The Beat Movement on Film
A Comprehensive Screening List
by Ray Carney, Boston University





The following text has been incorporated in the UC Berkeley Media Resources Center Web site with the kind permission of the author. Copyright 1996 Ray Carney. All rights, electronic and print, are reserved by the author.

Call numbers for titles owned by UCB libraries are indicated after the film description

This screening list was prepared by Ray Carney for the show, "Beat Culture and the New America, 1950-1965" which was mounted at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York in November 1995 and subsequently toured to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco. It represents an overview of a wide range of Beat culture on film.

  • R. Carney's Selected Program Notes for the films described below
  • The Beat Generation & Its Circle: Media Resources in the UCB Libraries
  • Beats in Film (via Literary Kicks web site)
  • Ray Carney is Professor of Film and American Studies at Boston University and teaches courses on the relation of various forms of American artistic expression. His most recent books are The Films of John Cassavetes: Pragmatism, Modernism, and the Movies (Cambridge University Press) and American Vision: The Films of Frank Capra (Wesleyan University Press). He curated the film and video component of the Whitney Museum's "Beat Culture" show and is one of the leading authorities on Beat film and the American independent film movement in general.

    I. THE BACKBEAT:
    BEHIND THE BEAT MOVEMENT

    THE SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL BACKGROUND/
    THE FEEL OF THE FIFTIES

    Point of Order! (1964), Emile de Antonio. Film, black-and-white, sound; 97 minutes. The decade of the fifties begines with the HUAC hearings. Paranoia is rampant. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C.1918

    The Atomic Cafe (1982), Kevin Rafferty, Jayne Loader, and Pierce Rafferty. Film, black-and-white and color, sound; 88 minutes. Comic compilation documentary of various Cold War propaganda films. A satire of American optimism and mindless conformism in the face of impending nuclear destruction. VIDEO/C 1025 Media Center

    Heavy Petting (1989) Obie Benz. Film, color, sound; 75 minutes. Humorous documentary. Interviews with Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Judith Malina, and others about their loves and lives in the fifties. VIDEO/C 6019

    Before Stonewall (1984) Greta Schiller, Robert Rosenberg, and John Scagliotti, producers. Film, color, sound; 87 minutes. Sexual repression and the development of a bohemian underground in New York and San Francisco. VIDEO/C.1461 Media Center

    The Beat Generation: An American Dream (1987) Janet Forman. Film, color, sound; 87 minutes. A sociological overview of the Eisenhower years. Contains archival film footage and more recent interviews with major Beat figures.

    AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS:
    MIDDLE-CLASS ANXIETIES AND FEARS

    The Bachelor Party (1957) Delbert Mann. Film, black-and-white, sound; 93 minutes. Hollywood examination of the cracks in the facade of the Organization Man. An important contemporaneous depiction of the self-doubts of the middle-class American male.

    The Savage Eye (1959) Joseph Strick, Ben Maddow, and Sidney Meyers. Film, black-and-white, sound; 68 minutes. A relentlessly savage attack on the values of the American middle-class: its conspicuous consumption, conformity, and quest for style.

    The Wild One (1954) Laslo Benedek. Film, black-and-white, sound; 79 minutes. Starring Marlon Brando, the patron saint of much of the youth movement of the period. His mumbling and brow-furrowing became Beat trademarks. VIDEO/C.999:399 Media Center

    Rebel Without a Cause (1954) Nicholas Ray. Film, color, sound; 111 minutes. The quintessential coming-of-age crisis film. A performance by James Dean that helped to shape Beat manners and mannerisms. (Nicholas Ray's son, Tony Ray, appears in Cassavetes' Shadows.) VIDEO/C 999:35 Media Center

    CREATIVITY ON THE MARGINS:
    THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE/THE JAZZ LIFE

    The Cry of Jazz (1958) Ed Bland. Film, black-and-white, sound; 35 minutes. An early definition of the distinctiveness of the black experience and its link to the aesthetics of jazz. Characteristically Beat in its somewhat romantic view of the black musician.

