films." [from ArtAbstracts]

Pendleton, Thomas A.
"What (?) Price (?) Shakespeare (?)." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 135-46
UCB users only
Investigates three films using Shakespeare material and featuring Vincent Price.

Pigeon, Renee.
"'No Man's Elizabeth': The Virgin Queen in Recent Films." In: Retrovision : reinventing the past in film and fiction. Edited by Deborah Cartmell, I.Q. Hunter, and Imelda Whelehan. pp: 8-24. London; Sterling, Va.: Pluto Press, 2001. Series title: Film/fiction; v. 6.
UCB Main PN1995.9.H5 R46 2001

Pilkington, Ace G.
Screening Shakespeare from Richard II to Henry V / Ace G. Pilkington.Newark: University of Delaware Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: AssociatedUniversity Presses, c1991.
UCB Main PR3093 .P55 1991
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .P55 1991
Contents via Google Books

Prumm, Hans-Joachim.
Film-script, William Shakespeare: Eine Untersuchung derFilm-Bearbeitungen von Shakespeares Dramen am Beispiel AusgewahlterTragodien-Verfilmungen von 1945-1985 / von Hans-Joachim Prumm.Amsterdam:B.R. Gruner, 1987. Series title: Munchner Studien zur neueren englischen Literatur; Bd. 3.
UCB Main PR3093 .P71 1987

The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory
Edited by Lisa S. Starks and Courtney Lehmann. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

Rhu, Lawrence F.
Stanley Cavell's American dream : Shakespeare, philosophy, and Hollywood movies Fordham University Press, 2006.
MAIN: B945.C274 R48 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0610/2006007880.html

Rosenthal, Daniel M.
Shakespeare on screen / Daniel Rosenthal ; foreword by Ian McKellen. London : Hamlyn, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.R65 2000

Ross, Charles
"Underwater Women in Shakespeare Films." CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture: A WWWeb Journal, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 27 paragraphs, March 2004.

Rothwell, Kenneth S. (Kenneth Sprague)
A History of Shakespeare on Screen: A Century of Film and Television / Kenneth S. Rothwell. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
UCB Main PR3093 .R67 1999
Contents via Google Books

Rothwell, Kenneth S. (Kenneth Sprague)
Shakespeare on Screen: An International Filmography and Videography /Kenneth S. Rothwell and Annabelle Henkin Melzer. New York: Neal-Schuman,c1990.
UCB Ref/Bib PR3093 .R68 1990
UCB Media Ctr PR3093 .R68 1990

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
How the Twentieth Century Saw the Shakespeare Film: 'Is It Shakespeare?'." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 82-95.
UCB users only
Survey of the literature on the study of Shakespeare on film.

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Orson Welles: Shakespeare for the art houses." (Shakespeare in the Cinema) Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):28 (6 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. Orson Welles's film adaptations of Shakespeare's plays are discussed. Welles made and starred in three such films: Macbeth (1948), Othello (1952), and Chimes at Midnight (1966). He also undertook ambitious plans for films based on Shylock and King Lear, but neither project was realized. His Macbeth explores the tortured soul of Macbeth through the Wellesian world of skewed camera angles and brilliant decoupage, and the film's sheer nerve and energy make it impossible to ignore. In Chimes at Midnight, Welles gave his best performance as the larger-than-life yet vulnerable antihero Sir John Falstaff, and his Othello, which took three years to make because of repeated financial crises, is a work of art. In his struggle to find the best way to put Shakespeare on screen, however, Welles never quite made the transition from bohemian art house to suburban mall house." [Art Index]

Sammons, Eddie
Shakespeare : a hundred years on film Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2004.
MAIN: PR3093 .S26 2004

Shakespeare after mass media
Edited by Richard Burt. New York : Palgrave, 2002.
Main Stack PR2970.S49 2002

Shakespeares after Shakespeare : an encyclopedia of the Bard in mass media and popular culture
Edited by Richard Burt. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2007.
Main Stack PR2880.A1.S48 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0611/2006010852.html

Shakespeare and appropriation
Edited by Christy Desmet and Robert Sawyer. London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PR2880.A1.S52 1999

Shakespeare and the Moving Image: The Plays on Film and Television
Edited by Anthony Davies and Stanley Wells. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
UCB Main PR3093 .S53 1994
Contens via Google Books

Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle
Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. New York: St. Martin's Press,
Main Stack PR3093 .S485 2000

"Shakespeare in the cinema: a film directors' symposium." (Shakespeare in the Cinema)(Panel Discussion)Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):48 (8 pages).
UC users only
A panel discussion among filmmakers who have been involved in adapting Shakespeare's plays for the cinema was conducted to gain insights into their working methods and aesthetic considerations. Participants included Sir Peter Hall ('A Midsummer Night's Dream,' 1968), Roman Polanski ('Macbeth,' 1971), Franco Zeffirelli ('Romeo and Juliet,' 1968), Baz Luhrmann ('William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet,' 1996) and Richard Loncraine ('Richard III,' 1995).

Shakespeare on Film
Edited by Robert Shaughnessy. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998. Series title: New casebooks.
UCB Main PR3093 .S537 1998
Contens via Google Books

"Shakespeare on Film: A Selected Checklist."
Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 191
UC users only

Shakespeare, The Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video
Edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
Main Stack PR3093.S545 1997
Contents via Google Books

Shakespeare, the movie, II : popularizing the plays on film, TV, video, and DVD / edited by Richard Burt and Lynda E. Boose. London ; New York : Routledge,
Main Stack PR3093.S543 2003

Silverstone, Catherine.
Shakespeare, trauma and contemporary performance / Catherine Silverstone. New York : Routledge, 2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3100 .S65 2011
Contents: Introduction -- "Honour the real thing?: Gregory Doran's Titus Andronicus in South Africa -- The legacy of colonisation: Don C. Selwyn's The maori Merchant of Venice and Aotearoa New Zealand -- Sexuality, trauma and community: The tempest, Philip Osment's This island's mine and gay sweatshop -- Theatres of war: Nicholas Hytner's Henry V.

Silviria, Dale
Laurence Olivier and the Art of Film Making / Dale Silviria. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, c1985.
UCB Main PN2598.O55 S54 1985
UCB Moffitt PN2598.O55 S54 1985

Simmon, Scott.
"Concerning the Weary Legs of Wyatt Earp: The Classic Western according to Shakespeare." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 24 no. 2. 1996. pp: 114-27.
UC users only

Skrebels, Paul.
"What's Shakespeare to Us or We to Shakespeare? An Interventionist Teaching and Learning Strategy." Readerly-Writerly Texts 2000 Spring-Winter, 8:1-2, 93-103.

Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002
Contents: All our Othello: black monsters and white masks on the American screen / Marguerite Hailey Rippy -- "How very like the home life of our own dear queen": Ian McKellen's Richard III / Lisa Hopkins -- (Un)doing the book "without Verona walls": a view from the receiving end of Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet / Alfredo Michel Modenessi -- Cutting up characters: the erotic politics of Trevor Nunn's Twelfth night / Laurie Osborne -- The marriage of Shakespeare and Hollywood: Kenneth Branagh's Much ado about nothing / Samuel Crowl -- Shakespeare in love: romancing the author, mastering the body / Courtney Lehmann -- "Art thou base, common, and popular?": The cultural politics of Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet / Douglas Lanier -- From the cinema to the classroom: Hollywood teaches Hamlet / Elizabeth A. Deitchman -- The film's the thing: using Shakespearean film in the classroom / Annalisa Castaldo -- Afterword: Te(e)n things I hate about Girlene Shakesploitation flicks in the late 1990's, or not-so-fast times at Shakespeare high / Richard Burt.

Starks, Lisa S.
"'Remember Me': Psychoanalysis, Cinema, and the Crisis of Modernity." Shakespeare Quarterly. 53(2):181-200. 2002 Summer
UC users only

Stenberg, Doug.
"The Circle of Life and the Chain of Being: Shakespearean Motifs in The Lion King." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 14 no. 2. 1996 Spring. pp: 36-37.

Streisand, Betsy.
"Looking for Mr. Good Bard this fall." (Shakespeare film adaptions) U.S. News & World Report v121, n19 (Nov 11, 1996):77 (1 page).
Motion picture studios have traditionally been very reluctant to try and film the works of Shakespeare, believing them to be too difficult and hard for audiences to appreciate. A new group of movies based on the Bard's work are now being produced, hoping to reverse that trend.

Styan, J. L.
Perspectives on Shakespeare in performance / J.L. Styan. New York: P. Lang, 1999. Series title: Studies in Shakespeare; vol. 11.
UCB Main PR3091 .S79 1999

Teker, Gulsen Sayin.
"Empowered by madness: Ophelia in the films of Kozintsev, Zeffirelli, and Branagh.(Grigori Kozintsev, Franco Zeffirelli, Kenneth Branagh)(Critical essay)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 113(7).
UC users only

Thompson, Ayanna.
"Rewriting the "Real": Popular Shakespeare in the 1990s." Journal of Popular Culture. Dec 2007. Vol. 40, Iss. 6; p. 1052 (21 pages)
(UCB users only)

Thorp, Margaret Farrand
"Shakespeare and the Movies." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 3. (Summer, 1958), pp. 357-366.
(UCB users only)

Tibbetts, John C.
Backstage with the Bard: or, Building a Better Mousetrap." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 147-64.
UCB users only
Looks at films that do not adapt Shakespeare so much as assimilate him into their primary texts.

Tibbetts, John.
"Breaking the Classical Barrier: Franco Zeffirelli interviewed by John Tibbetts." Literature-Film Quarterly v22, n2 (April, 1994):136 (5 pages).
UC users only
Director Franco Zeffirelli places importance on bringing opera and William Shakespeare's works to a mass audience, as in his Shakespearean films. His 1990 film of 'Hamlet' was only possible because it starred Mel Gibson, for there is great difficulty in selling Shakespeare to film studios today. Zeffirelli sees Hamlet as the first modern man, although he gave the sets a primitive medieval look with grayish colors. He sees Shakespeare's language as a challenge for accessibility to a modern audience.

Tiffany, Grace
"Not much information about Bollywood Shakespeare." (William Shakespeare in Indian cinema)(Critical Essay) Shakespeare Newsletter Winter 2002 v52 i4 p123(1)

"Tough acts." (film adaptations of William Shakespeare's plays)(Editorial)Sight and Sound v7, n2 (Feb, 1997):3 (1 page).
Filmdom is facing a current trend toward contemporary film adaptations of Shakespearean plays, which has elicited sundry reactions from the film community. While critics smirk on the merits of these adaptations relative to their justification, filmmakers as well as the fare-getters welcome the refreshing change from the cliche Hollywood formulas to verified story-telling inherent in every classic Shakespearean tale.

Transforming Shakespeare: contemporary women's re-visions in literature and performance
Edited by Marianne Novy. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999.
UCB Main PR2880.A1 T7 1999

Walker, Elsie
"Shakespeare on Film: Early Modern Texts, Postmodern Statements." Literature Compass 1 (2003)SH 035,1 -5
UC users only

Walking Shadows: Shakespeare in the National Film and Television Archive
Eited by Luke McKernan and Olwen Terris. London: British Film Institute, 1994.
UCB Main PR2880.A1 W35 1994

Watson, William Van.
"Shakespeare, Zeffirelli, and the Homosexual Gaze." (Franco Zeffirelli) (Shakespeare - Film & Television) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):308 (18 pages).
UC users only
Director Franco Zeffirelli displays a homosexual 'gaze' in much of his camera work. Often Zeffirelli's camera will focus on the bearer rather than the object of the gaze, and often the bearer will be one of his handsome leading actors such as Michael York or Leonard Whiting. In his film version of 'Taming of the Shrew' Zeffirelli balances such scenes with shots of Elizabeth Taylor's cleavage. The homosexual gaze that Zeffirelli brings to the camera is not overdone and seems tempered by his own closeted sexual politics.

Welles, Orson
Orson Welles on Shakespeare : the W.P.A. and Mercury Theatre playscripts / edited with an introduction by Richard France. New York : Greenwood Press, 1990. Contributions in drama and theatre studies ; no. 30
Main Stack PR2877.W45 1990

Welsh, James M.
"Classic demolition: why Shakespeare is not exactly 'our contemporary'; or, 'Dude, where's my hankie?'." Literature/Film Quarterly (30:3) [2002:3] , p.223-227.
UC users only

Welsh, Jim.
"Shakespeare Boom or Bust?" West Virginia University Philological Papers. 47:150-54. 2001

Welsh, James M.
"What is a "Shakespeare film," anyway?" In: The literature/film reader : issues of adaptation / edited by James M. Welsh, Peter Lev. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .L516 2007

Willis, Susan
The BBC Shakespeare Plays: Making the Televised Canon / Susan Willis. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, c1991.
UCB Main PR3093 .W55 1991
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .W55 1991

Willson, Robert Frank
Shakespeare in Hollywood, 1929-1956 Madison [N.J.]: London; Cranbury, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; Associated University Presses, 2000.
UCB Main PR3093.W57 2000

Yong, Li Lan
"Returning to Naples: seeing the end in Shakespeare film adaptation." Literature/Film Quarterly; Vol.XXIX nr.2 (2001); p.128-134
UC users only
Examines the differences that cinematic reproduction makes to the endings of Shakespeare in several film versions of the plays.

Individual Plays

Anthony and Cleopatra

Deats, Sara Munson
"Shakespeare's Anamorphic Drama: A Survey of Antony and Cleopatra in Criticism, on Stage, and on Screen." In: Antony and Cleopatra : new critical essays / edited by Sara Munson Deats. New York : Routledge, 2005. Shakespeare criticism ;v. 30
Main PR2802 .A837 2005 Deats, Sara Munson, Deats, Sara Munson (ed.). (2005). Antony and Cleopatra: New Critical Essays. (pp. 1-93). New York, NY: Routledge, x, 341 pp.

As You Like It

Crowl, Samuel
"As You Like It." Shakespeare Bulletin; Spring 2008, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p97-101, 5p
The article reviews the film "As You Like It," directed by Kenneth Branagh and starring Kevin Kline, Alfred Molina and Brian Blessed.

Hatchuel, Sarah.
"Review of Kenneth Branagh's As You Like It, or All the World's a Film." Shakespeare, Dec2007, Vol. 3 Issue 3, p365-368, 4p
UC users only

Hollifield, Scott
"The Lionesses and Olive Trees of Meiji-Era Japan: A Consideration of Kenneth Branagh's As You Like It." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, Vol III · No. 2 Spring/Summer 2008

Jays, David
"As You Like It." Sight & Sound; Oct 2007, Vol. 17 Issue 10, p48-48, 1p
UC users only

Klett, Elizabeth
"Dreaming of Orientalism in Kenneth Branagh's As You Like It." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, Vol III · No. 2 Spring/Summer 2008

Falstaff (Chimes at Midnight): Orson Welles

Anderegg, Michael
"'Every Third Word a Lie': Rhetoric and History in Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Film Quarterly XL/3, Spring 87; p.18-24.
UC users only
Criticizes Orson Welles's use of Shakespeare's language and history in Chimes at Midnight. Reprinted under the same title in Beja, Perspectives on Orson Welles [F]: 210-18; incorporated into Anderegg, Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture

Arthur, Paul; Liebler, Naomi C.
"Kings of the road: "My Own Private Idaho" and the traversal of Welles, Shakespeare, and liminality." Post Script, 1998, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p26-38, 13p;
UC users only

Baxter, Keith.
"Filming Falstaff." [translated] Positif 378 (1992): 29-35.
Recounts the filming of Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight. Baxter, who played Prince Hal in the film, wrote this in 1982. Translated by Francois Thomas.

Bell, Robert H.
"Rereading Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Southwest Review; 2004, Vol. 89 Issue 4, p566-574, 9p
UC users only
Offers an appreciation of Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight as both a flawed work and "a strong interpretation of Shakespeare."

Bell, Robert H.
"Rereading Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Shakespeare Newsletter 54 (2004-5): 17, 20, 22.
Offers an appreciation of Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight as both a flawed work and "a strong interpretation of Shakespeare."

Chimes at Midnight: Orson Welles, Director
Bridget Gellert Lyons, editor. New Brunswick [N.J.]: Rutgers University Press, c1988. Series title: Rutgers films in print; [v. 11].
UCB Main PN1997 .C46437 1988
UCB Moffitt PN1997 .C46437 1988

Crowl, Samuel
"The Long Goodbye: Welles and Falstaff." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 3. (Autumn, 1980), pp. 369-380.
(UCB users only)
Analyzes Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight as an exception to the recent trend in productions to diminish Falstaff in order to explore other values in 1 and 2 Henry IV and Henry V.

Curren-Aquino, Deborah T.
"Chimes at Midnight: Retrospectively Elegiac." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter 4, no. 1 (December 1979): 1, 7-8.
Discusses how Orson Welles makes the betrayal of a friendship between Hal and Falstaff the core of Chimes at Midnight

Dean, Leonard F.
"Comedy, Cultural Poetics, and Chimes at Midnight." Sewanee Review 102 (1994): 451-55.

Hapgood, Robert.
"Chimes at Midnight from Stage to Screen: The Art of Adaptation."Shakespeare Survey 39 (1987): 39-52.
Studies Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight against the backdrop of his earlier stage productions: the aborted Five Kings (1938), which folded before reaching the New York stage, and the Belfast/Dublin Chimes at Midnight (1960). Reprinted in Alexander, editor, The Cambridge Shakespeare Library, Volume 3: Shakespeare Performance (q.v.), and in Beja, editor, Perspectives on Orson Welles [F]: 193-209.

Hoffman, Dean A.
"'Bypaths and Indirect Crooked Ways': Mise-en-Scene in Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 87-112, Spring 2005.
UC users only

Howlett, Kathy M.
"Utopian revisioning of Falstaff's tavern world: Orson Welles's Chimes at midnight and Gus Van Sant's My own private Idaho." In Framing Shakespeare on film. pp. 149-77. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .H69 2000

Howlett, Kathy M.
"Utopian Revisioning of Falstaff's Tavern World: Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight and Gus Van Sant's My Own Private Idaho." In: The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory Edited by Lisa S. Starks and Courtney Lehmann. pp: 165-88. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

McBride, Joseph
" Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Film Quarterly, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Autumn, 1969), pp. 11-20
UC users only

McLean, Andrew M.
"Orson Welles and Shakespeare: History and Consciousness in Chimes at midnight." Literature/Film Quarterly XI/3, July 83; p.197-202.
UC users only
Demonstrates how the segments in the motion picture 'Chimes at Midnight' or 'Falstaff,' directed by Orson Welles capture the essence of Shakespearean tetralogy. Details on the filming of 'Falstaff'; Setting of the film.

McLean, Andrew M.
"Orson Welles and Shakespeare: History and Consciousness in "Chimes at Midnight" Literature/Film Quarterly 11:3 (1983) 197
UC users only
(Shakespeare On Film IV Papers from the World Shakespeare Congress, 1981 Stratford-upon-Avon)

Poague, Leland.
"`Reading the Prince?: Shakespeare, Welles, and Some Aspects of Chimes at Midnight." Iowa State Journal of Research 56, no. 1 (1981): 57-65.

Rubin, Stanley S.
"Welles/Falstaff/Shakespeare/Welles: The Narrative Structure of Chimes at Midnight." Film Criticism 2, nos. 2-3 (1977-78): 66-71.
UC users only

Sylvano, John B.
"Orson Welles`s Falstaff: A Selected Bibliography." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter 2, no. 2 (April 1978): 3, 8.

Falstaff: My Own Private Idaho: Gus Van Sant

See Gay/Lesbian bibliography

Hamlet

Baker, David.
"Ophelia's Travels." In: Gender and Culture in Literature and Film East and West: Issues of Perception and Interpretation: selected conference papers / edited by Nitaya Masavisut, George Simson, Larry E. Smith. pp: 3-8. Honolulu, Hawaii: College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature, University of Hawaii: East-West Center: Distributed by University of Hawaii Press, c1994. Series title: Literary studies--East and West; v. 9.
UCB AsianAmer PN1995.9.A8 G46
UCB Main PN1995.9.A78 G46 1994

Biggs, Murray.
"'He's Going to His Mother's Closet': Hamlet and Gertrude on Screen." Shakespeare Survey v45 (Annual, 1993):53 (10 pages).
Four 20th century film adaptations of William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' are analyzed focusing on the closet scene, which is Act 3, Scene 4. This is because it is considered the emotional center of the play, is conceivedfrom the camera's perspective and focuses on the complex love between Hamlet and Gertrude. Results show that the four productions interpreted Hamlet's character in differing but probable ways, significantly widening the scope of the debate regarding the hero's nature.

Bigliazzi, Silvia.
"'The Time Is out of Joint': Hamlet on Screen and the Crystal Image." Hamlet Studies, vol. 18 no. 1-2. 1996 Summer-Winter. pp: 105-25.

Burton, J. Anthony
"The Lady Vanishes or, the Incredible Shrinking Gertrude." In: Acts of criticism : performance matters in Shakespeare and his contemporaries : essays in honor of James P. Lusardi / edited by Paul Nelsen and June Schlueter. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2006.
Main Stack PR3091.A27 2006

Gillespie, David
"Adapting foreign classics : Kozintsev's Shakespeare." In: Russian and Soviet film adaptations of literature, 1900-2001 : screening the word / edited by Stephen Hutchings and Anat Vernitski. London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2005.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F437 2005

Guntner, J Lawrence
"Expressionist Shakespeare: The Gade/Nielsen "Hamlet" (1920) and the History of Shakespeare on Film." Post Script - Essays in Film and the Humanities 17:2 (Winter 1997-Spring 1998) Issue p. 90-102
UC users only

Halio, Jay L.
"Three Filmed Hamlets" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 316
UC users only

Kliman, Bernice W.
Hamlet: Film, Television, and Audio Performance / Bernice W. Kliman. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, c1988.
UCB Main PR2807 .K571 1988
UCB Moffitt PR2807 .K57 1988

Khoury, Yvette K.
"'To Be or Not to Be' in 'The Belly of the Whale'; A Reading of Joseph Campbell's 'Modern Hero' Hypothesis in Hamlet on Film." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 120-29, 2006
(UC Berkeley users only)

Lake, James H.
"The effects of primacy and recency upon audience response to five film versions of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):112 (6 pages).
UCB users only
Primacy, or the first adaptation in a series, and recency, or the latest in a series, are posited as having the greatest impact on audience impression. A comparison is made between Laurence Olivier's 1947 adaptation and Kenneth Branagh's 1996 version, with Olivier's ending open to interpretation and Branagh's providing closure.

