Education Psychology Library
Ed/Psych Library
UC Berkeley
2600 Tolman Hall #6000
Berkeley, CA 94720

Circulation: 510-642-4209

Reference: 510-642-2475


We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy. By  Maurice Sendak.

Celebration of Maurice Sendak
An Exhibit of Award-winning Children's Books

The Celebration of Maurice Sendak Exhibit, curated by Jill Woolums, Librarian, is on display in the Reading Room of the Education Psychology Library in Tolman Hall. Sadly, Sendak, a beloved and prolific author and illustrator, passed away in May 2012. This Exhibit, by displaying several of his best award-winning books and illustrations, pays tribute to this major contributor to Children's Literature.

View the additional online exhbit that was created to accompany the Celebration of Maurice Sendak Exhibit by clicking on the Sendak Gallery of images, the Bibliography of Sendak's work, the Webliography of links to live interviews with Sendak, and About Sendak to learn more about the man and artist. More information on children's book awards can be found on the Awards webpage.

The display case at the EDP Library showcases illustrations from:

Where the Wild Things Are (Maurice Sendak, author and illustrator)
Awards: Caldecott Medal, 1964; New York Times Best Illustrated, 1963.
A young boy, Max, is sent to his room as punishment for wild behavior. He then travels to another land to become King of all wild things.

We are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy (Maurice Sendak, author and illustrator)
Award: ALA Notable Children's Book, 1994.
Joining together two traditional nursery rhymes with illustrations, the story depicts the plight and eventual triumph of orphaned and homeless children.

Brundibar (Tony Kushner, author; Maurice Sendak, illustrator)
Award: New York Times Best Illustrated, 2003.
A story based on a Czech opera. Children search and sing through the town to obtain milk for their sick mother. With help from talking animals they thwart the bully Brundibar, the organ grinder, to get the milk.

Outside Over There (Maurice Sendak, author and illustrator)
Awards: ALA Notable Books, 1982; Boston Globe Hornbook, 1981; Caldecott Honor, 1982; New York Times Best Illustrated, 1981; National Book Award, 1982.
Addressing dark and difficult childhood emotions, the story portrays Ida whose baby sister is stolen by goblins while she plays her horn. She must rescue her sister before she becomes a goblin's bride.

In the Night Kitchen (Maurice Sendak, author and illustrator)
Awards: Caldecott Honor, 1971; New York Times Best Illustrated, 1970.
A story, criticized for it's depiction of nudity, tells of young Mickey's dreams of baking the morning cake.

Fly by Night (Randall Jarrell, author; Maurice Sendak, illustrator)
Award: New York Times Best Illustrated, 1976.
During the night while all are asleep, a boy, David, floats up from his bed and flies through the house and countryside while listening to the songs and tales of the animals.

The Moon Jumpers (Janice May Udry, author; Maurice Sendak, illustrator)
Award: Caldecott Honor, 1960.
Four children play and dance in the moonlight.

The Animal Family (Randall Jarrell, author; Maurice Sendak, illustrator)
Award: Newbery Honor, 1966; New York Times Best Illustrated, 1965.
A very special family is created when a lonely hunter and a mermaid become friends, then adopt a bear, a lynx, and a little boy.

Nutcracker (E.T.A. Hoffman, author; Maurice Sendak, illustrator)
Award: New York Times Best Illustrated, 1984.
A retelling of the holiday story about a little girl who, after hearing how her toy nutcracker got his ugly face, breaks the spell and changes him into a handsome prince.

King Grisly-Beard (Edgar Taylor, translator from Brothers Grimm 1823 German Popular Tales; Maurice Sendak, illustrator)
Award: New York Times Best Illustrated, 1973.
Adapted from a fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm, the story tells of a king who disguises himself as a poor traveling musician in order to teach his new bride humility and the danger inherent in making fun of other people.

The Light Princess (George MacDonald, author; Maurice Sendak, illustrator)
Award: New York Times Best Illustrated (1969)
Because she is not invited to the christening of the baby princess, the King's sister casts a spell depriving the princess of gravity and the ability to weep tears.

For more information about Sendak's many books, illustrations, and work, see the Sendak Bibliography.

For links to other websites, libraries, museums honoring Sendak's work, see the Sendak Webliography.

To read more about Sendak, click Maurice Sendak.

See examples of Sendak's illustrations in the Photo Gallery.

The Celebration of Maurice Sendak Exhibit will be on display at the Education Psychology Library from August through December 2012.




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