    Celebrating Bird! The Triumph of Charlie Parker (1988) Kendrick Simms and Gary Giddins. Video, black-and-white, and color, sound 59 minutes. Recent interviews and documentary footage of Parker in performance, but more biography than performance. Media Center VIDEO/C 2341

    The World According to John Coltrane (1991) Toby Byron and Robert Palmer. Video, black-and-white and color, sound; 59 minutes. Extensive footage of Coltrane in performance on New York television in the fifties. A deep insight into the spirituality of his music. VIDEO/C 3125 Media Center

    Jazz on a Summer's Day (1960) Bert Stern. Film, color, sound; 85 minutes. Documentation of the 1959 Newport Jazz Festival. Performers include: Anita O'Day, Dinah Washington, Jerry Mulligan, Jack Teagarden, and Louis Armstrong. A major documentary of the period, but slanted toward Dixieland and "hot" jazz and away from the "cooler" or bebop work that was more important to the Beats.

    RELIGION WITHOUT GOD:
    THE QUEST FOR A NEW RELATION TO THE UNIVERSE

    Essential Alan Watts: Man in Nature, Work as Play (1973) David Grieve and Henry Jacobs. Video, color, sound, 58 minutes. Visual records of Watts' radio broadcasts and public lectures from the fifties and sixties are not available. This video contains two of a series of filmed talks from the early seventies. Connections with the Beat aesthetic and the work of many West Coast Beat artists in particular are evident.

    Zuigan's Permanent Principle (1994) Nita Freidman and Abbott John Daido Loori. Video, color, sound; 54 minutes. A lecture by Abbott John Daido Loori on change, permanence, time, and redeeming the everyday work of life.

    II. THE DOCUMENTARY RECORD

    PORTRAITS OF THE ARTISTS-FOUR FIGURES

    JACK KEROUAC

    Kerouac (1984) John Antonelli. Video, color, sound; 90 minutes. Interviews with Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti, Burroughs, and others; music by Ellington, Mingus, Sims. An upbeat, affirmative depiction of Kerouac's early years with a salutary emphasis on the young Kerouac. Media Center VIDEO/C 2253

    What Happened to Kerouac? (1985) Louis MacAdams and Richard Lerner. Film, color, sound; 96 minutes. Interviews with Corso, Ginsberg, and others. Focuses on the adult Kerouac. Includes a scene of an older, conservative, alcoholic, beaten Kerouac arguing with Ed Sanders and William Buckley on Firing Line. Kerouac's appearance on television on The Steve Allen Plymouth Show is also included. Depressing and sad. The older, boozy Kerouac is emphasized. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 1058

    Jack Kerouac's Road: A Franco-American Odyssey (1987), Hermenegilde Chiasson. Film, color, sound; 55 minutes. An unusual view of Kerouac entirely from the perspective of his French-Catholic background. An interesting corrective to the view of Kerouac as being rootless and culturally ungrounded. Kerouac speaks French (with English subtitles). Media Center VIDEO/C 6885; Bancroft Motion Picture 752 D

    ALLEN GINSBERG

    A Moveable Feast: Profile of Contemporary American Authors- Allen Ginsberg (1991), Bruce Berger. Video, color, sound; 30 minutes.Interviews with and readings by Ginsberg, and an account of his early years in New York and friendship with Kerouac.

    The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg (1993) Jerry Aronson. Film, black-and-white and color; 82 minutes. Both a biography of Ginsberg and a comprehensive portrait of the period. A wealth of archival footage and photographs that nicely contextualizes Ginsberg's life and work. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 3463

    WILLIAM BURROUGHS

    Burroughs: The Movie (1983) Howard Brookner. Film, black-and-white and color, sound; 87 minutes. Rare footage of Burrough's appearance on Saturday Night Live. Interviews with Burroughs and others who speak about him. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 4143

    William Burroughs: Commissioner of Sewers (1986) Klaus Maeck. Film, black-and-white and color, sound; 60 minutes. Interviews with Burroughs by Jurgen Ploog during Burroughs' 1986 tour of Germany. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 3222; UCB Bancroft Motion Picture 770 D

    LENNY BRUCE

    "Playboy's" Penthouse [the Beat episode] (1959). Video, black-and-white, sound; 56 minutes. Hugh Heffner, Lenny Bruce, Cy Coleman, Charlie Coleman, and others. Bruce conducts an extended (and hilarious) extempore conversation with Heffner.

    Lenny Bruce Performance Film (1968). John Magnuson, producer. Video, black-and-white, sound; 59 minutes. The only surviving visual record of a Bruce performance on stage. Bruce improvises a jazz-like "riff" based on the transcript of his trial. His intellectual brilliance and agility come through notwithstanding the static camera set-up. VIDEO/C 2903 Media Center

    ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS FROM THE PERIOD

    Wholly Communion (1966), Peter Whitehead. Film, black and white, sound; 33 minutes. Ginsberg, Corso, Ferlinghetti, and others reading at the Royal Albert Hall in 1965.