Maher, Mary Z.
"At Last, an American Hamlet for Television." [Kevin Kline and Kirk Browning] Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):301 (7 pages).

Maher, Mary Z.
"Hamlet's BBC Soliloquies." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 4. (Winter, 1985), pp. 417-426.
(UC Berkeley users only)

Niyogi De, Esha
"Modern Shakespeare in popular Bombay cinema: translation, subjectivity and community." Screen; Vol.XLIII nr.1 (Spring 2002); p.19-40
Two Indian adaptations of 'Hamlet': "Khoon ka khoon" (1935) and Kishore Sahu's "Hamlet" (1955) are considered for their illustration of a colonial and post-colonial translation of an imperious 'master text'.

Pizzato, Mark
"Ghosts of Hamlet Onscreen." In: Ghosts of theatre and cinema in the brain / Mark Pizzato. Pizzato, Mark, 1960- New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1650.G56 P59 2006

Scolnicov, Hanna.
"Gertrude's willow speech: word and film image." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)('Hamlet')(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):101 (11 pages).
An analysis is presented on Gertrude's account of Ophelia's death in film adaptations of William Shakespeare's play 'Hamlet', and the variations in interpretation by directors Laurence Olivier, Grigori Kozintsev, Franco Zeffirelli, and Kenneth Branagh. These variations include the account as a voiceover, a visual pan of the drowned Ophelia, and as a speech, and the emotive response drawn by each.

Seidl, Monika.
"Room for Asta: gender roles and melodrama in Asta Nielsen's filmic version of Hamlet (1920)." Literature/Film Quarterly (30:3) [2002:3] , p.208-216.
UC users only

Shaltz, Justin.
"Three Hamlets on Film." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 11 no. 1. 1993 Winter. pp: 36-37.

Simmons, James R., Jr.
"In the Rank Sweat of an Enseamed Bed": Sexual Aberration and the Paradigmatic Screen 'Hamlets.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):111 (8 pages).
UC users only
Hamlet's sexuality has become the focal point of Shakespeare's play for modern audiences because of the influence of four filmed versions of the play. Svend Gade's 1920 version portrayed Hamlet as a woman pretending to be a man. Laurence Olivier's 1948 'Hamlet' was the first to depict the prince as a man motivated by Oedipal longings for his mother. The 1980 BBC teleplay made Hamlet's longings more explicit, while Franco Zeffirelli's 1990 version carried Olivier's Oedipal interpretation even further. Critical acclaim for the Olivier and BBC films have fostered popular acceptance of their Freudian premise.

Teker, Gulsen Sayin.
"Empowered by madness: Ophelia in the films of Kozintsev, Zeffirelli, and Branagh.(Grigori Kozintsev, Franco Zeffirelli, Kenneth Branagh)(Critical essay)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 113(7).
UC users only

Vanneman, Alan
"Nine Hamlets." Bright Lights Film Journal, vol. 51, pp. (no pagination), February 2006

Weller, Philip.
"Freud's Footprints in Films of 'Hamlet.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):119 (6 pages).
UC users only
Laurence Olivier's 1948 film adaptation of William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' was the first to be influenced by Sigmund Freud's concept of the Oedipus complex, as interpreted by Ernest Jones' 1910 article 'Hamlet and Oedipus.' Since Olivier's version, the Oedipal interpretation of Hamlet has become standard on film and in performance. Subsequent film adaptations, such as the 1980 BBC version and Franco Zeffirelli's 1990 production, have made the Freudian message increasingly explicit. Critics, directors, performers and audience have mostly forgotten that other views of Hamlet are not only possible but preferable.

Hamlet: Michael Almereyda

Abbate, Alessandro.
"To Be or Inter-Be": Almereyda's end-of-millennium Hamlet." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2004. Vol. 32, Iss. 2; p. 82 (8 pages)
UC users only

Almereyda,Michael
"A live wire to the brain: hooking up 'Hamlet.'" (director of the latest film version of 'Hamlet' discusses his film) . The New York Times May 7, 2000 pAR19(N) pAR19(L) col 1 (25 col in)

Bowman, James
"Hamlet." (Review) The American Spectator June 2000 v33 i5 p66(2)

Burnett, M. T.
"'To Hear and See the Matter': Communicating Technology in Michael Almereyda's Hamlet (2000)." Cinema Journal 42, No. 3, Spring 2003
UC users only

Chang, Chris
"The Pleasures and Terrors of Michael Almereyda." (filmmaker)Film Comment May 2000 v36 i3 p56
UC users only

Croteau, Melissa
"Celluloid Revelations: Millenial Culture and Dialogic 'Pastiche' in Michael Almereyda's Hamlet (2000)." In: Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations / edi Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Jess, Carolyn
"The Promethean Apparatus: Michael Almereyda's Hamlet as Cinematic Allegory." Literature Film Quarterly; 2004, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p90-96, 7p, 1bw
UC users only
"This article presents a critical analysis of the motion picture, Hamlet, directed by Michael Almereyda. William Shakespeare's cinematic renaissance ended in the twentieth century with John Madden's Shakespeare in Love. Emergent cinematic technology promoted developments in the film industry. Baz Luhrmann's film, William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet, started a trend in Shakespearean cinema that is expressed by the digitally composed, The King Is Alive and Rave Macbeth. Both these films in particular serve as examples of what cinema has to offer Shakespearean appropriation throughout the following century. As the first film of the new millennium to adapt a Bardic text, Hamlet signals this discursive and technological abundance as cinematically as possible. Denmark here is a New York corporation, ostensibly involved in film production. Hamlet, played by Ethan Hawke, is constructed as a filmmaker who is obsessed with observing his environs and forefathers through a camera lens. In this light, it would seem that cinema is Shakespeare's ideological precursor. Almereyda's production crystallizes the play's engagement with a specifically cinematic dogma while also displaying pre-cinematic inventions." [Ebsco]

Kauffmann, Stanley
"On Films - The Muses in Manhattan."The New Republic June 5, 2000 p26 (1428 words)
UC users only

Ko, Yu Jin.
""The Mousetrap" and remembrance in Michael Almereyda's Hamlet.(Shakespeare on Film)(Critical essay)." Shakespeare Bulletin 23.4 (Winter 2005): 19(14). 5 Dec. 2006
UC users only

Matthews, Peter
"Hamlet." (Review) Sight and Sound Jan 2001 v11 i1 p50(2)
UC users only
"Almereyda provides a brash modernization of Hamlet that, at 111 minutes, must be one of the speediest versions of the sound era. He portrays a Baudrillardesque world bombarded by the mass media in which it is no longer possible to tell what is real. However, the film itself falls victim to the same problem it diagnoses, with the imagery hurtling by pell-mell without making a strong impression on the memory. Almereyda appears to be blind to the paradox of jog-trotting through Shakespeare's immortal study in procrastination." [Art Index]

Mitchell, Elvis
"Hamlet." (Review) The New York Times Nov 10, 2000 pB27(N) pE28(L) col 1 (5 col in)

Mitchell, Elvis
"A simpler melancholy." The New York Times May 12, 2000 pB1(N) pE1(L) col 1 (35 col in)

Nochimson Martha P.
"Hamlet." (Review) Cineaste Fall 2000 v25 i4 p37 (1904 words)
UC users only
"A review of Hamlet, a film directed by Michael Almereyda. This new adaption of Shakespeare's play relocates the drama from Elsinore to the Elsinore Hotel in contemporary New York. While the spectacle of the actors wandering among the city's monolithic skyscrapers, articulating Shakespearean cadences in flat modern tones, has the charm of innovation, the change of setting results in a change of ethos that kicks the supports out from under all the motivations in the original play: Saturated by empty images of late capitalism, the urban setting leaves Hamlet, his family, and his friends at loose ends in a distinctly un-Shakespearean universe with a void at its center. The film bristles with hints about what a successful postmodern Hamlet might be like, but these moments are thwarted by Almereyda's inability to translate the teleology of tragedy, with all its implication of an ordered and just universe, for a contemporary setting." [Art Index]

Rainer, Peter
"Hamlet." (Review) New York May 22, 2000 v33 i20 p88(2)

Simon, John
"A Will But No Way." (Review) National Review June 19, 2000 v52 i11 pNA (1241 words)
UC users only

Rienstra, Debra
"Postmodern Hamlet." (Critical Essay) Books & Culture Jan 2001 v7 i1 p18 (1850 words)

Hamlet: Kenneth Branagh

Alleva, Richard.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews)Commonweal v124, n6 (March 28, 1997):18 (2 pages).

Bowman, James.
"The Great Dane's a Dog." (motion picture adaption of theatrical plays)(The Talkies) American Spectator v24, n3 (March, 1991):30 (2 pages).

Bowman, James.
"Hamlet."(motion picture) American Spectator v30, n3 (March, 1997):66 (2 pages).

Buhler, Stephen M.
"Double takes: Branagh gets to Hamlet." Post Script (17:1) 1997, 43-52
UC users only

Burnett, Mark Thornton.
"The "Very Cunning of the Scene": Kenneth Branagh's 'Hamlet.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):78 (5 pages).
UC users only
Kenneth Branagh's film version of William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' is dominated by Branagh's powerful performance of the title role. The film is also notable for its emphasis of the military elements of the play, usually ignored or neglected in modern productions. The restoration of the Fortinbras subplot is especially welcome. The film's production design, use of locations and settings, camera work and other visual elements effectively reinforce the messages conveyed by the spoken words. Sometimes, however, Branagh allows the film's score and its visual elements to overwhelm Shakespeare's text.

Coe, Jonathan.
"Hamlet."(motion picture) New Statesman (1996) v126, n4321 (Feb 14, 1997):41.

Crowl, Samuel
"Hamlet 'Most Royal: An Interview with Kenneth Branagh" Shakespeare Bulletin vol. 12 no. 4, 1994 Fall: 5-8

Denby, David.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) New York v29, n51 (Jan 6, 1997):49.

Felperin, Leslie.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v7, n2 (Feb, 1997):46.

Fisher, Bob
"Tragedy of Epic Proportions." (Interview).American Cinematographer LXXVIII/1, Jan 97; p.58-60,62,64,66. illus.
Cinematographer Alex Thomson recalls his period working as camera operator for Nicolas Roeg and the influence of this on his later career; plus thoughts on the decision to shoot Kenneth Branagh's version of 'Hamlet' in 65mm.

Guenther, Leah
"Luhrmann's Top 40 Shakespeare and the Crisis of Shakespearean Consumption." Journal of American Culture ; Spring99, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p17, 7p
UC users only
Focuses on the motion pictures `Hamlet,' directed by Kenneth Branagh, and `William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet,' by Baz Luhrmann. How the press viewed the film `Hamlet'; Music for the `Romeo and Juliet'; Comparison between the two films.

Jackson, Russell.
"Kenneth Branagh's Film of Hamlet: The Textual Choices." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 15 no. 2. 1997 Spring. pp: 37-38.

Johnson, Brian D.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) Maclean's v109, n53 (Dec 30, 1996):102 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) New Republic v216, n4 (Jan 27, 1997):26 (3 pages).

Kliman, Bernice W.
"The Unkindest Cuts: Flashcut Excess in Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet." In: Talking Shakespeare : Shakespeare into the millennium / edited by Deborah Cartmell and Michael Scott New York : Palgrave, 2001.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks

Lake, James H.
"The effects of primacy and recency upon audience response to five film versions of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):112 (6 pages).
UC users only
Primacy, or the first adaptation in a series, and recency, or the latest in a series, are posited as having the greatest impact on audience impression. A comparison is made between Laurence Olivier's 1947 adaptation and Kenneth Branagh's 1996 version, with Olivier's ending open to interpretation and Branagh's providing closure.

Lanier, Douglas
"Art thou base, common, and popular?": The cultural politics of Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002

Lyons, Donald.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) Commentary v103, n2 (Feb, 1997):58 (3 pages).

Maerz, Jessica M.
"Beyond Epic: Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet and the Meta-Narrative Functions of Classical Hollywood Genre." Literature Film Quarterly, 2011, Vol. 39 Issue 2, p128-140, 13p
UC users only

Maslin, Janet.
"William Shakespeare's Hamlet." (movie reviews) New York Times v146 (Wed, Dec 25, 1996):B1(N), C7(L), col 1, 16 col in.

Mullan, John.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4899 (Feb 21, 1997):19.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Hamlet."(motion picture) New Yorker v72, n42 (Jan 13, 1997):80 (2 pages).

Riding, Alan.
"To be, or not to..O.K., cut!" (new film versions of 'Othello' and 'Richard III' attempt to modernize Shakesepeare for movie audiences) New York Times v144, sec2 (Sun, Sept 17, 1995):H1(N), H1(L), col 3, 49 col in.

Rothenberg, Robert S.
"Hamlet."(motion picture) USA Today (Magazine) v126, n2628 (Sept, 1997):81.

Sanders, Julie.
"The End of History and the Last Man: Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle / edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 147-64 New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Simon, John.
"Hamlet."(motion picture) USA Today (Magazine) v126, n2 National Review v49, n2 (Feb 10, 1997):57 (2 pages)

Sheppard, Philippa.
"The Castle of Elsinore: Gothic Aspects of Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet." Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 19(3):36-39. 2001 Summer

Smith, Emma.
"'Either for Tragedy, Comedy': Attitudes to Hamlet in Kenneth Branagh's In the Bleak Midwinter and Hamlet." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle / edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 137-46. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Starks, Lisa S.
"The Displaced Body of Desire: Sexuality in Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet." In: Shakespeare and appropriation
Edited by Christy Desmet and Robert Sawyer. London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PR2880.A1.S52 1999

Teker, Gulsen Sayin.
"Empowered by madness: Ophelia in the films of Kozintsev, Zeffirelli, and Branagh.(Grigori Kozintsev, Franco Zeffirelli, Kenneth Branagh)(Critical essay)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 113(7).
UC users only

Travers, Peter.
"Hamlet."(motion picture) Rolling Stone, n752 (Jan 23, 1997):72.

Welsh, Jim.
"Branagh's Enlarged "Hamlet." Literature Film Quarterly, 1997, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p154, 2p;
UC users only

Wolf, Matt.
"Branagh's 'Bracing' Encounter with Bard." (Kenneth Branagh on his adaptation of William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet')(London: Entertainment Town)(Top of the Town: Kenneth Branagh)(Interview) Variety v365, n7 (Dec 16, 1996):25 (3 pages).

Hamlet: Grigori Kozintsev

Brebach, Emily S.
"From Olivier to Kozintsev: Visual Technique in Transforming Hamlet into Film."PCLS., vol. 12. 1981. pp: 67-81.

Catania, Saviour.
"'The Beached Verge': On Filming the Unfilmable in Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet." EnterText: An Interactive Interdisciplinary E-Journal for Cultural and Historical Studies and Creative Work, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 302-16, Spring 2001
UC users only

Gillespie, David
"Adapting foreign classics : Kozintsev's Shakespeare." In: Russian and Soviet film adaptations of literature, 1900-2001 : screening the word / edited by Stephen Hutchings and Anat Vernitski. London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2005.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F437 2005

Heine, Erik.
"Controlling and Controlled: Ophelia and the Ghost as Defined by Music in Grigori Kozintsev's "Hamlet." Literature Film Quarterly, 2009, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p109-123, 15p
UC users only

Jorgens, Jack J.
"Image and Meaning in the Kozintsev Hamlet" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 307
UC users only

Teker, Gulsen Sayin.
"Empowered by madness: Ophelia in the films of Kozintsev, Zeffirelli, and Branagh.(Grigori Kozintsev, Franco Zeffirelli, Kenneth Branagh)(Critical essay)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 113(7).
UC users only

Sokolyansky, Mark
"Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet and King Lear." In: The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare on film Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .C36 2000

Hamlet: Laurence Olivier

Albanese, Denise
"School for scandal?: new-media Hamlet, Olivier; and camp connoisseurship." Renaissance Drama 34 [2005]

Alkire, N. L.
"Subliminal Masks in Olivier's Hamlet."Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 16 no. 1. 1991 Dec. pp: 5.

Ashworth, John
"Olivier, Freud and Hamlet", Atlantic Monthly, n. 183, May 1949, pp. 30-33

Brebach, Emily S.
"From Olivier to Kozintsev: Visual Technique in Transforming Hamlet into Film."PCLS., vol. 12. 1981. pp: 67-81.

Crowdus, Gary
"Hamlet." (Review).Cineaste XXII/3, Dec 96; p.46-47. illus.
Reviewed on the occasion of its laser disc release.

Donaldson, P.
"Olivier, Hamlet and Freud."Cinema Journal XXVI/4, Summer 87; p.22-48.
Psycho-biographical analysis of Laurence Olivier's "Hamlet".

Gross, Sheryl W.
"Olivier's Shakespearean Films: A Selected Bibliography, II."Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 2 no. 1. 1977 Dec. pp: 1-3.

Kliman, Bernice W.
"A Palimpsest for Olivier's Hamlet." Comparative Drama, vol. 17 no. 3. 1983 Fall. pp: 243-253.

Kliman, Bernice W.
"Olivier's 'Hamlet': A Film-infused Play." Literature/ Film Quarterly, V/4, Fall 77; p.305-14.
UC users only
Praises Olivier's version as a unique blend of film and play and analyzes its techniques.

Kliman, Bernice W.
"The Spiral of Influence: 'One Defect' in Hamlet."Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 11 no. 3. 1983. pp: 159-166.
UC users only

Lake, James H.
"The effects of primacy and recency upon audience response to five film versions of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):112 (6 pages).
UC users only
Primacy, or the first adaptation in a series, and recency, or the latest in a series, are posited as having the greatest impact on audience impression. A comparison is made between Laurence Olivier's 1947 adaptation and Kenneth Branagh's 1996 version, with Olivier's ending open to interpretation and Branagh's providing closure.

Schlueter, June.
"The Camera in Gertrude's Closet." In: Shakespeare and the Triple Play: From Study to Stage to Classroom. / edited by Sidney Homan. pp: 150-174. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press; London: Associated University Presses, c1988.
Main Stack PR2976.S337341 1988
Moffitt PR2976.S33734 1988

Simmons, James R., Jr.
"In the Rank Sweat of an Enseamed Bed": Sexual Aberration and the Paradigmatic Screen 'Hamlets.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):111 (8 pages).
UC users only

Weller, Philip.
"Freud's Footprints in Films of Hamlet."Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 25 no. 2. 1997. pp: 119-24.
UC users only

Hamlet: Tony Richardson

Bourus, Terri
"The First Quarto of Hamlet in Film: The Revenge Tragedies of Tony Richardson and Franco Zeffirelli." EnterText: An Interactive Interdisciplinary E-Journal for Cultural and Historical Studies and Creative Work, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 180-91, Spring 2001
UC users only

Duffy, R.A..
"Gade, Olivier, Richardson: visual strategy in Hamlet adaptation." Literature/Film Quarterly Vol IV nr 2 (Spring 1976); p 141-52.
UC users only
Examines the visual techniques of 3 widely variant versions of Hamlet, (by Gade, Olivier and Richardson) one of Shakespeare's least visual works.

Litton, Glenn
"Diseased Beauty in Tony Richardson's "Hamlet" Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 108
Analyzes T.R.'s techniques in their contexts and the filmic style in which T.R. adapts Shakespeare's metaphor of decay.
UC users only

Meier, Paul.
"King of Infinite Space: Richardson's Hamlet(1969)" The Cinema of Tony Richardson: Essays and Interviews / edited by James M. Welsh and John C. Tibbetts; foreword by Jocelyn Herbert. pp: 177-87. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, c1999. Series title: The SUNY series, cultural studies in cinema/video.
UCB Main PN1998.3.R53 C56 1999

Mullin, Michael
"Tony Richardson's "Hamlet": Script and Screen." Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 123
UC users only
Describes Richardson's stage and film reworking of Shakespeare's text, which preserves the essence while creating a new 'Hamlet'. Appendix 1: Cuts on the text. Appendix 2: Distribution of cuts.

Hamlet: Franco Zeffirelli/Mel Gibson

Alleva, Richard.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) Commonweal v118, n6 (March 22, 1991):194.

Corliss, Richard.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) Time v137, n1 (Jan 7, 1991):73.

Crowl, Samuel
"Zeffirelli's Hamlet: the golden girl and a fistful of dust." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):56 (6 pages).
UC users only
Family romance is at core of Franco Zeffirelli's film adaptation of 'Hamlet.' This is evident in his casting of actors Mel Gibson and Glenn Close in the principal roles, his manipulation of space and landscape, his alteration of the text and his approach to editing. Zeffirelli's context for Close is opera, thus her character Gertrude is portrayed as the golden girl in the midst of a colorless masculine world and at the center of Hamlet's shattered consciousness.

Denby, David.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews)New York v24, n3 (Jan 21, 1991):57 (2 pages).

Dodsworth, Martin.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews)TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4594 (April 19, 1991):17.

Grant, E.
"Hamlet." (Review).Films in Review (XLII/3-4, Mar-Apr 91; p.108-109.

"Hamlet." (movie reviews)Economist v319, n7704 (April 27, 1991):96.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews)New Republic v204, n4 (Jan 28, 1991):24 (2 pages).

McCombe, John P.
"Toward an Objective Correlative: The Problem of Desire in Franco Zeffirelli's 'Hamlet.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):125 (7 pages).
UC users only
Franco Zeffirelli's 1990 film adaptation of William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' is ultimately disappointing because it excises most of the elements in the play that contribute to the character Hamlet's ambiguities, especially the political dimension that helps to explain his hesitation. Zeffirelli instead offers mother-son desire between Gertrude and Hamlet as the sole reason why the prince hesitates to kill the usurper Claudius. By concentrating on the single overriding dimension of desire, Zeffirelli presents an explanation of Hamlet that is sufficient to explain his actions, but grossly oversimplifies the play.

McGuigan, Cathleen.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) Newsweek v116, n27 (Dec 31, 1990):61.

Quigley, Daniel.
" 'Double Exposure': The Semiotic Ramifications of Mel Gibson in Zeffirelli's Hamlet." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 11 no. 1. 1993 Winter. pp: 38-39.

Richardson, Anne.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews)Sixteenth Century Journal v22, n4 (Winter, 1991):862 (3 pages).