    The Beats: An Existential Comedy. Philomene Long. Video, sound; 58 minutes. A comic compilation of television and film clips of the Beats, focusing on the West Coast Beats. VIDEO/C 4674 Media Center

    The Anatomy of Cindy Fink (1966) Richard Leacock, Patricia Jaffe, and Paul Leaf. Film, color, sound; 12 minutes. Rarely seen documentary about the life of a Greenwich Village dancer.

    THE BEAT GOES ON
    (AFTER-EFFECTS, CONTINUATIONS, REFLECTIONS)

    Fried Shoes, Cooked Diamonds: The Beats at Naropa (1978), Costanzo Allione. Video, color, sound; 55 minutes. Burroughs, Ginsberg, Corso, Anne Waldman, Diane DiPrima and others at Naropa in the early 1970s. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C1802; UCB Bancroft Motion picture 473 D

    This Song for Jack (1983), Robert Frank. Film, black-and-white, sound; 30 minutes. Documents the 1982 "On the Road, Jack Kerouac Conference" in Boulder, Colorado. Frank creates a deliberate companion piece to his earlier Pull My Daisy. This is, in effect, the same film twenty years later.

    West Coast, Beat and Beyond (1984), Chris Felver. Video, color, sound; 59 minutes. Readings by Ginsberg, Kerouac, Ken Kesey, Laurence Ferlinghetti, and others, on San Francisco's North Beach. Narrated by Gerald Nicosia. UCB Bancroft Motion picture 793 D

    Gang of Souls (1989), Maria Beatty. Video, color, sound; 58 minutes. Recent footage of Ginsberg, Burroughs, Di Prima, and others, and tributes to them from a generation of contemporary artists. VIDEO/C 4345 Media Center; Motion Picture 754 D Bancroft

    Love Lion: Performance with Words and Music by Michael McClure and Ray Manzarek (1991). Sheldon Rochlin and Maxine Harris. Video, color, sound; 70 minutes. On-stage reading that captures the Beat tendency to combine music and poetry in one performance.

    Allan `n' Allen's Complaint (1982), Nam June Paik and Shigeko Kubota. Video, color, sound; 30 minutes. Featuring Allen Ginsberg and Allan Kaprow. VIDEO/C 4679 Media Center

    Living with the Living Theater (1989), Nam June Paik with Betsy Connors and Paul Garrin. Video, color, sound; 28 1/2 minutes. Ginsberg reflecting on the Beat movement.

    Gregory Corso Reads from the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights (1992), James Rasin and Jerry Poynton. Film, color, sound; 18 minutes. A work in progress. Corso delivers an improvised "riff," somewhat rough and flat in places, on American history.

    Huncke and Louis (1995), Laki Vazakas. Video, color, sound; 10 minutes. A work in progress. A wonderful and disturbing portrait of Herbert Huncke and his companion Louis Cartwright. Wonderful and disturbing. The Beat generation with the bloom off. Cuts beneath the primping and preening of the movement, to document the human cost, as Huncke's work also does. Usefully compared with The Connection as a study of self-desturction through drugs and life-style.

    New Orleans, 1938 (1995) Jerry Poynton. Video, color, sound; 12 minutes. Actor Edgar Oliver reads the Herbert Huncke's story, "New Orleans, 1938."

    THE HAPPENING:
    TAKING ART OFF THE WALLS AND BRINGING IT TO LIFE

    Happenings: One (1962), Raymond Saroff. Film, black-and-white, silent; 21 minutes. Claes Oldenburg, Pat Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, and others at the Ray Gun Theater.

    Happenings: Two (1962), Raymond Saroff. Film, black-and-white, silent; 22 1/12 minutes.

    The White Rose (l967), Bruce Conner. Film, black-and-white, sound; 7 minutes. The removal of Jay de Feo's massive sculptural piece from her apartment in l965. A very subtle, deep exploration of art's place in the world. Media Center VIDEO/C 999:625

    III. THE BEAT SENSIBILITY IN FILM

    CHRISTOPHER MACLAINE

    The End (1953). Film, color, sound; 35 minutes. Set in San Francisco, a series of surreal episodes deal with suicide and death and the atomic age. Media Center VIDEO/C 999:1598

    Beat (1958). Film, color, sound; 6 minutes. A boy and girl dance through the streets of a city. Reveals MacLaine's fundamentally choreographic sensibility.