Romney, Jonathan.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v1, n1 (May, 1991):48 (2 pages).

Simon, John.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) New York v21, n27 (July 11, 1988):49.

Teker, Gulsen Sayin.
"Empowered by madness: Ophelia in the films of Kozintsev, Zeffirelli, and Branagh.(Grigori Kozintsev, Franco Zeffirelli, Kenneth Branagh)(Critical essay)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 113(7).
UC users only

Tibbetts, John C.
"Breaking the Classical Barrier." (Interview).Literature/Film Quarterly XXII/2, Apr 94; p.136-140.
UC users only
Franco Zeffirelli recalls his difficulties in raising finance for "Hamlet", and stresses his desire for widespread accessibility to Shakespeare's works.

Travers, Peter.
"Hamlet." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n595 (Jan 10, 1991):54.

Henry V

Andrew, James Dudley
"Realism, rhetoric, and the painting of history in Henry V -- Echoes of art: the distant sounds of Orson Welles." In: Film in the aura of art / Dudley Andrew. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1984.
Main Stack PN1995.A494 1984

Andrew, James Dudley
"Realism, rhetoric, and the painting of history in Henry V -- Echoes of art : the distant sounds of Orson Welles." In: Film in the aura of art / Dudley Andrew. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1984.
Main Stack PN1995.A494 1984

García Landa, José Ángel
"Adaptation, Appropriation, Retroaction: Symbolic Interaction with Henry V." In: Books in motion : adaptation, intertextuality, authorship / edited by Mireia Aragay. Amsterdam : Rodopi, 2005.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .B66 2005
Pacific Film Archive PN1995.3 .B66 2005

Geduld, Harry M.
Filmguide to Henry V [by] Harry M. Geduld. Bloomington, Indiana University Press [1973] Indiana University Press filmguide series, FG-7
Main Stack PN1997.H454.G41

Griffin, C.W.
"Henry V's Decision: Interrogative Texts." (king's decision to declare war on France, as portrayed in three film adaptations of Shakespeare's play) Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):99 (5 pages).
Catherine Belsey's contention, in her 1983 article in 'Literature/Film Quarterly,' that films of Shakespeare's plays must convey a solitary, fixed meaning because of constraints inherent to the medium is incorrect. A careful analysis of the scene depicting the king's decision to declare war on France in three film versions of 'Henry V' indicates that the portrayed ambiguities of Henry's character leave the scene open to conflicting interpretations. The BBC's videotaped 1979 version, the English Shakespeare Company's 1988 film of their staging, and Kenneth Branagh's 1989 production are considered.

McCreadie, Marsha
Henry V": Onstage and On Film." Literature/Film Quarterly 5:4 (1977:Fall) 316
UC users only

McFarlane, Brian.
"Dallas Bower: The Man Behind Olivier's Henry V." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 12 no. 1. 1994 Winter. pp: 45-46.

Manheim, Michael.
"The Function of Battle Imagery in Kurosawa's Histories and the 'Henry V' Films." Literature-Film Quarterly v22, n2 (April, 1994):129 (7 pages).

Nichols, John G.
"The atomic Agincourt: Henry V and the filmic making of postwar Anglo-American cultural relations." Film & History (27:1-4) 1997, 88-94.

Kael, Pauline.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) New Yorker v65, n41 (Nov 27, 1989):104 (2 pages).

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"War and Relection on War: The Olivier and Branagh Films of Henry V" Shakespeare Bulletin vol. 9 no. 3, 1991 Summer: 27-29

Henry V: Kenneth Branagh

Adelman, Ken.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Policy Review, n52 (Spring, 1990):80 (4 pages).

Aitken, Ian.
"Formalism and Realism: Henry V (Laurence Olivier, 1944; Kenneth Branagh, 1989)" Critical Survey, vol. 3 no. 3, 1991:260-68

Billington, Michael.
"A 'new Olivier' is taking on Henry V on the screen." (Kenneth Branagh) New York Times v138, sec2 (Sun, Jan 8, 1989):H18(N), H18(L), col 1, 41 col in.

Blake, Richard A.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) America v162, n3 (Jan 27, 1990):64 (2 pages).

Briggs, Julia.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Times Literary Supplement, n4516 (Oct 20, 1989):1154.

Canby, Vincent.
"Henry V" (movie reviews)New York Times v139, sec2 (Sun, Jan 21, 1990):H1(N), H1(L), col 1, 18 col in.

Cardullo, Bert.
"Henry V" (movie reviews)Hudson Review v43, n2 (Summer, 1990):289 (9 pages).

Collier, Susanne
"Post-Falklands, Post-Colonial: Contextualizing Branagh as Henry V on Stage and on Film" Essays in Theatre/Etudes Theatrales vol. 10 no. 2, 1992 May:143-54

Corliss, Richard.
"King Ken Comes to Conquer: A Brash British Star Rurns Henry V Into an Antiwar War Movie." Time v134, n20 (Nov 13, 1989):119 (2 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Time v134, n20 (Nov 13, 1989):119 (2 pages).

Deats, Sara Munson.
"Rabbits and Ducks: Olivier, Branagh, and 'Henry V.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):284 (10 pages).
Norman Rabkin has persuasively argued that Shakespeare's 'Henry V' vacillates between depicting Henry as an ideal king and an ambitious and ruthless ruler. The patriotic film adaptation of the play by Laurence Olivier subscribes to the ideal king view, while the anti-war portrayal by Kenneth Branagh casts Henry as ruthless and calculating. Both directors changed the play's text and rearranged parts to achieve their respective aims. Each film is a brilliant comment on Shakespeare's play as well as poignant comment on the social and political conditions of their audiences.

Denby, David.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) New York v22, n47 (Nov 27, 1989):74 (3 pages).

Donaldson, Peter S.
"Taking on Shakespeare: Kenneth Branagh's Henry V." Shakespeare Quarterly v42, n1 (Spring, 1991):60 (12 pages).
Kenneth Branagh's and Laurence Olivier's adaptations of William Shakespeare's 'Henry V' differ in treatment of the main theme, in using Shakespeare's dramatic strategies such as the chorus in character delineation, in technical aspects and in the use of cinematic devices such as the flash back. Olivier suppressed the film medium and presents the film 'Henry V' more as a play. Branagh, on the other hand, presented it in a cinematic form. There are differences between both versions in the depiction of battle scenes and in the use of dramatic props.

Forbes, Jill.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v58, n4 (Autumn, 1989):258 (2 pages).
A comparison of the Olivier and Branagh productions.

Friedman, Michael D.
"'Independence Day': the American 'Henry V' and the myth of David." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(King David of the Bible)(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):140 (9 pages).
A comparison is presented between the motion picture 'Independence Day', William Shakespeare's play 'Henry V' and the biblical story of King David. Parallels include how each work incorporates aspects of the popular culture of the era, and in turn influences the development of popular culture.

Geduld, Harry M.
"Henry V" (movie reviews)Humanist v50, n4 (July-August, 1990):43 (2 pages).

Griffin, C.W.
"Henry V's Decision: Interrogative Texts." (king's decision to declare war on France, as portrayed in three film adaptations of Shakespeare's play) Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):99 (5 pages).

Johnson, Brian D.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Maclean's v102, n47 (Nov 20, 1989):89 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) New Republic v201, n23 (Dec 4, 1989):28 (3 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Nation v249, n20 (Dec 11, 1989):724 (3 pages).

Kroll, Jack.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Newsweek v114, n21 (Nov 20, 1989):78 (2 pages).

Lane, Robert.
"'When Blood Is Their Argument': Class, Character, and Historymaking in Shakespeare's and Branagh's Henry V."ELH, vol. 61 no. 1. 1994 Spring. pp: 27-52. UCB users only

Lehmann, Courtney
"Kenneth Branagh at the Quilting Point: Shakespearean Adaptation, Postmodern Auteurism, and the (Schizophrenic) Fabric of 'Everyday Life'"Post Script - Essays in Film and the Humanities 17:1 [Fall 1997] p.6-27
UC users only
"Offers an analysis of the film adaptation of Shakespeare's "Henry V" by the actor-director Kenneth Branagh and discusses how his dual identity as an Irishman and as an Englishman has influenced his aesthetic philosophy toward the production of Shakespeare. Argues that this "schizophrenic" aspect of Branagh's cultural heritage informs his merging of the "high" culture of Shakespeare with the "low" cultural form of film and is indicative of art during the postmodern age." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Loehlin, James N.
Henry V / James N. Loehlin. Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press; New York: Distributed exclusively in the USA by St.Martin's Press, 1996.
UCB Main PR2812 .L64 1996

Manheim, M.
"The Function of Battle imagery in Kurosawa's Histories and the Henry V Films." (Speech).Literature/Film Quarterly XXII/2, Apr 94; p.129-135.

McCreadie, Marsha
Henry V": Onstage and On Film." Literature/Film Quarterly 5:4 (1977:Fall) 316
UC users only
Given at Seminar no. 16, 'Shakespeare on Film', World Shakespeare Congress, Tokyo 1991: a comparison of the depiction of war in both film versions of 'Henry V' (Olivier/Branagh), and Kurosawa's "Ran" (based on 'King Lear') and "Kagemusha" (considered to be 'in a Shakespearean vein').

O'Brien, Tom.
"Henry V" (movie reviews)Commonweal v117, n4 (Feb 23, 1990):116.

Pursell, Michael.
"Playing the Game: Branagh's 'Henry V.'" (Kenneth Branagh) (Shakespeare - Film & Television) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):268 (8 pages).
UC users only
Three articles on Kenneth Branagh's "Henry V": a reading of the film in terms of contemporary political and popular culture references; a survey of postwar theatrical productions and their influence on this version; and a comparison of the handling of various aspects of the play in versions by Olivier and Branagh.

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Henry V" (movie reviews)Comparative Drama v24, n2 (Summer, 1990):173 (6 pages).

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Kenneth Branagh's Henry V: The Gilt (Guilt) in the Crown Re-Examined." Comparative Drama, vol. 24 no. 2. 1990 Summer. pp: 173-78.

Royal, Derek.
"Shakespeare's Kingly Mirror: Figuring the Chorus in Olivier's and Branagh's Henry V." Literature/ Film Quarterlyvol. 25 no. 2. 1997. pp: 104-10.
A comparison of the differing use made of the Chorus in both adaptations, and the political implications of each.

Schwartz, Amy E.
"Henry V." (movie reviews) Washington Post v113 (Tue, Feb 6, 1990):A25, col 1, 13 col in.

Shaw, William P.
"Textual Ambiguities and Cinematic Certainties in 'Henry V.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v22, n2 (April, 1994):117 (12 pages).
UC users only
The ambiguities in William Shakespeare's 'Henry V' are absent from performances of the play and in Lawrence Olivier's and Kenneth Branagh's film versions. In scenes 1.1 and 1.2, there is indication that the king may be conspiring with the archbishop, resulting in a morally ambiguous character for the king. These lines are deleted or performed in such a way as to eliminate their questionable nature. Olivier deleted many lines, whereas Branagh plays the lines as if the king is manipulated by a different conspiracy.

Simon, John.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) National Review v42, n5 (March 19, 1990):57 (2 pages).

Salomon, Patricia P.
"The Sentimentalizing of Communitas in Kenneth Branagh's Henry V." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 13 no. 1. 1995 Winter. pp: 35-36.

Seidenberg, Robert.
"Henry V: Kenneth Branagh and a bard for all seasons." (Kenneth Branagh's production of Shakespeare's "Henry V")American Film v15, n2 (Nov, 1989):62 (2 pages).

Travers, Peter.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n566 (Nov 30, 1989):49.

Tatspaugh, Patricia E.
"Theatrical Influences on Kenneth Branagh's Film: 'Henry V.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):276 (8 pages).

Ulstein, Stefan.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Christianity Today v34, n4 (March 5, 1990):50 (2 pages).

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"War and Relection on War: The Olivier and Branagh Films of Henry V" Shakespeare Bulletin vol. 9 no. 3, 1991 Summer: 27-29

Henry V: Laurence Olivier

Donaldson, Peter.
"Claiming from the Female: Gender and Representation in Laurence Olivier's Henry V." In: Shakespearean Films/Shakespearean Directors / Peter S. Donaldson.Boston: Unwin Hyman, 1990.Series title: Media and popular culture
UCB Main PR3093 .D66 1990
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .D66 1990

Forbes, Jill.
"Henry V" (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v58, n4 (Autumn, 1989):258 (2 pages).
A comparison of the Olivier and Branagh productions.

Fuller, Graham
"Existential hero." Sight & Sound v. ns17 no. 8 (August 2007) p. 40
"The writer discusses Laurence Olivier's film version of Shakespeare's Henry V. (1943-44). This adaptation of Shakespeare's play was scripted by the theater critic and Shakespeare scholar Alan Dent, and it was he, working closely with Olivier, who devised the film's dramatic structure and cut the play by nearly 1,500 lines in order to preserve the integrity of the English characters. The resulting film honored the British war effort, and its triumphant British release on 12 July 1944, five weeks after D-Day, was a propagandist's dream. It is in depicting the night before Agincourt that Olivier came into his own, producing work that represents the existential climax of his career on camera." [Art Index]

Griffin, C.W.
"Henry V's Decision: Interrogative Texts." (king's decision to declare war on France, as portrayed in three film adaptations of Shakespeare's play) Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):99 (5 pages).
Argues that films can be as interrogative as theatrical performances; to illustrate this compares the second scene of 'Henry V' as presented in two film versions (1944, 1989) and a BBC tv production from 1979.

Hoenselaars, Ton
"Recycling the Renaissance in World War II: E. W. & M. M. Robson review Laurence Olivier's Henry V." In: Challenging humanism : essays in honor of Dominic Baker-Smith / edited by Ton Hoenselaars and Arthur F. Kinney. Newark : University of Delaware Press, c2005.
Main Stack B821.C455 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0511/2005009988.html

Manheim, M.
"Olivier's Henry V and the Elizabethan World Picture."Literature/Film Quarterly XI/3, July 83; p.179-184.
UC users only
Discusses Laurence Olivier's interpretation of Henry V in the context of E. M.W. Tillyard's critical theories.

McCreadie, Marsha
"Henry V: Onstage and on Film." (Article).Literature/Film Quarterly V/4, Fall 77; p.316-21.
UC users only
Compares the staging and characterization in several theatrical productions of 'Henry V' to Olivier's film version.

"Shakespeare play makes glorious, exciting film." Life v. 20 (May 20 1946) p. 38-42

Shaw, William P.
"Textual Ambiguities and Cinematic Certainties in 'Henry V.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v22, n2 (April, 1994):117 (12 pages).
Compares the approaches of Branagh and Olivier to Shakespeare's ambivalent depiction of Henry V.

Royal, Derek.
"Shakespeare's Kingly Mirror: Figuring the Chorus in Olivier's and Branagh's Henry V." Literature/ Film Quarterlyvol. 25 no. 2. 1997. pp: 104-10.
A comparison of the differing use made of the Chorus in both adaptations, and the political implications of each.

Young, J.W.
"Henry V, the Quai d'Orsay, and the Well-being of the Franco-British Alliance, 1947."Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television VII/3, 87; p.319-321.
A note from an official of the French Ministry for Foreign Affairs in 1947 shows disquiet about the effect the screening of "Henry V" might have on Anglo-French relations.

Julius Caesar

Anderegg, Michael.
"Orson Welles and After: Julius Caesar and Twentieth Century Totalitarianism." In: Julius Caesar : new critical essays / edited by Horst Zander. New York : Routledge, 2005.
Main Stack PR2808.J853 2005
Table of contents

Axline, Kimberly L.
"A 'new deal' and a New Direction: Welles' and Houseman's Depression-Era Productions of Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, and Julius Caesar." Theatre Studies 45 (2001): 16-49.
Consider how Orson Welles' productions of Macbeth (1936) and Julius Caesar (1937) "set a new artistic level of the staging of classical material" and have continued to exert influence on productions. Traces the inception and critical reception of both productions.

Miller, Anthony.
"'Julius Caesar' in the Cold War: the Houseman-Mankiewicz film." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(John Houseman, Joseph Mankiewicz)(Critical Essay.Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):95 (6 pages).
An analysis is presented on the 1953 film adaptation of William Shakespeare's play 'Julius Caesar', a collaborate effort by director Joseph Mankiewicz and actor John Houseman. While the film's correlation with political events is explored, it is posited that its message is ultimately apolitical, as humanity between characters is only expressed within domestic and private settings, rather than in the public domain.

Sargent, Seymour H.
"Julius Caesar and the historical film." English Journal v 61 Feb 1972. p. 230-3+
UC users only

King Lear

Coursen, Herbert R.
"Lear and Cordelia" Cahiers Elisabethains, 1991 Oct., N40:11-20.

Davies, Anthony
"King Lear on film" In: Lear from study to stage: essays in criticism / edited by James Ogden and Arthur H. Scouten. pp: 247-66. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, c1997.
Main Stack PR2819.L36 1997

Griggs, Yvonne
"King Lear as Western Elegy." Literature Film Quarterly; 2007, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p92-100, 9p
UC users only
"The article discusses western film adaptations of William Shakespeare's "King Lear." The article discusses the scholarly attention payed to the western film genre. The article discusses the film "Broken Lance," directed by Edward Dmytryk, and its similarities to "King Lear." The author draws parallels between the film's story involving contested space and a patriarch with three children vying for his empire. The author believes that "King Lear" is a drama which lends itself well to the exploration of myth and archetype. "Broken Lance," like "King Lear," examines the ending of one era, and features lead characters that are unable to adapt to a changing society." [Ebsco]

Kershaw, Baz.
"King Real's King Lear: Radical Shakespeare for the Nuclear Age." Critical Survey, vol. 3 no. 3. 1991. pp: 249-59.

Parker, R.B.
"The Use of Mise-en-Scene in Three Films of King Lear." Shakespeare Quarterly v42, n1 (Spring, 1991):75 (16 pages).
UC users only
A study of the film versions of Shakespeare's 'King Lear,' directed by Peter Brook, Grigori Kozintsev and Akira Kurosawa reveals that the use of cinematic techniques such as lighting, setting, depiction of nature to express moods, use of close-up are all functional. Each director's treatment of the Shakespearean play is different.

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"In Search of Nothing: Mapping King Lear." In: Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video / edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. pp: 135-47. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
UCB Main PR3093 .S545 1997

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Representing King Lear on Screen: From Metatheatre to 'Meta-Cinema'." Shakespeare Survey, vol. 39. 1987. PAGES: 75-90.

Salgado, Gamini
King Lear / Gamini Salgado. London: Macmillan, 1984. Series title: Text and performance.
UCB Main PR2819 .S251 1984
UCB Moffitt PR2819 .S34

Stenberg, Doug.
"Tom's a-cold: Transformation and Redemption in King Lear and The Fisher King."Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 22 no. 3. 1994. pp: 160-69.
UC users only

King Lear: Peter Brook

Acker, Paul.
"Conventions For Dialogue in Peter Brook's King Lear." Literature Film Quarterly, 1980, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p219, 6p
UC users only

Berlin, Normand.
"Peter Brook's Interpretation of King Lear: 'Nothing Will Come of Nothing'." Literature Film Quarterly, Fall77, Vol. 5 Issue 4, p299, 5p
UC users only

Coursen, H. R.
"The Peter Brook/Orson Welles King Lear." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 15 no. 2. 1991 Apr. pp: 8.
Analyzes the 1953 Peter Brook/Orson Welles production as an "excellent introduction for students" to King Lear.

Gilman, Todd S.
"The Textual Fabric of Peter Brook's 'King Lear': 'Holes' in Cinema, Screenplay, and Playtext." Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):294 (7 pages).
UC users only
The cinematic discourse of Peter Brook's unconventional film adaptation of Shakespeare's 'King Lear' is best understood in symbiosis with its screenplay and the playtext. Brook purposely fails to exploit numerous cinematic techniques. He uses neither color nor music. His lighting is monotonal, and he does not use the camera to exploit background-foreground contrasts. However, this is consistent with his unusual screenplay and Brook's interpretation of the playtext. Brook views the themes of denial and suppression as important in 'Lear', and his sparse use of cinematic technique reinforces this.

Harris, Laurilyn J.
"Peter Brook's King Lear: Aesthetic Achievement or Far Side of the Moon?" Theatre Research International, vol. 11 no. 3. 1986 Autumn. pp: 223-239.

Hodgdon, Barbara.
"Two King Lears: Uncovering the Filmtext." Literature Film Quarterly, 1983, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p143, 9p
UC users only
Examines the creation of filmtext 'King Lear,' by Peter Brook and Grigori Kozintsev. Plot of the film; Characters in the film.

Johnson, W.
"King Lear." (directed by Peter Brook) Film Quarterly v 25 no3 Spring 1972. p. 41-8
UC users only

Mullin, Michael
"Peter Brook's "King Lear": Stage and Screen." Literature/Film Quarterly 11:3 (1983) 190
UC users only
Shakespeare On Film IV Papers from the World Shakespeare Congress, 1981 Stratford-upon-Avon

Reddington, John.
"Film, Play and Idea." Literature Film Quarterly, Fall73, Vol. 1 Issue 4, p367, 5p
UC users only
Discusses the film adaptations of the plays 'Macbeth' and 'King Lear,' directed by Roman Polanski and Peter Brooks. Response of audiences to all recorded art; Views on the film of Polanski; Opinion on the film of Brooks.

Ryle, Simon J.
"Filming Non-Space: The Vanishing Point and the Face in Brook's King Lear" Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 140-47, 2007
UC users only

Saunders, J. G.
"'Apparent Perversities': Text and Subtext in the Construction of the Role of Edgar in Brook's Film of King Lear." Review of English Studies, vol. 47 no. 187. 1996 Aug. pp: 317-30.
UC users only

Shaw, William P.
"Violence and Vision in Polanski's Macbeth and Brook's Lear."Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 4. 1986. pp: 211-213.
UC users only

Vigeurs, Susan.
"Costuming as Interpretation: The Elliot/Olivier and the Brook/Scofield King Lear." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 12 no. 2. 1994 Spring. pp: 44-46.

Wilds, Lillian
"One "King Lear" for Our Time: A Bleak Film Vision by Peter Brook." Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 159
UC users only

King Lear: Jean-Luc Godard

Bennett, Susan.
"Godard and Lear: Trashing the Can(n)on." .(Jean-Luc Godard's 'King Lear') Theatre Survey v39, n1 (May, 1998):7 (13 pages).
"Jean-Luc Godard's film 'King Lear' is described as postmodern on the grounds that it is not nostalgic for a better past, focusing instead on modern commercial culture. However, it is also suggested that the production portrays desolation and despair in a time devoid of art, hence requiring reinvention of the past. An overview of the film is given, along with details of the relationship between Godard and Cannon films." [Expanded Academic Index]
Jean-Luc Godard's film 'King Lear' is described as postmodern on the grounds that it is not nostalgic for a better past, focusing instead on modern commercial culture. However, it is also suggested that the production portrays desolation and despair in a time devoid of art, hence requiring reinvention of the past. An overview of the film is given, along with details of the relationship between Godard and Cannon films.

Benoit, Laurent
"King Lear." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no399 Sept 1987. p. iii

Corliss, Richard.
"Mad Monarch as Gang Lord." (King Lear the movie)Time v131, n5 (Feb 1, 1988):71.

Defraeye, Piet; Owens, Margaret.
"Digging for Lear: In Search of the Vanishing Point in Jean-Luc Godard's King Lear."ALFA: Actes de Langue Francaise et de Linguistique Symposium on French Language and Linguistics 1997-1998, 10-11, 243-52.

Diniz, Thais Flores-Nogueira
"Godard: a contemporary King Lear." In: Foreign accents : Brazilian readings of Shakespeare / edited by Aimara da Cunha Resende. p. 198-206 Newark [Del.] : University of Delaware Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002. International studies in Shakespeare and his contemporaries.
Main Stack PR2971.B7.F67 2002

Durgnat, Raymond
"King Lear." (movie reviews) Monthly Film Bulletin LV/649, Feb 88; p.38-39.

Guneratne, Anthony R.
"Four Funerals and a Bedding: Freud and the Post-Apocalyptic Apocalypse of Jean-Luc Godard's King Lear." In: Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Impastato, David.
"Godard's Lear . . . Why Is It So Bad?"Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 12 no. 3. 1994 Summer. pp: 38-41.

Katsahnias, Iannis
"King Lear." (motion picture review) Cahiers du Cinema no397 June 1987. p. 19

Maerz, Jessica M.
"Godard's King Lear: Referents Provided Upon Request." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2004. Vol. 32, Iss. 2; p. 108 (7 pages)
UC users only

Morice, Jacques
"King Lear." Beaux Arts Magazine no. 215 (April 2002) p. 24
Jean-Luc Godard's film King Lear is on release in French cinemas from April 3, 2002. The film, a version of the Shakespeare play of the same name, was made as the result of a pact made in 1986 between Godard and two heads of the Cannon firm, but it has not been seen for a long time because of a legal imbroglio. Funereal and weak, it is the most lifeless of Godard's late works.

Nokes, David.
"King Lear." (Cannon Cinemas, London) (movie reviews) Times Literary Supplement, n4,426 (Jan 29, 1988):112.

Robinson, Marc.
"Resurrected images: Godard's 'King Lear.'"Performing Arts Journal v11, n1 (Wntr, 1989):20 (6 pages).
UC users only

Robinson, Marc.
"Resurrected images: Godard's 'King Lear.'"Performing Arts Journal v11, n1 (Wntr, 1989):20 (6 pages).

Rosenbaum, Jonathan
"The importance of being perverse: Godard's King Lear." In: Placing movies: the practice of film criticism / Jonathan Rosenbaum. p. 184-89. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1995.
UCB Main PN1995 .R65 1995

Scheinfeld, Michael
"King Lear." (motion picture review) Films in Review v 39 May 1988. p. 301-2

Strick, Philip
"King Lear." (Review).Films & Filming /401, Feb 88; p.33-34.

Tarantino, Michael.
"Jean-Luc Godard, King Lear." (New York City)Artforum v26, n8 (April, 1988):141.

Walworth, Alan.
"Cinema Hysterica Passio: Voice and Gaze in Jean-Luc Godard's King Lear." In: The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory Edited by Lisa S. Starks and Courtney Lehmann. pp: 59-94. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

King Lear (Korol Lir): Kozintsev

Catania, Saviour.
"Darkness Rumbling": Kozintsev's Karòl Lier and the Visual Acoustics of Nothing. Literature Film Quarterly, 2008, Vol. 36 Issue 2, p85-93, 9p;
UC users only
"An essay is presented which explores the films directed by Grigori Kozintsev. His film "Karòl Lier," an adaptation of the play "King Lear" by William Shakespeare, is examined. The concept of "visual acoustic" is explored, and the cinematic techniques used in the film are described. Specific scenes from the motion picture are analyzed for their acoustic properties." [Ebsco]

Gillespie, David
"Adapting foreign classics : Kozintsev's Shakespeare." In: Russian and Soviet film adaptations of literature, 1900-2001 : screening the word / edited by Stephen Hutchings and Anat Vernitski. London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2005.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F437 2005

Griggs, Yvonne.
"On the Road: Reclaiming "Korol Lir." Literature Film Quarterly, 2009, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p97-108, 12p,
UC users only

Hodgdon, Barbara
"Kozintsev's "King Lear": Filming a Tragic Poem." Literature/Film Quarterly 5:4 (1977:Fall) 291
UC users only

Jutkewitsch, Sergej
"The Conscience of the King: Kozintsev's "King Lear"",Sight and Sound, Vol. 40, 1971, pp. 193-196

Kozintsev, Grigori
King Lear, The Space of Tragedy: The Diary of a Film Director / Grigori Kozintsev; translated by Mary Mackintosh; with a foreword by Peter Brook. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1977.
UCB Main PR3093.K613
UCB Moffitt PR3093.K61

Sokolyansky, Mark
"Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet and King Lear." In: The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare on film Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .C36 2000

Welsh, James M.
"To See It Feelingly: "King Lear" Through Russian Eyes." Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 153

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Lear and Dispossession: The Peopled Space of Kozintsev's King Lear." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 6 no. 3. 1988 May-June. pp: 20-22.

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"On the Closing of Gloucester's Door in the Kozintsev Lear." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 2 no. 1. 1977 Dec. pp: 3, 5.

Womack, Kenneth.
"Assessing the Rhetoric of Performance Criticism in Three Variant Soviet Texts of King Lear." Yearbook of Comparative and General Literature, vol. 41. 1993. PAGES: 149-59.

Ran (King Lear): Kurosawa

King Lear: Laurence Olivier

Giroux, Robert.
"Laurence Olivier`s Lear ." Films in Review 35, no. 2 (1984): 98-100.
Compares Laurence Olivier`s film of King Lear with productions by Orson Welles and Paul Scofield.

Mebane, John S.
"Olivier's King Lear and the 'Feminine' Virtues in Shakespearean Tragedy." The Shakespeare Yearbook, vol. 3. 1992. pp: 143-66.

Occhiogrosso, Frank.
"'Give Me Thy Hand': Manual Gesture in the Elliott-Olivier King Lear." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 2 no. 9. 1984 May-June. pp: 16-19.

King Lear: Orson Welles

Coursen, H. R.
"The Peter Brook/Orson Welles King Lear." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 15 no. 2. 1991 Apr. pp: 8.

Pendleton, Thomas A.
"Shakespeare in the Golden Age of Television: Orson Welles' King Lear."The Shakespeare Newsletter, vol. 44 no. 3 (222). 1994 Fall. pp: 58.

The King Is Alive (Kristian Levring)

Appelo, Tim
"The Dogmeteers." (Review) The Nation June 25, 2001 v272 i25 p36 (1662 words)

Bottinelli, Jennifer J.
"Watching Lear: Resituating the Gaze at the Intersection of Film and Drama in Kristian Levring's The King Is Alive." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 101-09, 2005.
UC users only

Cartelli, Thomas; Rowe, Katherine.
"Surviving Shakespeare: Kristian Levring's The King Is Alive." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. [no pagination], Fall 2005

Durbin, Karen
"Making 'Lear' a 'Survivor' in the desert." (Living Arts Pages) The New York Times April 22, 2001 pAR19(N) pAR19(L) col 1 (18 col in)

Falcon, Richard
"The King is Alive." (Review) Sight and Sound May 2001 v11 i5 p52(2)

Jess, Carolyn
"The barbarous Cronos": (post)colonialism, sequelization, and regenerative authority in Kristian Levring's The King Is Alive (2000). (Critical Essay) Shakespeare in Southern Africa Annual 2003 v15 p11 (6454 words) UC users only

Jess, Carolyn
"New-ness, Sequelization, and Dogme logic in Kristian Levring's The King is Alive." New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film, 2005, Vol. 3 Issue 1, p3-16, 14p;
UC users only

Jess-Cooke, Carolyn.
"The Promised End" of Cinema: Portraits of Cinematic Apocalypse in 21st Century Shakespearean Cinema." Literature Film Quarterly, 2006, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p161-168, 8p
UC users only

Nochimson, Martha P.
"The King Is Alive." Film Quarterly. 55(2):48-54. 2001-2002 Winter "The King Is Alive." Film Quarterly, Winter2001, Vol. 55 Issue 2, p48, 7p
UC users only

Pearson, Bryan
"Dogma Spirit 'Alive' and Well in Africa." Variety 376:1 [23 August 1999-29 August 1999] p. 14

Love's Labour's Lost

Christensen, Peter G.
"Love's Labour's Lost: Branagh's revitalization of the fairy tale musical." Shakespeare and Renaissance Association of West Virginia: selected papers (26) 2003, 86-93. (2003)
UC users only

Corliss, Richard.
"Branagh Faces the Music: His bad-singing, bad-dancing Love's Labour's Lost suggests this is the end of the reign of King Ken." (The Arts/Cinema)(Review)_(movie review) . Time June 12, 2000 v155 i24 p82
UC users only

Friedman, Michael D..
"'I won't dance, don't ask me': Branagh's Love's Labour's Lost and the American film musical." Literature / Film Quarterly (32:2) 2004, 134-43. (2004)
UC users only

Green, Douglas E.
"Branagh's Love's Labour's Lost and the Return of the Hollywood Musical: Song of the Living Dead." Shakespeare Bulletin, Spring2008, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p77-96, 20p
UC users only

Holste, Gayle.
"Branagh's labour's lost: too much, too little, too late." Literature/Film Quarterly (30:3) [2002:3] , p.228-230.
UC users only

Jays, David
"Labour's lost." Sight & Sound v. ns10 no. 4 (April 2000) p. 54-5
UC users only
"Branagh fashions a 1930s-style musical out of Shakespeare's play and studs it with popular standards. The film inhabits a lovingly artificial Oxbridge of courtyards and autumnal leaves floating toward flagstones, into which the women bring arresting dabs of color. Branagh has cut almost three-quarters of the original text, using news-reel interludes to explain the plot. Unfortunately, the glutinous score robs the lovers' barbed exchanges of tension." [Art Index]

Kauffmann, Stanley
"On Films - Well, Not Completely Lost." (Review)_(movie review) The New Republic July 10, 2000 p32

Marshall, Kelli
"'It Doth Forget to Do the Thing It Should': Kenneth Branagh, Love's Labour's Lost, and (Mis)Interpreting the Musical Genre." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 83-91, 2005.
UC users only

McDonald, Neil .
"Branagh's labours lost." (Film). (Kenneth Branagh, Love's Labour's Lost in Australia) Quadrant April 2002 v46 i4 p56(8)

Nardo, Anna K.
"Playing With Shakespeare's Play: Branagh's Love's Labour's Lost." Shakespeare Survey, 2008, Vol. 61, p13-22, 10p

Wray, Ramona
"Nostalgia for Navarre: the melancholic metacinema of Kenneth Branagh's 'Love's Labour's Lost.'" (Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly July 2002 v30 i3 p171(8)
UC users only
"Kenneth Branagh's 2000 motion picture 'Love's Labour's Lost' presented Shakepeare's play as a Hollywood musical of the 1930s, and was a critical and financial failure. Branagh reinvented the play's ending as well, moving from the realm of pleasure and nostalgia to the 1940s' anxiety of global conflict." [Expanded Academic Index]

Macbeth

Arkai, Marta.
"The (Transvestite) Play: Is It the Thing? A (Two-Dimensional) Literary-Psychological Re-Reading of Shakespeare's Macbeth with Jeremy Freeston and Henry Fuseli."AnaChronist, 1999, 1-15.
Online: Also available at http://www.btk.elte.hu/englit/anachronist/

Barasch, Frances K.
"Revisionist Art: Macbeth on Film." University of Dayton Review, vol. 14 no. 1. 1979-80. pp: 15-20.
Draws on Orson Welles's and Roman Polanski's films of Macbeth in arguing that new works produced under the influence of antecedent arts are not imitations but reshapings.

Hale, Dav G.
"Order and Disorder in Macbeth, Act V: Film and Television."Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 101-06.
UCB users only
Considers how the ending of 'Macbeth' is interpreted by different directors

Hatchuel, Sarah
"Prithee, see there! Behold! Look!" (3.4.69): The Gift or the Denial of Sight in Screen Adaptations of Shakespeare's Macbeth." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. [no pagination], Fall 2005

Jorgens, Jack J.
"Media for Shakespeare's Macbeth." University of Dayton Review, vol. 14 no. 1. 1979-80. pp: 45-54.

Kliman, Bernice W.
Macbeth / Bernice W. Kliman. Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press; New York: Distributed exclusively in the USA and Canada by St. Martin's Press, c1992. Series title: Shakespeare in performance.
UCB Main PR2823 .K58 1992

Mullin, Michael.
"Macbeth on Film." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 1. 1973. pp: 332-42.

Ornstein, Robert.
"Interpreting Shakespeare: The Dramatic Text and the Film." University of Dayton Review, vol. 14 no. 1. 1979-80. pp: 55-61.

Ray, Sid.
"Finding Gruoch: The Hidden Genealogy of Lady Macbeth in Text and Cinematic Performance." In: Shakespeare and the Middle Ages : essays on the performance and adaptation of the plays with medieval sources or settings / edited by Martha W. Driver and Sid Ray ; foreword by Michael Almereyda and Dakin Matthews. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3069.M47 S54 2009

Stenberg, Doug.
"The Circle of Life and the Chain of Being: Shakespearean Motifs in The Lion King." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 14 no. 2. 1996 Spring. pp: 36-37.

Wilson, R.
"Macbeth on film." Theatre Arts v. 33 (June 1949) p. 53-5

Macbeth (Throne of Blood): Kurosawa

Macbeth: Roman Polanski

Barasch, Frances K.
"Revisionist Art: Macbeth on Film."University of Dayton Review 14, no. 1 (1979-80): 15-20.
Draws on Orson Welles's and Roman Polanski?s films of Macbeth in arguing that new works produced under the influence of antecedent arts are not imitations but reshapings.

Berlin, Normand
"Macbeth: Polanski and Shakespeare" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 291
UC users only
Argues that R.P.'s film is a valid modern interpretation of the play

Crowl, Samuel.
"Chain Reaction: A Study of Roman Polanski's Macbeth." Soundings: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, vol. 59. 1976. pp: 226-33.

Deats, Sara M.
"Polanski's Macbeth: A Contemporary Tragedy."Studies in Popular Culture, vol. 9 no. 1. 1986. pp: 84-93.

Grossvogel, David I.
"When the Stain Won't Wash: Polanski's Macbeth." Diacritics: A Review of Contemporary Criticism. 2 (2): 46-51. 1972 Summer.
UC users only

Gushurst, Bruna.
"Polanski's determining of power in Macbeth." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter (13:2) 7. (1989)

Harper, Wendy Rogers.
"Polanski vs. Welles on Macbeth: Character or Fate?"Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 4. 1986. pp: 203-210.
UC users only
Discusses how television directors, Roman Polanski and Orson Welles, presented the characters of the novel 'Macbeth,' written by William Shakespeare. Information on the television production of the play; Details of the realistic imagery approach of Polanski; Discussion on the directorial strategy of Welles; Description of the characters.

Johnson, William
"King Lear and Macbeth."Film Quarterly Vol XXV nr 3 (Spring 1972); p 41-48

Jorgens, Jack.
"The Opening Scene of Polanski's Macbeth."Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 3. 1975. pp: 277-78.Literature/Film Quarterly Vol III nr 3 (Summer 1975); p 277-78
Continues a discussion begun in previous issues (Rothwell, I/1 and Silverstein II/1).

Kliman, Bernice W.
"Gleanings: the residue of difference in scripts: the case of Polanski's Macbeth." In: Shakespearean Illuminations: Essays in Honor of Marvin Rosenberg / edited by Jay L. Halio and Hugh Richmond. pp. 131-46. Newark: University of Delaware Press, c1998.
Main Stack PR2976.S33895 1998

Middleton, David.
"The Self-Reflective Nature of Roman Polanski's Macbeth." University of Dayton Review, vol. 14 no. 1. 1979-80. pp: 89-94.

Mullin, M.
"Macbeth on film." Literature/Film Quarterly Vol I nr 4 (Fall 1973); p 332-342
UC users only
Discusses four screen versions of the play.

Pearlman, E.
"Macbeth on Film: Politics." In: Shakespeare and the Moving Image: the plays on film and television / edited by Anthony Davies and Stanley Wells. pp: 250-60. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Compares Akira Kurosawa`s Throne of Blood to Welles?s and Roman Polanski`s Macbeth. Of the three films, finds that Throne of Blood "is the most akin to Shakespeare in the grandeur and spaciousness of its vision." Revision of "Macbeth on Film: Politics,"Shakespeare Survey 39 (1987): 67-74.]

Petersen, Per Serritslev.
"The 'Bloody Business' of Roman Polanski's Macbeth: A Case Study of the Dynamics of Modern Shakespeare Appropriation." In: Screen Shakespeare / edited by Michael Skovmand. pp: 38-53 Aarhus, Denmark : Aarhus University Press, c1994. Dolphin (Arhus, Denmark) ; no. 24.
Main Stack PR3093.S37 1994

Rathburn, Paul.
"Polanski's Macbeth: Sequence in the Boy's Bedroom at Fife."Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 15 no. 1. 1990 Dec. pp: 1-2.

Reddington, J.
"Film, play and idea." Literature/Film Quarterly Vol I nr 4 (Fall 1973); p 367-371
Argues that Brook's 'King Lear' is a much more successful transformation of play into film than Polanski's 'Macbeth'

Reynolds, Bryan.
"The Terrorism of Macbeth and Charles Manson: Reading Cultural Construction in Polanski and Shakespeare." The Upstart Crow, vol. 13. 1993. pp: 109-29.

Reynolds, Bryan.
"Untimely Ripped: Mediating Witchcraft in Polanski and Shakespeare." In: Performing transversally : reimagining Shakespeare and the critical future / by Bryan Reynolds. pp: 111-35. 1st ed. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Main Stack PR3091.R477 2003

Robinson, Randal.
"Reversals in Roman Polanski's Macbeth." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 22 no. 2. 1994. pp: 105-08.
UC users only
Roman Polanski's movie of William Shakespeare's 'Macbeth' makes use of reversals in the story, and three reversals are Polanski's works. The three Polanski reversals are Macbeth's murder of Duncan, Macbeth's dream of Fleance and Duncan's confrontation with Cawdor. A common element of these three scenes is that they precede the appearance of a woman, and women symbolize the suffering inner children in men. Macbeth is thus a tortured child who must seek self destruction to atone for his crimes.

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Roman Polanski's Macbeth: Golgotha triumphant."
UC users only Literature/Film Quarterly Vol I nr 1 (Winter 1973); p 71-75

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Roman Polanski's 'Macbeth': the 'privileging' of Ross."" CEA Critic: an official journal of the College English Association (Bucknell Univ., Lewisburg, PA) (46:1/2) 1983/84, 50-5. (1983-1984)

Royster, Francesca
"Riddling Whiteness, Riddling Certainty: Roman Polanski's Macbeth." In: Weyward Macbeth : intersections of race and performance / Edited by Scott L Newstok; Ayanna Thompson Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
Main Stack PR2823 .W37 2010

Shaw, William P.
"Violence and Vision in Polanski's Macbeth and Brook's Lear." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 4. 1986. pp: 211-213.
UC users only

Silverstein, Norman.
"The Opening Shot of Roman Polanski's Macbeth." Literature Film Quarterly, Winter74, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p88, 3p
UC users only

Wexman, Virginia Wright.
"Macbeth and Polanski's Theme of Regression." University of Dayton Review, vol. 14 no. 1. 1979-80. pp: 85-88.

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Fated Macbeths: The Film Director as God."Shakespeare-Jahrbuch 1984, pp. 164-67.
Discusses Wells`s, Roman Polanski?s, and Akira Kurosawa`s films of Macbeth to demonstrate problems of adaptations in regard to the borderline between interpreting Shakespeare and creating a new work.

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Recontextualizing Shakespeare on Film: My Own Private Idaho, Men of Respect, Prospero's Books."Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 10 no. 3. 1992 Summer. pp: 34-37.

Yong, Li Lan.
"'The Very Painting of Your Fear': Roman Polanski's Macbeth." Shakespeare-Jahrbuch. 133: 109-17. 1997.

Macbeth: Orson Welles

Barasch, Frances K.
"Revisionist Art: Macbeth on Film."University of Dayton Review 14, no. 1 (1979-80): 15-20.
Draws on Orson Welles's and Roman Polanski?s films of Macbeth in arguing that new works produced under the influence of antecedent arts are not imitations but reshapings.

Blansfield, Karen C.
"Artistic and Social Dimensions of Black Cultures in the 'Voodoo' Macbeth." Journal of American Drama and Theatre 4, no. 1 (1992): 78-100.
Examines how black culture and attitudes to race influenced the inception, adaptation, staging, structure, and reception of Orson Welles's "Voodoo" Macbeth (1936).

France, Richard.
"The 'Voodoo' Macbeth of Orson Welles." Yale/Theatre 5, no. 3 (1974): 66-78.
Believes that Orson Welles's production of Macbeth (1936), conceived as a suspense thriller about a man manipulated by the forces of darkness, was hardly tragic because the adaptation substituted--effectively, through Welles's overtly clever mechanics--the spectacle of the horror movie for the catharsis of the portrayal of tragic destiny.

Harper, Wendy Rogers.
"Polanski vs. Welles on Macbeth: Character or Fate?"Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 14 no. 4. 1986. pp: 203-210.
UC users only
Discusses how television directors, Roman Polanski and Orson Welles, presented the characters of the novel 'Macbeth,' written by William Shakespeare. Information on the television production of the play; Details of the realistic imagery approach of Polanski; Discussion on the directorial strategy of Welles; Description of the characters.