    STAN BRAKHAGE

    Desistfilm (1954). Film, black-and-white, sound; 7 minutes. Parker Tyler called it the first authentically Beat film (though the award might actually go to MacLaine's The End). Sexual combat and social anxiety among a group of young people.

    Anticipation of the Night (1958). Film, black-and-white, silent; 40 minutes. The quest for an innocent eye and a form of film that can capture the complexity of lived experience before it has been simplified by the understanding. Media Center VIDEO/C 4917

    JONAS MEKAS

    Lost, lost, lost (1949-1963/1976). Film, black-and-white and color, sound; 178 minutes. An exploration of terminal marginality, lostness, searching, longing. The first, chronologically, of Mekas' diary films-which capture the movements of time and space and mind into film. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 3979

    Guns of the Trees (1962). Film, black-and-white, sound; 75 minutes. Two couples-one white, one black-living on the margins. Ties in with Beat anxieties about the A-bomb and the point of work in American society. Narration by Allen Ginsberg. Not nearly as interesting or complex as Lost, Lost, Lost , but more obviously "Beat." Features Ben Carruthers, who also stars in Cassavetes' Shadows. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 4426

    FRANK PAINE

    Motion Picture (1956). Film, color, sound; 4 minutes. The energy and freedom of traveling down the road in an automobile was one of the central Beat metaphors. Paine's mastery of space and time is usefully contrasted with Clarke's in her short films. While Paine lunges through space and eats it up, Clarke balletically dances around in it.

    SHIRLEY CLARKE

    Bridges Go Round (1958), Film, color, sound; 4 minutes.

    Skyscraper (1959), Film, black-and-white, and color, sound; 20 minutes. A bebop sensibility. Clarke animates the city and its objects and makes them dance to her tunes.

    The Connection (1961). Film, black-and-white, sound; 103 minutes. From the Jack Gelber play, acted by The Living Theater. Waiting for Godot as a drug-pusher story. Because of some of its language, it was legally ruled obscene and only released after a court battle. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 999:893

    Portrait of Jason (l967). Film, black-and-white, sound; 105 minutes. Brilliant and disturbing. Jason is the archetypal hipster of the period, the psychopath Norman Mailer's essay "The White Negro" describes, condemned to swing forever. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 999:893

    ANDREW MEYER

    Shades and Drumbeats (1964), Film, color, silent; 25 minutes. An all-nighter of drugs and sex with a group of young people. Compare with Shadows as an evocation of the milieu.

    JOHN CASSAVETES

    Shadows (1957-1959). Film, black-and-white, sound; 87 minutes. Mixed races, questions of identity. Charlie Mingus and Shafi Hadi (a.k.a. Curtis Porter) perform on the soundtrack. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 4336

    Too Late Blues (1962). Film, black-and-white, sound; 103 minutes. Jazz milieu. A hero with a Peter Pan complex. Cassavetes tells the story of an artist too idealistic to function in contemporary capitalistic society. Is the problem society or him?

    ROBERT FRANK

    Pull My Daisy (l959). Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie. Film, black-and-white, sound; 28 minutes. One of the best-known Beat films. Although for many years mistakenly believed to be improvised, the film still stands as a paean to spontaneity and freedom. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 4336

    Me and My Brother (1965-1968). Film, black-and-white and color, sound; 91 minutes. Peter and Jules Orlovsky, Christopher Walken, Joe Chaikin, Allen Ginsberg. Raises questions about the boundaries between art and life by forcing the viewer to wonder about what in the film is acted and what is not. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 999:2156

    RON RICE

    The Flower Thief (1960). Film, black-and-white, sound; 75 minutes. Taylor Mead clowns and improvises his version of Chaplin in City Lights.

    The Queen of Sheba Meets the Atom Man (1963/1982). Film, black-and-white, sound; 109 minutes. Taylor Mead and Winifred Bryan, who has the most emotionally powerful passage-a ferry ride out into New York harbor. Film began by Ron Rice in 1963. After his death Taylor Mead completed the film between 1979 and 1982. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 999:1597

    VERNON ZIMMERMAN

    Lemon Hearts (1960). Film, black-and-white, sound; 26 minutes. Taylor Mead house-hunting (and house-haunting) in San Francisco.

    KEN JACOBS

    Blonde Cobra (1959-63) Film, black-and-white and color, sound with live radio; 30 minutes. Jack Smith camping it up in a work that hovers between the comic and the tragic. Where does role-playing end and reality begin?