Lindley, Arthur.
"Scotland Saved from History: Welles's Macbeth and the Ahistoricism of Medieval Film."Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 96-100.
UC users only
Presents a review of director Orson Welles's motion picture `Macbeth.' Impact of the motion picture on other motion pictures which deal with the Medieval Age; Purpose of elements in the motion picture; Example depicting the difference between the modes of modern and medieval historical films.

McCloskey, Susan.
"Shakespeare, Orson Welles, And the "Voodoo" Macbeth" Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 4. (Winter, 1985), pp.406-416.
(Berkeley users only)

Naremore, James
"The Walking Shadow: Welles's Expressionist Macbeth" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 360
UC users only

Pearlman, E.
"Macbeth on Film: Politics." In: Shakespeare and the Moving Image: the plays on film and television / edited by Anthony Davies and Stanley Wells. pp: 250-60. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Main Stack PR3093.S53 1994

Smith, Amanda J.
"Defining Welles's Macbeth: Hollywood Horror And The Hybrid Mode." Literature Film Quarterly, 2011, Vol. 39 Issue 2, p151-159, 9p
(Berkeley users only)

Ulbricht, Walt.
"Orson Welles' Macbeth: Archetype and Symbol."University of Dayton Review, vol. 14 no. 1. 1979-80. pp: 21-27.

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Fated Macbeths: The Film Director as God."Shakespeare-Jahrbuch 1984, pp. 164-67.
Discusses Welles`s, Roman Polanski;s, and Akira Kurosawa`s films of Macbeth to demonstrate problems of adaptations in regard to the borderline between interpreting Shakespeare and creating a new work.

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Shakespeare on poverty row: Welles's Republic Pictures Macbeth (1948)." In: Shakespeare in Hollywood, 1929-1956 / Robert F. Willson, Jr.p. 130-42 Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2000.
Main Stack PR3093.W57 2000

Macbeth: Geoffrey Wright

Rooks, Amanda Kane
"Macbeth's Wicked Women: Sexualized Evil in Geoffrey Wright's "Macbeth."" Literature Film Quarterly; 2009, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p151-160, 10p,
UC users only

Macbeth: Scotland, PA

Brown, Eric C.
"Shakespeare, class, and Scotland, PA.(Cover story)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 147(7).
UC users only

Deitchman, Elizabeth A.
"White Trash Shakespeare: Taste, Morality, and the Dark Side of the American Dream in Billy Morrissette's Scotland, PA." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2006. Vol. 34, Iss. 2; p. 140 (7 pages)
UC users only

Hoefer, Anthony D., Jr.
"The McDonaldization of Macbeth: Shakespeare and pop culture in Scotland, PA." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 154(7).
UC users only

Holden, Stephen.
"Fair is fowl and fowl is fair in rural Pennsylvania." ('Scotland, Pa.') (movie review) The New York Times Feb 8, 2002 pB14(N) pE15(L) col 1 (35 col in)

Kehr, Dave
"Lady Macbeth, medium rare." (Maura Tierney plays character based on Lady Macbeth in new film 'Scotland, Pa.')(Weekend) The New York Times Feb 8, 2002 pB8(N) pE8(L) col 1 (15 col in)

Malanowski, Jamie
"'Macbeth,' droll and deep fried." (Billy Morrissette discusses his new film,'Scotland, PA') The New York Times Feb 3, 2002 pAR11(N) pAR11(L) col 3 (35 col in)

Rippy, Marguerite
"A fast-food Shakespeare." ('Scotland, PA')_(movie review) The Chronicle of Higher Education April 19, 2002 v48 i32 pB16(1)

Merchantof Venice

Mallin, Eric S.
"Jewish Invader and the Soul of State: The Merchant of Venice and Science Fiction Movies." In: Shakespeare and modernity : early modern to millennium / edited by Hugh Grady.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks

Rooney, Tom.
"'A Thousand Shylocks': Orson Welles and the Merchant Of Venice." Shakespeare Survey, 2006, Vol. 59, p63-68, 6p;
UC users only

Rothwell, K. S.
"The Merchant of Venice." Cineaste v. 29 no. 4 (Fall 2004) p. 56-7
UC users only
"A review of DVD of a television film of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, directed by Trevor Nunn and Chris Hunt. Through its roaming, interrogative camera, this version of Shakespeare's play manages to go far beyond the prison house of a photographed stage play. A Berlin cabaret pulls the play from Venice, Italy, and relocates it in a decadent and even more poisonously anti-Semitic Weimar Germany. It is a pity that there are no "extras" on the DVD, as interviews with the director and cast would have been useful." [Art Index]

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Trevor Nunn's The Merchant of Venice: Portia's House of Mystery, Magic, and Menace." In: Acts of criticism : performance matters in Shakespeare and his contemporaries : essays in honor of James P. Lusardi / edited by Paul Nelsen and June Schlueter. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2006.
Main Stack PR3091.A27 2006

The Merchant of Venice: Michael Radford

Crowl, Samuel.
"The Merchant of Venice.(Movie Review)." Shakespeare Bulletin 23.2 (Summer 2005): 45(7).
UC users only

Daniel, Drew
"William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice." Film Quarterly v. 60 no. 1 (Fall 2006) p. 52-6
UC users only
"The writer reviews Michael Radford's 2004 film adaptation of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. Radford's film is at its best when it is engaged in the ethically admirable and historically accurate project of portraying Jewish oppression. Nonetheless, it is at exactly these moments that it struggles unsuccessfully with the comic machinery and fairytale logic of Shakespeare's play. If Shylock is to really be the moral hero of the play, then the audience must correspondingly regard Portia and Antonio as vicious and cynical bigots. Unwilling to follow this logic to its end, Radford's film instead tries to sympathize equally with every character, softening the sharp corners until the dramatic shape disappears. This compromise ultimately betrays Shakespeare's Christian and Jewish characters by removing the play's vision of their differences for the sake of an easily digestible universality." [Art Index]

Dickson, Andy.
"William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice.(Movie Review)." Sight and Sound 15.2 (Feb 2005): 79(1). UC users only
"Director Michael Radford appears to miss the essence of Shakespeare's claustrophobic psychological drama: Although it addresses big issues, it's ultimately a tale of people under unbearable pressure. Apart from Pacino and a few supporting roles, the cast is unengaging and not given much to do. By the time Portia challenges Pacino's bewildered Shylock, all tension has ebbed from the climax. This version only nicks the skin of Shakespeare's drama and never gets near to its heart." [Art Index]

Enright, R.
"The Heart of the Matter: Michael Radford's The Merchant of Venice." Border Crossings v. 24 no. 1 (February 2005) p. 16-17 UC users only
"A review of Michael Radford's film version of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. Throughout the play, Shakespeare reveals how Venetian society defined itself through tropes of measurement and weight, and Radford and his brilliant cast find telling ways to embody those methods of knowing and acting in the world. As Shylock, Al Pacino is superb, fleshing out the complexities of the character as much as could be hoped for. His performance is so persuasive as to the passion and rightness of Shylock's moral position that he quiets any lingering accusations that Shakespeare was involved in an act of disguised anti-Semitism." [Art Index]

Geller, C.
"The Merchant of Venice." Cineaste v. 30 no. 2 (Spring 2005) p. 48-50
UC users only
"A review of The Merchant of Venice, a film directed by Michael Radford. While Radford's adaptation of Shakespeare's play is visually arresting, well acted, and generally faithful to the original script, without subsiding into the dreary stiffness that so frequently plagues stories with the "classic" label, it is simply wrongheaded about the structure and meaning of the play. At the heart of its wrongheadedness is the depiction of Shylock as a victim rather than a villain. However, this bad philosophy is overcome by good acting: As Shylock, Al Pacino displays a range and depth perhaps never previously realized by him. He extracts every ounce of humanity out of the stereotype Shakespeare began with and could not quite leave alone." [Art Index]

Lake, James H.
"The Influence of Primacy and Recency Upon Audience Response to Michael Radford's The Merchant of Venice." Shakespeare Newsletter; Fall2007, Vol. 57 Issue 2, p61-78, 2p

Magnus, Laury
"Michael Radford's The Merchant of Venice and the Vexed Question of Performance." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 108-20, 2007
UC users only

Pittman, L. Monique
"Locating the Bard: Adaptation and Authority in Michael Radford's The Merchant of Venice." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 13-33, Summer 2007
UC users only
"The article focuses on the approach to adaptation and authorization used by director Michael Radford for the film "The Merchant of Venice." Radford's adaptation of the production indirectly invoke the sources of narrative authority that threatens the correctness of the film. The reasons behind the adaptive authority used for the film are mentioned. The issues highlighted by the film are discussed."

Streete, Adrian
"The Politics of Apocalypse: Interrogating Conversion in Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ and Michael Radford's The Merchant of Venice." In: Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Midsummer Night's Dream

Burnett, Mark-Thornton
" Impressions of Fantasy: Adrian Noble's A Midsummer Night's Dream." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle / edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 89-101. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Crowl, Samuel
"Babes in the Woods: Or the Lost Boys"Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 11 no. 3, 1983. pp: 185-189
UC users only
On "A midsummer Might's Dream" (Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle) and "As You Like It" (Paul Czinner) which interpret Shakespeare's flight to the woods as regression into childishness.

Donaldson, Peter S.
"'Two of Both Kinds': Modernism and Patriarchy in Peter Hall's A Midsummer Night's Dream." In: In: The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory Edited by Lisa S.http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=6905879&site=ehost-livears and Courtney Lehmann. pp: 43-58 Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

Ford, John R.
"Translating Audiences and Their Bottoms: Filming A Midsummer Night's Dream." Publications of the Mississippi Philological Association, 2000, 1-9.

Ford, John R.
"Recounting Our Dreams: Imagining Shakespeare in Two Recent Film and Televised Adaptations of A Midsummer Night's Dream." Shakespeare Bulletin, Volume 26, Number 3, Fall 2008, pp. 31-43 (Article)
UC users only

Halio, Jay L.
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Jay L. Halio. Manchester [England]; New York: Manchester University Press; New York: Distributed exclusively in the USA and Canada by St. Martin's Press, c1994. Series title: Shakespeare in performance.
UCB Main PR2827 .H29 1994

Hinely, Jan Lawson
Expounding the Dream: Shaping Fantasies in A Midsummer Night's Dream / edited by Maurice Charney and Joseph Reppen. Rutherford [N.J.]; Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Press, 1987.
Main Stack PN56.P92.P721 1987

Mullin, Michael
"Peter Hall's Midsummer Night's Dream on Film." Educational Theatre Journal, vol. 27, 1975 pp: 529-34

Occhiogrosso, Frank
"Cinematic Oxymoron in Peter Hall's A Midsummer Night's Dream." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 11 no. 3, 1983 pp: 174-178.
UC users only
On P.H.'s perception of the concord of discords in "A midsummer night's dream" which he expresses through cinematic oxymoron.

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Constructing Female Desire and the Female Gaze in the Dreams of Reinhardt, Hall, and Papp." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 15 no. 1, 1990 Dec. pp. 5

Wiegmann, Mira.
The staging and transformation of gender archetypes in A midsummer night's dream, M. Butterfly, and Kiss of the Spider Woman Lewiston, N.Y. : Edwin Mellen Press, c2003.
MAIN: PN56.S52 W54 2003

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Ill Met by Moonlight: Reinhardt's a Midsummer Night's Dream and Musical Screwball Comedy." Journal of Popular Film, vol. 5, 1976 pp: 185-97

Midsummer Night's Dream: Michael Hoffman<

Bemrose, John
"What muddled dreams may come: Hollywood loves -- but doesn't quite trust -- Shakespeare." (Review)Maclean's (May 17, 1999):61 (1 page).

Denby, David.
"Bottom's up." (Review) New Yorker v75, n11 (May 17, 1999):96 (3 pages).

Donaldson, Peter.
"Bottom and the Gramophone: Media, Class and Comedy in Michael Hoffman's A Midsummer Night's Dream." Shakespeare Survey, 2008, Vol. 61, p22-35, 14p,

Felperin, Leslie.
"A Midsummer Night's Dream." (Review) (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v9, n10 (Oct, 1999):51 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Stanley Kauffmann on Films: Dream Time." (Review) New Republic (May 31, 1999):32 (1 page).

Levy, Emanuel
"William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream." (Review)Variety v374, n12 (May 10, 1999):49 (1 page).

Schickel, Richard.
"But Midsummer Night's Drear." (Review)Time v153, n18 (May 10, 1999):82 (1 page).

Simon, John.
"Film: Pidgeon Feathers." (Review) National Review v51, n10 (May 31, 1999):70 (1 page)

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Those mortal fools." (Michael Hoffman discusses filming 'A Midsummer Night's Dream,' starring Michelle Pfeiffer)(Column) New York Times (Fri, March 26, 1999):B15(N), E15(L), col 2, 14 col in.

Welsh, Jim.
"'Ill Met by Moonlight': Michael Hoffman's Dream." Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 27 no. 2. 1999. pp: 159-61.

Midwinter'sTale

Holden, Stephen.
"A Midwinter's Tale." (movie reviews) New York Times v145 (Fri, Feb 9, 1996):B4(N), C5(L), col 5, 16 col in.

Howlett, Kathy M.
"Playing on the rim of the frame: Kenneth Branagh's A midwinter's tale." In Framing Shakespeare on film. p. 178-200. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .H69 2000

Lehmann, Courtney.
"Shakespeare the Savior or Phantom Menace? Kenneth Branagh's A Midwinter's Tale and the Critique of Cynical Reason." Colby-Quarterly, 2001 Mar, 37:1, 54-77.

Simon, John.
"A Midwinter's Tale." (movie reviews) National Review v48, n5 (March 25, 1996):62 (1 page).

Schickel, Richard.
"A Midwinter's Tale." (movie reviews)Time v147, n9 (Feb 26, 1996):68 (1 page).

Travers, Peter.
"A Midwinter's Tale." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n728 (Feb 22, 1996):70 (1 page). Pub Type: Review.

Wolcott
"A Midwinter's Tale." (movie reviews) New Yorker v71, n48 (Feb 12, 1996):84 (2 pages). , James.

Much Ado About Nothing: Kenneth Branagh

Alleva, Richard.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) Commonweal v120, n12 (June 18, 1993):23 (2 pages).

Barton, Anne.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) New York Review of Books v41, n10 (May 27, 1993):11 (3 pages).

Bromwich, David.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)New Leader v76, n10 (August 9, 1993):20 (2 pages).

Canby, Vincent.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) New York Times v142 (Fri, May 7, 1993):B1(N), C16(L), col 5, 31 col in.

Collins, Michael J.
"Sleepless in Messina: Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado about Nothing." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 15 no. 2. 1997 Spring. pp: 38-39.

Corliss, Richard.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)) Time v141, n19 (May 10, 1993):65.

Crowl, Samuel
"The marriage of Shakespeare and Hollywood: Kenneth Branagh's Much ado about nothing." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002

Deleyto, Celestino.
"Men in Leather: Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado about Nothing and Romantic Comedy." Cinema Journal, vol. 36 no. 3. 1997 Spring. pp: 91-105.
UC users only
"The writer examines Kenneth Branagh's film Much Ado About Nothing as a case study of the underlying sexual ideology of romantic comedy. As a contemporary adaptation of a Shakespearean comedy, the movie occupies an uneasy position in historical terms as it both bears witness to the birth of modern romantic comedy and stands side by side with the genre's latest representations. In openly hinging on the female protagonist as the main point of identification for the audience, the film also continues a general trend in Shakespearean romantic comedy. Moreover, in his adaptation of this particular play, Branagh taps into the two elements whose presence/absence defines the genre's contemporary stage of development. The films almost brings into the open the pressure of homoerotic desire on a generic and social structure based on heterosexuality." [from ArtAbstracts]

Denby, David.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) New York v26, n19 (May 10, 1993):62 (2 pages).

Edgerton, Ellen.
"'Your Answer, Sir, Is Cinematical': Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado about Nothing." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 12 no. 1. 1994 Winter. pp: 42-44.

James, Caryn.
"Why Branagh's bard glows on the screen." (Kenneth Branagh's version of William Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing') New York Times v142, sec2 (Sun, May 16, 1993):H17(N), H17(L), col 1, 17 col in.

Johnson, Brian D.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) Maclean's v106, n19 (May 10, 1993):51 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) New Republic v208, n19 (May 10, 1993):38 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)New Republic v209, n3-4 (July 19, 1993):28 (2 pages).

Klawans, Stuart.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) Nation v256, n21 (May 31, 1993):750 (3 pages).

Kroll, Jack.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) Newsweek v121, n19 (May 10, 1993):60.

Lane, Anthony.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) New Yorker v69, n12 (May 10, 1993):97 (3 pages).

Light, Alisonn and Felperin Sharman, Leslie
"The Importance of Being Ordinary."Sight & Sound v. 3 (Sept. '93) p. 16-19.
Profile of Kenneth Branagh: compares his work to that of Laurence Olivier, incl. views on "Much ado about nothing".

Matthews, Peter
"Will and Ken's Excellent." adventure. (Review).Modern Review I/10, Aug-Sept 93; p.21.

Maxwell, Glyn.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4718 (Sept 3, 1993):18.

McCarthy, Todd.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) Variety v351, n1 (May 3, 1993):39 (2 pages).

Moses, Carol.
"Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado about Nothing: Shakespearean Comedy as Shakespearean Romance." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 14 no. 1. 1996 Winter. pp: 38-40.

"Much Ado About Nothing."
Films in Review, v. 44 (July/Aug. '93) p. 260-1

"Much Ado About Shakespeare." (Kenneth Branagh's successful film adaptations)Economist v329, n7831 (Oct 2, 1993):95 (2 pages).

Ottenhoff, John.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)Christian Century v110, n24 (August 25, 1993):823 (2 pages).

Pearson, Harry.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)Films in Review v44, n7-8 (July-August, 1993):260 (2 pages).

Romney, Jonathan.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)New Statesman & Society v6, n267 (August 27, 1993):34.

Ryan, Richard.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) Commentary v96, n4 (Oct, 1993):52 (4 pages).

Sharman, Leslie Felperin.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v3, n9 (Sept, 1993):50 (2 pages).

Shelton, Robert.
"Raiders of the Lost Archive." (Kenneth Branagh's film 'Much Ado About Nothing' based on William Shakespeare's play) Times Educational Supplement, n4031 (Oct 1, 1993):A23.

Sheppard, Philippa
"'Sigh no More Ladies'-the Song in Much Ado About Nothing: Shakespeare and Branagh Deliver Aural Pleasure." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 92-100, 2005.
UC users only

Simon, John.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) National Review v45, n11 (June 7, 1993):60 (2 pages).

Travers, Peter.
"Much Ado About Nothing." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n657 (May 27, 1993):56.

Othello

Aebischer, Pascale
"Black Rams Tupping White Ewes: Race vs. Gender in the Final Scene of Six Othellos."In: Adaptations : from text to screen, screen to text / edited by Deborah Cartmell, I.Q. Hunter, and Imelda Whelehan. pp: 59-73. London; Sterling, Va.: Pluto Press, 2001. Series title: Film/fiction; v. 6.
UCB Main PN1995.9.H5 R46 2001

Coursen, H. R.
"Janet Suzman's Othello."Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 16 no. 2. 1992 Apr. pp: 1, 4.

Fisher, James E.
"Olivier and the Realistic Othello" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 321

Hodgdon, Barbara.
"Kiss Me Deadly: Or, The Des/Demonized Spectacle." In: Othello: New Perspectives / edited by Virginia Mason Vaughan and Kent Cartwright. pp: 214-55. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, c1991.
Main Stack PR2829.O87 1991
Moffitt PR2829.O87 1991

Jackson, Russell
"Two Silent Shakespeares: Richard III and Othello." Cineaste v. 28 no. 2 (Spring 2003) p. 48-51
UC users only

Lake, James H.
"The Effects of Primacy and Recency upon Audience Response to Two Film Versions of Othello." Shakespeare Newsletter, vol. 56, no. 2 [269], pp. 45-46, Fall 2006

Marks, Elise.
"'Othello/Me': Racial Drag and the Pleasures of Boundary-Crossing with Othello." Comparative Drama. 35(1):101-23. 2001 Spring

Pilkington, Ace G.
"Othello's Stature: Three Filmed Versions of the Moor."Encyclia 1991, 68, 301-14.

Rippy, Marguerite Hailey
"All our Othello: black monsters and white masks on the American screen." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002 Skrebels, Paul. "All Night Long: Jazzing Around with Othello." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2008. Vol. 36, Iss. 2; p. 147 (10 pages)
UC users only

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"A Double Life: Othello as Film Noir Thriller." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 11 no. 1. 1986 Dec. pp: 3, 10.

Othello: Laurence Fishburne (dir. Oliver Parker, 1995)

Alleva, Richard.
"Othello." (movie reviews)Commonweal v123, n8 (April 19, 1996):19.

Buchanan, Judith.
"Virgin and Ape, Venetian and Infidel: Labellings of Otherness in Oliver Parker's Othello." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle / edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 179-202 New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Buss, Robin.
"Othello." (movie reviews) Times Educational Supplement, n4156 (Feb 23, 1996):S12.

Canby, Vincent.
"Filming Othello." (movie reviews)New York Times v136 (Wed, Feb 4, 1987):19(N), C24(L), col 1, 18 col in.

Canby, Vincent.
"Othello." (movie reviews) (Living Arts Pages) New York Times v141 (Fri, March 6, 1992):B1(N), C1(L), col 5, 34 col in.

Corliss, Richard.
"Othello." (movie reviews) Time v139, n16 (April 20, 1992):91 (2 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"Othello." (movie reviews)Time v147, n3 (Jan 15, 1996):67.

Cramer, Barbara.
"Othello." (movie reviews) Films in Review v43, n7-8 (July-August, 1992):256 (3 pages).

Denby, David.
"Othello." (movie reviews) New York v29, n2 (Jan 15, 1996):49.

Dorval, Patricia
"Shakespeare on Screen: Threshold Aesthetics in Oliver Parker's Othello." Early Modern Literary Studies 6.1 (May, 2000):1.1-15
UC users only

Johnson, Brian D.
"Othello." (movie reviews)Maclean's v109, n2 (Jan 8, 1996):71.