    Little Stabs at Happiness (l959-63). Film, color, sound; 15 minutes. The dark side of the Beat sensibility. Kerouac regarded "goofing: -clowning around-as "holy," but Jacobs wanted to restore its blasphemous potential, and does so in this film.

    JACK SMITH

    Flaming Creatures (l963). Film, black-and-white, sound; 45 minutes. A Sternbergian view of life as a form of theater. Relates to the Beat interest in costume and carnival, and the attempt to treat personal identity as a work of art. Media Center VIDEO/C 3258

    COMING TO GRIPS WITH THE TRASH-HEAP OF CULTURE:
    FOUND FOOTAGE AND FOUND-OBJECT FILMS

    BRUCE CONNER

    A Movie (l958). Film, black-and-white, sound; 12 minutes. Media Center VIDEO/C 999:625

    Cosmic Ray (1961). Film, black-and-white, sound; 4 minutes.

    Report (1963-67). Film, black-and-white, sound; 13 minutes.

    Marilyn Times Five (1968-73). Film, black-and-white, sound; 13 minutes. Media Center VIDEO/C 999:625

    Conner recycles the culture of advertising, Hollywood, and and the media to adapt it to his anti-establishment purposes.

    STAN VANDERBEEK

    Wheels #1 (1958). Film, black-and-white, sound; 5 minutes.

    Wheels #2 (1959). Film, black-and-white, sound; 4 minutes.

    Science Friction (1959). Film, color, sound; 9 minutes.

    Breathdeath (1964). Film, black-and-white, sound; 15 minutes.

    Explorations of the American passion for fashion, the lust for motion, and the Faustian push into space-documented and satirized though found footage.

    MARIE MENKEN

    Go, Go, Go (1962-64). Film color, silent; 11 1/2 minutes. Making space amid the hecticness and crush for privacy, consciousness, interiority.

    WILLIAM BURROUGHS:
    CAPTURING THE SHOCK SENSIBILITY ON FILM

    Towers Open Fire, The Cut Ups, Bill and Tony, William Buys a Parrot (1962-72), Anthony Balch. Film, black-and-white, and color; sound; 35 minutes. Written and narrated by William Burroughs. Inspired by Brion Gysin. An attempt to mimic Burroughs' cut-up methods in the medium of film. Towers Open Fire:UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 2991

    Naked Lunch (1991) David Cronenberg. Film, color, sound; 115 minutes. An attempt to do in commercial film what Burroughs does on the page. The film can be compared to Balch's Towers Open Fire as evidence of the problems that arise in attempting to translate the Beat sensibility into a mainstream form of expression. VIDEO/C 999:1912

    A CLASH OF SENSIBILITIES: BEAT COOL MEETS WARHOL COLD

    ANDY WARHOL

    Tarzan and Jane Regained, Sort of (1963). Film, black-and-white and color, sound; 81 minutes. Wallace Berman and his son appear in the film.

    Couch (1964). Film, black-and-white, silent; 54 minutes. Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, and Gregory Corso appear.

    ANIMATION: EAST COAST AND WEST

    HARRY SMITH:

    Early Abstractions, Nos. 1-5, 7, and 10 (1939-57). Film, color, sound; 23 minutes. The creation of transcendental visual style.

    Heaven and Earth Magic Feature (1959-1966). Film, black-and-white, sound; 66 minutes.

    ROBERT BREER:

    Recreation (l956). Film, color, sound; 1 1/2 minutes. VIDEO/C 5229

    Eyewash (1959). Film, color, silent; 3 minutes.

    Breathing (1963). Film, black-and-white, sound; 5 minutes.

    Fist Fight (1964). Film, color, sound; 9 minutes. An attempt to engage the viewer in a playful pursuit of ever-elusive meanings.

    IV. VISIONARY PURIFICATIONS AND WEST COAST INFLECTIONS

    JAMES WHITNEY

    Yantra (1950-55). Film, color, sound; 7 minutes.

    Lapis (l963-66). Film, color, sound; 10 minutes. VIDEO/C 6474

    Meditative states translated into the medium of film.

    JORDAN BELSON

    Caravan (1952). Film, color, sound; 4 minutes.

    Mandala (1953). Film, color, sound; 3 minutes.

    Seance (1953). Film, color, sound; 4 minutes.

    Allures (1961). Film, color, sound; 8 minutes.