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Othello." (movie reviews) New Republic v206, n10 (March 9, 1992):28 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Othello." (movie reviews)New Republic v214, n7 (Feb 12, 1996):30 (2 pages).

Luscombe, Belinda.
"One Moor Time." (Laurence Fishburne may become the first black man to play Moor in Shakespeare's Othello in a major movie)(Brief Article) Time v145, n18 (May 1, 1995):93.

Macnab, Geoffrey.
"Othello." (movie reviews)Sight and Sound v6, n2 (Feb, 1996):51 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"Othello." (movie reviews)New York Times v145 (Tue, Dec 14, 1995):B1(N), B1(L), col 1, 12 col in.

McCarthy, Todd.
"Othello." (movie reviews)Variety v361, n6 (Dec 11, 1995):83.

Rafferty, Terrence.
"Othello." (movie reviews)New Yorker v71, n41 (Dec 18, 1995):126 (2 pages).

Riding, Alan.
"To Be, or Not To..O.K., Cut! "(new film versions of 'Othello' and 'Richard III' attempt to modernize Shakesepeare for movie audiences) New York Times v144, sec2 (Sun, Sept 17, 1995):H1(N), H1(L), col 3, 49 col in.

Salamon, Julie.
"Othello." (movie reviews) Wall Street Journal (Thu, March 5, 1992):A11(W), A12(E), col 1, 15 col in.

Starks, Lisa S.
"The veiled (hot) bed of race and desire: Parker's Othello and the stereotype as screen fetish." Post Script (17:1) 1997, 64-78.
UC users only

Sterritt, David.
"Othello." (movie reviews)Christian Science Monitor v84, n70 (Fri, March 6, 1992):12, col 1, 3 col in.

Travers, Peter.
"Othello." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n626 (March 19, 1992):104.

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Strange New Worlds: Constructions of Venice and Cyprus in the Orson Welles and Oliver Parker Films of Othello." Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 20(3):37-39. 2002 Summer

Othello: Orson Welles

Buchman, Lorne M.
"Orson Welles's Othello: A Study of Time in Shakespeare's Tragedy."Shakespeare Survey, vol. 39. 1987. pp: 53-65.
Finds that Orson Welles "uses the rhythm of time" to guide the spectator through Othello: "As Iago works in time to destroy time, Othello's uncertainties about time are undone." Reprinted in Alexander, editor, The Cambridge Shakespeare Library, Volume 3: Shakespeare Performance

Buchman, Lorne M.
"Orson Welles's Othello: A Study of Time in Shakespeare's Tragedy."Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 39. 1987. pp: 53-65.

Comer, Brooke.
"Restoring the Dusky Moor: Welles' Othello."American Cinematographer v. 73 (July '92) p. 66-8+.
Account of the restoration of Orson Welles' "Othello".

Cramer, Barbara
"The Restored Othello." (Review). Films in Review XLIII/7-8, July-Aug 92; p.256-258.

Crowdus, Gary
"Othello." (Review).Cineaste XXI/4, 95; p.52.

Gil, Daniel Juan
"Avant-Garde Technique and the Visual Grammar of Sexuality in Orson Welles's Shakespeare Films." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. [no pagination], Fall 2005

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare Through the Camera's Eye 1953-1954." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 6, No. 1 (Winter, 1955), pp. 63-66
UCB users only

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare Through the Camera's Eye: III." Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 235-40, Spring 1956
UCB users only

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare Through the Camera's Eye: IV." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Autumn, 1966), pp. 383-387
UC users only

Hodgdon, B.
"Kiss me deadly; or, The Des/demonized spectacle." In: Othello : new perspectives / edited by Virginia Mason Vaughan and Kent Cartwright. Rutherford [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c1991.
Main Stack PR2829.O87 1991
Moffitt PR2829.O87 1991

Howlett, Kathy M.
"The voyeuristic pleasures of perversion: Orson Welles's Othello." In Framing Shakespeare on film. pp. p. 52-91. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .H69 2000

Hurwitz, Gregg Andrew.
"Transforming Text: Iago's Infection in Welles' Othello." Word & Image v. 13 (Oct./Dec. '97) p. 333-9.
"A discussion of Orson Welles's depiction of the character Iago in his 1952 film production of Othello. In the play, Iago is infectious, seeping into every corner of Othello's mind. In his film, Welles constructs the text visually in order to portray this infectious influence. Iago is presented, without explanation, as inherently evil, and the theatrical language of Welles's text is mainly devoted to displaying this evil as it steals over Othello, darkening and limiting his world and mind. Thus darkness and enclosure are the film's principal visual motifs, and, as Iago's manipulation progresses, the film becomes darker and more enclosed, mirroring Othello's inner landscape and Iago's grip on his mind. The writer goes on to examine how, through the use of lighting, sound, image, and perspective, Welles portrays Iago's gradual and total possession of Othello." [from ArtAbstracts]

Impastato, David.
"Orson Welles' Othello and the Welles-Smith Restoration: Definitive Version?"Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 10 no. 4. 1992 Fall. pp: 38-41.

Jacobs, Alfred
"Orson Welles' Othello: Shakespeare Meets Film Noir." In: International Shakespeare Association. World Congress (6th : 1996 : Los Angeles) Shakespeare and the twentieth century : the selected proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Los Angeles, 1996 / edited by Jonathan Bate, Jill L. Levenson, and Dieter Mehl. Newark : University of Delaware Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c1998. Main Stack PR2970.I68 1996

Jameson R.
"Cries And Whispers" (Restoration Of The Welles 'Othello') Film Comment, 1992 Jan-Feb, V28 N1:56-56.

Jones, Nicholas
"A Bogus Hero: Welles's Othello and the Construction of Race." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 9-28, Spring 2005.
UCB users only

Jorgens, Jack J.
"Welles' Othello: A Baroque Translation" In: Focus on Orson Welles. / edited by Ronald Gottesman. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, c1976. (Series: A Spectrum book)
Moffitt PN2287.W456.F6
Main Stack PN2287.W456F61

Kemp, Philip.
"Perplexed in the Extreme." (restored 'Othello' reflects disruption in Orson Welles' work) Sight and Sound v2, n6 (Oct, 1992):31.

Kliman, Bernice W.
"The Making of Welles's Othello." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 11 no. 2. 1987 Apr. pp: 1, 6.

Kliman, Bernice W.
"The Making of Welles's Othello." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 1, 6, Spring 1987

Laffel, Jeff
"Julian Schlossberg."Films in Review XLIII/3-4, Mar-Apr 92; p.94-96.
US producer/distributor J.S. on the release of the restored "Othello".

Mac Liammoir, Micheal
Put Money in Thy Purse; The Diary of the Film of Othello. With a preface by Orson Welles. London, Methuen [1952].
UCB Main PN1997.O84 M3

Mason, Pamela
"Orson Welles and Filmed Shakespeare." In: The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare on film / edited by Russell Jackson. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.C36 2000
PFA PR3093.C36 2000

Newstok, Scott L.
"Touch of Shakespeare: Welles Unmoors Othello." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 29-86, Spring 2005.
UCB users only

O'Rawe, Des
"Venice in Film: The Postcard and the Palimpsest." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 224-32, 2005
UC users only

Rosenbaum J. and Kemp, Philip
"Improving Welles" (Restoration Of The Film, 'othello') Sight And Sound, 1992 Oct, V2 N6:28-30.
A consideration of Orson Welles' position within Hollywood, on the release of the restored "Othello"; plus details of the film's troubled production history.

Rosenbaum, Jonathan
"Othello goes Hollywood." SO: In: Placing movies : the practice of film criticism / Jonathan Rosenbaum. p. 124-32 Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
Main Stack PN1995.R65 1995
Available online (UCB users only)

Squitieri, Victor Paul.
"The twofold corpus of Orson Welles's "Othello"." (Dissertation: University of California, Berkeley, 1993)
UC users only

Stone, James W.
"Black and white as technique in Orson Welles's 'Othello.'" (Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly July 2002 v30 i3 p189(5)
UC users only
" Orson Welles's 1952 adaptation of 'Othello' used stark lighting and shadows of gridlike objects to create a fatal claustrophobia. Audio and optical distortions portray Othello's increasing moments of insanity, and Cyprus is shown as a repressive and disciplinary culture." [Expanded Academic Index]

Vaughan, Virginia Mason.
"Orson Welles and the patriarchal eye." In: Othello : a contextual history / Virginia Mason Vaughan. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Main Stack PR2829.V38 1994

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Strange New Worlds: Constructions of Venice and Cyprus in the Orson Welles and Oliver Parker Films of Othello." Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 20(3):37-39. 2002 Summer
UCB users only

"O" (Tim Blake Nelson)

Ansen, David
"Final Score: O,What a Pity: The Bard gets sent back to warm the bench." (Arts and Entertainment)(Review)Newsweek Sept 10, 2001 p67 (242 words)

Ardolino, Frank.
"The Story of O: Shakespeare's Othello and the tragedy of Columbine.(Movie review)." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology 28.1-2 (April 2006): 5(7).

Brown, Eric C.
"Cinema in the round : self-reflexivity in Tim Blake Nelson's O." In: Almost Shakespeare: reinventing his works for cinema and television
Edited by James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner. Jjavascript:openWindow(this,'basic1');efferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2004.
MAIN: PR3093 .A46 2004
PFA : PR3093 .A46 2004

Criniti, Steve.
"Othello: A Hawk Among Birds." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2004. Vol. 32, Iss. 2; p. 115 (7 pages)
UC users only

French, Emma.
"Hollywood teen Shakespeare movies." In: Selling Shakespeare to Hollywood : the marketing of filmed Shakespeare adaptations from 1989 into the new millennium Hatfield [England] : University of Hertfordshire Press, 2006.
MAIN: PN1995.9.M29 F74 2006

Kelleher, Ed
"O" (Review) . Film Journal International August 2001 v104 i8 p80 (466 words)

Leggatt, Alexander
"Teen Shakespeare: 10 Things I Hate about You and O." In: Acts of criticism : performance matters in Shakespeare and his contemporaries : essays in honor of James P. Lusardi / edited by Paul Nelsen and June Schlueter. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2006.
Main Stack PR3091.A27 2006

Mitchell, Elvis
"The Moor shoots hoops." (O)(Review) The New York Times August 31, 2001 pB1(N) pE1(L) col 2 (45 col in)

Nichols, Peter M.
"O". (film directed by Tim Blake Nelson)(Living Arts Pages)(Weekend)(Review) The New York Times Sept 14, 2001 s0 pD5(N) pE5(L) col 1 (15 col in)

"O." (movie review)
The New York Times Feb 22, 2002 pB31(N) pE34(L) col 4 (4 col in)

Rainer, Peter
"The Moor's last sigh." ('O') (movie review) . New York Sept 10, 2001 v34 i34 p166(2)

Semenza, Gregory M. Colon
"Shakespeare after Columbine: teen violence in Tim Blake Nelson's "O"." . College Literature 32.4 (Fall 2005): p99(26). (11452 words)
UC users only

Shimizu, Celine Parreñas.
"The Tragedy of Whiteness and Neo-Liberalism in Brad Kaaya's O/Othello." In: The persistence of whiteness : race and contemporary Hollywood cinema / edited by Daniel Bernardi. London : New York : Routledge, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995.9.M56 P47 2008

Travers, Peter
"O". Rolling Stone Sept 13, 2001 i877 p116(1)

Walters, Ben
"O". Sight and Sound, Feb 2002; Vol. 12, Iss. 2; pg. 56
UC users only
"Nelson's resetting of Othello in an American high school is an eminently level-headed film. It is based on a clever adaptation and sensitive performances instead of on the kind of visual exuberance found in Baz Luhrmann's Shakespeare adaptation." [Art Index]

Othello: Zeffirelli

Hunter, Allan
"Opera Into Films, The New Musicals." Films & Filming /385, Oct 86; p.16-17.
On the recent trend for film versions of operas, with particular reference to Zeffirelli's "Otello".

Paskin, Sylvia
"Otello." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin LIII/633, Oct 86; p.314-315.

Pericles

Nelsen, Paul
"Shot from the canon: the BBC video of Pericles." In: Pericles: critical essays / edited by David Skeele. p. 297-324. New York: Garland Pub., 2000. Garland reference library of the humanities; vol. 2074. Garland reference library of the humanities. Shakespeare criticism.
Main Stack PR2830.P46 2000

Richard II

Forker, Charles R.
"Richard II on Screen." Shakespeare Survey; 2008, Vol. 61, p57-73, 17pForker, Charles R.

Richard III

Andrews, Christopher.
"'Richard III' on film: the subversion of the viewer." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):82 (13 pages).
UC users only
A comparison is made between the three film adaptations of William Shakespeare's 'Richard III', with Laurence Olivier, Ron Cook and Ian McKellen playing the title role. It is posited that film enhances the scheming nature of Shakespeare's character, as the solitary perspective of the camera limits and edits what the viewer can perceive.

Casey, Jim
"'Richard's Himself Again': The Body of Richard III on Stage and Screen." In: Shakespeare and the Middle Ages : essays on the performance and adaptation of the plays with medieval sources or settings / edited by Martha W. Driver and Sid Ray ; foreword by Michael Almereyda and Dakin Matthews. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3069.M47 S54 2009

Crowdus, Gary
"Shakespeare is up to date: an interview with Sir Ian McKellan." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter,1998):46 (2 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. An interview with Shakespearean actor Sir Ian McKellen. McKellen, who has enacted many of the major Shakespearean roles, has long been known as an advocate of updating the playwright's work. In the interview, he discusses a range of topics regarding the adaptation of Shakespeare for the screen, including his 1995 film adaptation Richard III, the choice of seasoned Shakespearean actors for Richard III because they can deliver the lines with the rhythm of contemporary speech, and his appreciation of Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet because it was a film rather than a filmed play." [Art Index]

Crowdus, Gary
"Sharing an enthusiasm for Shakespeare: an interview with Kenneth Branagh." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):34 (8 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. An interview with actor and filmmaker Kenneth Branagh. If any one filmmaker can be considered to be responsible for the current renaissance of film production of plays by Shakespeare, it is Branagh. Branagh discusses several topics in the interview, including his feeling that filming Hamlet invited a more strongly interpretive approach to the central character's inner life than he would take in the theater, his experience that the delivery of rhyming text requires a lightness of touch that is achieved a little more easily in cinema than in the theater, and his experience of being directed in Oliver Parker's Othello." [Art Index]

Dixon, Wheeler.
"The 'Performing Self' in Filmed Shakespearean Drama." Shakespeare Bulletin 5, no. 4 (1987): 18-19.
Suggests that alhough there is something lost in any filmic translation of a stage drama, there is also something to be gained--a final formalizing of the actor-audience relationship. Discusses, for example, Laurence Olivier's Richard III, Hamlet, and Henry V; Orson Welles's Macbeth; Roman Polanski's Macbeth; Stuart Burge's Julius Caesar; Robert Burton's and Nicol Williamson's Hamlet; and Peter Brook's King Lear

Forse, James H.
"Staging (on Film) Richard III to Reflect the Present." Popular Culture Review. 12(1):33-39. 2001 Feb

Geckle, George L.
"Shakespeare's Rhetoric versus the Ideology of Ian McKellen's Richard III." Theatre Symposium: A Journal of the-Southeastern Theatre Conference 1997, 5, 50-63.

Hopkins, Lisa
""How very like the home life of our own dear queen": Ian McKellen's Richard III." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002

Jackson, R.
"Two Silent Shakespeares: Richard III and Othello." Cineaste v. 28 no. 2 (Spring 2003) p. 48-51
UC users only

Loehlin, James N.
"'Top of the World, Ma': Richard III and Cinematic Convention." In: Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video. / edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. pp: 67-79. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
UCB Main PR3093 .S545 1997

McIntyre, Dan.
"Integrating multimodal analysis and the stylistics of drama: a multimodal perspective on Ian McKellen's Richard III." Language & Literature, Nov2008, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p309-334, 26p

Rich, Frank.
"A banished kingdom." (American Film Institute recovers mint print of 1912 silent movie, 'Richard III')(Column) New York Times v145 (Sat, Sept 21, 1996):15(N), 19(L), col 6, 16 col in.

Riding, Alan.
"To be, or not to..O.K., cut!" (new film versions of 'Othello' and 'Richard III' attempt to modernize Shakesepeare for movie audiences) New York Times v144, sec2 (Sun, Sept 17, 1995):H1(N), H1(L), col 3, 49 col in.

Salamon, Linda Bradley.
"'Looking for Richard in History': Postmodern Villainy in Richard III and Scarface."Journal of Popular Film and-Television, 2000 Summer, 28:2, 54-63.

Salamon, Linda Bradley.
"Postmodern Villainy in Richard III, and Scarface." (Critical Essay) Journal of Popular Film and Television Summer 2000 v28 i2 p55 (
UC users only

Turner, George.
Rediscovering Richard III. American Cinematographer v. 78 (Feb. '97) p. 20+.

Varnell, Margaret A.
"A note on Richard III (1912)." Post Script (17:1) 1997, 88-90.
UC users only

Weinraub, Bernard.
"Movie history emerges from a basement." (near-perfect print of 1912 film 'Richard III' discovered in Portland, Oregon)New York Times v145 (Tue, Sept 17, 1996):A1(N), A1(L), col 5, 22 col in.

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Shakespeare in The Goodbye Girl." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 2 no. 2, 1978 Apr. pp: 1, 3-4

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Hunchbacked Fuhrer: The Loncraine-McKellen Richard III as Postmodern Pastiche." Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 16(2):39-41. 1998 Spring

Looking for Richard

Alleva, Richard.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) Commonweal v123, n21 (Dec 6, 1996):18 (2 pages).

Aune, M. G.
"Star Power: Al Pacino, Looking for Richard and the Cultural Capital of Shakespeare on Film." Quarterly Review of Film and Video, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 353-67, August 2006
UC users only
"The strength, popularity, and effectiveness of Al Pacino's 1996 film Looking for Richard rests to some extent on Pacino's exploitation of his own ability and reputation as a movie star. The film combines techniques of documentary and narrative feature film making to produce a hybrid sort of film intended, according to Pacino, to communicate my feelings about Shakespeare" to its audience. As such, the film is generally successful, and it also provides a helpful introduction to Richard III. However, the means by which the film mediates between the American public and the cultural capital of Shakespeare rely as much on Pacino's status as a movie star as on any other position of authority. The writer goes on to interpret key scenes in the film and to review the film's critical and popular reception." [Art Index]

Bartels, Emily C.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) Performing Arts Journal, n55 (Jan, 1997):58 (3 pages).

Cartelli, Thomas
}Shakespeare and the Street: Pacino's Looking for Richard, Bedford's Street King, and the Common Understanding." In: Shakespeare, the movie, II : popularizing the plays on film, TV, video, and DVD / edited by Richard Burt and Lynda E. Boose. London ; New York : Routledge,
Main Stack PR3093.S543 2003

Coe, Jonathan.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) New Statesman (1996) v126, n4319 (Jan 31, 1997):41.

Coursen, H. R.
"Filming Shakespeare's History: Three Films of Richard III." In: The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare on film / edited by Russell Jackson. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .C36 2000
PFA : PR3093 .C36 2000

Fedderson, Kim; Richardson, J. Michael
"Praising and Burying the Bard: Epideictic Dilemmas in Recent Adaptations of Shakespeare." In: Relocating praise : literary modalities and rhetorical contexts / edited by Alice G. den Otter. Toronto : Canadian Scholars' Press, 2000.
Main Stack PN80.5.R44 2000

Fedderson, Kim; Richardson, J. Michael
"Looking for Richard in Looking for Richard: Al Pacino Appropriates the Bard and Flogs Him Back to the Brits." Postmodern Culture. . 8.2 (1998)
UC users only

Hodgdon, Barbara
"Replicating Richard: Body Doubles, Body Politics." Theatre Journal - Volume 50, Number 2, May 1998 -
UC users only

Johnson, Brian D.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) Maclean's v109, n46 (Nov 11, 1996):74 (2 pages)

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) New Republic v215, n15 (Oct 7, 1996):30.

Lanier, Douglas.
"Now: The Presence of History in Looking for Richard." Post Script, vol. 17 no. 2. 1998 Winter-Spring. pp: 39-55.
UC users only

Lyons, Donald.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) Commentary v103, n2 (Feb, 1997):58.

Macnab, Geoffrey.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) Sight and Sound v7, n2 (Feb, 1997):48 (2 pages).

Marshall, Kelli
"The Creative Process and the Power of Art in Shakespeare behind Bars, or So This Is What Looking for Richard Meant to Do?" Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 140-150, 2009
UC users only

Maslin, Janet.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) New York Times v145 (Fri, Oct 11, 1996):B1(N), C3(L), col 2, 17 col in.

Mullan, John.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4899 (Feb 21, 1997):19.

Salamon, Linda Bradley
"'Looking for Richard in History': Postmodern Villainy in Richard III and Scarface." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 54-63, Summer 2000
UC users only
"Part of a special issue on the changing portrayal of good and evil in film and television. One possible method of depicting evil in movies without excusing it is to set the film in earlier times, when values were seen as being clearer and ethical lines more defined. An excellent historical example of a cold-blooded killer is King Richard III, who has repeatedly been depicted on both the screen and the stage during the 20th century. Among the movies in which he has appeared in various guises are Looking for Richard and Scarface, both starring Al Pacino, and Richard III, starring Ian McKellen. The writer discusses how in these movies, Pacino and McKellen represent evil for the postmodern era by acting in historically vibrant genres set within historical events that are significant for the 20th century." [Art Index]

Sinyard, Neil
"Shakespeare Meets The Godfather: The Postmodern Populism of Al Pacino's Looking for Richard." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle
Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 58-72. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Su, Peirui
"Method Acting and Pacino's Looking for Richard." CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture: A WWWeb Journal, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 16 paragraphs, March 2004

Travers, Peter.
"Looking for Richard." (movie reviews) Rolling Stone, n746 (Oct 31, 1996):78.

Weber, Bruce.
"Al Pacino, slouching (again) toward Shakespeare." (the actor directs his first film, a documentary, 'Looking for Richard,' on scenes from play, 'Richard the III,' in which he plays the role of Richard) New York Times v145, sec2 (Sun, Oct 6, 1996):H17(N), H17(L), col 1, 44 col in.

Richard III: Richard Loncraine/Ian McKellan

Alleva, Richard.
"Richard III." (movie reviews)Commonweal v123, n8 (April 19, 1996):18 (2 pages).

Corliss, Richard.
"Richard III." (movie reviews) Time v147, n3 (Jan 15, 1996):67.

Crowdus, Gary
"Richard III." (Review).Cineaste XXII/1, Apr 96; p.34-37.

Crowl, Samuel.
"Changing colors like the chameleon: Ian McKellen's Richard III from stage to film." Post Script (17:1) 1997, 53-63
UC users only

Denby, David.
"Richard III." (movie reviews) New York v29, n2 (Jan 15, 1996):48 (2 pages).

Donaldson, Peter S.
"Cinema and the Kingdom of Death: Loncraine's Richard III." Shakespeare Quarterly. 53(2):241-59. 2002 Summer
UC users only

Fedderson, Kim; Richardson, J. Michael
"Praising and Burying the Bard: Epideictic Dilemmas in Recent Adaptations of Shakespeare." In: Relocating praise : literary modalities and rhetorical contexts / edited by Alice G. den Otter. Toronto : Canadian Scholars' Press, 2000.
Main Stack PN80.5.R44 2000

Francke, Lizzie
"Richard III." (Synopsis+Review).Sight & Sound VI/5, May 96; p.58-59.

Friedman, Michael D.
"Horror, Homosexuality, and Homiciphilia in McKellen's Richard III and Jarman's Edward II." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 567-588, Winter 2009
UC users only

Geckle, George L.
"Shakespeare's Rhetoric versus the Ideology of Ian McKellen's Richard III." Theatre Symposium: A Journal of the Southeastern Theatre Conference 1997, 5, 50-63.

Holden, Stephen.
"Richard III." (movie reviews)New York Times v145 (Fri, Dec 29, 1995):B1(N), C3(L), col 1, 19 col in.

Howlett, Kathy M.
"Vivid negativity: Richard Loncraine's Richard III." In Framing Shakespeare on film. pp. 128-48. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .H69 2000

Johnson, Brian D.
"Richard III." (movie reviews)Maclean's v109, n6 (Feb 5, 1996):56 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Richard III." (movie reviews)New Republic v214, n7 (Feb 12, 1996):30.

Kroll, Jack.
"Richard III." (movie reviews) Newsweek v127, n5 (Jan 29, 1996):58.

Levy, Emanuel.
"Richard III." (movie reviews)Advocate, n700 (Feb 6, 1996):53 (3 pages).

Medhurst, Andy
"Imaging Richard III./ Dressing the Part."Sight & Sound VI/6, June 96; p.28-29.
Example of story boards for Richard Loncraine's "Richard III"; plus notes on the significance of costume in historical films, with particular reference to "Restoration", "Sense and sensibility" and "Richard III".

Mitchell, Deborah.
"'Richard III': Tonypandy in the Twentieth Century." Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):133 (13 pages).
UC users only
The reputation of England's Richard III is still bitterly contested five hundred years after his death. Belief in his infamy persists despite logical evidence to the contrary. His negative portrayals in William Shakespeare's plays have legitimized this view. The film adaptation of 'Richard III' by Richard Loncraine and Ian McKellen, a highly successful version, presents Richard as a near-parody of absolute evil, thereby making the truth of his complex historical character a less contentious issue. McKellen's performance as Richard is so dastardly and arch that it cannot be taken as a true portrayal.

Riding, Alan.
"To Be, or Not To..O.K., Cut! "(new film versions of 'Othello' and 'Richard III' attempt to modernize Shakesepeare for movie audiences) New York Times v144, sec2 (Sun, Sept 17, 1995):H1(N), H1(L), col 3, 49 col in.

Richard III: Olivier

Brown, Constance A.
"Olivier's Richard III- a re-evaluation." Film Quarterly v 20 no4 Summer 1967. p. 23-32

Gross, Sheryl W.
"Olivier's Shakespearean Films: A Selected Bibliography, II."Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 2 no. 1. 1977 Dec. pp: 1-3.

Jorgens, Jack J.
"Laurence Olivier's Richard III."Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 4. 1976. pp: 99-107.
UC users only

Malone, Toby
"'A Dog, a Rat, … a Cat to Scratch a Man to Death': Olivier's Richard III and Popular Cultures." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 124-139, 2009
UC users only

McMurtry, Jo
"'His Name, My Lord, Is Tyrrel': Comparing Scenes in Two Versions of Richard III." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 15 no. 2, 1991 Apr 7

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Disarming Scenes in Richard III and Casablanca." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter, vol. 10 no. 1, 1985 Dec. pp: 4

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Shakespeare and Hollywood: Two Film Cliches." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 15 no. 2, 1987 Summer. pp: 83-84

Wood, Charles T.
"Whatever Happened to Margaret of Anjou? On Olivier's Shakespeare and Richard III."Iowa State Jour. of Research, vol. 53, 1979 pp: 213-17

Romeo & Juliet

Baron, Cynthia
"Acting Choices / Filmic Choices: Rethinking Montage and Performance." Journal of Film and Video v. 59 no. 2 (Summer 2007) p. 32-40
"An analysis of the 1936, 1968, and 1996 film adaptations of Romeo and Juliet reveals that the selection and combination of actors' movements, gestures, and facial and vocal expressions have a relationship to a film's selection and combination of shots, editing patterns, design elements, and audio choices. The differences between these three films show that the selection and combination of gestures and vocal/facial expressions are elements that actors and directors create in the performance montage. Like the contributions of other members of the production team, the work of performers is intended to add something to the style of the film as a whole, and the differences between the case studies show that performance elements are not merely inert matter given meaning by directors, cinematographers, and editors. Rather, as Sergei Eisenstein suggested, individual elements necessarily bear distinct tonal qualities that are frequently shaped by the quality of the actors' gestures and expressions." [Art Index]

Basile, Michael.
"Teaching Mothers in Romeo and Juliet: Lady Capulet, from Brooke to Luhrmann." In: Approaches to teaching Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet / edited by Maurice Hunt. pp: 125-30
Main Stack PR2831.A89 2000

Davies, Anthony.
"The Film Versions of 'Romeo and Juliet.'" Shakespeare Survey v49 (Annual, 1996):153 (10 pages).
Graham Holderness and Christopher McCullough list 23 film adaptations of William Shakespeare's play 'Romeo and Juliet' in a selected filmography. The earliest version was made in 1900 by Clement Maurice in France. Editors Kenneth Rothwell and Annabelle Henkin Melzer list 61 film versions of the play. An analysis of the play's life in cinema and television is best done through the films directed by George Cukor (1936), Renato Castellani (1954), Franco Zeffirelli (1968), and the BBC television film (1978) directed by Alvin Rakoff.

Diniz, Thais Flores Nogueira
"Shakespeare parodied: Romeo and Juliet." In: Latin American Shakespeares / edited by Bernice W. Kliman and Rick J. Santos. Madison [NJ] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2005.
Main Stack PR2881.5.S7.L38 2005

Grindley, Carl James
"The Plague in Filmed Versions of Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth Night." In: Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Martin, Jennifer L.
"Tights vs. Tattoos: Filmic Interpretations of Romeo and Juliet." English Journal. 92(1):41-46. 2002 Sept

Palmer, Chris.
"'What Tongue Shall Smooth Thy Name?': Recent Films of Romeo and Juliet." The Cambridge Quarterly. 32(1):61-76. 2003

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Hollywood and Some Versions of "Romeo and Juliet": `Towards a Substantial Pageant'" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 343

Vela, Richard.
"Shakespeare, Hollywood, and Mexico: the Cantinflas Romeo y Julieta." Literature/Film Quarterly (30:3) [2002:3] , p.231-236.
UC users only

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Star-Crossed Generations: Three Film Versions of Romeo and Juliet." In: Approaches to teaching Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet / edited by Maurice Hunt. pp: 179-85 New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2000. Approaches to teaching world literature.
Main Stack PR2831.A89 2000

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Star-Crossed Generations: Three Film Versions of Romeo and Juliet." In: Approaches to teaching Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet / edited by Maurice Hunt. pp: 179-85 New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2000. Approaches to teaching world literature.
Main Stack PR2831.A89 2000

Romeo + Juliet: Baz Luhrmann/Leonardo di Caprio

Alleva, Richard.
"Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews)Commonweal v123, n21 (Dec 6, 1996):19.

Ansen, David.
"Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews)Newsweek v128, n19 (Nov 4, 1996):73 (2 pages).

Arroyo, Jose.
"Kiss Kiss Bang Bang." (Baz Luhrmann's version of 'Romeo & Juliet') Sight and Sound v7, n3 (March, 1997):6 (4 pages).
The film 'William Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet' by Australian director Baz Lurhmann succeeds in elevating the Shakespearean masterpiece cinematically. It is intended to entertain the audience, offering action, romance and spectacle. In addition, unlike other film adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, 'Romeo & Juliet' does not treat the bard's language as its raison d'etre. The dialogue is enlivened by the fast-moving images that accompany it and stir the audience's emotions.

Cieslak, Magdalena
"Shakespeare's Camp City." In: Images of the city / edited by Agnieszka Rasmus and Magdalena Cieslak. Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Pub., 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN56.C55 I45 2009

Cole, Melanie.
"Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews) Hispanic v9, n10 (Oct, 1996):84.

Cranny-Francis, Anne.
"Canonical Iconoclasm: William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet." Screen Education, 2007, Issue 48, p125-130, 6p
UC users only

Donaldson, Peter.
"'In Fair Verona:' Media, Spectacle and Performance in Romeo + Juliet." In: Shakespeare after mass media
Edited by Richard Burt. New York : Palgrave, 2002.
Main Stack PR2970.S49 2002

Downing, Crystal.
"Misshapen chaos of well-seeming form: Baz Luhrmann's 'Romeo + Juliet'." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):125 (7 pages).
UC users only
A defense is presented of director Baz Luhrmann's adaptation of William Shakespeare's play in his film 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet', creating a parallel between the subversiveness of theater and Luhrmann's interpretation. Topics include both theater and film as simulacrums, which Luhrmann emphasizes.

French, Emma.
"Hollywood teen Shakespeare movies." In: Selling Shakespeare to Hollywood : the marketing of filmed Shakespeare adaptations from 1989 into the new millennium Hatfield [England] : University of Hertfordshire Press, 2006.
MAIN: PN1995.9.M29 F74 2006

Friedmna, Michael D.
"Introduction: "To think o' th' teen that I have turned you to': The Scholarly Consideration of Teen Shakespeare Films." Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p1-7, 7p
UC users only

Gates, Anita.
"One Juliet Has the Vapors, Another Packs a Gun." (somewhat tongue-in-cheek survey of six movie versions of William Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet,' from 1936 through 1996)(Illustration)New York Times v145, sec2 (Sun, Oct 27, 1996):H13(N), H13(L), col 1, 8 col in.

Giles, Miranda.
"Cultural Capital and the Canon in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo+Juliet." Journal of the Wooden O Symposium, 2007, Vol. 7, p13-21, 9p
UC users only
The article examines the depiction of commercialism and globalization in the film adaptation "William Shakespeare's Romeo+Juliet," directed by Baz Luhrmann. It is observed that the director changed the mindset of Western culture especially in the depiction of the double suicide of the characters. The embodied, objectified and institutionalized states of cultural capital in the works of playwright William Shakespeare is also examined.

Guenther, Leah
"Luhrmann's Top 40 Shakespeare and the Crisis of Shakespearean Consumption." Journal of American Culture ; Spring99, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p17, 7p
UC users only
Focuses on the motion pictures `Hamlet,' directed by Kenneth Branagh, and `William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet,' by Baz Luhrmann. How the press viewed the film `Hamlet'; Music for the `Romeo and Juliet'; Comparison between the two films.

Hamilton, Lucy.
"Baz vs. the bardolators, or why 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet' deserves another look." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):118 (7 pages).
UCB users only
An argument is presented in support of director Baz Luhrmann's interpretation of William Shakespeare's play in his film 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet'. A parallel is drawn between the forbidden nature of the characters' love and the social challenge it presents to Luhrmann's unconventional adaptation of the work.

Hodgdon, Barbara.
"Baz Luhrmann's Wiliam Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet." In: Romeo and Juliet / William Shakespeare; edited by R.S. White. pp: 129-46. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, U.K.; New York: Palgrave, 2001. Series title: New casebooks (Palgrave (Firm))
UCB Main PR2831 .R64 2001

Hodgdon, Barbara.
"'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet': everything's nice in America."Shakespeare Survey v52 (Annual, 1999):88 (1 page).
It is important to consider the position of Baz Luhrmann's 1996 film 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet' within Shakespeare culture and world popular culture. This research has focused on how different audiences refunction Luhrmann's film and actor Leonardo DiCaprio's presence to meet their own needs and pleasures. The film seems to highlight the fact that modern society offers no answers, either real or imaginary, legal or religious, to gender, class and ethnic conflicts. It denies any hope of securing the social through the heterosexual or the homosocial.

Horspool, David.
"William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews) TLS. Times Literary Supplement, n4906 (April 11, 1997):19.

Johnson, Brian D.
"William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews)Maclean's v109, n46 (Nov 11, 1996):74 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews)New Republic v215, n23 (Dec 2, 1996):40 (2 pages).

Lehmann, Courtney.
"Strictly Shakespeare? Dead letters, ghostly fathers, and the cultural pathology of authorship in Baz Luhrmann's 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet'." Shakespeare Quarterly v52, n2 (Summer, 2001):189 (3 pages).
UC users only
Issues are presented concerning the paradoxically urgent postmodernism which was used by film maker Baz Luhrmann in his motion picture production of William Shakespeare's play 'Romeo and Juliet' made in 1996.

Loehlin, James N.
"'These Violent Delights Have Violent Ends': Baz Luhrmann's Millennial Shakespeare." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle / edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 121-36. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Luscombe, Belinda.
"This Romeo Packs Heat." (latest film adaptation of Shakespeare's play 'Romeo and Juliet' updates the Bard's story to more contemporary setting)(Brief Article) Time v147, n18 (April 29, 1996):106.

Lyons, Donald.
"William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews)Commentary v103, n2 (Feb, 1997):57 (2 pages).

Maslin, Janet.
"William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet." (movie reviews) New York Times v145 (Fri, Nov 1, 1996):B1(N), C1(L), col 1, 18 col in.

Matthews, Peter.
"William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet."(movie reviews)Sight and Sound v7, n4 (April, 1997):55.

Modenessi, Alfredo Michel
""(Un)doing the book "without Verona walls": a view from the receiving end of Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002

Radel, Nicholas F.
"The Ethiop's Ear: Race, Sexuality, And Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet." Upstart Crow: A Shakespeare Journal, 2008/2009, Vol. 28, p17-34, 18p;
UC users only

Scott, Lindsey.
""Closed in a Dead Man's Tomb": Juliet, Space, and the Body in Franco Zeffirelli's and Baz Luhrmann's Films of Romeo and Juliet" Literature/Film Quarterly. 2008. Vol. 36, Iss. 2; p. 137 (10 pages)
UC users only

Sheppard, Philippa
"Latino elements in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet." In: Latin American Shakespeares / edited by Bernice W. Kliman and Rick J. Santos. Madison [NJ] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2005.
Main Stack PR2881.5.S7.L38 2005

Sterritt, David.
"The Bard Makes Resurgence in Movies.(new films based on the works of William Shakespeare include 'Looking for Richard,' 'Twelfth Night' and 'Romeo and Juliet')"Christian Science Monitor v88, n223 (Fri, Oct 11, 1996):12, col 2, 25 col in.

Travers, Peter.
"William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet."(movie reviews)Rolling Stone, n747 (Nov 14, 1996):123 (2 pages).

Vela, Richard
"Post-Apocalyptic Spaces in Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet." In: Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Walker, Elsie.
"Pop goes the Shakespeare: Baz Luhrmann's 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet'." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):132 (8 pages).
UCB users only
An argument is presented supporting director Baz Luhrmann's interpretation of William Shakespeare's play in his film 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet', focusing on the change inherent in drama to reflect its contemporary surroundings, even while essential meanings remain unchanged.

Walker, Elsie.
"Pop goes the Shakespeare: Baz Luhrmann's 'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet'." In: The literature/film reader : issues of adaptation / edited by James M. Welsh, Peter Lev. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2007. The literature/film reader : issues of adaptation / edited by James M. Welsh, Peter Lev. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .L516 2007

Welsh, Jim.
"Postmodern Shakespeare: Strictly Romeo." (movie reviews)Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):152 (2 pages)

York, Robert L.
"Smells Like Teen Shakespirit” Or, the Shakespearean Films of Julia Stiles: The Inception: Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet and the Teen Market." In: Shakespeare and youth culture / Jennifer Hulbert, Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr., and Robert L. York. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR2976 .H48 2006

Zubarev, Vera
"Nature vs. Civilization." CLCWeb: Comparative Literature & Culture: A WWWeb Journal; Jun2009, Vol. 11 Issue 2, p1-6, 6p
UCB users only
D"This article discusses the films directed or produced by Australian Baz Lurhmann. Lurhmann's work is often considered to be exotic and they often do not fit into traditional genre categories with the films being based on concepts rather than characters or stories. The films analyzed include "Australia," starring Nicole Kidman and Hugh Jackman, and "Romeo + Juliet," starring Claire Danes and Leonardo DiCaprio. These two films depict a struggle between civilization and nature with "Australia" examining civilization and the un-civilized Aboriginal culture and "Romeo + Juliet" exploring nature versus civilization where civilization is negative." [EBSCO]

Romeo and Juliet: Zeffirelli

Donaldson, Peter.
"'Let Lips do what hands do': Male Bonding, Eros and Loss in Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet." In: Shakespearean Films/Shakespearean Directors / Peter S. Donaldson.Boston: Unwin Hyman, 1990.Series title: Media and popular culture
UCB Main PR3093 .D66 1990
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .D66 1990

Friedmna, Michael D.
"Introduction: "To think o' th' teen that I have turned you to': The Scholarly Consideration of Teen Shakespeare Films." Shakespeare Bulletin; Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p1-7, 7p
UC users only

Halio, J. L.
"Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet: The Camera versus the Text" Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 5, 1977: 322-25

Holmer, Joan Ozark
"The Poetics of Paradox: Shakespeare's Versus Zeffirelli's Cultures of Violence."Shakespeare Survey, vol. 49, 1996:163-79

Holmer, Joan Ozark.
"The poetics of paradox: Shakespeare's versus Zeffirelli's cultures of violence." Shakespeare Survey: an annual survey of Shakespearean studies and production (Cambridge) (49) 1996, 163-79.

Pursell, Michael
"Artifice and Authenticity in Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet" Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 14 no. 4, 1986: 173-178

Pursell, Michael
"Zeffirelli's Shakespeare: The Visual Realization of Tone and Theme" Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 8, 1980: 210-18

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Zeffrelli's Romeo and Juliet: Words into Picture and Music" Literature/ Film Quarterly vol. 5, 1977: 326-31

Scott, Lindsey.
""Closed in a Dead Man's Tomb": Juliet, Space, and the Body in Franco Zeffirelli's and Baz Luhrmann's Films of Romeo and Juliet" Literature/Film Quarterly. 2008. Vol. 36, Iss. 2; p. 137 (10 pages)
UC users only

Willson, Robert F., Jr.
"Franco Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet and the Uses of Cultural Translation" The Upstart Crow vol. 16, 1996:101-07

Shakespeare in Love

Burt, Richard.
"Shakespeare in Love and the End of the Shakespearean: Academic and Mass Culture Constructions of Literary Authorship." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle / edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray. pp: 203-31. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Chang, Yahlin.
"Bloom the Bardolator." (Professor Harold Bloom comments on movie 'Shakespeare in Love')(Brief Article)Newsweek v133, n7 (Feb 15, 1999):64 (1 page).

Combs, Richard.
"Shakespeare." (Review) Film Comment v35, n3 (May, 1999):32.

Corliss, Richard.
"If Movies Be the Food of Love..Let them be as romantic and ravishing as this one." (Review) (movie reviews)Time (Dec 14, 1998):99 (1 page).

Cunneen, Joseph
"When you're talking dialogue, it's hard to top the Bard." (Review) National Catholic Reporter v35, n12 (Jan 22, 1999):18 (1 page).

Dipietro, Cary.
"Sex, Lies and Videotape: Representing the Past in Shakespeare in Love, Mapping a Future for Presentism." Shakespeare Apr2007, Vol. 3 Issue 1, p40-62, 23p
UC users only

Fedderson, Kim. Richardson, J. M.
"'Love Like There Has Never Been in a Play': Shakespeare in Love as Bardspawn." West Virginia University Philological Papers. 47:145-49. 2001

Gleick, Elizabeth.
"The Scene Stealers: Dazzlingly inventive, cleverly passionate, the smart new movie Shakespeare in Love taps some of Britain's showiest talent." (Review) (movie reviews)Time v153, n3 (Jan 25, 1999):70 (1 page).

Goodale, Gloria.
"How they imagined 'Shakespeare in Love.'" (Arts & Leisure; interview with screenwriters Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard) Christian Science Monitor v91, n68 (Fri, March 5, 1999):17, col 1, 18 col in.

Harries, Martin.
"Hollywood in love." (explaining the popularity of 'Shakespeare in Love') Chronicle of Higher Education v45, n32 (April 16, 1999):B9 (1 page).
The reason 'Shakespeare in Love' won so many Academy Awards is because the voters are actors, and the film is a tribute to acting and theater. The film was a standard Hollywood vehicle, full of anachronisms and in-jokes reflecting Hollywood's narcissism. The studio spent $15 mil promoting the film to Academy members.

Kamaralli, Anna
" Rehearsal in Films of the Early Modern Theatre: The Erotic Art of Making Shakespeare." Shakespeare Bulletin; Spring2011, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p27-41, 15p
UC users only
The article examines the erotic presentations of actor-tutor relationships in the films "Shakespeare in Love," "Stage Beauty" and "The Libertine." According to the article, the erotic actor-tutor relationship in the films was depicted within a larger frame of social constructions of sexuality that are substantially different from the present day. The films also followed a template that when art became interwoven with passion, the man was always the giver of wisdom while the woman the receiver.

Klawans, Stuart
"Shakespeare in Love."(Review)Nation v268, n7 (Feb 22, 1999):34 (1 page).