    Re-Entry (1964). Film, color, sound; 6 minutes.

    LARRY JORDAN

    Triptych in Four Parts (1958). Film, color, sound; 12 minutes.

    Visions of a City (1957/1979). Film, black-and-white tinted sepia; 8 minutes.

    BRUCE BAILLIE

    Mr. Hayashi (1961). Film, black-and-white, sound; 3 minutes.

    Have You Thought of Talking to the Director? (1962). Film, black-and-white, sound; 15 minutes.

    To Parsifal (1963). Film, black-and-white, sound; 16 minutes.

    Mass for the Dakota Sioux (1963-4). Film, black-and-white, sound; 20 1/2 minutes.

    Quixote (1965). Film, black-and-white and color, sound; 45 minutes. A spiritual sensibility, Oriental terseness, love of nature, interest in purity and innocence, and distrust of science, technology, and modern civilization define Baillie's work.

    KENNETH ANGER

    Scorpio Rising (1963). Film, color, sound; 29 minutes. VIDEO/C 999:25

    Kustom Kar Kommandos (1965). Film, color, sound; 3 1/2 minutes. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 999:1179 A Los Angeles sensibility: there is no escape from the relentless cultural processing of experience. Culture has become the new nature.

    RUTH WEISS

    The Brink (1961). Film, black-and-white, sound; 40 minutes. Stan Brakhage called The Brink one of the most important San Francisco films of the period. A playful love story about two lonely people. Photographed by Paul Beattie, the painter. UCB Bancroft Motion Picture 768 D

    JOHN KORTY

    The Crazy Quilt (1966). Film, black-and-white, sound; 72 minutes.

    Funnyman (1967). Film, color sound; 98 minutes. Two independent features from the San Francisco North Beach area. A celebration of extravagance, personal eccentricity, and the transforming power of the individual imagination. Beat transmuting into hippie.

    JAMES BROUGHTON

    Adventures of Jimmy (1950). Film, black-and-white, sound; 11 minutes. Mama's boy looks for a match.

    V. THE BOUTIQUING OF BEATNESS: HOLLYWOOD GOES BEAT

    The Beat Generation (1959), Charles Haas. Film, black-and-white, sound; 95 minutes. Louis Armstrong makes an appearance. A rapist masquerades as a beatnik. Need I say more?

    The Subterraneans (1960), Ranald MacDougall. Film, color, sound; 89 minutes. Music by Gerry Mulligan, Carmen McRae, and Shelley Manne. A gentrification of Kerouac's novel of the same title, with a race change (from black to white) of the female lead.

    A Bucket of Blood (1959), Roger Corman. Film, black-and-white, sound; 66 minutes. Follows the mass media in treating Beats as deviants, weirdos, psychopaths. A waiter in a coffeehouse murders people and passes himself off as a Beat sculptor.

    Greenwich Village Story (1961), Jack O'Connell. Film, black-and-white, sound; 95 minutes. The best of the Hollywood adaptations. A love story about a struggling writer and his girlfriend, set in a Beat milieu.

    Heart Beat (1980), John Byrum. Film, color, sound; 105 minutes. Hollywood portraits of Cassady, Kerouac, Ginsberg, and others. Adaptation of Carolyn Cassady's memoir of the period. Soap opera on the big screen.

    VI. TRANSATLANTIC TRANSFORMATIONS:
    ANGRY YOUNG MEN (AND WOMEN)
    IN THE U.K.

    The Rebel Set (a.k.a. Beatsville) (1959), Gene Fowler, Jr. Film, black-and-white, sound; 72 minutes. Rebellious youths get involved in a robbery plot.

    Beat Girl (a.k.a. Wild for Kicks) (1962), Edmond T. Greville. Film, black-and-white, sound; 92 minutes. A teeenage girl rebels against her father by becoming a beatnik and a criminal. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 999:1745

    Saturday Night, Sunday Morning (1960), Karel Reisz. Film, black-and-white, sound; 90 minutes. Starring Albert Finney. One of the best "angry young men" films, about a Nottingham factory worker rebelling against his working-class background and surroundings.

    Look Back in Anger (1989), David Jones. Video, color, sound; 114 minutes. Starring Kenneth Branagh. The most faithful and dramatically powerful film version of Osborne's play and therefore preferable to the film of the same title made during the period. Arguably the most sympathetic portrait of the British "angry young man" on film. UCB Media Ctr VIDEO/C 999:155




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