Klett, Elizabeth.
"Shakespeare in Love and the End(s) of History." In: Retrovisions: reinventing the past in film and fiction / edited by Deborah Cartmell, I.Q. Hunter, and Imelda Whelehan. pp: 25-40. London; Sterling, Va.: Pluto Press, 2001. Series title: Film/fiction; v. 6.
UCB Main PN1995.9.H5 R46 2001

Lehmann, Courtney
"Shakespeare in love: romancing the author, mastering the body." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002

Loewenstein, Lael.
"Shakespeare In Love." (movie reviews)Variety v373, n4 (Dec 7, 1998):53 (1 page).

McMahon, Michael.
"A codpiece and LSD experience." (influence of films such as 'Shakespeare in Love' on the young) New Statesman (1996) v128, n4422 (Feb 5, 1999):30 (1 page)
The idea which predicates the film 'Shakespeare in Love' is a suitable metaphor for the contemporary UK's cultural condition. Too many children cannot write and will not read but they watch movies. It will be interesting to see how less gifted children express their recollections of this film.

"Shakespeare in Love".(Review)
Economist (US) v350, n8105 (Feb 6, 1999):91 (1 page).

Simon, John.
Film: Of Blood and a Poet.(film reviews of 'The Thin Red Line' and 'Shakespeare in Love')(Review) (movie reviews) National Review (Jan 25, 1999):54 (1 page).

Travers, Peter.
"Shakespeare in Love." (Review) (movie reviews) Rolling Stone (Jan 21, 1999):84 (1 page).

Taming of the Shrew

Christensen, Ann C.
"Petruchio's House in Postwar Suburbia: Reinventing the Domestic Woman (Again)." Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities vol. 17 no. 1. 1997 Fall. pp: 28-42.
UC users only

Hapgood, Robert.
" Popularizing Shakespeare: The Artistry of Franco Zeffirelli." In: Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video. / edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. pp: 80-94. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
UCB Main PR3093 .S545 1997

Henderson, Diana E.
" A Shrew for the Times." In: Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video/ edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. pp: 148-68. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
UCB Main PR3093 .S545 1997

Hodgdon, Barbara.
"Katherina Bound; Or, Play(K)ating the Strictures of Everyday Life." PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America vol. 107 no. 3. 1992 May. pp: 538-53. (also in: The Taming of the shrew: critical essays / edited by Dana E. Aspinall. New York: Routledge, 2002. Shakespeare criticism [Main Stack PR2832.A87 2002])

Kliman, Bernice W.
"A 'Skimmington' in Zeffirelli's Shrew?" Shakespeare on Film Newsletter vol. 15 no. 2. 1991 Apr. pp: 10.

Mischo, John Brett.
"The Screening of the Shrews: Teaching (against) Shakespeare's Author Function." In: The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory Edited by Lisa S. Starks and Courtney Lehmann. pp: 212-28. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

Kranz, David L.
"Tracking the Sounds of Franco Zeffirelli's The Taming of the Shrew." Literature Film Quarterly, 2008, Vol. 36 Issue 2, p94-112, 19p;
UC users only
"An essay on the film "The Taming of the Shrew" directed by Franco Zeffirelli is presented. It examines the film as an adaptation of the play of the same name by William Shakespeare and discusses its use of sound. Comments about the acting of Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in the film are included and it is argued that Zeffirelli's use of music, sound, and verbal silence clarifies his romantic and progressive interpretation of the play." [Ebsco]

Pilkington, Ace G.; Chidester Stephanie.
"The Taming of the Shrew: The Mirror of the Film."Encyclia 1993, 70, 91-105.

Pursell, Michael.
"Zeffirelli's Shakespeare: The Visual Realization of Tone and Theme."Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 8. 1980. pp: 210-18.

Watson, William Van.
"Shakespeare, Zeffirelli, and the Homosexual Gaze." (Franco Zeffirelli) (Shakespeare - Film & Television) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):308 (18 pages).
Director Franco Zeffirelli displays a homosexual 'gaze' in much of his camera work. Often Zeffirelli's camera will focus on the bearer rather than the object of the gaze, and often the bearer will be one of his handsome leading actors such as Michael York or Leonard Whiting. In his film version of 'Taming of the Shrew' Zeffirelli balances such scenes with shots of Elizabeth Taylor's cleavage. The homosexual gaze that Zeffirelli brings to the camera is not overdone and seems tempered by his own closeted sexual politics.

Taming of the Shrew: Kiss Me Kate

Paul, William
"Breaking the Fourth Wall: 'Belascoism', Modernism, and a 3-D Kiss Me Kate." Film History (Bloomington, IN) v. 16 no. 3 (2004) p. 229-42
"Part of a special section on 3-D cinema. The 3-D cinematic release of the musical Kiss Me Kate in late 1953 is examined. This musical version of Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew demonstrates a notable playfulness of form suggestive of Modernist theater in its high degree of self-reflectivity, which perhaps suggested 3-D as an appropriate technology for its cinematic release. At the same time, it schematizes the use of "negative parallax," or the emergence effect, through a play between a naturalistic reality and theatrical reality in order to contain the disruptive aspects of that phenomenon. It seeks to combine a conventional realism with the Modernist imperative of breaking the frame in an attempt to set the constraints of classical cinema, with its focus on narrative as a controlling force, to bear on a process that appears to exist outside these strategies for containment." [Art Index]

Taming of the Shrew: Ten Things I Hate About You

Burt, Richard.
"Afterword: T(e)en Things I Hate about Girlene Shakesploitation Flicks in the Late 1990s, or, Not-So-Fast Times at Shakespeare High." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002

Clement, Jennifer
"The Postfeminist Mystique: Feminism and Shakespearean Adaptation in 10 Things I Hate About You and She's the Man." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, Vol III · No. 2 Spring/Summer 2008

Davis, Hugh H.
"I Was a Teenage Classic: Literary Adaptation in Turn-of-the-Millennium Teen Films" Journal of American Culture, Mar2006, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p52-60, 9p
UC users only

Leggatt, Alexander
"Teen Shakespeare: 10 Things I Hate about You and O." In: Acts of criticism : performance matters in Shakespeare and his contemporaries : essays in honor of James P. Lusardi / edited by Paul Nelsen and June Schlueter. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2006.
Main Stack PR3091.A27 2006

The Tempest

Buchanan, Judith.
""In Mute Despair": Early Silent Films of The Tempest and their Theatrical Referents." Shakespeare , Dec2007, Vol. 3 Issue 3, p315-336, 22p
UC users only

Martin, Sara.
"Classic Shakespeare for All: Forbidden Planet and Prospero's Books, Two Screen Adaptations of the Tempest." In: Classics in film and fiction / edited by Deborah Cartmell ... [et al.]. London ; Sterling, Va. : Pluto Press, 2000.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .C56 2000

Miller, Anthony.
"'In This Last Tempest': Modernising Shakespeare's Tempest on Film." Sydney Studies in English ( vol. 23. 1997-8. pp: 24-40.

Vaughan, Virginia Mason.
"Tampering with The Tempest." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 10 no. 1. 1992 Winter. pp: 16-17.

Youngs, Tim.
"Cruising Against the Id: The Transformation of Caliban in Forbidden Planet." In: Constellation Caliban: Figurations of a Character/ edited by Nadia Lie & Theo D'haen. pp: 211-29. Amsterdam; Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 1997. Text (Rodopi (Firm)); 10.
Main Stack PN57.C26.C65 1997

Zabus, Chantal.
"'I'll Be Wise Hereafter': Caliban in Postmodern British Cinema." In: The Contact and the Culmination / edited by Marc Delrez and Benedicte Ledent. pp: 365-79. Liege, Belgium: L [superscript] 3, Liege Language and Literature, 1997.
Main Stack PR9080.C65 1997

The Tempest: Peter Greenaway (Prospero's Books)

See Peter Greenaway bibliography

The Tempest: Derek Jarman

Auty, Martyn
"The Tempest." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin XLVII/555, Apr 80; p.78-79.

Ellis, Jim.
"Conjuring The Tempest: Derek Jarman and the Spectacle of Redemption." Glq-A Journal of Lesbian & Gay Studies. 7(2):265-84. 2001
UC users only

Harris, Diana; Jackson, MacDonald.
"Stormy Weather: Derek Jarman's 'The Tempest.'" Literature-Film Quarterly v25, n2 (April, 1997):90 (9 pages).
Derek Jarman's 1979 film adaptation of William Shakespeare's 'The Tempest' is superior to Peter Greenaway's 1991 'Prospero's Books,' which it anticipates in many ways, because it engages the emotions in the same way as Shakespeare's play. Greenaway's film, despite its high-tech effects and post-modernist messages remains ultimately unmoving. Jarman centers his film on the relations between Prospero, Ariel and Caliban, as does Shakespeare, and upon the fuzziness of the edges separating truth from illusion. The film's culminating wedding-masque provides a strikingly original and satisfying climax.

McCabe, Colin.
"A Post-National European Cinema: A Consideration of Derek Jarman's The Tempest and Edward II." In: Screening Europe: Image and Identity in Contemporary European Cinema / edited by Duncan Petrie. pp: 9-18. London: BFI Publishing, 1992. BFI working papers
Main Stack PN1993.5.E8.S33 1992

Zarkin, R.
"The Tempest." (Review).Films & Filming XXVI/9, June 80; p.28.

The Tempest: Paul Mazursky

Bruster, Douglas
"The Postmodern Theatre of Paul Mazurky's Tempest." In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle
Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 26-39. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Calhoun, J.
"Tempest." (Review).Films in Review XXXIII/8, Oct 82; p.489-490.

Coppedge, Walter R.
"Mazursky's Tempest: Something Rich, Something Strange." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 21 no. 1. 1993. pp: 18-24.
Defends Paul Mazursky's critically-reviled "Tempest" as a faithful reworking of Shakespeare.

Haspel, Paul >
"Ariel and Prospero's Modern-English Adventure: Language, Social Criticism, and Adaptation in Paul Mazursky's Tempest." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2006. Vol. 34, Iss. 2; p. 130 (10 pages)
UC users only

Mazursky, Paul.
Tempest: A Sreenplay / by Paul Mazursky & Leon Capetanos. 1st ed. New York: Performing Arts Publications, c1982. Series title: PAJ playscripts.
Main PN1997.M3 T282

Pulleine, Tim
"Tempest." (Review).Monthly Film Bulletin L/590, Mar 83; p.77.

Taylor, Geoffrey
Paul Mazursky's Tempest / written and edited by Geoffrey Taylor; designed by Michael Diehl. New York: New York Zoetrope, c1982.
UCB Main PN1997.T45 T39

Forbidden Planet (The Tempest)

See Science Fiction bibliography

Titus Andronicus

Agustí, Clara Escoda.
"Julie Taymor's Titus (1999): Framing Violence and Activating Responsibility." Atlantis , jun2006, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p57-70, 14p
UC users only

Burt, Richard.
"Shakespeare and the Holocaust: Julie Taymor's Titus Is Beautiful, or Shakesploi Meets (the) Camp." Colby-Quarterly, 2001 Mar, 37:1, 78-106.

Calhoun. John
"Taymor Tackles Titus." (theater director and designer Julie Taymor)(Brief Article) Entertainment Design March 2000 v34 i3 p8
UC users only
"The film version of William Shakespeare's Titus, directed by Julie Taymor, is set in an undefined era. Oscar-winning costume designer Milena Canonero, who worked on the movie, says Taymor wanted to create a unique world in which there were no specific, direct references to an era. The film stars Anthony Hopkins as the title character, a Roman general who kills the eldest son of defeated Goth queen Tamora (Jessica Lange), and Alan Cumming as Saturninus, the corrupt Roman emperor who makes Tamora his queen, setting the stage for a series of vengeful and bloody acts. The challenges the plot presented to Canonero and production designer Dante Ferretti are discussed." [Art Index]

Cartelli, T.
"Taymor's Titus in time and space: surrogation and interpolation." Renaissance Drama 34 [2005] p. 163-184

Cieslak, Magdalena
"Shakespeare's Camp City." In: Images of the city / edited by Agnieszka Rasmus and Magdalena Cieslak. Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Pub., 2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks New books PN56.C55 I45 2009

Corliss, Richard.
"Titus." (The Arts/Cinema)(Brief Article)(Review) (movie reviews)Time v154, n26 (Dec 27, 1999):166+.

De Luca, Maria; Lindroth, Mary
"Mayhem, madness, method: an interview with Julie Taymor." Cineaste v 25 no3 2000. p. 28-31
UC users only
"An interview with director Julie Taymor on the occasion of the release of her film Titus Andronicus. Best known for her Broadway presentations of The Lion King and The Green Bird, Taymor had presented a version of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus on stage in 1994. Her film retains the play's Roman Empire setting, but it also makes quantum but seamless leaps into an unanticipated and thematically resonating variety of time periods, from the present day, to Mussolini's (and then Fellini's) Italy, and contemporary Bosnia. Topics discussed include the differences between Taymor's film and the original stage production, the function of art in the presentation of violent material, and the timeliness of this early Shakespeare play." [Art Index]

Escoda Agustí, Clara.
Julie Taymor's Titus (1999): framing violence and activating responsibility.(Critical essay)." Atlantis, revista de la Asociación Española de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos 28.1 (June 2006): 57(14).
UC users only

Fedderson, Kim.
"Titus: Shakespeare in Pieces." SRASP. 25:70-80. 2002

Fedderson, Kim. Richardson, J. M.
"Liberty's Taken, or How 'Captive Women May Be Cleansed and Used': Julie Taymor's Titus and 9/11." In:Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Lindroth, Mary.
"'Some Device of Further Misery': Taymor's Titus Brings Shakespeare to Film Audiences with a Twist." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 107-15.
UCB users only

Luca, Maria De; Lindroth, Mary.
"Mayhem, Madness, Method: An Interview with Julie Taymor." (Interview)Cineaste v25, n3 (Summer, 2000):28.

Marti, Cecile.
"Julie Taymor's Titus: Deciding Not to Cut." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2004. Vol. 32, Iss. 2; p. 122 (4 pages)
UC users only

McCandless, David Foley
"A Tale of Two Tituses: Julie Taymor's Vision on Stage and Screen." Shakespeare Quarterly - Volume 53, Number 4, Winter 2002
UC users only

Pizzello, Stephen
"From stage to screen." American Cinematographer v. 81 no. 2 (February 2000) p. 64-6, 68, 70-3
UC users only
"An interview with theatrical director/designer Julie Taymor about her film Titus Andronicus. Renowned in theatrical circles as an adventurous and highly imaginative artist with a flair for mind-bending visuals, Taymor has adapted her off-Broadway theatrical production of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus for the cinema. Taymor discusses several topics, including how production of the film got off the ground, the influence of Fellini and Kurosawa on her work, how the play's transformation from theater to film impacted on her directorial instincts, some of the key problems faced on the project, how cinematographer Luciano Tovoli joined the project, and her own involvement in the film's lighting and composition." [Art Index]

Pizzello, Stephen
"A timeless tale of revenge." American Cinematographer v. 81 no. 2 (February 2000) p. 52-6, 58, 60, 62-3
UC users only
"Luciano Tovoli's work for Julie Taymor's film Titus is discussed. The film takes Titus Andronicus, generally regarded to be Shakespeare's most violent work, as its source material, placing it in a completely new and intriguing context that combines various periods into a timeless world in which Roman soldiers tool around on motorcycles and Goth princes dance to modern rock music and play video games in the Emperor's palace. For the film, which was shot at exterior locations in and around Rome, and in Pula, Croatia, with interiors shot in soundstages at Rome's famed Cinecitta studios, Tovoli felt it was appropriate to apply a somewhat theatrical lighting scheme to the narrative since it was adapted from Taymor's stage production. Given an array of beautiful sets and structures to photograph, including Mussolini's E.U.R. building, Tovoli attempted to make the film's architectural flourishes an integral part of its narrative flow. He used an Arri 535 as his A-camera and shot on Kodak's 500 ASA EXR 5298 film stock on almost the entire picture." [Art Index]

Schechner, Richard.
"Julie Taymor."(Interview)TDR (Cambridge, Mass.) v43, n3 (Fall, 1999):36.

Starks, Lisa S.
"Cinema of Cruelty: Powers of Horror in Julie Taymor's Titus." In: In: The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory Edited by Lisa S. Starks and Courtney Lehmann. pp: 121-42. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

Travers, Peter.
"Titus." (Review) (movie reviews)Rolling Stone, n834 (Feb 17, 2000):64 (1 page).

Vincinguerra, Thomas
"Alas, poor Titus. You're bloody, awful and ready for dismemberment." (William Shakespeare's play 'Titus Andronicus,' the latest film version of which is Julie Taymor's 'Titus') The New York Times June 13, 1999 s4 pWK7(N) pWK7(L) col 1 (25 col in)

Walker, Elsie.
"'Now is a time to storm': Julie Taymor's Titus (2000)." Literature/Film Quarterly (30:3) [2002:3] , p.194-207.
UC users only

Wrathall, John.
"Bloody arcades." Sight and Sound v10, n7 (July, 2000):24 (3 pages).
UC users only
"The acclaimed American theater director Julie Taymor makes her feature-film debut with Titus, an adaptation of Shakespeare's earliest and most outlandish tragedy Titus Andronicus. Taymor's distinctive achievement is in the flair and dynamism with which she reinvents proven material for a new medium. Her vision of Titus originated in an acclaimed stage production, off-Broadway in 1994, and even the most purely visual and overtly "cinematic" moments in the film are drawn from the stage production." [Art Index]

Wrathall, John.
"Titus" (Julie Taymor's film Titus)Sight and Soundns10 no. 10 (October 2000) p. 61-2
UC users only
"Taymor films Shakespeare's early tragedy in an extremely challenging, dynamic, and faithful way. She shoots the dialogue scenes fairly straight, in order to allow the words to shine through as much as possible, and then punctuates these scenes with scenes of stunning spectacle. This leaves her film with a slightly awkward theatrical rhythm so that, despite the dynamism of individual sequences, the film never picks up the momentum to sustain it over 160 minutes." [Art Index]

The Twelfth Night

Grindley, Carl James
"The Plague in Filmed Versions of Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth Night." In: Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Twelfth Night: Trevor Nunn/Helena Bonham Carter

Brown, Eric C.
"'What's to Come Is Still Unsure': Madness and Deferall in Nunn's Twelfth Night." Colby-Quarterly, 2001 Mar, 37:1, 15-29.

Crewe, Jonathan.
"In the Field of Dreams: Transvestism in Twelfth Night and The Crying Game." Representations, vol. 50. 1995 Spring. pp: 101-21.

Alleva, Richard.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews)Commonweal v123, n22 (Dec 20, 1996):14.

Ansen, David.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews)Newsweek v128, n19 (Nov 4, 1996):73 (2 pages).

Coe, Jonathan.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews)New Statesman (1996) v125, n4306 (Oct 25, 1996):39.

Hale, David G.
"The End of Twelfth Night: Two Recent Performances on Film." Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 20(2):42-44. 2002 Spring

Holden, Stephen.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews)New York Times v145 (Fri, Oct 25, 1996):B1(N), C3(L), col 4, 15 col in.

Johnson, Brian D.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews)Maclean's v109, n46 (Nov 11, 1996):74 (2 pages).

Kauffmann, Stanley.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews) New Republic v215, n23 (Dec 2, 1996):40.

Lyons, Donald.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews)Commentary v103, n2 (Feb, 1997):59 (2 pages).

Marks, Peter.
"So Young, So Fragile, So Vexed About Sex: as ever, Shakespeare; but will 'Twelfth Night,' with a rickety Renaissance plot, work on screen? Yes, says Trevor Nunn, because it's so modern." New York Times v145, sec2 (Sun, Oct 20, 1996):H13(N), H13(L), col 1, 27

Marshall, Kelli.
"'How do you solve a problem like Maria?': a problematic (re)interpretation of Maria in Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night." Literature/Film Quarterly (30:3) [2002:3] , p.217-222.
UC users only

Morgenstern, Joe.
"Twelfth Night." (movie reviews)Wall Street Journal (Fri, Oct 25, 1996):A15(W), A12(E), col 2, 7 col in.

Osborne, Laurie
"Cutting up characters: the erotic politics of Trevor Nunn's Twelfth night." In: Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002

Sheppard, Philippa
"Inter-cutting in Trevor Nunn's 'Twelfth Night.'" (Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly July 2002 v30 i3 p179(10)
UC users only
"Trevor Nunn's 1996 adaptation of William Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night' makes the counterpoint between the plot and subplot more explicit and immediate. Nunn emphasizes how women and men regard love differently, and how identity is more important than gender in romantic matters." [Expanded Academic Index]

Sterritt, David.
"The Bard Makes Resurgence in Movies.(new films based on the works of William Shakespeare include 'Looking for Richard,' 'Twelfth Night' and 'Romeo and Juliet')"Christian Science Monitor v88, n223 (Fri, Oct 11, 1996):12, col 2, 25 col in.

Thomas, Catherine.
"Nunn's Sweet Transvestite: Desiring Viola in Twelfth Night." Journal of Popular Culture. Apr 2008. Vol. 41, Iss. 2; pg. 306, 15 pgs
UC users only

Twelfth Night: She's the Man

Balizet, Ariane M.
"Teen Scenes: Recognizing Shakespeare in Teen Film." In: Almost Shakespeare : reinventing his works for cinema and television / edited by James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2004.
Main Stack PR3093.A46 2004
PFA PR3093.A46 2004

Clement, Jennifer
"The Postfeminist Mystique: Feminism and Shakespearean Adaptation in 10 Things I Hate About You and She's the Man." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, Vol III · No. 2 Spring/Summer 2008

Friedmna, Michael D.
"Introduction: "To think o' th' teen that I have turned you to': The Scholarly Consideration of Teen Shakespeare Films." Shakespeare Bulletin; Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p1-7, 7p
UC users only

Klett, Elizabeth.
"Reviving Viola: Comic and Tragic Teen Film Adaptations of Twelfth Night." Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p69-87, 19p
UC users only

Martindale, Sarah.
"She's the Man." Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p135-138, 4p
UC users only

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Twelfth Night's Cinematic Adolescents: One Play, One Plot, One Setting, and Three Teen Films." Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p9-36, 28p
UC users only

Pittman, L Monique.
"Dressing the Girl / Playing the Boy: Twelfth Night Learns Soccer on the Set of She's The Man." Literature/Film Quarterly. 2008. Vol. 36, Iss. 2; p. 122 (15 pages)
UC users only



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